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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, October 14, 1865, Image 1

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COLUMBIA, S. p., THURSDAY MORNING, IEPTEMBE% 21, ?8G5.
.YOL. I-NO. *?*. y
THE PHCENIX
" * P??LISKB? DAILY AND TRI-WBKKI.T,
BY JULIAN A. SELBY
TFRMS-IN'ADVANCE,
SrSSCRIPTION.
Daily Paper, six menths.!..$5 CO
Tri-Weekly, " " . A 50
Single cepies 10 cents. *
ADYHRTISBMEKTS
Iasertod at $1 per square for tit? first in?
sertion, and 73 cents for each subsequent.
?^"Special notices 15 cents a linc
Ask Eagliah Bokci^-Dcaa AiTuJr.
A most roinantio elopement has just
occurred in Loudon; .England, which
has severely shocked the propriety of
the "Upper Ten," And created a
general "nine day's wonder," on ac?
count of the different positions whieh
the respective parties to the affair
held in society. It appears that a
-young lady named Crosse, aged about
twenty years, the daughter of a
clergyman, formed au attachment to
.her father's groom-a lad two years
her junior, named George Smith.
George had b^en in the family for
about two years, during which time he
used to accompany the young lady
during her equestrian exercises. In
this way, an intimacy sprung up be?
tween them, which tho father finally
became aware of, and thereupon de?
termined to discharge George at once.
The young lady heard of her father's
intention, and on the day the boy was
to leave, she managed to see him, and
told him to come to her windowat
night* as she wanted to escape with
him. The groom advised her not to
, pursue this course, but she persisted,
and accordingly the reluctant youth
went to the window at the time in
dicated, when the young lady dropped j
from her bower into the arms of the j
object of her passion. The next ques
tibn was, how to get married? The 1
lady had a considerable sum of money
in her .possession, which she placed
in the hands of her lover, and tho
!>airsiaried off they knew not whither.
They, however, made tracks for
Wandsworth, whore they hired apart?
ments, and the next day appeared
before a magistrate for the purpose of
being matrimonially united. The
magistrate refused to marry them on
the ground that the lady was under
age.
The couple, therefore, returned dis?
consolate to their apartments, and
lived together for two days, when the
police, who had been notified by the
father to hunt up ?he runaways, came
upon them and arrested the groom on
a charge of fraudulently inducing the"
young lady to leave her home, know?
ing that she had money in her poss?i
sion belonging to Mr Crosse. The
case afterwards came tip for exami?
nation, before a police magistrate,
where the facts were made apparent.
Upon being asked if the groom had
induced her to quit her home, or
made the first advance to that end,
the damsel said "No, I think we were
about equal." It being plainly proved
that she was a consenting party, the
young man was acquitted of the
charge of fraudulently enticing her
from her home. In regard to the
money, he had left it untouched, arid
offered to return it to the father. Ac?
cording to the evidence of the young
lady, the chivalrous groom had con?
ducted himself with the utmost honor
and restraint, and it was officially an?
nounced that the young lady ".return?
ed to her home as intact .as on the
day she leftiu" "All'swell that cn^s
well." The reverend gentleman find?
ing his daughter really attached to tho
young mau, and determined to marry
him, gave Tiis' consent, and on thc
14th inst., the happy pair were united
Ii and the blushing bride taken to her
husband's home in triumph, the
party being followed by an "admiring
crowd, " who cheered lustily, and the
scene ends by Mr. George Smith re?
turning "hcarfeit thanks" to his
friends from a first floor window
"A man who has boon cultivating
tea, as an experiment, since 1860,
' . writes to- ?ie Savannah Herald that
*nost of his .plants grow finely, that
hi* tea is of good quality, and the
plants will do quite as v/ell iu Georgia
'as in their native country.
/
DOIT GKEEK STIIL, LIVES-WHAT
MK. LINCOLN SATD.-Gen. Duff Green
is about to publish a letter reciting
the conversation he nacl "with Presi?
dent Lind?l? just before the fall of
Richmond. Mr. Green, in Iii" inter?
view, told Mr. Lincoln that the peoplo
of the South wanted peace. The latter
replied, Mr. Green says, in this wise*
"If you want peace, come back into
the Union, and if you! want slavery,
or do not want it, you can vote on
the Constitutional' Amendment. I
cannot take back any ci my emanci?
pation proclamation, but I will be
liberal in amnesty to the Southern
people." This took place in presence
of Gen, Weitzel and others.
?
