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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, December 13, 1865, Image 1

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lJJLEi
DAILY
Daily Paper $10 a Year.
"Let our Just Censure
PHONIX.
Attend the True Event.
Tri-Weekly $7 a Year
BY J. A. SELBY
COLUMBIA, S. C., WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 13, 1865.
VOL. I-XO. 220.
THE PHOENIX,
rCBLISIIED DAILY AND TKI-WEEKLY,
BY JULIAN A. SELBY.
STATE T B I N T E R.
TER.VS-J y A D VA NCR
ST7BSCRIPTI02?.
Dai'v Paper, sis months.?? 00
Tri-Weeklr, ': " .3 50
ADVERTISEMENTS
Inserted at il per square for the iirst in?
sertion, and 75 cents for each subsequent.
a?~ Special notices 15 cents a line.
Counting Howse Calendar for 1SOG.
DopiytnicHt. Reports.
On Saturday we published thc Pre?
sident's message, and to-day wc give
the substance of the most interesting
department reports:
REPOHT OF THE SECRETARY OF WAK.
Mr. Stanton reports that the mili?
tary operations by the last Congress
amounted to the sum of $516,240,131.
The military estimates for the next
fiscal year amount to $38,814,561.83.
The national military force on the 1st
of May. 18(35, numbered 1,000/516
men. It is proposed to reduce the
militaiy establishment to 50,000
troops, and over SOO, OOO have already
been mustered out of service. The
cause of this great reduction i ?. of
course, the end of the rebellion, : nd
the return of the States arrayed
against the Union to the national
authority. The Secretary gives an
extended review of the militaiy ope?
rations of the past, two years' cam?
paigns, in every department. On the
1st of May, 1SG4, the aggregate na?
tional force was 070,710 men; but the
effective force is put down at 662,345.
The Commissioner-General of Pri?
soners reports that, between the 1st
of January and the 20th of October,
there were, in our custody, 98,802
prisoners-of-war. Of these. 1,055
enlisted into the United States ser?
vice, P?3,442 were released after the
cessation of hostilities, and 33,127
were deli vertid in exchange. Besides
theso, 174,223 prisoners surrendered
in the different rebel armies, and
were released on parole, viz: Army of
Northern Virginia, commanded by
Gen. ll. E. Lee, 27,305; army of Ten?
nessee and others, commanded by
Gen. J. E. Johnston, 31,243; Gen.
Jeff. Thompson's army of Missouri,
7,1*78; miscellaneous paroles, depart?
ment of Virginia, 9,072; paroled at
Cumberland, Maryland, and other
stations, 9,377; paroled by Gen.
McCook, in Alabama and Florida,
6,428; army of the department of
Alabama, Lieut. Gen. H. Taylor,
42,293; army of thc Trans-Mississippi
department, Gen. E. K. Smith, 17,
bstJ; paroled in the department of
Washington, 3,390; paroled in Vir?
ginia, Tennessee, Georgia. Alabama,
Louisiana, and Texas, 13,022; sur?
rendered at Nashville and Chattanoo
go, Tennessee, 5,02'.); total, 174,223.
Looking to the causes that have
accomplished the national deliver?
ance, says thc Secretary in conclu?
sion, there seems no room henceforth
to doubt the stability of the Federal
Union. These causes are permanent,
and ninst always have an active exist?
ence. The majesty of national power
has been exhibited in the courage
and faith of our citizens, and the
ignominy of rebellion is witnessed
by the hopeless end of the great re?
bellion.
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF CHE
TREASURY.
This report will be read with an in?
terest perhaps unequalled since the
days of "William Duane, Nicholas
Biddle, and tile United States Bank.
Seldom lins an executive document
been looked for with more anxiety.
We subjoin but a brief synopsis, de?
ferring a more ample abstract:
The Secretary discusses the three
questions of thc currency, the x>ublic
debt and the revenue. He goes into
a full exposition of the objections to
United States notes as a permanent
currency, the chief of which he
states to be the fact that the Govern?
ment of the United States is one of
limited and defined powers, and that
I tho authority to issue notes as money
j is neither expressly r?iven to Congress
i by the Constitution, nor fairly to be
inferred except as a measure of ne?
cessity in a great national emergency.
He holds it to be the ' 'crowning glory
of the Constitution that this great
war has been waged and closed with?
out the power of the Government
being enlarged or its relations to thc
States being changed."
