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The daily phoenix. (Columbia, S.C.) 1865-1878, November 11, 1868, Image 2

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COLUMBIA.
Wednesday Horning, Nov. IV
Cotton and It? M i nu rut-tn rc. j
. We moke the following extraots
Irom a lengthy and very interesting
article in the New York Times, on
cotton:
"The first record we have of the
cultivation of cotton in this country,
dates baok to 1731, when Peter Pur-,
ry, in his . description of Carolina,
speaks of 'cotton thriving admirably,
but as few peoplo know how to order
it, there is very little cultivated. ' The
cultivation of tho plant in gardens
was frequoutly to be met with as early
as 1736. An exportation of seven
bags was made from Charleston in
1747 and 1719. Among the exports
of Carolina in 1753, and of Charles?
ton in 1757. ? quantity of cotton ia
mentioned. We are informed, in an
old London publication of 1762, that
'what cotton and silk both the Caro?
linas , send us is excellent, and calls
aloud for its encouragement of its
cultivation in a place well adapted to
raise both. ' In 1734, a pap - r of the
seed was sent from Chelsea, England,
to the founders of Georgia, aud in
1742, a French planter erected on his
plantation, in Louisiana, a gin for
separating the fibre from the seed.
Among the documents in the archives
of the colonial department of Paris,
thoro is said to bo 'a most curious re?
port cn cotton, in 1760;' of the great
advantages Louisiana might dorivo
from its culture. We are also further
told that early in the Revolution Ker?
sey Borden, to whom Carolina is in?
debted for the silky cotton of her sen
islands, constructed a 'roller-gin,'
which enabled bim 'to clotho his ne?
groes in garments of domestio fabric.'
Not until 1770 were the first ship?
ments of cotton made. In that year,
there were shipped to Liverpool three
bales from New York, four from Vir?
ginia and Maryland, and three bar?
rels full from North Carolina. In
1784, an American ship which im?
ported eight bags of cotton into Li?
verpool, was seized on the ground
that 30 much cotton could not be the
produce of the United States; and
when an old planter obtained fifteen
small bales from five acres, he ex?
claimed, 'Well,. well, I have done
with cotton ; here* is enough to make
stockings for all the people of Ame?
rica.' The first reguiar exportation
of cotton from Charleston commenced
iu 1785, when ono bag arrived in Li?
verpool, January 20, 'per Diann,' to
John and Isaac Teasdalo & Co. In
the same year, twelve additional bags
from Philadelphia and ono from Now
York wore received at that port. Dur?
ing the next five years, the receipts
of American cotton were respectively
6, 109, 389, 842, and 81 bog's, esti?
mated at 151 ponnds each, or 1,441
bags, weighing 216,150 pounds, in
six years, from 1785 to 1790, inolusive.
In 1791, the export was 189,316
pounds; in 1800, it had reached
17,789,803 pounds. The first suc?
cessful crop of sea island cotton is
said to have been grown by William
Elliott, near Beaufort, in 1790. The
culture of cotton was so far success?
ful in 1786, that in that year, at the
Anapolis Convention, Mr. Madison
ventured to remark that 'there was
no reason to doubt that the United
States would one day become a great
cotton producing country.
"To encourage an article which
promised soou to become a revenue,
Congress was induced, in 1789, to im?
pose a duty on foreign cotton. The
invention of devices for cleaning cot?
ton gave un immense impulse to its
cultivation, and in about the year
1800, tho culture became general,
and some very large estates were ac?
cumulated in South Carolina. That
State exported, in 1795, cotton to thc
value of ?1,109,653, and in 1801,
nbont 8,000,000 of pouuds weight.
Tho recent accounts from Spaii
would seem to indicato that the revo?
lution in that country is not to be
cheated out of the usual feast of
blood und rapiuo. The lazzaroni of
Madrid, who collect in mobs 100,000
strong, aro assuming daily a moro
threatening aspect, and have devel?
oped nil the inhuman passions which
characterized the Parisian blood?
hounds of '89. Gen. Prim, who has
more than once oeen called upon to
ballin their rago and protect the vic?
tims of their fury, baa already in?
curred suspicion, and cries of muertu
a Prim have moro than once echoed
beneath his palace windows. The li?
bation of blood which popular liber?
ty seoms always to demand ns her
baptism, it is thought, will not be
long evaded; tho present storm may
be quelled, but the elements of n new
tempest is there which lowors dark
and threateningly in the not distant
future.
