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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, December 05, 1866, Image 1

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n
aiiy Paper $8 a Ye?
HY JULIAN A. SELBY
P??ONI?.
Attend the True Event."
Tri-Weekly $0 a Year
COLUMBIA, S. C.. WEDNESDAY MORNING. DECEMBER 5. 1866.
VOLUME II-NO.x2&2r
THE PHOENIX,
PUBLISHED DAILY AN? 1A? -WEEKLY.
THF, GLEANER,
EVEUY. WEDNESDAY MORNING.
BY JULIAN A. SELBY,
CITY PRINTER.
TERMS-IN AD VANCE.
SUUSCUIPTION.
Dailv Paper, six months.?-t 00
Tri-Weekly, " " .'2 50
Weekly, " ". 1 50
ADVERTISEMENTS
Inserted at 75 cents pei- s?piare for tho first
insertion, anti 50 cents for each subsequent.
Weekly 75 cents <'aeh insertion.
SOT A liberal discount made on the aboce
ra'es when adoertisenients are inserted by
the month or year.
Another Letter from Hon. Benjamin
V. Perry.
COLUMBIA, S. C.,
November 30, 1866.
Charles W. Woodward, Esq., Phila?
delphia.
Mi DEAR Silt: In your reply to j
my letter ou the coustitutiomil amend?
ment, you express tho opinion that
"this measure will be dropped by the
radicals for one which they deem
more humiliating to the people of
the South, viz: universal suffrage.
Hon. Horace Greeley (the most
prominent candidate for the United
States Senate from the State of New
York) writes me as follows: 4Iu my
judgment, the true basis of settle?
ment of all our troubles is universal
amnesty, with impartial suffrage. In
other words, I would have all disa?
bilities because of rebellion and be?
cause of color, utterly and absolutely
abolished; and (coming to the point)
I strongly hope and trust that a set?
tlement on this basis will be made at
"Washington this winter.' This he
wrote in reply to a letter I addressed
to him, in whicb I put the question
as to whetl\er the Southern delegates
to Congress would be admitted, in the
event of their respective States
adopting the amendment."
I do not believe, as it is rumored,
that President Jobnson intends to
abandon his policy, of reconstruction,
or that he will attempt to interfere
with any of the States in regulating,
as they may see proper, the right of
suffrage. Nor do I see any reason to
hope that the present or the next
Congrass will accept of any compro
mise without universal suffrage for
all the negroes in the Southern
States. I am, likewise, unwilling to
believe that the Southern people will
adopt any compromise which will
disfranchise one-fifth of the white
votes, for the purpose of enfranchis?
ing a few huudred negroes in the
Southern States.
Impartial suffrage may be accom?
plished by permitting all persons,
black and white, to vote who are
twenty-one years old. This the
Southern people will never consent
to. as it would degrade the right of
suffrage and demoralize the Govern?
ment and society. It may be accom?
plished by restricting the right of
suffrage in the Southern States to
such persons, black or white, who
have a property qualification and can
read and write. This would disfran?
chise about "one-fifth of the present
number of white voters, and confer
the right of suffrage on a few hun?
dred negroes who own the property
qualification and can read and write.
Are the Southern people willing to
disfranchise and degrade one-fifth of
themselves, and elevate a few hun?
dred or a few thousand negroes above
this fifth in all political rights and
privileges? I do not think so.
According to the last census, there
are over 200,000 white males over the
age of twenty-one in" the Southern
States who cannot read and write.
Many thousands of this number
foughtgallantly throughout the whole
Avar for the right of self-government.
Are they now to be voluntarily de?
prived by their comrades-in-arms of
this inestimable right, and reduced to
a level with their former slaves? It
may be that their freed m en, having
tho qualification of property and eau
read and write, will be placed above
them! They will have Ibo mortifica?
tion of seeing themselves excluded
from the polls, whilst their former
slaves are permitted to vote!
Every Southern man knows that
there are a great many men of sub?
stance and character in the Southern
States who cannot read and write,
and especially old men. They are
men of intelligence, patriotism and
excellent judgment, and as capable of
exercising prudently the right of suf?
frage as any one, no matter how well
educated he may have been. They
have enjoyed this right, too, through?
out their manhood, and valued it as
sacred and inestimable.
It is well known, too, that there are
hundreds of thousands of young men
I in tiie Southern States who were gal?
lant, soldiers and officers in our army,
destitute of the property qualification
requisite to entitle them to vote.