The Secretary, after very ablj
meeting the various objections to a
reduction of the currency, recom
mends :
First. That Congress declare thal
the compound interest notes shal
cease to bc a legal tender from tin
day of their maturity.
Second. That the Secretary be au
thorized, in his discretion, to sel
bon'"..; of the United States bearing
interest at a rate not exceeding si:
per cent, and redeemable and payabL
at such periods as may be conducivi
to the interests of the Government
for the purpose of retiring not onl;
compound interest notes, but th
United States notes.
In reference to the debt, the Sec
rotary believes that, if kept at home
it need not be oj)pressive, but that i
is still a national burden, and th
work of removing it should not b
long postponed.
Tho Secretary socs no way of rc
moving it but by an increase of th
national income over the expend
tures. It should be our ambitio
not to bequeath it to our desce?e
ants.
The first step should be to fun
the maturing obligations. The ne?
should be to provide for raising, i
the least odious manner, the revenu
necessary to pay the interest and
certain definite annual amount f<
tlie payment of the principal. M
McCulloch hopes that Congress wi
be decided and emphatic on tb
point.
Tho debt on tho 31st of Oetob
was $2,808,519,137.55; deductir
moneys in the Treasury it was $2,74C
851,750. He estimates it on Julv
1806, at $3,000,000,000. The an?u
interest, if funded at five aud a li;
per cent., would be $105,000,000, l>
if funded at five per cent., it AVOU
be $150,000,000.
If $200,000,000 per annum shou
bo applied to pay accruing intere:
and to reduce the principal funded
the higher rate of five per cent., t
debt would be paid in thirty-ti
years, or ut five and a-half per con
in a little over twenty-eight years.
Tile Secretary believes that no A
of Congress would be more popul
than one which should provide 1
such an extinguishment of the del
Upon tho subject of internal re-?
nue, tho report recommends:
First. That the collection of t
Internal Revenue Taxes, which ;
crned before the establishment
revenue offices in the States recen
in rebellion, be indefinitely po
poned.
Se cond. That all sales of prope:
in those States, under Lue. Direct 1
Law, be suspended until the Sta
shall have an opportunity of assn
ing (as was done by the loyal Stat
the payment ol' the tax assessed UT
them.
Third. That all transactions in si
States, which may be invalid by
non-use of skimps, be legalized as
as it is in the power of Congress
localize them.
Tiie Secretary regards the natio
banking system as one of the great
compensations of the war, and gives
some interesting statistics about its
operations.
REPORT OF THE COMPTBOIiLER OF THE
CURRENCY.
The report of Hon. Freeman H.
Clarke, Comptroller of the Currency,
gives ?a clear statement of the condi?
tion of the nuances, and recommends
important changes in our financial sys?
tem. The Comptroller urges a return
to a specie, basis, and suggests, as the
most available method of attaining
it, the funding and consequent retire?
ment of a portion of the inactive cir?
culation shown to be now held in
reserve. By a gold valuation of our
imports and exports, it is estimated
that a balance has accrued against
this country during the four years
previous to the 30th of June last of
8308,000,000. As a remedy for this,
th? Comptroller recommends an in?
crease of the rate of duties just in
proportion as the price of gold and
foreign exchange may recede, to be
followed by the graduated reduction
of such increase, say ten per cent., at
the expiration of each six months,
until brought down to the original
rate. In the meantime, by a steady
reduction of the volume of redeem?
able currency and consequent reduc?
tion of prices, we would be able once
more to place our manufactured and
agricultural productions on a footing
that would enable them to enter into
successful competition with those ol
other nations in the markets of thc
world.
As the first step to be taken towardt
a reduction of the Government issue?
used as currency, tho conversion o?
all the interest-beariug leg:d tendei
notes into five-twenty six per cent,
bonds, is urged. It is also suggestec
that the national currency Act be s(
amended as to allow- an increase o
the limit to 0400, (t??, 000, on conditioi
only that all the banks be required t<
redeem their notes in New York
Boston or Philadelphia, and also th a
au issue of six per cent, five-twenty
bonds be authorized to thc amoun
that it wir require to secure the ad
ditional circulation under the pro
visions of the Act, which bonds, th
banks, when organized, shall pul
chase, as each may require, of tb
Secretary of the Treasury, at sucl
fair rates as lie may from time to tim
prescribe, but not less than their pa
value, and pay for the same in th
United States legal tender notes, an
all notes so received shall be cancel
ed and destroyed.