A life of more pleasure! A little
while in tho spring-time of the senses,
in tho sunshine of prosperity, in tho
jubilee of health, it may seem well
enough. But how insufficient, how
mean, how terrible when agc comos,
and sorrow and death! A lifo of
pleasure! What does it look like
when these great changes beat against
it-when tho realities of eternity
stream in? It looks like tho frag?
ments of a feast, when the sun shines
upon thc withered garlunds and tho
tinsel, and the overturned tables and
dead lees of wine.
i rum i wi
BIIOODX* TRAGEDY,-A terrible and
horrid tragedy waa enacted on our
publie square last night. About 10
o'clock a largo bod; of disguised
mounted, men entered the square
frqm Washington sfcroet, and slowly,
orderly, without a word, rodo around
the square, and passed off the same
way they carno. At the time, there
was a radical meeting being held in
the Court HOUHO, composed almost
entirely of negroes, who, whon the
procession appeared, rushed down
from the Court-room and set up the
wildest yells, cursing and crying,
"Charge on tho Ku Klux! Shoot
tho damned rebels!" ^After the ca?
valcade had left the square fully 200
yards, a body of at least twenty ne?
groes rushed through the North gate,
armed with shot-guns, pistols and
elubs. Among them were a number
of white men, who had been in at?
tendance at tho meeting. On the
side-walk, ulong by the Moore build?
ing, were a large number of persons,
white and black, drawn there to wit?
ness the procession. Just as the ne?
groes rushed through the gate, soino
one of them fired upon the crowd on
the side-walk, and ia a moment as
many as thirty shots were fired from
both parties, when the firing sodden?
ly ceased, the negroes running off in
many directions. The sequel of this
dastardly and fanatical outrage was
the killing of one negro outright,
mortally wounding another, and the
slight wounding of a third; the mor?
tal wonndingof one white man, seri?
ously wounding a second, and slight?
ly wounding two others. Judge
Thurlow, present Judge of Probate
Court of Limestone County, was
shot through tho bowels, and is al?
most certain to die.
The negroes came to the meeting
with guns, for we saw ono in a negro's
possession; and it is attested by
twenty witnesses, some of them Fede?
ral soldiers, that the firing was com?
menced by negroes. The Ku Klux
did not molest tho negroes in any
way whatever, and were off tho
square fully 200 yards beforo tho
firing ceased. Negroes were heard
to say afterwards that the matter was
not settled yet. Let every white man
be ready to defend himself to the
death.
[Huntsville (Ala.) Independent, Nov. 1.
Fuss AND FURY AFTER THE ELEC?
TIONS.-The radical organ in this city
and Greeley's narrow-minded block?
heads of the Loyal League are rais?
ing a groat deal of fuss and fury over
the result of the election in this
State, and are making themselves
generally ridiculous by talking about
contesting the election of State offi?
cers who have been chosen by twen?
ty-five or thirty thousand majority.
Greeley, who always takes thc lead
in such follies, declares that every
State whose electoral vote is cast for
Seymour and Blair has boon carried
by fraud or terrorism, and attributes
a radical minority, wherever found,
to repeaters or tho Ku Klux Klan.
This is all balderdash. Politicians ou
both sides, Republicans and Demo?
crats, generally get in as many bogus
votes as possible for their candidates,
and we have no idea that they were
any more scrupulous in the election
just over than in any other that has
been held for the past quarter of a
century. Grant has been chosen by
a handsome majority; the people are
well satisfied, and it is a paltry busi?
ness for the Union Leagues to be ex?
pending their wrath npon Justice
Shandley because he worked faith?
fully for his party, or debating
whether Pat Keenan or Dennis O'Raf
ferty had one person or a dozen re?
gistered from his residence.