They have been well educated, aud
are the sons of many of our most
respectable citizens, and some of them
have been colonels and generals in the
Confederate army. Are they, with
all their respectability, virtue, edu?
cation und distinction, to be disfran?
chised by this compromise and placed
upon an equality with the negro, or
below him, as to the right of suf?
frage?
At the organization of the State
Governments, during, and immedi?
ately after the American Revolution,
there were a great many restrictions
imposed on the right of suffrage. The
example of Great Britain had its in?
fluence on the judgment of our an?
cestors in regulating this right.
Hut as time progressed, and republi?
can principles were better understood
and more highly appreciated, these
restrictions were nil swept away, ex?
cept in one or two States, by a more
enlightened, liberal and just public
opinion. All free white male per?
sons, over the age of twenty-one,
have been allowed to vote in all the
Southern States, for many years past,
who are citizens. No other qualifi?
cation is required. In my opinion,
this is.right and proper, und should
be adhered to, as sacred to republican
principles. Its abandonment at
this time, and the disfranchisement
of two or three hundred thousand
voters, would be a sad grievance.
They are liable to taxation, to work
ou the toads, do military and police
duty, and, when necessary, to defenc
their count ry at the sacrifice of theil
lives.
If the proposed compromise sim
ply enfranchised negroes, who coull
read aud write, and had a property
qualification, without disfranchising
white persons, it might, with reasoi
and propriety, be accorded to by tin
Southern States. There is sonni
philosophy, public policy and justice
in permitting, as they do in some o
the Northern States, negroes to vot<
who have a property qualification
and can read and write. It would bi
a stimulus to their good conduct am
elevation, morally and intellectually
It would be a safety-valve to theil
superior intelligence and industry
Such negroes in the Northern States
as a friend of mine recently informet
me, " generally vote with the leas
radical party." In North Carolina
when such negroes were allowed tt
vote in that State, Mr. Stanley de
dared in the House of Representa
tives, "always voted with the gen
tlemen." In Connecticut, very re
cently, this class ?f negroes votet
against conferring general suffragi
on their whole race. They said," Ie
them show themselves worthy of suf
frage, as we have done, and they cai
obtain it."
The proposed constitutional amend
ment disfranchises all in tho South
ern States who had ever taken an oatl
to support the Constitution, and at
terwards aided or countenanced th
war in any way. The unanimou
opinion of the South has been tha
such terms were dishonorable am
self-degrading. I would ask, in al
candor and siucerity, if those of im
partial suffrage are not equally so
If it be dishonorable to deprive tw
or three hundred thousand prominen
men in the Southern States of' th
right of holding office, is it not equal
ly dishonorable and degrading, to di
prive the same number of. humble
though worthy men, wno have fough
through our struggle for self-goverr
meut, of the right of participating ?1
til in the government under whic
they have to live ? In my opinior
it is worse. They who are sacrifice
by the amendment are allowed t
vote; but they who are to be sacrifice
by " impartial suffrage," are d<
prived of this right altogether. Th
exclusion, too, is to apply only t
the Southern States. In the Nortl
the same class of persons are allowe
to exercise the right of suffrage.
I know it has been urged that th
qualified impartial suffrage will ou
exclude 'J'ose who are not so we
qualified to \ r>te, and thereby in
prove our repr?sentatives and civ
officers. Dr. Franklin illustrated li
?dews on this subject by stating
;ase. In his day and time, there wi
i property qualification ot $350 for
?roter in Pennsylvania. A man had
ackass worth this sum, and he w
illowed to vote. Before tho ne
dection, his jackass died, and ]
;ould not vote. "Querrie," said tl
loctor, "did the man or the jacka
rote?" There are thousands, as eve
3ne knows, who are poor, and y
move wise, and virtuous, and p
triotic, than those who are rich.
The last State Convention in Sou
Carolina abolished all property qn
litications for holding office, as wt
is of voting. There is at this tim?
r?reat reformation in pregress in En
land as to the extension of the rig
A suffrage. And can it be that 1
are now disposed to turn back the
clock of civilization nnd republican?
ism one hundred years, andfcom
mence again where our ancestors
started in 177G?
I have said that I do not believe
the present or ensuing Congress will
accept anything but unqualified ne?
gro suffrage from the Southern Sfates.
