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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, December 07, 1866, Image 1

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DAILY
Daily Paper $8 a Year
PH (EUX
'Let our Just Censure
Attend the True Event.'
Tri-Weekly $5 a Year
BY JULIAN A. SELBY.
COLUMBIA, S. C., TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 2. 1866.
VOLUME II-NO. 16^
THE PHONIX,
PCBLISUKD DAUA* AND TRI-WEEKI.Y.
THF, GLEAN&R,
EVERT WEDNESDAY MORNING.
BY JULiAN A. SELBY,
CITY PRINTER.
TERMS-IN ADVANCE.
SUBSCRIPTION.
Dailv Paper, six months.?4 00
tri-Weeklv, " " .. 2 50
Weekly, ' " " . 1 50
ADVERTISEMENTS
Insortod at 75 cents per square for the first
Insertion, and 50 cents for each subsequent.
Weakly 75 cents each insertion.
IBT A liberal discount made on the above
rale* when advertisements are inserted by
the inntUli or year.
Radical Reception Jo Congress.
We extract tho following from the
Richmond Times, of the 5th instant:
As has been announced by tele?
graph, the radical members of Con?
gress met with a reception on Mon?
day, at the hands of a rabble of some
two thousand "Union Leaguers, "
"Boys in Blue," negroes, "Southern
loyalists," and such like. From the
Northern papers we get further par?
ticulars. The procession formed at
noon, and marched down Pennsyl?
vania ave nu o to the East portico ol
the Capitol. At least half of the pro?
cession were negroes. There was mu?
sic from both white aud colored
bands, and banners and emblems
were profusely displayed. When the
radical Congressmen appealed ou the
portico, they were loudly Sheered by
the negroes. Judge Carter, of the
Supreme Court of Washington, de?
livered the address of welcome, in
which he praised Congress next to
the country's brave defenders, for
saving the country in its late ex?
tremity. Speaker Colfax responded
in a very lengthy address, on behalt
of the House of Representatives. The
tone of the speech was bitter against
the South for rejecting the constitu?
tional amendment.
Senator Yates, of Illinois, respond?
ed on behalf of the Senate, who said
he represented the North-west, where
it was proposed not only to beat
down Copperheadism and modern
Democracy, but to demolish it ut?
terly. He was very enthusiastic ovei
the election, and referred to the 2d
and 12th chapters of the Epistle to
the Ephesians for the epitaph of the
Democratic party. Being requested
to quote tho chapters, ho begged to
be excused, much to the . amusement
of every one around. Being pressed
still further, and offered a Bible, he
said:
"Well, if you insist upon it, I
believe it is something in this style:
"Ye are without ?hrist, being aliens
to tho Commonwealth of Israel.
[Laughter.] Without the convenant
I promise, having-no hope and with?
out God in the world.'" [Laughter
and applause.]
Yates was very emphatic in his op
position to Southern admission, de?
claring that those States should
never' corrie in until every American
should have tho privilege of going to
any part; of this country and enjoying
its privileges.
After a speech from Kelley, of
Pennsylvania, the rabble dispersed.
At aight, tho welcoming banquet
took place at the Fair building, on
Pennsylvania Avenue. About 400
persons of both sexes (but no ne?
groes) were present.
Gen. Hiram Walbridge, of New
York, did the honors as president ol
tho feast, and made the address ol
?welcome, in which he said he recog?
nized in the members and Senators
present those in whom the American
people had expressed their confidence
*in the recent elections. The appeal
which a recreant President had made
had been met with a stern rebuke on
the part of the people, and it would
become the duty of Congress soou to
put into the national legislation the
means of bringing tho Southern
States into obedience and subordina?
tion. If the Executive should resist,
it wonld become the duty of Cougress
to remove him from office. [Cheers.]
If the Southern States should con?
tinue to set themselves np against
Congress, it would be its duty to
appeal to the people of those States
without regard to color.
Thad. Stevens, of Pennsylvania,
respondod, but could not be clearly
heard. He attacked tho President
with vigor, declaring that having
been elevated into power through un
unexpected event visited upon the
nation for its sins, he now wished to
be King, instead of President.
[Hisses.] Mr. Stevens said the war j
was not over. Its main and final
object was pursued by the enemy wiih
relentless energy. The object liad at
first been to rulo over at least half
the oountry as a nation of slaves, i o
introduce free trade and to humiliate
fie North for its persistent advocacy
of freedmen. The object now was to
rule the whole nation, by means of
an oligarchy, making negroes and
! c pperheads c< n'ributo to the in
? creased power of the South through
I the iucreuse of the number of its
i votes, to seize the reins of Govern?
ment, to introduce free trude ?md to
break down the modesty of the free
people of the North. During the
war. Jeff. Davis was commander-in
chief of the rebel'army, with Lee as
his chief adviser.* Now, Andrew
Johnson was their commander-in?
ch .ef, and poor old Wool was their
chief martini adviser; and for the
navy they had Sommes and Welles.