The radicals would bo more profit?
ably^ employed studying the true les?
son of tho election. Tho people
elected Grant because they have con-1
fidence that he will securo to tho na?
tion the peace for which he fought
on the field of battle. They gave the
State of New York to the opposition
and deprived'the Republicans of their
two-third majority in tho House of
Representatives, because they disap?
prove tho violent measures and ex?
treme policy of radicalism. Tho
sooner Union Lenuges and Republi?
can Congressmen understand this
fact the better.-Neto York Herald.
A well-known wealthy Parisian has
had himself painted, by an eminent
artist, " ar, ho was," "as he is," und
"as he will bo." "As he was" rep?
resents him, at tho ago ?f twenty
five, a poor devil in ragged garments,
with his toes peeping through holes
in his shoes, sinking, half-famished,
by the side of a wall. "As he is,"
figures him fat and jolly as an alder?
man, well-dressed, with gold chains
decking his waistcoat, and diamond
rings blazing on his fingers. And in
"as he will bc," he is made a rotting,
hideous corpse. Not the least single
feature of such a singular freak, is
the fact that he has the paintings
hnng in his drawing-room.
VICES OF AMERICA??.-A recent
medical writer states that the vices of
the American character may be briefly
summed up as follows: 1st. An in?
ordinate passion of riohes. 2d. Over?
work of mind and body in the pur?
suit of business. 3d. Uudue hurry
and excitement in all the affairs of
life. 4th. Intemperance in eating,
drinking and smoking. Otb. A geno
ral disregard of the true laws of life
and health.
Tun ELECTION IN CHESTEB COUNTY.
The following is ?he result o? the
election in the Above County: Re?
publican 1,300; D?mocratie 1,100
Republican majority 200. The Be
pu&liuuu majority in the hut State
election' amounted to 1,000, hence
there has been a Demoorntio gain of
800.
? few days since, four laborers in
a brick-yard in Glaseo, Ulster Coun?
ty, N. Y., while drunk, broke into a
saloon and so beat Philip Onterhondt,
a young negro, that he died of his in?
juries in a few hours.
Idol worship is firmly established
in Portland, Oregon. Thore is a tem?
ple there belonging to the Chinese,
with graven images and all the other
accompaniments of a real heathen
temple.
Mr. John Quiucy Adams was a can?
didate for representative from Quincy
as woll as for Governor of Massachu?
setts, and was defeated in both in?
stances.
Queen Isabella had 170 carriages.
These she could not take with her,
and the canaille of Madrid amuse
themselves by taking rides in tho
royal vehicles.
Mrs. Partington (P. B. Sbillnber)
was a Democratic candidate for tho
Massachusetts Legislature in tho re?
cent election and was defeated.
Colombia Chapter No. 5, R. A. M.
m2llt"m A REGULAR CONVOCATION
iy$S?|of Columbia Chapter No. 5, R. A.
orara* M., will bo hold, at Masonic Hall,
OMnm THIS EVENING, at 7 o'clock.
Rv order of tho High Priest.
Nov ll 1 W. HUTSON W1GG, Scribe.
MADAME 0,1 DIERE,
CALDER HOUSE,
COUNEU OF
CHVUCH AND Q,UBEN STREETS,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
TRANSIENT R?AR6"$2.50 PER DAY.
Nov ll_ 3
H?XBERS HOUSE,
NO. 234 King etrcot, betweon Went?
worth and Hasel streets, Charleston,
H. C. Within five minutos walk of the
Post Oftice and principal business bouses
of Meeting and Hayne streets, and lilly
yards of tue City Railway, which commu?
nicates with all parts of tho city. Terms,
$2 por diem. Special contrasts made, on
most reasonable terms, for board by tho
week or month for single gentlemen or
families. MRS. R. HILRERS.
Nov ll
GREAT INDUCEMENTS
IN
SILVERWARE,
WATCHES,
JEWELRY.
PLAIN GOLD RINGS.
CLOCKS.
SPECTACLES, Sc.
SELLING LOW AT
I. 8ULZBACH?R'B,
Nov Sign of the Greon Specks. ll
Apples, Apples
ANOTHER lot of those fino large AP?