Punch hears that His Holiness the
Pope has given positive orders that
all his Bulls shall be kept within the
precincts of the Vatican while the
cattle disease is rife.
For the Legislature.
Du. J. H. BOAT WHIG HT,
DE. WM. P. GEIGER,
WM. WALLACE. Oct 12*
For the Legislature.
J. H. BOATWRIGHT,
WM. WALLACE.
JOHN H. KESSLER,
W. H. TALLEY. Oct 1
For the Legislature.
The following gentlemen arc suggested
as lit persons to represent Richland Dis?
trict iii thc- next General Assembly:
WM. WALLACE, I WM. K. BACHMAN,
WM. H. TALLEY, | JAS. G. GIBBES:
Sept 28_ _*
FOR STATE SENATOR.
The many friends of E. J. ARTHUR*in
consideration of his past valuable services,
beg leave respectfully to nominate him for
re-election to the office of SENATOR from
Richland District, at the ensuing election.
Sept 27
For Congress.
We Aro authorized to announce JAMES
FARROW, Esq., of Spartanbnrg, as a can?
didate to represent, in the Congress of the
United States, ibo Fourth Congressional
District, comprising the Districts of An?
derson, Pickens, Greenville, Laurens, Spar?
tanbnrg, Union, York and Cheater.
Sept'30_*
FOR CONGRESS.
The. friends of GEO. D. TILLMAN, Esq-.,
respectfully announce him a candidate for
CONGRESS, at the ensuing election, in the
Third District, embracing Orangeburg,
Edgeficld, Lexington, Abbeville, Newberry,
Richland and Fairfield. Sept 28 *
To tile Voter* ot Orangeburg, E?lge
iield, Abbeville, Newberry, Lexing?
ton, Kitliland anil Fairfield.
FSLT.OW-CITIZENS: After much hesitation,
1 have consented to be put in nomination
for your Representative in the Congress of
' thc United States. I publish this card, be
? cn uso the District is so large and tho time
?before the election so short that I could
: not, if I desired, canvass the District. If a
j canvass were possible, however, I do not
: think it becoming or desirable. In my
! judgment, this is no time for a sera ruble for
j office. It seems to me that no one proper
' ly impressed with the solemnity of the
j crisis, and the delicacy and importance of
! the duties to be discharged, could seek the?
; position merely for the gratification of per
! sonal ambition. For myself, I declare rhat
j I have no wish but to servo the State.
In 1788, South Carolina, through a ron
j vention of her people, became one of the
j United States. She remained a member of
I tho Union until December, 1800, when,
j through another convention of her people,
I she repealed the Ordinance of 17S8. seced
I ed from the United Statea, and with cer
I tain other sister States entered into another
i government' known as tho Confederate
; Government. We believed that we had the
right to secede and that our security re?
quired ita exercise in co-operation with our
Southern sisters. South Carolina, in 1852,
proclaimed by solemn ofdinance the right
J of secession. It bad long been tho settled
opinion of the State that abe was sovereign
and entitled to all tho rights of sovereignty.
She asserted self-government in order to
secure ber institutions and principles from
great evils, believed to be imminent. 8c
cession wa? ir. the nature of a proceeding
quia limet. It was coeecived in thc spirit of
I self-preservation-not to injure others but
to save ourselves. It cannot bc necessary
I to say that I am one of those who believe
that it was an honest effort for honorable
I purp -ses. The United States Government
I denic I the right of secession and waged
war ipon tho Confederate States, which
stooc upon the defensive-. A terrible war
of in? Vbion and desolation followed, and
finalh the Confederate States were over?
whelm i d by force of numbers and dissolved.
At the md of tho war the State of South
Carolin i found thc Confederacy broken un,
her cit a ens who survived tho terrible
ordeal ? hausted and impoverished, her
institut, i s destroyed, and the whole coun?
try occupied bj-tho military forces of the
United States. Under thes? painful cir
j cumstaxu the President of the United
States invited the States lately composing
the Confederacy to re-organizH tlicir gov
"ernnicnts and restore their connection, with
tho Constitution and Government o'f thc
United States, upon certain conditions, thc
' principal of which was an acqniesence in
tho abolition of slavery, whieh had boon
accomplished by the military authorities.