The tariff, it is suggested, can be s
adjusted as to produce Sl20,000,00(
of which 8100,000,000 should b
raised on whiskey, malt liquors an
wines. It is estimated that the cotto
crop of next year will amount t
between 2,500,000 and 3,000,000 c
bales, on which might be levied a ta
of eight cents per pound, whie
would realize $180,000,000, more tba
sufficient to pay the interest on tl:
publie debt after the entire amoui
is funded. The license and stani
duties, is is thought, could be di
pensed with after the next fiscal yea
BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF TI
INTERNAL REVENUE.
The Commissi oner remarks h
recent accession to the post and co
, sequent brief time in which to pi
pare his views, mid offers son
general considerations of interest ai
importance. The amount of rovem
raised in one year, up to 30th Ju:
j last, was equal to all the revenues
the United States from the found
! tion of the Government np to IK]
j and yet 1,000,000 of men were wit
! drawn fr. productive labor, and t
marine was relatively idle. The ii
lowing are sonn; of the aggregate
Receipts for 18G3, $41,003,192.i
receipts for 1S<".4, $116,850,672.]
j receipts for 1805, $129,529,017.
The. tax on distilled spirits has be
i a failure in a great degree, but fri
causes believed to have been <
viated.
The cost of collecting the rever
is estimated to have been three a
a half per centum of receipts up
the present year, a sum much bel
the cost of British revenue, as sho
by a citation introduced into 1
report. This will surprise many. Tho
per centum of the lust fiscal year is
estimated at two and three-fourths.
Thc current fiscal rear, ending June
30, lc'fiO, the cost will be greater,
owing to the sparsely inhabited and
unsettled condition of the South.
The current fiscal year is expected
to bring $272,000,000 revenue.
Thc Commissioner recommends
that tho power to appoint Assistant
Assessors, now, in the opinion of the
Attorney-General, in the President
only, be lodged in the Secretary of
the Treasury by law.
He recommends that the appeal
system be abolished, as useless and
generally neglected by parties inte?
rested.
The penalties are so various in the
existing law that it is recommended
that, by proper amendment, they
may be simplified. Tho franking
privilege is proposed for Assessors
and Collectors.
Section 46, Act June 30, 1864, is
believed to require the very careful
attention of Congress. This section
relates to collection of taxes in insur?
rectionary districts, and attention is
called to the mischief which will arise
from the fact that, for nearly three
years, all instruments of writing in
the South, on which hang immense
monetary interests, are invalid for
want of stamps, as enjoined in
schedule B of the revenue Act,
unless Congress, in some appropriate
manner, relieves the matter. Section
150, of the Act of 30th June, 1864,
?would seem to indicate a purpose ai
one time of, in some way, collecting
the duties on successions in the in?
surrectionary districts, through thc
direct tax commissioners. Howevei
that may be, there is now certainly
no necessity for the motion, and thc
Commissioner recommends its repeal
He also recommends important mo
difications of the law regulating
stamps. But for inconvenience ii
thinly peopled districts, he woulc
suggest the substitution of stampec
paper for adhesive stamps. He think
the public have become sufficient!
familiar with tho novelty to be heh
more severely accountable for infrac
tion of the law, and suggests mor
stringent remedies.
Important analysis are given am
recommendations offered respectin;
the operation of the revenue an
direct tax laws in the Southern State.?
An increase in the clerical force
and in their compensation, is earnesl
ty recommended.
- - ...- -
Mr. Warren Dc La Rue, king <
astronomical photographers, hi
taken a photograph of the lum
eclipse of the 4th inst. The atmoi
phere having been clear, the image
excellent, and affords another pro<
of the important advantage now ope
to observers who make use of photi
grapliy. When it is understood th
an instantaneous image of a phen>
men on can be taken, it will be sec
that by no other means could tl
various movements to which our sate
lite is snbject be so well observed an
recorded as by photography. By n
sociating tins new image? with one
a former eclipse, Mr. Pe La line o
tains a stereoscopic effect difficult
desaribe, but singularly remarkab]
To a pract ised eye, the bulging hemi
phere of the moon appears ainu
transparent, comparable to a lui
glass shade covering a fiat surface.
DKATIIOF A VENERABLE CITIZEN.