PLES, for sale by
Nov 10_FI8HER & LOWRANCE.
Gas Consumers
WILL tako notice that their bills, for
the month of OCTOBER, are now
due. Prompt payment is respectfully re?
quested. Wo havo largo amounts to pay
by tho 15th. All persons who are in de?
fault at that time will find their motors ro
movod. JACOB LEVIN,
Nov 8 3 Secretary Gas Company.
Notice.
ALL persons having claims against thc
estate of ROBERT NEWSON, do
ceased, will hand in their claims, properly ?
attested, and receive payment.
R. C. SHIVER,
Nov 8 4 Administrator.
At Swygert & Benn's.
FRESH Buckwheat FLOUR,
Primo North Carolina Mullets, some?
thing rare,
Golden Drip Syrup,
Choice Goshen Butter, Choose, ic.
ALSO,
Choico FAMILY SUPPLIES, received
daily, at SWYGERT A BENN'S.
Nov?_Imo
OYSTERS. "
rnTIT? UNDERSIGNED has opened
X XXX?i an OYSTER SALOON, at the
Carolina House, and will furnish, at short
notice, OYSTERS FRIED, ROASTED,
STEWED and on the SHELL. Oivo me a
call. W. K. SESSFORD.
Nov C_
Corn Whiskey.
PURE and good, for sale by
Nov G FISHER & LOWRANCE.
Rye Whiskey,
SCHNAPS,
Bitters,
Brandies,
Rum,
Gin. Ac., ?Lc.
For salo low by
Nov C FISHER St LOWRANCE.
Pure Leaf Lard
FOR salo by
Nov 6_FISHER St LOWRANCE.
Smoked Beef and Breakfast Bacon.
Qnn LBS. Choice SMOKED BEEF.
?UU 1,000 lbs. Breakfast Bacon Strips.
For sale by E. St O. D. HOPE.
Nov6
PISTOLS, PISTOLS.
JOST received, a supply of PISTOLS,
from the most celebrated makers;
' also, Cartridges, Powder, Shot, lieaa, Per?
cussion Gap?, Gun Wads, Powder Flasks, ,
Shot Bolts and Shot Ponohes, for salo at {
I low figures for cash by
Nov5 J. ? T. B. AGNEW.
Tho oyster war hos commenced in
Virginia. Several skirmishes have
occnrrred between the owners of
oyster boats and tko State revenue
col toe tors. One man reported hilled
and several wounded.
The Winnsboro News proclaims
the election iu that County for State
Senator illegal, from the fact that it
was not ordered within the legal time
-fifteen days before tho election.
2,000 stand of arms belonging to
tho Florida Stato Arsenal, were seized
by a party of unknown persons, while
in transit through the State, on
Thursday night, and destroyed.
Another dreadful railway accident
has occurred in Wales. Several pas?
sengers are killed and many wound?
ed.
The total number registered in
Charleston during the three days
was 11,102-white 5,308; colored
5,854.
Sitka has less than 1,000 inbubi- J
tauts.
New Buckwheat Flour.
JUST received anti for ?alo by
_ NoY 11_G. W. PARKER, Agent.
A Fine Lot of Fresh
MOUNTAIN BUTTER received thia
day, and for sale low bv
JSov ll_G. W. PARKER, Agont. _
A Lot of
FBES H LESIONS Jual to hand, and for
salo by G. W. PARKER,
Nov ll_Agont.
In the District Court of the United
States, for the District of South
Carolina-October Tenn, 1868.
In tbo matter of Philip Epatoin, of Colum?
bia, S. C., Bankrupt.-Petition for full
andfinal discharge in Bankruptcy.
ORDERED, that a hearing be had on the
27th day of NOVEMBER, A. D. 18G8,
at Federal Court House, in Columbia, 8.
C., and that all creditors, Ac., of said
Bankrupt appear at said time and pl.ice
and show cause, if any they can, why tho
prayer of tlft petitioner should not ho
granted.
And that tho second and third meeting
of Creditors of said Bankrupt will he held
at tho office of Henry Summer, Esq., Bogis
ter of 3d Congressional District, of South
Carolina, on the 26th dav of NOVEMBER,
1808, at 12 M.
