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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, August 14, 1865, Image 1

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THE DULY HIE P rICEHX.
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DAILY PAPER $10 A YBAR.? '?LET OUR JUST CENSURE ATTEND THE TR VE EJ^EWT. " . *. TKI-WEEELT ?7 A
BY I A, SELBY.
COLUMBIA, S. &, MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 14, 1865.
VOL. NO.
IS P0BLISHE?
?JD A IL Y AND TR I- WE EEL T.
AND THE
. WEEKLY GLEANER
EVERY WEDNESDAY.
BY JULIAN A. SELBY.
TERMS-IN ADVANCE.
. 8TJB3CBIPTION.
Daily Paper, sis months.$5 00
Tri-Weekly, " " .3 50
. Weekly, - " ". .2 00
. " Single espies of tho Daily and Tri-Weekly,
10 cents? of the Weekly, lo cents.
ADVERTISEMENTS
Inserted in either the Daily or Tri-Wecklv at ?
SI per square for the first insertion, and 75
cents for each subsequent insertion. In thc
Weekly, $1 a square.
jB3~Speeial notices 15 cents a hue.
> Why Gen. lice Asked for Pardon. I
We extract the following from a
Virginia letter, which gives the eonr
.versation between a planter and the ;
writer:*
He fwent on to say that for a time
Iiis high admiration for the character
'of Gen. Lee had sensibly declined, j
He had been told that the General had
made application to the Washington
authorities for pardon. He had sup?
posed that rather than do that the
General would undergo exile or death.
Not lo?g afterward an opportunity had
presented itself for speaking tq Gen.
Lee * on the subject. Thc report
' proved to be correct and not a slander.
A voluminous application had been
sent in, to'wli?ch, however, .no answer
has yet been made. Since, the time of
his visit a reply may have been re- !
ceived. Having learned the motives I
wilvil had actuated Gen. Lee in ask- j
ing for a pardon, his admiration, his i
veneration, for the man and the pa?
triot, was profounder than ever. Had
the General considered his own feel?
ings alone, he would have died sooner
than humble himself and a just cause
hy a seeming admission that it was |
wrong. His application was one more
proof of his love for his country.
There were thousands of high-toned
yimhg men in the South who medi?
tated expatriating themselves, and
who, when asked why they did not
seek for a par?lon, replied, that until
'Gen. Lee had done so they would not. \
After a long struggle with his iuclina-1
tions, believing that those* young men
ought to he saved to the country i
whose future they were so well quali?
fied to adorn, and, by participating in
the rights of citizenship, to guide and
shape, the General had done violence
to his own feelings, and made the re?
quest. Still he had made no abject
submission, but had accompanied the
petition for pardon with a full state?
ment of those things which made his
past conduct seem to him right and
proper, and had avowed his unchang?
ing devotion to his former principles, j
I asked Mr. K. if he-supposed tho
Government would send Gen. Lee a
favorable answer.
"O, yes," he replied, "undoubt- '
edly." * I
"And does he expect to be restored
to full enjoyment of all the rights of
citizenship?"
"Yes,, sir; he has asked for that.
Anti if it is refused him, he will at any
rate li?ve done all that he intended to
do. The class of men whom he in?
tended to benefit haye, many of them,
applied to be pardoned, and probably
all will do so. Thus Gen. Lee's sacri?
fice will have saved many of our first
young men from exile, and opened to
them a public career from which they
wouhl otherwise have shut themselves
out." . ,
General Gilhnor?'s Department of
South Carolina Ls gradually stripped
oi troops. The 165th New York
-(Zouave?l take their departure mext
? week. They'will be sent home, it is
said without arms a punishment for
the conduct of a few me? of the regi
. ment in the late disturbances. The
47th regiment Pennsylvania Volun?
teers, the 3d Rhode Island Artillery,
and 54th and 55th Massachusetts
(colored) will soon follow. Superior
and criminal provost cenrts, as organ?
ized by order of Generals Gillmore
, ? and Hatch, arc now in full operation,
and have much business before them.
[Army and Nary* Journal.
. txcneral Kanta Anna.