This alone will give them, as they
suppose, power aud influence in the
Southern States, and enable them to
control the Government in all time
to come. "Impartial suffrage" will
not do this, as it would exclude, with
few exceptions, the whole negro race,
liorace Greeley proposes too kind a
I mode, and is too generous aud liberal
in his views, to be any longer the
representative and exponent of the
ultra radical party. This honor has
devolved on the Chief Justice, and
such men as Gen. Butler, Sumner
and Stevens.
In order to induce the Southern
people to adopt "impartial suffrage, "
it is proposed to connect with it a
general aud universal amnesty. This
is certainly a most desirable boon for
the Southern States. But I do not
see that they are in any great peril.
Almost every one has been pardoned
by taking the amnesty oath, or bj
special application for Executive cle?
mency. There is no danger of prose?
cutions for treason or confiscation,
whilst President Johnson remains in
office. No matter what unconstitu?
tional legislation may pass Congress,
it cannot be enforced, except through
the President. Exclusion from Con?
gress will continue; but this is nc
great, vital sacrifice for the Southern
people to make. Their members ouc<
voluntarily withdrew from Congress,
and it has been six years since wt
were represented there. We should
be in a hopeless minority, at present,
if our members had their seats, anti
they could do nothing for their con
stituents or the country. We should
devote all our energies to the materia'
improvement of the South, andaban
dou politics, until the times are mon
propitious and there is a returning
sense of justice at the North.
lt is possible that a national con
vention of all the States, compose*'
of their best and wisest and greatest
men. might revise our Federal Con
stitntion, and adjust all difficulties
between the two great sections of thc
republic. If such a proposition wai
made by the North, the South woulc
accede to it. This grand tribuna
would command the respect of botl
sections, and bo worthy of settling
all difficulties between thirty-six so
verejgn States. The association ol
wise, patriotic and virtuous men
from all parts of the country, con
vened for the purpose of restoring
peace and harmony to the nation
would have a salutary influence. N<
danger could possibly result fror,
such a convention, for their act'oi
would have to be submitted to tin
States for their adoption, and l>e rati
fled by three-fourths of them, befon
it becomes a part of the Federal Con
stitntion. If two-thirds of the Stat
Legislatures will make the applica
tion for such a convention, the Con
stitution makes it imperative ou Con
gress to order its assembling.
I do not, never have, and neve
will despair of my country. Ther
is tOo much intelligence, virtue am
patriotism in the American people
lor tho rule of passion and reveng
ro contiuue always. The growth
prosperity and happiness of one sec
tion of this great Republic is mos
intimately blended with and depen
huit on that of the other. Lik? th
imus of the human body, when on
is broken, paralyzed or injured, i
oust affect the whole system. Thi
ruth will soon be seen and felt at th
North. I am, with great respect
pours, fte., B. F. PERRY.
Charity Pair.
CERTAIN ladies of Columbia have a?s(
ciated themselves together for th
impose of raising funds to clotho an
.?locate a limited number of orphan chi
Iren. To carrv this design intoexecntioi
hey propose t? hold a CHARITY FAIR :
Columbia, commencing on TUESDA
EVENING, December 4, and continuiu
luring tho week, at Janney's Hall.
An attractive feature of tho Fair wi
:onaist of a serios of Tableaux, represen
ng various scenes at homo and abroad.
Donations from tho city and country ai
?arnestly solicited, and may be deliver*
o Mrs. THEO. STARK, Miss JANNEY <
,o any of tho Managers.
Several valuable articles, among whit
s a splendid Piano, will bo disposed of ;
afrle.
Nurses positively not admitted.
&?" Price of admission 50 cents.
MANAGERS.
Governor Orr, Mayor Stark,
ron. Wade Hampton, Dr." John LeConte,
V. F. DeSaussuro, I). B. DoSaussuro,
i. D. Childs, J. P. Thomas,
r. G. Gibhes, Edward Hopo,
Vm. li. Stanley, John Waties,
>r. John Fisher, Col. Wm. Wallace
Vm. C. Swaftield, A. It. Taylor,
'. C. Janney, Dr. Jos. LoConte,
:\ G. DeFoutaino. ' Dec 1
7^CANDLES?~CA?DL?S!~
r"VNE HUNDRED boxes Sperm and Ad
'\J mantino CANDLES. Just receiv<
nd for sale by J. & T. R. AGNEW.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
SWEET OPOTONAX FROM MKXICO! New,
very rare, rich and fashionable perfume.
The finest ever imported or manufactured
in United States. -Try it and bc convinced.