The State, wisely in my judgment, respond?
ed favorably to "tho invitation, ' It is true
that the mere issue of battle does not prove
right any more than did the old "wager of
battle;" but it does prove power which can
hot bc disregarded. A Provisional Gover?
nor was appointed, who called another con?
vention of the people, which lias lately
repealed tho Ordinance of Secession, and
bj- ah article in the state Constitution,
recognized the abolition of slavery arid pro?
hibited its re-establishment. Bv repeal?
ing that of Secession, the Ordinance of
1788, through whieh Soutli, Carolina be?
came a member, of th'? Union, was ipso
facto revived, and we are this day in the
Union precisely as we became in ?7JSS and
remained up to 1860.
We arc* now in a very anomalous position.'.
Relying upon tho good faith .".nd patriotic
intentions of the President oUhc United
States, wo have done all that Wm required
of us 'to restoro o un old reflrnons to tho
Constitution and the Union; but still we
have not; been received into fellowship at
Washington. That important par^>f the
plan of reconstruction remains ysBto he
accomplished. It is understood" ^fct' a
party will oppose thc President's P?sb pf
reorganizing the Statesaud giving to tm>m
equality of rights, and will i:. ;ud upon still
farther" despoiling and crushing the Stated
of the South as conquered provinces. Thur
radical fanatical party opposed our leaving
tho Union, and now they oppose ourreturn
I ing to it. When we were in the Union, they
I abused us on account ?f slavery. They
j waged T. ur upon us because we tried to
separate from them, and now that wo pro?
pose to return without slavery, they still
object. In this emergency, tho"8tate"needs
the assistance of all her tn?- men. Much
remains to be done, and not the least is to
secure a prudent, faithful and patriotic
representation in Congress, to assist and
forward the work of restoration which the
State has commenced. I arrogate not to
myself fitness to form part of such a rep?
resentation, hut friends have Urged me for?
ward, and if you are willing to try mo, I
will give my befit efforts.
In sonic respects, we are at the beginning
?d' our policy, as if we were a new State
about to assume now relations with our
sister States; but we must never allow our?
selves to forget that in other respects we?
are an old State-a State having antcce
j dents-a name to maintain and a history to
preserve. Whatever nicy betide ns in the
j uncertain future, the past, r.t least, is sc
I cure. . South Carolina hus never swerved
I from the path of honor, as she conceived it.
! We have a record of whieh none need he
ashamed: and when anv apostate son ef
hers disclaims or disparages it, may she
east him out as unworthy of her. The
devotion of every true son of tho State
adheres in adversity as well as in pros?
perity-is loyal through evil as well as
through good report ; and in, the midst of
the greatest misfortunes, "sticketh closer
than a brother."
After the delegations from the Southern
States shall have been received into Con?
gress, many delicate and impoi tant duties
will devolve upon them, especially in refer?
ence to the freedmen of the South, and the
control whieh Congress, or a party in Con?
gress, may desire still to exercise -over
them. It may not be improper, in this
connection, to say that, whilst I havo a?>
provod rV.c course of tho State in seeking
to restore herold relations with the Govern?
ment of the United States, it'has been upon
the faith awtd expectation that the State, as
soon as reconstructed, is to have entire
' control of thc whole subject of lier domes?
tic affairs. The Statc^and the State alone,
must be loft to decide to whom she will
give the right of suffrage! or other political
rights. A new code noir must be enacted
to protect and govern tho population lately
made free-to prevent idleness, vagrancy,
pauperism ami crime. I am not prophet
enough to foresee whethe r wo cari succeed,
but 1 solemnly belie ve it v.ill be impossible
to live in the country at all unless the Stat?
has exclusive control bf the whole subject.
1 have hope that this vnllbe permitted, nm:
I-think it is in accordance with our inte?
rests and true?olicy to sustain tho Presi?
dent and tho Democratic party in .theil
efforts to restore the St.ties to their posi
tion of equality and to give them equa
rights in tho (fovcrnment.
With these views, if the voters of th?
District think that I can servo them or th<
'State in this critical emergency, I will d<
my best for them; but I have too high t
sense of my own incompetency and of tb
difficulties and responsibilities of thc posi
tion, lo solicit it l>v a personal canvass.
"SAMUEL Med O WAN.
ABBCVTLLBC. IT?, Sept. 27, 1865.
Auction andCoiiiiiiis'nBusiiiess.
THE undersigned, having just completed his large and commodious AUCTION AN?
COMMISSION SALES-BOOMS, situated above his NEW STOBE, on Main street,
adjoining the Court House, is prepared to sell all kinds of MERCHANDIZE, REAL
ESTATE, FURNITURE, HORSES, VEHICLES, etc., cte., either at AUCTION or PRI?
VATE SALE.