.On ene of the lofty peaks of the
little island of St. Thomas, West In?
dia Islands, resides thc most remark?
able man whom Mexico has produced
-General Santa Anua. He occupies
an elegant villa, with extensive
grounds, and luxuriant shrubbery,
and all the appurtenances which
wealth and taste can collect around a
private gentleman's establishment.
Here, in retired comfort and philoso?
phic resignation, lives the hero of
Tampico, who, thirty yours ago, de?
stroyed the last army of old Spuin;
who, ten years af forwards, lost a leg in j
resisting the landing of the French* i:i j
Mexico, and who lcd with cons um- j
mate skill and energy the resistance of ?
his degenerate countrymen to our ]
own conquering armies.
A United States naval officer, who
has lately visited the exiled Mexican !
chief, says that his carriage is still
military and erect,' and that he lias tho j
appearance of excellent health and
condition. He walks so easily without !
the aid of a cane that it would be im- j
possible to tell which ia His natural
and which his artificial leg. He is
rather over than under six feet in
?height, and c?oas not stoop at all. His !
complexion is rather dark, his eyes \
piercing, but kindly, and his mouth <
I firmly compressed, but not stern. "I \
am a poor exile," he said, "but from
mylittle watch-tower of St. Thomas I
look all around. " jj,-.
? And then he returnod to Mexico,
discoursing with mingled sadness and
humorous irony upon the condition' of
affairs there. Ho looked upon . the
Austro-French Empire as a very tehi
l porary affair. He described his ejec?
tion most amusingly. ''Those French
.are a very polite people," said he;
"very polite indeed. We talk, youJ
knowj of everything a av disposici?n
to our friends, but we don't mean that
literally. They *do. That Bazaine
told? me that a steam voyage would
conduce to my health, and he furnish?
ed me "with a steamer. He told mo to
j go where I pleased, but not to come
I back to Mexico. . That was thc only
j condition the pleasant fellow made."
"Look here," he added, his voice,
j face, manner, everything changing 1
i him to another man* "perhaps I may
j yet have an Opportunity of recipro
j eating such attentions."*
[Richmond Republican. .
LAND AT THE SOUTH.-While our
speculators .ire on tho watch for what^
they consider gtxnl investments for
their money, they would do well to
keep an eye upon the Southern pa?
pers. Land at the Soutii is now very
cheap, and no one will deny that a
; large portion of it can be worked with
great profit itt the future, i" not im?
mediately. It has always hoon claim?
ed by a large number of people at the
North, that ono result of slavery was
to impoverish the South; and were the
j Lind in that section of the country
worked as it is in the Northern States,
j it would be many fold more produc?
tive, and hence mwre profitable. Now
is-the time for those persons to put
then*,theory to the test. Land in the
late rebellious States is now offered for
sale in large quantities, and can he
purchased at extremely ' reasonable
rates.-Xetc York World.
DESTRUCTION HY Fn;r. or. AN Om
WELL.-Well No. lfe United States
Farm, on the Pit Hole Greek, was
destroyed by fire, ojj the evening of
the 3d. Thc well was finished, and |
was flow ing about 20U barrels, and no
tanks being up thc oil, was allowed to
flow on the ground. Some twenty
persons were standing in and.around
the derricks, some of whom," it i? fear?
ed, were unable to eseapc, for the !
ground for forty feet around*was one
bbeet of flame in a moment. Three J
men are known to be ^seriously burn?
ed, and only saved their fives by jump?
ing into the creek. The well is still
flowing and burning.
- ?..
' The negroes employed on the rail?
road at Game Point {uear Fredericks
burg, Va.,) became unruly and threat?
ened insurrection. The military were
called out, and after one of the rioters
had been shot, order was restored.
The army worm threatens entire de?
struction to the cotton crop in Louisi?
ana.