By ordor of tho Court, tho 3d day of No?
vember, 18G8. DAN'L. HORLIiECK,
Nov ll w2 C. U. S. Dist. C. for S. C.
Potatoes.
FINE Northern IRISH POTATOES, for
salo bv
Nov 10 FISHER A LOWRANCE.
What Dry Goods
gTORE GIVES THE MOST FOR YOUR
MONEY? C. P. JACKSON.
Nov 8
TO RENT,
A NEAT COTTAGE, with four rooms
J\. and necessary out-buildings. A well
of good water OB the premises. Apply at
tho TELEGRAPH OFFICE.
JCov 10 _ iY
WANTED,
BY a young lady, a situation as TEACH?
ER, either in a private family or a
school. Sho is competent to teach Music,
the English branches usually taught in
schools, and tho rudiments ot French and
Latin. Sho can como well recommeuded.
Address, stating terms, J. E. A.,
Nov 10 4 St. Matthew's, S. C.
"NICKERSON HOUSE,"
COLUMBIA. S. C.,
First Class Hotel, - - $3 Per Day.
WILLIAM A. WRIGHT
HAYING assumed thc ma?
nagement ol this HOUSE,
respectfully solicits a share
Zof public patronage.
FREE OMMIB US lo and from the Uotel
Nov 10 Imo
Legal Notice.
SUPBEME CoUnT,
COLUMBIA, S. C., November 9, 1868.
IN purauanco of tho Act of tho General
Assembly, passed the 18th day of Sep?
tember, in tho year of our Lord 18G8, a
Session of the Supromo Court will he held
at Columbia, commencing tho FOURTH
TUESDAY of November, instant.
ALBEBT M. BOOZER,
Nov 10 3?_Clerk Supremo Court
Thc Dry Goods Store
rpo
GET
BARGAINS
IS
Nov 8 P. JACKSON'S.
Class in Phonography.
COURSE of ten lessons sufficient to
enablo the student, without further
instruction, to perfect himself in tho art.
Lessons given aiao by mail. For terms,
etc., apply at this office, at Dr. Jackson's
Drug Storo, or to
JAMES WOOD DAVIDSON,
Nov 4 t_Columbia, S. C. _
T0UX?NE
Nov 7_12
New Bootf Shoe
AND
HAT STORE.
^ * M
THE undersigned, who is experienced in
tho business, has opened a fino and
carefully selected stock of goods in the
above lino, and invites a call from pur?
chasers. In the assortment, will be found
Gent's, Ladies', Mia s os', Boys', Youths'
.sd Children's BOOTS aud SI?G?5, or tho
best make. His stock of HATS is varied.
Tho articles will bo disposed of cheap for
rash. A. SMYTHE.
lu Presbyterian Depository, opposite
Klnaxd's dry goods store. Got 24
"'
Bocal xtems. I
SWEET AND Jcior.-? lot of Ano,
fresh, sweet nod jnioy oranges have
jost been received at Mr. McKenzie's.
Sample them.
The holiday number of Godey's
Lady's Book-December-has been ]
received by Messrs. Bryan & McCnr
ter. Christmas festivals and prettily
illustrated.
The election for municipal officers
passed off very quietly, yesterday,
although considerable interest was
manifested. About 1,450 votes were
polled. Tho contest for Mayor was
very close. The votes will be counted
this morning, commencing at 10
o'clock. A number of mechanics and
workingmen, as a token of respect
for Mr. McKeuzie, formed a proces?
sion and visited the different polls,
headed by a neat banner, prepared j
by au urtist-orchitect. It is impossi?
ble to make any statement with refer?
ence to cither Mayor or Aldermen.
NEW BOOKS.-We are indebted to
Messrs. Bryan & McCarter for a copy
of a work with tho following title:
Theatrical Management in the West
and South for thirty years. Inter?
spersed with Auecdotical Sketches,
Autobiographically given by Sol.
Smith, Retired Actor. With illas
trations. "Tho web of life is of a
mingled yarn-good and ill toge?
ther."-Shukspeare. New York:
Harper it Brothers, Frauklin
square.