A NEW PEKFUMB! Called Sweet Opoponax
from Mexico, manufactured by E. T. Smith
Sc Co., New York, ia making a sensation
wherever it ia known. Is very delicate,
and its fragrance remains on tho handker?
chief for days.-I'UilacL'a Evening Bulletin.
SWEET OPOPONAX! New Perfumo from
Mexico. The only fashionable Perfume
and ladies' delight.
SWEET OPOPONAX! Tho only elegant Per?
fume. Is found on all toilets, aud never
stains the handkerchief.
I SWEET OPOPONAX! IS the sweetest Ex?
tract ever made.. Supersedes all others.
Try it once; will uso no other.
SWEET OSOPONAXI Ladies, in their morn?
ing calls, carry joy ami gladness, when
perfumed with*Sweet Opoponax.
ARTIFICIAL EYES-ARTIFICIAL
HUMAN EYES made to order and inserted
by Drs. F. BAUCH and P. GOUGELMANN,
(formerly employed by Boissonneau, Paris,)
No^SOD Broadway, Now York. Oct 17 ly
COLGATE'S HONEY SOAK.
This celebrated Toilet Soap, iu such
universal demand, i-> made from thu
choicest materials, i j mil?! and emol?
lient in its nature, fragrantly scented,
and extremely 1M-MC1?C?J?.1 in its action
upon thc ski::. For sale by all Druggists
and Fancy Goods Dealers. March 28 Iv
NEW SCHOOL.
^ THE undersigned, formerly
fl -jjjjji Principal of Columbia Female
?J-1 Cgfe* Academy, has oner.eil a FE
^rejp^yiALK SEMINARY in Cohuu
jCVypr bia, at coi ner of Camden and
t??3L?r Pickens streets, where all tho
branches essential to female education are
thoroughly taught, including Ornamental
Branches and Mordern Lang-.ages. A few
BOARDERS will bo received into his fami
Iv. For terms, Sec., apply at his residence.
' Dec 1 Imo._NV. MULLER.
Fine Chewing and Smoking Tobacco.
6BOXES TEMPTATION.
2 .-' ATLANTIC CABLE,
lt) boxes different brands-Zephyr Puff,
Virginia Kiln Dried, Piney Woods, Green
Seal, Rillickinick and other brands. Whole?
sale and retail.
Nov 23 ' JOHN C. SEEGERS Sc CO.
Hamsi Hams!
1TIERCE PIG HAMS-small.
1 " Sugar-cured HAMS-strictly
prime. JOHN C. SEEGERS Sc CO.
Nov 21_
"COA?AREE RESTAURANT!"
Next door West of the Post Office.
TREVET & BEEAG-HI
WOULD respectfully inform their
friends and the public in general
that they have opened a RESTAURANT at
the above place, where tho very best of
everything in the way of eating and drink?
ing can be obtained at short notice.
CREAM ALE on draught.
LUNCH every day from ll to 1 o'clock.
Fresh OYSTERS constantly on hand.
July 10_
RESTAURANT :
The Pollock House!
TTVIIS new and completo establishment
J. has been recently opened, and gentle?
men will find eveiything connected with
thc hoitae in the very best order. MEALS
served at r-hort notice. Private dinner and
supper rooms attached.
OYSTERS, FISH, GAME and MEATS
prepared in every stvle.
The best o? WINES, LIQUORS, ALE,
tte, constantly on hand.
Choice SEGARS ann TOBACCO.
*3- FREE LUNCH every day at ll
j'cloek. T. M. POLLOCK, Proprietor.
Nov 27
G-unny Bagging.
I f\ BALES GUNNY BAGGING, extra
IA" weight-2V pounds.
50 coils MANILLA ROPE.
1 bale BAGGING TWINE.
The above in store at reduced rates.
A. L. SOLOMON,
Second door from Shiver House,
Oct 18 On Plain street.
IRON, STEEL.
NAILS, POT WARE.
Tin'd and Jap'd H0LL0WWA
Carpenters' and Blacksm's TOOLS.
SCALES.
AXES, S. W. Collins' and other
?rands.
PAINTS, OILS and GLASS.
In store and for sale LOW by
FISHER & LOWRANCE.
Nov 9
POTATOES! POTATOES!
)-r RBLS. choice Northern POTATOES.
Cl O 20 bushels choice Sweet Potatoes, at
i per bushel. Just received and for sale
y J. Sc T. R. AGNEW.
Nov 13
To the Public in Gene* al !