[Laughter.] The people were to de?
cide now whether they were to havo
Andrew Johnson as President or as
King, tor they were tobi they had
no other choice left. [Laughter.]
He wanted the encouragement of the
soldiers. The enemy had the van?
tage ground, having possession of
the Wliite House, and was dispensing
I with a corrupt hand the vast patron?
age of the nation, and yet he had no
j fears. The army consisted of citi?
zens as well as soldiers. It had a few
I mercenary officers like the Steedmans,
the Dixes and the Wools; but if the
I Government were to order Grant, or
Howard, or Farragut to do its trea?
cherous work, they would break their
t swords rather than obey. With She
i ridan for ;>. leader, and 25,000 or
i -30,000 colored soldiers, they might
defy Andrew Johnson and all who
might follow his loud, lint if the
time should ever come when the con?
spirators would muster audacity equal
to their ambition, and, as once hap?
pened in England, attempt to turu
J the regular army against the people,
? Congress would not have to rely on
the Southern freedmen alone. The
men bf the loyal North would spring
to their feet and Unsheathe their wea?
pons, as when they heard the first
booming cannon of Sumter.
Let Congress be bold, and the sol?
diers of the last war would take care
of the next, and the usurper who
leads the hostile forces would have
! time and leisure to revise his boasted
proclamation in ono of the embra?
sures of Fortress Monroe. [Cheers.]
The usurper's head would rest innen
more quietly, to be sure, on a lap?
board and goose than wheu oppressed
with a crown. [Laughter.J With
less than impartial suffrage, the South,
with his consent, should never be re?
constructed. He would not be con
tent with such a puerile work as uni?
versal amnesty and universal suffrage.
Senators Howe and Wilson nut:
Mr. Forney also spoke, and the ban
quet did not end till nearly 12 o'clock
THE MASS RECEPTION A RUHLESC/UE
-Our reporters have furnished ui
full details of the mass reception tc
Congress, which has occupied tht
public attention for weeks past, bu
the affair was such a melancholy and
deplorable failure, that we forbear ti
publish a circumstantial deseriptioi
of it. Strangers in the city anticipntet
un imposing demonstration of som?
sort, and the members of Congres?
counted upon a grand display afte
the flourish of trumpets that prelude?
the ''mass welcome.'' Strangers an<
Congressmen were doomed to disap
pointaient. The colored troopsfough
bravely, it is true. They turned oui
strong, but the white end of tho pro
cession was very shabby in point o:
uumbers. What with desertions am
bad corns, their numbers were re
duced to less than a hundred as the
passed Centre Market.
A good proportion of the whit
welcornists consisted of a delegatioi
t'rom Baltimore, and the others wen
quite miscellaneous. They all wor
m expression of countenance whicl
seemed to say. "If Congress don'
pass our bills after all this marching
we'll not be caught in another simila
scrape." The colored portion of ttl
column marched" more easily an
merrily thau their white leaders
They were nu looking so far ahcad
itito legislation, for instance, wher
axes might be ground-and as the
had simply turned out for a goo
time, they enjoyed themselves correi
pondingly. Ono of them, who seeme
to be satiated with the pleasures c
the occasion, said it was "most to
much, this having two Sundays com
together."
The speeches at tho Capitol wer
eloquent, of course. That of Chit
Justice Carter was devoid of bm
combe, while the others were mad
up of tho efflorescence of radies
buncombe.
The banquet in the wigwam, com?
of Seventh street, was an exceeding]
confused affair. The meal provide
was partaken of hastily, very liti
order being observed. Colored nu
were admitted-as waiters, not aspa
takers of the feast. The commitu
said every ono was welcome to utter
who would pay five dollars for a su
per ticket, but we presumo the poi
colored men of the District find bi
ter use for their money, in buildii
up their churches and schools, rath
than paying for five-dollar suppers.
Tho truth is, that the money ?
pended in this "Mass Welcome"
some $5,000 or more-ought to ha
been given to tho freedmen. An
appeal has gone to the North for
funds to relieve the pressing necessi?
ties* of freedmen congregated in
Washington and vicinity, and this
fact makes the burlesque of yesterday
more than a mockery.
[ Washington Republican.
A New Proposition.
We extract the following from the
Louisville Courier:
The proposition fora national con?
stitutional convention appears to be
the only outlet, if indeed it is an out?
let, from our present embarrassments.