SANTA ANH.Y'S PROCLAMATION.-That
political chameleon and irrepressible
revolutionist, Antonio Lopez de Santa j
Anna, from his retreat at St. Thomas,
has addressed a proclamation to the
people of Mexico. We are not quite
sure that the document is genuine, as
there appears to be, just now, an effort
to force upou the public a variety of
sensational fables in regard to Mexicmi
affairs, The proclamation in question
is sufficiently grandiloquent, absurd,
Mexican and Santa Annaish, to have
Emanated from the source to which it
is credited; and possibly the superan?
nuated hero of a thousand cock-pits
and of a less number- of military de?
feats nifty have uttered that amount of
sublime nonsense. This reflection
occurs to us: If Santa Anna is about
to support in person the cause of Jua?
rez, Mexican republicanism needs the
interposition of some power as mighty
as that of the United States.
The question of Mexicali republi
oani/nr"oecupies a great deal of popu?
lar attention at this moment; but we
e/>nfess that we are more concerned
About the republicanism of our own
country. While civil war waa raging
upon our own territory, wc urged
upon tin: public the consideration of
Moxicau affairs, in the hope that the
sections might be united by a common
desire to free this continent from imj
perialism. But the close of the war
has left this republic in a very uiire
publiean condition, and, in our opi?
nion, it is our first duty to save our?
selves from usurpation, and afterward
to assist our neighbors. The reign of
Maximilian luis thus far brought no
great hardship upon the Mexican peo?
ple. They are more fr>e under his
imperialism than we are u>ider our
professed republicanism. Onr conn- j
try needs rest, recuperation,, and re?
storation io its natural political eor/U
tion; and this is not a propitious time
' for provoking -a quarrel with foreign
powers. Let us first put our own
! household in order, and then, when
we, have scorned the benefits of self
1 government for ourselves, wo shall be
better qualified to confront imperial?
ism elsewhere'.-2Veto York Netcs.
Most nations love peace, and enfti
j vate it assiduously. Not so the Mexi?
cans. They appear to be happy only
: ??\ war. Agitation, anarchy, strife,
' appear to be their congenial element*.
', Tn trie last thirty-five years, their re
I volutions-great and little, general
I and provincial-may be safely esti
; nutted nt from forty to fifty, Revolu
I ti on seems to be the natural, normal
i condition of that excitable and restless
; people. How property is preserved,
? families raised and supported, chil
! dren educated; how trade is carried
on," how the learned professions and
j mechanic arts are acquired, we cannot
'? understand. There really appears to
I " ?. no leisure in Mexico for study or
r carrying on the regular avocations
; of life. Revolution absorbs every
! energy. Half robber, half patriot,
j tile Mexican chiefs are all alike. Tl ie
i pre-eminent aiid the most generally
i known representative man of this class
is Santa Anna. For the past ten years
j he has been an .exilex and for a Mexi?
can has muinhdned remarkable reserve
and repose. He has, however, not
I been an inattentive or uninterested
1 observer of events. *Te the seating of
j Maximilian upon the Imperial throne
j he bad given his countenance-his
j sanction. He now, from his retreat,
i issues a manifesto to the Mexican
i people in the true "Ereles vein," in
j which he denounces Maximilian and
j his Government. He declares that
j "the hopes of those who sought in
j monarchy tho repose which the Re
I piddle denied them, have been disap
I pointed, the national dignity bas been
contemned, justice derided^ our holy
rights trodden under foot, thought en?
slaved, prostitution elevated and virtue
vilified, the church afflicted with tri?
bulation and the. sanctuary draped in
mourning." He raises the cry of "war
to the invaders." He says "liberty or
death should be the cry of every gene?
rous bosom in which honor has her
home, ^independence her altar, and
liberty her rites."-Richmond Times.
The yellow fever is prevailing to a
considerable extent at Havana. Tire
proportion of deaths is greater than
usual.
In view of tho importance of the approach?
ing Convention, it is of vital consequence
to us that wo should be represented by men,
not only of patriotism and experience, but
of legal acquirements. I beg,*thorefore, to
present to tho voters of Richland the names
tff the following gentlemen, who are emi?
nently titted for fhc responsible post for
which thev arc nominated:
CHANCELLOR CARROL,
HON. WM. F. DESAUSSURE,
COL. WM. WALLACE,
_COL, F. w. MCMASTER. Aug 3
THE following gentlemen are respectfully J
suggested as candidates for the Convention
to bo held in September next:
WADE BAMPTON,
A. R. TAYLOR,
W. A. HARRIS,
_J._G. GIPPES. July 31 *
For thc Convention.