Having secured the services of Mr. C. F. HARRISON, so long and favorably know?
! for his qualifications in thia line of business, he t .inks he can guarantee perfect sat?s
faetion ni all transactions entrusted to. his care.
As snow as the necessary arrangements can bc made, he designs inaugurating a sys
I tera <-r REGULAR WEEKLY SALES, which will present RA RB FACILITIES to AU pe? -
i sons deairoua of disposing of MERCHANDIZE, etc., at auction. Oct 1 Imo
<rniuated rm (ha Foot of Richland Street, '
near Greenville Railroad, Co-undtia. j
GOLDSMITH & KIND, PKOP^IETOBS.
THE above works fV| J
ar?' now Completed.JwP ?
a?:ind thc undersigned beg j
to inform the pubhc that '?
tthey ar* now prepared to !
execute all kinds of IKON' CASTINGS, such
as are needed for agriculturists and ma
chinists, RAILROAD IRON, MILL IRON,
IRON FENCING, etc. They are also pr?
pared to furnish BRASS CASTINGS fr
every description. Orders arc solicited and !
wiil bo prompt!* attended to.
M. GOLDSMITH.
Oct 8 ? . P. KIND.
Xaand for Sale. \
A VERY' DESIRABLE PLANTATION,
J:\_ consisting of .,'210 acres of Land
somewhat neglected during these war
times. The Dwelling is a two-3tory frame,
building, with seven rooms and tour ?re
places, with all necessary out-buildings,
such as a Kitchen, good Barn and Stabling,
attached: two good Ghi Houses and one
Screw, five er six framed Negro Houses,
with brick ohtmiiiea, Carriage House, Ac.
An Orchard of Peach and Apple Trees is on
the premises, near tho house -seldom fail?
ing to yield its fruit. This healthy and
valuable plantation is situated within four?
teen miles of Columbia, on the main State
Road running toWmnsboro. To a suitable
purchaser, a bargaiUfWill be given, l'av
ments easy. Address Mrs H. E. RUEF.on
the Plantation. Oct 6 f?5*
ITH I? IDItFITIl'l r *n i'm arm* -
4?1U Al?llLULLE D\\\L?,
I DESIRK>o say to thc old
patrons of this paper and thc
public generally, that its pub?
lication will ho resumed on or
.about the FIFTEENTH OF
OCTOBER INST., under my
proprietorship and the editorial control of
a gentleman eminently qualified for such a
position, and a well known and prominent
citizen of the District.
It is rav aim to revive the BANNER and
conduct it as it was before its discontinu?
ance, to wit: to make it a first-class, high
toned*, NEWS and LITERARY PAPER.
Tie; terms of the paper will be as for?
merly, viz: $'2 a year in advance-in specie,
or provisions at specie valuation.
T. B. CREWS, Abbeville C. H., S. C. j
? SPECK & iPOtOC&t I
General Commission Merchants, !
DEAI.EES IS i
GROCERIES, ?KY GOODS, &C, '
Plain street, 2dr door'from Assembly, \
Sept. 7 COLUMRI?. S. C._ I
William jESlliott,
ATTORN?' AT LAW,
H?UT0N nHADt $> G<
Oct ll _ w4
State South Carolina-Eichland Dist.
COLUMBIA, OcTOBEB 4 1865.
PURSUANT to an Ordinance of the State
Convention, polls will be opened at the
several election precincts of this District,
on WEDNESDAY, Octbcr 18, ISt??, for Go?
vernor and Lieutenant-Governor of the
State, and one Senator and four Represen?
tatives to the State Legislature.
?J. C. JANNEY,
Oct 5 Chairman Board of Managers.
CALNAN & KRETJDEB.
COMZflSSION MERCHANTS,
WHOLESALE dealers in GROCERIES,
WINES, LIQUORS and SEGARS.
Especial attention paid to the purchase and
sale of COTTON, MERCHANDIZE and
PRODUCE. Gervais street, bet ween Main
and Assembly,.opposite State House.
Sept '23 _._ Imo
J. M. Blajsely and G. P. Copeland
HAYE this day entered into copartner?
ship, for the purposoof transacting a
general COMMISSION BUSINESS, under
the style and name of BLAKELY & COPE?
LAND. Tiiey will give their best attention
to the !-;ale and purchase of COTTON, as
well as other things consigned to their
care. Thoj have ample store-room and
will take charge, of'cotiton, and sell here,
Charleston or New York, as may ba desired;
Store and offico on Maui street, comer of
Boundary, near Cotton Town,Columbia, S.