Upon the demand of the legislatures
8f two-thirds of the States, Congress
is required to call a convention.
When that convention is elected and
assembles, the whole subject cd the
Constitution is iu its hands. It can
amend iu whatever respect it sees
proper, and can in effect make a new
constitution. It may be objected to
this, that it will be a dangerous ex?
periment when such careless views
concerning the rights of individuals
and States prevail, to venture upon
the reconstruction of theconstitutiou.
But thc reply to this objection is,
that it will be much, more safe to en?
trust .the matter to the control of dele?
gates fresh from the people, and rep
"resenting the whole country, than to
permit Congress ?my longer to tinker
with the constitution for the gratifi?
cation of its unreasonable malice and
for the promotion of its ambitious
schemes. Delegates so elected will
be free from mueh of the prejudice,
and will have no connection with the
schomes\vhich guide th*e policy which
controls thc members of Congress.
The natui-al presumption isthat they
would proceed to the discharge ol
the trust confided to them with an
honest and impartial purpose to re?
store the Union and put it again on
the high road to prosperity and great?
ness, and, controlled by such inten?
tions, they could not fail to agree
upon some compromise which nil ol
the States could honorably accept.
This is precisely what we want.
It has beeu suggested that the lan?
guage of the Constitution r< quiring
Congress to call a convention upou
the demand of two-thirds of thc
States is indefinite, and that as there
is no restriction, Congress might at
tempt to fix the qualification of voters
as well as of delegates to the conven?
tion. The iron-clad oaths and dis
criminations might be made whirl:
would defeat the very objects in view
in calling the convention. We admil
the danger that such tilings might b<
attempted, but still insist that if sud
au iniquity was consummated it wonk
not put us in a worse condition than
we are now. Whatever work thc
Convention might do, would have tc
he submitted to the approval of thc
people, and be ratified by two-third:
of the States. The fear expressec
that the Convention itself might, ii
tho new Constitution they framed
change the mode of ratification, w<
regard as altogether groundless
They could not do it without repudi
ating the authority which brough
the Convention iuto existence, foi
the Constitution expressly require!
that amendments be ratified by tin
legislatures of three-fourths of tht
States, -or by conventions of the peo
pie in three-fourths of the States
Thus, it will bo seen, that the South
era States are secure against th?
adoption of any ameudmeuLs not ac
ceptable'to them. The time will pro
bably never come when those State;
will not be able to prevent a three
foutths vote against them by States.
But, it may be asked, is there an^
likelihood that a national conventioi
would adopt such a constitution a:
the South would be willing to receive
and if there is not, what advantagi
will there be in the Convention pro
ject ? Wo aro compelled to admit
after a calm and candid examiuatioi
of the whole subject, that the pros
peet for a satisfactoiy adjustment ii
this way is not as nattering as w<
could desire, but there is a chance
and that chance should not be throwi
away. If the effort fuiled of success
we should at least have gained time
and that we conceive to be a matte
of no little consequence. In tba
time there might occur a sufficien
change in public sentiment in th
North to check the spirit of radical
ism, now so fearfully rampant, am
in deference to public manifestations
Congress might revise its programme
and recede from tho extreme grouni
it now assumes.
MARYLAND A MEDIATOR.-A lette
in the New York Herald says that
for many reasons, a plan is bein,
considered in Maryland, bcarin.
upon the constitutional amendmen
question, in which that State is t
figure as a mediator between th
North and tho South. The Bait:
more delegation to the Legislatur
have had private meetings and pa-se
resolutions requesting the Governu
to call an extra session of the LegisU
ture, to take action on this questioi
FROM ARKANSAS.-Tho Atlanta In?
telligencer says:
Wo-met with a gentleman, a day
or two ago, who hud just arrived
from the Hot Springs in Arkansas.
He represents affairs in tho interior
of the State as rather quiet, and that
but comparatively few outrages of
any kind occur; and those few are
confined to parties known as Union
Leaguers and Jayhawkers. lu some
portions of the State tho yield of cot?
ton is pretty fair, and there is plenty
of corn. The supply of labor, how?
ever, is short, and the larger planters
are making strenuous efforts to pro?
cure it from the oidor Southern States.
Tho price paid is from twenty to
twenty-live dollars per month for
good hands. Our informant also
stated that on tho Arkansas River
and thc larger bottoms the mortality
among tho negroes is two-fold what
it was before the war, owing to their
careless habits, and aversion to take
medicine when left to their-own choice
in the matter. He thinks thc great
cotton-growing region of the lo\ver
valley will continue to draw on the
older Sontbern States for labor, until
the supply is entirely exhausted, and
that our people have no idea of the
extent to which this has already been
done. The subject is oue that merits
the attention of all more immediately
interested in the economy of labor.