It is our melancholy office to chronh
thc decease of the venerable Hen
A. DeSaussnre, one of the nu
esteemed and venerated of our ci
zens. He died, on Saturday afterno
last, after a short illness, at the ri
agc of about seventy-six years. ]
was tlie eldest son of* thc late Chane
lor Henry W. DeSaussnre, and
native of this city, in which
passed his long life of usefulness a
honor. By profession a lawyer,
was ranked among the eminent of 1
legal fraternity, and enjoyed an
tensive and lucrative; practice, ai
by reason of his seniority and h
standing, bo was long regarded ?
reverenced us the patriarch e>f
Charleston Bar.-Charleston Cow
On thc evening of November 21, a
carpet bag was stolen from Albert
Pike, at the depot of the Richmond
and Fredericksburg Railroad, in the
former city. It contained all the
original treaties made by the Con?
federates with the different Indian
tribes, and a number of Masonic
documents, the former being of
great importance to the Government.
Secretary Stanton has ordered Gen.
Terry to make all diligent search for
the stolen documents.
BOOT?, SHOES. K
THE subscribers have^
fVl just received, hy late ar
Mrivals from the most cele?
brated manufacturers in Phi- _
ladelphia, a largo and well selected stock
of Ladies', Misses' and Children s
BOOTS,
SHOES and
GAITERS,
Of tho latest and most fashionable styles.
We are prepared, as usual, to manufac?
ture Ladies' and Gentlemen's work in the
most durable manner and at the shortest
notice; and from our large experience in
business in this city, we can warrant satis?
faction. THOMAS FLANIGAN A CG
Dec 9_
NOTICE.
UNTIL FURTHER
O X?. 3=> 33 H fit ,
THE SUBSCRIBER'S
WILL BE AT THE STORE OF
C. S. JENKINS,
ASSEMBLY STREET, NEXT MARKET*
SANTA GLAUS.
Dec 9_Imo
To Heut,
AWELL-SLT FLED PLANTATION, con?
sisting of about 1,500 acres of Land
SDI) of which arc cleared, and thc remain?
der well timbered. On the said plantation
arc a Saw Mill, Grist Mill and Gin, pro?
pelled by water power. Situated in the
fork of tue Con<,raree and Wateroe Rivers,
on the South Carolina Railroad, about ono
mile from Kingsville and a mile and a half
from Gadsden. Location healthy and all
the buildings in good condition, capable of
accommodating between fifty and seventy
five laborers. On the premises, also, is"a
Kood Overseer's Iloase. Thc said property
can bc rented on shares with owners, or
the whole, if desired. Apply to
_Dec_7_?*_H ANAHAN A WARLEY.
BOOTS, SHOES AND LEATHER.
THE subscribers have just received
general assortment of BOOTS and
LSHOES, consisting of : Gent's Single
and Double-soled BOOTS, (Philadelphia
make,) Balmorals, Gaiters, Bootees, Bro?
gans, Ac. Also, a tine lot of the very best
Baltimore Oak Sole LEATHER. Wc will,
as usual, make to order all variet'es of
Boots and Shoes, of the best material and
workmanship, for cash only-a rule from
which there will bc no exception.
J. A A. OLIVER,
Sumter st., between Richland and Laurel
Dec 7 _Imo*
BG UN SMIT H ! N G.
PETER W. KRAFT would
^spectrally inform his old
friends and customers thct
*'*\ whe has resumed bis old busi?
ness of a GUNSMITH, and will promptly
attend to all orders. Dc;- 7 12S|
KEROSENE LAMPS, &C
OPENED THIS DAV. a new and beauti?
ful assortment cf KEROSENE LAMPS,
for Stores, Parlors, Hall.- und Chamo? rs.
KEROSENE oil., WICKS. CHIMNIES,
SHADES, ?1 c. W. B. STANLEY,
Dec -? t onier Plain and Gates sts.
DELICACIES! ?ELIC?cTiS!
Frene and Italian Confectionary.
~t f\f\f\ POUNDS of the purest and
I.UUU finest nnalitv LADIES' ICE
CREAMS, ICE CREAM DROPS, JELLY
CAKES, Jelly Drops. Liquid Drops, Italian
Almonds, french Almonds, Marshmallow
Paste, Iloyal Cream Drops, Chocolate
('ream, (tine,) French Burnt Almonds,
Cordial Drops, Fruit Drops, Fruit Paste,
Cream Jelly Paste, Sherbert t'ream Drops.
At E.'POLLARD'S Variety Store,
On Main street, a few doors above Be?
dells corner. Dec 2 IC
Spectacles and Eye Glasses,
i DM!KALLY adapted to any agc.
^'V At E. POLLARD'S,
(>n Main street, a few doors above Be
.h W's corner. Dec 2 ti?

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