WE RfflME WI UT BY EXP?ES,
Q AA YARDS ADD ROILED HEAVY BLACK SILK, 28 inches, $2.00.
OUU 500 " FRENCH MERINOES, verv fino, $1.00.
1.000 vards FIGURED DELAINES, onlv 25c.
1,000 " " STRIPE GINGHAMS, very cheap. 20c.
1,000 " CALICOES. 12$c. ALSO,
1,01)0 " Colored COBURGS, damaged on the voyage from New York, whioh will
bo sold as low as 20 cents per yard-worth 60 cents.
"We "Will Not T>e Under-sold.
S. H. MYERS & CO.,
SUCCESSORS OF ABELES, MYERS & CO.
Dec 2
Cheaper than Ever!
DOES THE UNDERSIGNED OFFER TUE FOLLOWING
PRINTS, at 12} cents a vard.
Brown and White SHIRTING, at 16 cents a yard,
Ladies' CORSETS, from 75 cents upward,
6-4, 8-4 and 10-4 TABLE DAMASK, at roduoud pricaa,
10-4 SHEETING, at 85 cents,
Fr?hch Merinoes, from $1 upward.
Silk Striped Poplins, All-wool DeLainos,
Black Dress Silk, at $1.25 a yard,
Black Alpacas, Bombazines,
White Linens, Ladies' Shawls,
Debege, Linen Towels, Stockings, Trunks,
Linen Handkerchiefs, at 15 cents a piece.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's BOOTS and SHOES,
The Largest Assortment of CLOTHS and CASSIMERES, at Lowest Prices !
A full assortment of Ladies' Cloak Trimmings, Bugle Trimmings,
Ladies' Gauntlets, Blankets, Flannels,
Balmoral Skirts, of the hest quality.
Cloth for Ladies' Cloaks, 6-4 wide, at $2 a yard.
A full assortment of Variety Goods, which is offered at
25 per cent, less than any other Merchant in this city offers them.
D?c 1
MENDEL,
Main Street, two doors above E. Stenhouse's.
Imo
R. & W. C. SWAFFIELD
WILL SELL
Clothing at Cost!
OWING to the GREAT SCARCITY OF MONEY, and to the fact that we
have not the room to handle the LARGE STOCK OF CLOTHING that we
have on hand. Call and see for yourselves. BEDELL'S ROW.
Nov 27
NEW STOR
AND
iw. Hats, Caps
AND *
GENT'S FUBtUSH?NG GOODS I
JSjt "Wholesale and Retail ?
AT TBE OLD STAND, NO. 57 AND 59 MAINSTREET, COLUMBIA.
tTHE undersigned informs his fellow-citizens, that having rebuilt and thoroughly
refurnished his store, he ia prepared to show a COMPLETE STOCK of GOODS in
the CLOTHING LINE, to which he invites attention. Hi? assortment oomprian?,
in part :
COA TS, O VER-COA TS, PANTS AND VESTS,
SC A RES, CR A VA TS, ? HA TS, CAPS,
TRA VE LIN G ELA NEETS, SHA WLS, COLLARS, de.
TR UN KS, VA LISES, HA T B OXES, Etc.
Also, a splendid assortment of
Jiy^UNDYOU TH'S CLOTHING.
HcriNGS on hand, made np at short notice.
? SUITS at $40,
HS SUITS at 45,
? SUITSat 50,
JHP SUITS at 60,
^T?raW^D^^^^ ?SUI PS at 75.
R. C. ANDERSON,
Oct 25 _Agent.
Flour and Buckwheat.
FIFTY bbls. FAMILY FLOUR.
200 bbls. medium and low-priced Flour.
10 hbls. New Hulled Buckwheat. Just
eceived and for salo by
Nov 13 J. A T. R. AGNEW.
llmonds, Raisins, Currants.
rUST received, a complete assortment of
ALMONDS. RAISINS. ' CURRANTS,
RUNES, CITRON, Ac.
Nov 7 J. Jt T. R. AGNEW.
Molasses, Molasses.
1 f\ HHDS. prime Sogar House MO
1U LASSES.
25 bbls. primo Sogar House Molasses.
Jnst received and for sale low bv
Oct 19 J. & T. R. A?NEW.
Scales, Scales, Scales.
JUST received, a supply of TEW SCALES,
Counter Scales and small Platform
Hcales. which will be soldat very low price?,
by J. ? T. ii. AGNEW

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