Application will soon be made to
the Legislatures of this Stato and
Georgia for a charter of a railroad to
run from seine point near Saltkehat
ellie, on the Charleston and Savannah
Railroad, to Millen, Georgia.
A London newspaper recently con?
tained the following: '-For President
of England-John Bright." Straws,
etc.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
SWEET OPOPONAX FROM MEXICO! New,
very rare, rich and fashionable perfume.
The finest ever imported or manufactured
i:i United Statis. Try it and be convinced.
A NEW PERFUME! Called Sweet Opoponax
from Mexico, manufactured by E.T. Smith
A- Co., New York, is makin-,' a sensation
wherever it is known. Is very delicate,
?md its fragrance romains on the handker?
chief for days.- Philarta Ecerdng Bulletin.
SWEET OPOPONAX! New Perfume from
Mexico. The only fashionable Perfume
and ladies' delight.
SWEET OPOPONAX! The only elegant Per?
fume. Is found on all toilets, and never
stains the handkerchief.
SWEET OPOPONAX! ls tho sweete.-t Ex?
tract ever made. Supersedes all others.
Fry it once; will use no other.
SWEET OI-OPONAX! Ladies, in their morn?
ing calls, carry joy and gladness, when
perfumed with Sweet Opoponax.
ARTIFICIAL EYES_ARTIFICIAL j
HUMAN EYES made to order and inserted
by Drs. F. BAUCH and P. GOUGELMANN. j
(formerly employed by Boissonneau, Paris,) J
No. 399 Broadway, New York. Oct 17 ly
COLGATE'S HONEY SOAP.
This celebrated Toilet Soup, fa such
universal demand, is made from the
choicest materials, i-j mild and .emol?
lient jn its nature, fragrantly scented,
and extremely beneficial bi its action
upon the skin. For sale by ail Druggists
and Fancy Goods Dealers. March 2S ly
ss? _ 95
o fr -.-m, j,.
Pi I? <
P M > lilli ll llfl ? .? ~
pu so Jj l^"^T ? .
? ? Ti.i nil
o p. tn I %
? sr ? NSK?
.If I 0C3 S ^
Ils e 02
'Si ?. s ^
a .9 }>
O s? e-M
?I* GT2 *d
Sil M ?3
? s ? C I M
T S. ? BW
c+ ?rr S??sSsHi T ,1
g * w
o cn
Sugar and Coffee.
ONE HUNDRED bbls. REFINED SU?
GARS, consisting of Crushed, Pow?
dered, Granulated and Extra Coffee Sugars.
50 bbls. Muscovado Sugars.
100 bags Rio, Maracaibo and Java Cof?
fees. On band and for sale at low prices by
Sept 5 J. & T. R. AGNEW.
SALT AND BLUE STONE.
FOUR HUNDRED sacks LIVERPOOL
SALT, extra large, at $3.30.
1,000 lbs. BLUE STONE, 7 lbs. for $1.
The above will be *<old at prices named,
or at lower prices, if offered lower by any
houso in Columbia. " We mill not be under?
sold." J. & T. B. AGNEW.
DOES TUE UNDERSIGNED OFFER TUE FOLLOWING
PRINTS, at 12i couts a vard,
Ik-own and White SHIRTING, at IC cent.? a yard,
Radios' CORSETS, from 75 "nts upward,
?-4, 8-4 and 10-4 TAU EE DAMASK, at r?ducad prico?,
10-4 SHEETING, at 83 rents,
French Mcrinoes, from il upward.
Silk Striped Poplins, All-wool Desaine?,
Black Dress Silk, at $1.25 a yard,
Black Alpacas, Bombazines,
White Linens, Ladies' Shawls,
Debcgc, Linen Towels, Stockings, Trunks,
Linen H ndkerchiefs, at 15 cents & piece.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's BOOTS and SHOES,
The Largest Assortment of CLOTHS and CASSIItfERES, at Lowest Price*
A full assortment of Ladies' Cloak Trimmings, Bugle Trimmings,
Ladies' Gauntlets, Blankets, Flannels,
Balmoral Skirts, of the best quality,
Cloth for Ladies' Cloaks, 6-4 wide, art $2 a yard.
A full assortment of Variety Goods, which is offered at
23 per cent, less than any other Merchant in this city offers them.
J . MENDEL,
Main Street, two doors above E. Stenhouse's.
Dec 1 Imo
READ AND PROFIT !