C. BLAKELY A COPELAND.
tau ' Charleston Courier copy six times and
' forward bill to thia effico. * Sept 24
At Home Again!
IMPORTANT TO" MILL OWNERS.
IWILL PATCH, ALTElt and REPA?
STEAM BOILERS, within fifty miles of
thia place; also, do anv heavy or particular
MILL FORGING. " I may be* fourni by ap?
plying at this offioa. t?. J. PERRY.
Sept 24_' _
New Store
^s'D
ri 1HF. subscribers have just received, di
JL rect from New York, a full supply of
Ladies' ami Genfs FALL and WISTE*
GOODS, of all kinds. Such as CALICOES,
DELAINES, MERD?OES, FLANNEL, Bal?
moral Skirts. Ladies' Cloaks, Long cloth.
Linen, Handkerchiefs and Fancy Dress
Goods, Ae.
GENT'S WEAR-Clothing, Hate, Caps,
Boots, Shoos, Under-shirts, Ac.
Al.RO,
A good assortment of CROCKERY and
GLASS-WARE.
Citizens and persons generally would de
well to gira as a, call before purchasing
elsewhere.
Sept IS lim? V. LYONS A CO..
.Corner Assembly and Washington sta.
NEW GOODS ! SEW GOODS !
JUST RECEIVED AND FOR SALE BY
AU his New Skire, Washington Street, just.
Opposite the Old Jail.
"l~\t?S?5 GOGuS, Colored and Mourni?g,
\_J consisting of :
Plain, Plaid and Striped ALI'ACAS.
LUSTRES and DELAINES.
Also, CALICOES. TWEEDS, Ar.
BROADCLOTHS and"CASSIMERES-.
UMBRELLAS, BALMORAL SKIRTS.
CRASH, for Towelling, LOVE VEILS.
LINEN SETTS, with and without Laca,
and with Mourning Edges.
Black Silk and Colored Silk Cravats.
Elastic Garters, Men's Buck Gloves.
Ladies' Gauntlets and Gloves.
Embroidered Handkerchiefs.
Linen (Cambric Handkerchiefs, for Ladies
and Gentlemen.
Fancy Hair Nets, for Waterfalls, and
plain Silk Nets.
Hair Brushes and Combs.
I Gent's Linen Collars. Scent Papers.
I Irish Linen, of all qualities,
j Longeloths, Ladies' Undervests.
! Rubi ber. Coat and Yest Buttons,
i Gent's Half Hose, of excellent quality.
I Mon's fina Felt Hats, black and colored.
I Colored Woolen Shirts arid Drawers.
Corsets, China Dolls of all sizes.
Hoop Skirts, Perfumery.
I Castile Soap, Suspenders,
j Head Handkerchiefs.
' Fancy Dress Buttons.
Belts of every variety, Belting Ribbon.
! Scissors, Tooth and Nail Brushes. Ac.
i GROCERIES.
White'and Brown SUGAR,
j Green and Black TEA, COFFEE.
Starch, Soap, Candles.
Molasses, Brooms, Herrings.
Sardines, Matches, Blacking.
Ruta Bags Turnip Seed, Ac. Sopt 39
COLUMBIA, S. C.
THE undersigned, having
leased the largo and com?
modious building, known as
_ _ _ rtho "Columbia Methodist
Female College," has opened it ns? FIRST
CLASS HOTEL. T. S. NICKERSON,
sept ll Proprieter.
Mounce & Calhoun,
COMMt$* MERCHANTS,
CORNER Gervais and Gates streets,
(nearS. C. and Cr A C. R. R. Depots,)
Columbia, S. C" reeeivo and forward all
kinds of Merchandize, Tobacco, Cotton and
jill Produce, or store the same. Parties
consigning to us will find their freight
shipped with despatch from Orangeburg,
Alston, Wriniisboro or other points, by wa?
gon, during the breakage on said roads.
Wo keep two two-horse wagons for city
hauling.
E. H. MOUNCE. J. W. CALnOLN.
! REFERENCES. -J. G. Gibbes, Edwin J.
( Scott, Columbia; Johnston, Crews & Co*
1 Charleston; Linton AIxtowty, Augusta, wa.;
Wm. Taylor A Co., Montgoim ry. Ala.- Cox
Braynard A Co., Mobil*?. Ala. : v\. A. J.
Finney, Danville, Va.; Robert Lumpln?,
Riul^nond, Ya. Sw?'? 14 tine

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