The work contains au almost inex?
haustible fund of amusement. Mr.
Smith, as a comedian, stands at the
head of his profession, and bc has
the happy faculty of imparting to his
writings a vein of human which is
really interesting.
Mobun ; or The Last Days of Lee and
his Paladins. Final Memoirs of a
Staff Officer Serving in Virginia.
From the MSS. of Colonel Surry,
of Eagle's Nest. By John Esten
Cooke, Author of "Surry of Eagle's
Nest." Nee ?spera terrent. New
York: F. J. Huntington & Co., 459
Broome street.
Wo are indebted to the publisher
for a copy of tho above work, which
is really a continuation of the author's
former popular productions. Many
iii old Confed. will recognize the
scones so vividly depicted in this plea
?uutly-written volume. Tho follow?
ing is an oxtract from tho prologue:
On tho wall over the mantle-piece,
hero in my quiet study at Eagle's
Nest, are two crossed swords. One
is a battered old sabro worn at Get?
tysburg and Appomattox; the other,
a Federal officer's dress sword, cap?
tured in 18G3.
It was a mero fancy to place them
there, as it was a whim to hang upon
that nail yonder, the uniform coat
with its stars and braid, which Stuart
wore on his famous ride around Mc?
Clellan, in 18G2. Under the swords
hang portraits of Lee, Jackson and
Stuurt. Jackson wears his old coat,
and his brow is raised as though he
were looking out from beneath his
yellow old cadet cap. Stuart is seat?
ed, grasping his sabre, with his
plumed hat resting on his knee. His
huge beard flows on his breast, his
eyes are clear and penetrating, and
benenth the picture I have placed a
slip cut from one of his letters to me,
and containing the words, "Yours to
count on, J. E. B. Stuart." Lastly,
tho gray commander-in-chief looks
with a grave smile over his shoulder,
tho eyes fixed upon that excellent en?
graving of tho "Good Old Rebel," a
private7 of tho Army of Northern Vir?
ginia, seated on a log, after the war,
and reflecting with kuit brows on tho
past and tho prosent.
From this sketch of my surround?
ings, worthy reader, you will per?
ceive, that I amuse myself by recall?
ing thc old times when the Grays and
Blues wero opposed to each other.
Thoso two swords crossed-thoso pic?
tures of Leo, Jackson, Stuart and tho
"Old Hebel"-you aro certain to
think that tho possessor of them is
unreconstructed (terrible *\vord!) and
still a rebel!
But is it wrong to rotneinber the
past? I think of it without bitter?
ness. God decreed it-God tho all
wise, tho all-merciful-for his own
purpose. I do not indulgo any re
pinings, or reflect with rancor upon
the issue of the struggle. I prefer
recalling the stirring adventure, the
brave voices, the gallant faces; even
in that tremendous drama of 1864-5,
I can And something besides blood
and tears, even hero and there some
Bun-shine.
FAST AKI> CHEAP PKINTINQ.-We
have just added a fast card press-of
the Degenor & Weiler patent-to tho
machinery of the Phoenix office; and
havo also made additions to our stock
of fancy type, cards, paper, etc.
Persons in want of any styles of
besk and j cb printing, uro invited io
call and examine samples and prices.
Cards printed at shortest notice, and
at prices varying from $3 to $10 per
thousand.
Petera* musical publications -Mon.
ly Olee Riva, United States Musi '?
Review, and Parlor Companion, to
November, havo jost been received.
Singlo copies 25 and 30 cents. Ad?
dress J. Ii. Peters, P. O. Box 5,429,
New York.
COUNTING BABY'S TOES.-What
parent cannot appreciate this beau?
tiful little poem:
Dear little bare feet,
Dimpled and white,
In your long night-gown,
Wrapped for the night,
Come let me count all
Tour queer toes,
Pink as the heart
Of a shell or a rose!
Oue is a lady
That sits in the sun;
Two is a baby,
And three is u nun;
Four is a lily
With innocent breast;
Five is a birdie
Asleep on her nest.