HOUSE-KEEPERS AND FURNISHERS !
IQALL and see our BED BLANKETS and SHEETINGS-C II E APER THAN
j EVER.
YOUNO MEN AND OLD !
I Call and K?O o-.r CLOTHS. CASSIMERES, SHAWLS, TIES, CLOVES, SOCKS, arid
I every article of COMFORT and FASHION.
LADIES!
Call and examino our fine stock of ZEPHYR KNIT GOODS.
>1 E CH ANTS !
Call and replenish from our LARGE STOCK, at a BARE COMMISSION.
Wo ask all to give us a call, and compare our GOODS and PRICES. Wo will tako
nloasuro in showing our stock, feeling certain that tho PRICES arc RIGHT, and know?
ing the GOODS to bo NEW and FIRST-CLASS. Nov 23
SHIVER _& jECKHAM.
WE HA?S J?J3T RECEIVED 1
And keep constantly on Hand !
(^ORN, RICE, LARD, BUTTER. Skimmed and English Dairy CHEESE.
^Baltimore SIDES and SHOULDERS. J. J. EVANS' EXTRA Sugar-cured HAMS.
SUGARS, of all grades.
SUPER and SERF-RAISING FLOUR.
GOSHEN BUTTER, CRACKERS, of all kinds.
SALT, in long, seamless sacks.
Together with a fine assortment of WINES and LIQUORS, and a varied ?tock of
House-keeping Articles, all of which will be sold at the LOWEST MARKET PRICES
for CASH. Call and examine for yourselves, at
S. SHERIDAN'S,
Oct 20 Corner of Gervais and Assenibly*streets, next to the Washington Hotise.
NEW STORE
AND
Clothier. Hats, Caps
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS I
At Wholesale and DR et ail I
AT THE OLD STAND, NO. 57 AND 59 MA TN STREET, COLUMBIA.
m
THE undersigned informs his fellow-ri; irena, that haring rebuilt and thoroughly
refurnished his store, he ia prepared to show a COMPLETE STOCK of GOODS iu
'tho CLOTHING LINE, to which he invites attention. Hi? assortment comprit**?,
"in part:
CO.4 TS, 0 VER-rOA TS, PA NTS A ND VESTS,
SC A RES, CR A VA TS, HA TS, CA PS,
TRA VELING BLANKETS, SHA WLS, COLLARS, &c.
TR UN KS, VA 1. IS ES, HA T BOXES, Eic.
Also, a splendid assortment of
BOY'S AND YOUTH'S CLOTHING.
CLOTHS, CASSIMEEES and VESTINGS on hand, made UD at short notice.
F?NGT CA8S?M3EEE
SUITS at $15,
SUITS at 20,
SUITS at 25,
SUITS at 30,
SUITS at 35,
SUITS at $40,
SUITS at 45.
SUITS at 50,
SUITS at 60,
SUI TS at 75.
R. C. ANDERSON,
Ort 25_Agent.
HL E. NICHOLS & CO.,
General Insurance Agents, Stock and Exchange Brokers,
COLUMBIA, ?. O
REPRESENT, among others, the following well-known FIRST-CLASS COMPANIES:
QUEEN'S INSURANCE COMPANY of Liverpool and London-author?
ized capital ?2,000,000, or nearly.$10,000,000
UNDERWRITERS' AGENCY, Now York-capital and assets over. 3,000,000
INTERNATIONAL, Now York-capital and assets nearly. 2,000,000
.SECURITY, New York-capital and assets. 1,500,000
HOME, Now Haven-capital and assets. . 1,500,000
MANHATTAN, New York-capital and assets. 1,100,000
NORTH AMERICAN, New York-capital and assets. 700.0(0
HOME, Savannah, Ga.-capital and assets.'. 500,000
SOUTHERN INSURANCE AND TRUST, Savannah-capital and assets_ 500,000
Risks taken on BUILDINGS, MERCHANDIZE, COTTON-in stern and on planta?
tions- Household Furniture, Rents, Leases, Mortgages and every description of-pro?
perty liable to loss or damage by tire, on tho LOWEST TERMS. Policies issued pay
able'in gold or currjney, and losses promptlv paid.
?ETNA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, Hartford-capital and assets nearly $4.060,000.
This liberal and generous company presents great inducements to those who feel that
life is uncertain, and who desire to make a CEUTAIM provision for those near and dear,
who otherwise might suffer when thev are gone.
SELL EXCHANGE ON NEW YORK, in sums to suit, at the usual rates.
Internal Revenue Stamps, of all denominations, for ?ale. v
?ar Office corner of il, ia and streets, over Agnew's ?tor?. Sept 9 6mo

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