*
Th* friends of the Union and of their
State, desiring to bring into ber councils
practical knowledge, sound patriotism and
devotion to her best interests, respectfully
nominate the following gentlemen as dole
?ates to the State Convention from the
listrict of Richland: _
JOHN CALDWELL, .
WADE HAMPTON,
A. R. TAYLOR,
W. A. HARRIS. August 1*
TFDI nr tvn iii
St?ge Line
SENDS A CARRIAGE . OR
fiSg^?f^SPRING WAGON to Orange
[?EgsSsjgS burn. *t 3 pk m. Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays,
making connection with Charleston trains
the following morning.
On arrival of train on Monday, Wednes?
day and Friday, a vehicle starts for Colum?
bia. For passage, applv to J. H. FOWLES
or E. COFFIN, at the store of R. M. Stokes,
Plain street. Aug 10 thfm3*
Va tu? ble Family Residence,
With a full supply of Furniture, in fine order,
at Private Sale. "v
rrtHE above is situated on Plain street, in
1 the. vicinity of thc Female College, lo?
cated on H acres of growid. The house
I contains eight rooms, with servant's house
of "bight rooms, and all other buildings re?
quired, and a fine well of water. Attached
t ) the grounds ar?? a choice variety of fruit
trees and shrubbery.
Particulars, with the list of furniture, can
be hail on application at my nfffec.
JACOB LEVIN,
Alie: ion and Commission Agent,
Corner riain and Assembly streets.
Aug i?_'_ no
LIMESTONE SPRIXGS
FEMALE Illlill SCHOOL,
SP. 1 li TA Xii TIP a, S. Ck
TERMS.
Per Term of Four Mouths, Payable, in
Art rn tief.
INSTRUCTION-English Departments.$20
Roard. including Washing and Fuel.. 40
Music-Piano. 20
Guitar. 16
Vocal (.special lessons). 16
Usc of Piano.' :. 2
French, German or Italian, each. 16
Drawing and Painting.16
Primary Department.12
No charges besides the above will bc
made in connection with the School, except
for books and stationery actually used.
The School wUl be re-opened for a term of
four months, on WEDNESDAY, August 16.
Payment can be made in money, provisions
or cotton, at old prices. Each boarder must
bring one pair of sheets, one pair of pillow
cases, towels, her drinking cup and lights.
WM. CURTIS, LL.D., Principal.
Aug 10
'haritable Appeal.
THE ladies of thc URSULINE CONVENT
and ACADEMY* are anxious to rebuild,
as speedily a? possible, an edifice suitable
for't heir Monastery and Institute, theirs
having been burned in thc general confla?
gration of Columbia by the United States
Army, under Gen. Sherman, on thc night of
February 17th. And while they aro far
from pressing their necessities on their fel?
low-sufferers of the South, will gratefully
receive any contributions which the friends
of education and religion may donate them
for ibis excellent work. Remittances may
be made through the Express Company.
Please address
THE MOTHER SUPERIOR,
Ursuline Convent ai-.d Academy,
Care Dr. John Lynch, Columbia, S..C.
Aug 2 Imo
FES.\ER,MM?T?& BOWMAN,
(Suc'sors to Hotchkiss, Fenner & Bennett,)
COM,
40 VESSEY STREET, NEW YORK,
AND
* MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.
THOS. FENNER, H. BENNETT, D. W. BOWMAN.
MR. T. A. TOBIN, who was for a length
of time connected with the old firm of
Hotchkiss, Fenner & Bennett, has an inter?
est in the present firm, and will davote his
attention principally to the-State of South
Carolina. His address will be Clinton,
Laurens District. Aug 4 Imo
Charleston Advertisements
STATE BONDS AND JU BONDS
BONDS OF THE STATE OF ALABAMA.
Bonds of the State of Georgia,
Bonds of the State of South Carolina.
Bonds of the State of North .Caroliaa. *
Bonds of the State of Tennessee.
Bonds of tho. State of Virginia.
ALSO, ?
Memphis and Charleston Railroad Bonds.