TEMPORARY EXECUTIVE.-During
tho absence of Gov. Scott from the
State, Major D. T. Corbin, United
States District Attorney, will, as Pre?
sident pro lcm. of tho Senate, be
acting Governor of South Carolina.
MAIL ARRANGEMENTS.-The post
office open during the week from 8>?
a. m. to G p. m. On Sundays, from
4 to 5 p. m.
The Charleston and Western mails
are open for delivery at 5 p. m., and
close at 8 % p. m. Charleston' night
mail open 8}?? a. m., close 4)? p. m.
Northern-Opon for delivery at
8}? a. m., closes at 2.45 p. m.
Groenville-Open for delivery 5
p. m., closes at 83? p. m.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.-Special'ot
tention is called to the following ad?
vertisements, published for the first
time this morning:
D. C. Peixotto ic Son-Auotion.
Madame Gidiere-Calder House.
L Sulzbacber-Inducements.
Meeting Columbia Chapter.
Mrs. B. Hilbers-Hilburs House.
G. W. Parker-Buckwheat, &c.
In the District Court of the U. S.
J. F. Ensor-Public Sale.
ENDURANCE.-It is astonishing what
the human frame can endure. The
numerous assistants that O. F. Jack?
son has in his complete establishment
are as fresh from for to-morrow's
work as they would bo after a long
rest. Try them.
PROGRESS.-Columbus sailed to the
American coast in a four hundred ton
ship, and first landed upon the island
of St. Domingo. Last week a vessel
from St. Domingo unloaded in New
York over four hundred tons of St.
Croix Rum for P. H.^Drake ?fe Co..
of that city. This is l5ut a few weeks'
supply of this article, which these
gentlemen use in the manufacture of
the celebrated PLANTATION BITTERS.
Wo are informed by an exchange that
Messrs. Drake & Co. have not adver?
tised a dollar for a year, but that the
sales of this article continue at the
former enormous figure. In 1864,
the receipts of the PLANTATION BIT?
TERS were equal to those of the New
York & New Haven Railroad.
MAGNOLIA WATER-Superior to the
best imported German Cologne, and
sold at half the price. N6tlf3
"Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps and
Bottled Wines and Liquors."
A supply of thoao juatly celebrated
medicinal ailicles just received and tor
sale by FISHER A LOWRANCE,
Oct 25 tlO Agents for Columbia.
WHO KEEPS
rpiIE BEST ASSORTMENT OF DRY
GOODS? C. P. JACKSON.
Nov 8 _
NOTICE.
"VTOTIOE is hereby Riven that applica
lN tion will he mado, in thrco months
from this date, to Railroad Bank of South
Carolina, for A renewal of CERTIFICATE
OF STOCK, No. 800, thc original of which
has been lost or doatroyed.
i u t 2.S w i JOHN H. HEISE.
New No. 1, 2 and 3 Mackerel,
IN KITTS, Quarter, Half and Wholo
barrels,
100 box? s No. 1 and Scaled Herrings.
For salo low, by E. A (LD. HOPE.
REDUCED PRICES.
DILLON'S COTTON TIES aro now
offered by tho undersigned at An
low prico of EIGHT CENTS FER POUND,
to close consignments.
ALSO,
GUNNY CLOTH and Balo Rope, at very
low prices. J. A T. B. AGNEW.
Hams and Bacon Strips.
I AA CHOICE SUGAR-CURED CAN
XUU YA8SED HAMS,
200 Choico Sagar-ourod Bacon Strips.
Just received, -nd for salo low by
October 23 J. A T. B. AGNEW.
BOUTTON SEED WHEAT.
0/~?f"\ BUSHELS of the celebrated Tir
OUU glnia BOUTTON SEED WHEAT,
forjaale by_ E. A Q. D. HOPE.
Blue Stone, Blue Stone, Blue Stone.
2f^f\r\ POUNDS superior BLUE
A) KJKJ STONE, for sale by
FIS2E? A ??E?NFISH,
?Oct 81 Droggiats.
TEN BARRELS
VERY fino Northern IRISH POTATOES,
lust received and for aalei>y
Oct 30 OEO. W. PARKER, Ag't.

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