Memphis and Charleston Railroad Coupons.
Memphis and Charleston Eailroad Stock.
Apply to WM. B. HERIOT & CO.,
Bankers and General Agents,
No. 262 King street, Charleston, S. C.
Aug 9_ 6*
J. H. BAGGETT A CO.,
Factor? anil Commission Merchcutr,
ADC ER'S SOUTH WHARF,
CHARLESTON, S. C. \
SELL in this Market, or ship to New York
or Liverpool, both Long and Short Sta?
ple COTTON. Liberal advances on ship?
ments, and returns made in gold or trea- -
sury notes, as instructed.
J. H. BAGGETT. E. M. SPEIGHTS. ?
_^Aug 8 26_
C. IS. Chichester,
RE AX, Ti? TATE BROKER,
18 BROAD STREET, CHARLESTON.
AGENT for tho purchase and sale of
REAL ESTATE lu any of the Southern
States. 0
ALSO,
For the REPAIRING,"*RENTING, Ac, of
city property.
Owners of property in Charleston, un?
avoidably detained in the up country, can
have their property taken care of and
promptly attended to by sending to above
a Power of Attorney, to assume control of
tho same, until the owner's return. Infor?
mation as to the condition of property in?
jured by shells, and otherwise, with proba?
ble expense of repairing, sent on application.
&B~ Wanted to purchase, for parties
seeking investment of Heal Estate, in South
Carolina, several PLANTATIONS, iu work?
ing order, in th# upper portion of thc State.
Aug 8 26_._.
Willis- fit Chisolm,
Factor?, Commission Merchants,
, AND SIUPPTNG A GENTS.
OFFTOK. M1L.1.S HOUSE,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
E. WILLIS. A. E. CUISOLM.
W1LU attend to the purchase, sale and
shipment (to foreign and domestic
ports) of COTTON, RICE, LUMBER,
NAVAL STORES; to the collection of Drafts.?
Purchase aial Sale of all Securities. Con?
signments of Vessels solicited.
.REFERS To:
Messrs. John Fraser & Co., Charleston,
S C
Messrs. Geo. W. Wilbarr fz Co., "
Messrs. George A. Hopley & Co." "
Geor.ce Scaley, Esq., Augusta, Ga.
T. S. Metcalf, Esq., ' " fi
Messrs. Clark, Dodsre &? Co., New York.
Messrs. Murray & Nephew, " "
Messrs. E. W. Clark & Co., Philadelphia,
Penn. 4
Messrs. Pendergast, Fenwick & Co., Bal?
timore. Md.
Messrs. Samuel Harris & Sons. Baltimore,
Md._Aug S 26
THADDEUS STREET,
-COMMISSION MERCHANT,
74 EAST BAY, CHARLESTON, S. C.,
WILL give attention to the forwarding
of COTTON to New York and Europe,
and will receive and forward goods from
abroad consigned to parties in the inttribr
of this State. Advances made on produce
consigned to Arthur Learv, Esq., New York.
A full stock of GROCERIES always on hand
and for sale at the lowest market rates.
Fay Brothers' STJBERIOR F AMPLY SOAP,
in quarter, half and whole boxes, can bs
shipped in any quantity at factorv prices.
July :)l 13*
Brass Foundry. .
THE subscriber* thankful for past patron?
age, would inform, his friends and the
public that he is still jkrepared to furnish all
kinds OJLBRASS (JESTING in a workmanlike
manner and with despatch.
ROBERT MCDOUGAL,
July 31 ni Gadsden, near Washington st.
COTTON
AND
COWttY PRODUCE
TAKEN in EXCHANGE for GOODS,
or BOUGHT at MARKET PRICES,
by MELVIN M. COHEN,
Assembly Street, West side,
Aug 7 mw9 One door from Pendleton.
W. B. JOHNSTON,
Office on Fiskens street East en i of Lady.
WILL attend to all official business
brought beforohim; will also attend
to drawing up Deeds, Conveyance?, Mort
?ra^es. Contracts, and other ordinary legal
instruments of writing. Fair copieeof ?17
document executed wita neatne?s and d*
Kpjrtch. August 1

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