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Democratic Northwest. (Napoleon, Ohio) 1869-1894, September 01, 1881, Image 6

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THE DEMOCRATIC NORTHWEST, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER h 1681.
AREIGXOFTEKKOR.
Taxis Despf radoas Attempt to Aasassi
nate Sheriff,
And Eight or them are ia Ton KUled
by. the Populates.
Men
Thrilling Scenes the Doomed
Crying far Their Lire.
Uovbton, Tex., August 23. The
most intense! excltment prevails at
0 ange, thi3 State, over the attempt to
assassinate Sheriff George Michel, and
the subsequent lynching of eight of
the leaders of the plot, who met death
at the hands of the citizens, banded to
gether for the purpose of putting an
effectual stop to outrages and all kinds
of lawlessness which have been openly
committed in the neigborhood for the
past few weeks.
The trouble began some throe weeks
ago, when 0. L. lelno, a noted crimi
nal, attempted to escape and was shot
by Detective Wood. "When Delno's
friends searched for V ood he could
not be found. They thon charged
Shirff Michel with conceling him and
vowed revenge.
Yesterday a diabolical plot to assas
sinate Michel was artfully arranged
between Charles Delno and "Dug'"
Harris (wjiite) and Samuel and Bob
Saxon (colored). A sham saloon fight
for the purpposo of involving Michel
wa3 started by Sam Saxion, who start
ed and ran toward the place where
Charlie Delno, Dug Harris, Bob Saxon
and numbers of negroes were lying in
ambush.
"When the sheriff and posse reached
thfi ambush thev were fired upon. The
former received buckshot wounds in all
narts t.f the bodv. One hundred and
fifty citizens were at once got together
thoroughly armed, ana starcea in pur
suit of the" outlaws, who, after the as
sault on the sheriff, succeeded in mak
ing their escape.
"Four of tho negroes were captured
and immediately shot. Another negro,
Robert Garcon. was tortured for an
hour bv beinc alternately hanged and
resuscitated, until he revealed the plot
described above. After this confes
sion, together with that of other crimes
had honn wrfistad from him. he wa9
strung up for good and left hanging.
Delno was captured and placed in jail,
where Sam Saxon .hough badly wound
ed, shortly after joined him.
By slight o'clock at night the mili
tary guard, thinking everthing secure,
left the jail and repaired to their homes.
At nine o'clock a large body of exas
perated citizens gathered at the jail,
demanded of Deputy Sheriff Jett the
release of Sam Saxon and his lead
ing negro accomplice. This was re
fused, but the crowd overpowered him
and draged them out.
A wild and thrilling scene then com-
mfinnprl. Tho neeroes fell on their
knees, and throwing their arms around
Deputy Sheriff Jett's legs, implored
him for God's sake to save them. Sud
denly they were inspired with the idea
of making there own escape, and amid
frantic veils, started to run.
The gathered crowd at once opened
Sre on them, riddling both bodies with
buckshot and killing them instantly.
The bodies were left where they fell
and the crowd dispersed. Charlie
Delno was not disturbed but is to be
tried befor a kangaroo court, Judge
Lynch presiding.
No sympathy whatever is expresed
for those shot and hanged. . A reign
of terror prevails. All buisness is
suspended. Gov. Eoberts has been so
licited to send troops to Orange, but
refuses until it becomes apparent that
the civil authorities cannot cope with
the difficulties.
The St. Louis Republican has been
making a study of Ohio politics. It dis
plays a qnantity of accurate information
surprising for a paper which has not even
had the advantage of being "born in
Ohio:"
"About a half-dozen years ago the Ohio
Democrats nominated old Bill Allen for
Governor. There was a terrible howl
then set up that Bourbonism barnacled
the party. Republicans said the leader
ship of the party could not apprehend
that the people were tired of mere pol
iticians, and were thinking of their ma
terial interest. But Allen was elected.
Later they nominated R. M. Bishop, a
business man, for Governor. Then it
was these Republicans were shocked be
cause all the old leaders were put aside
for one not trained in public life. And
Bishop was elected. This year another
business man is nominated, and again
Republicans are shocked that Ohio Dem
ocrats should have passed by all the
politicans again and taken a practical man
of eminence in the field of production.
His Democracy is not of long enough
standing either. Do they forget that
they nominated Grant for the highest
offioe in their gift before he ever voted a
Republican ticket at all? That they hur
ried up their Convention for fear the
Democrats would nominate him first? The
probability is Mr. Bookwalter will become
Governor Bookwalter by the voice of the
people of Ohio, and that he will make an
excellent Executive."
i "'T bible Improvement.
$Ir Jfoah Bates, Elmira, N. Y writes:
,; About, four years ago I had an attack of
bilious fever, and never fully recovered.
My digestive organs were weakened and
I would be completely prostrate for days.
After using two bottles of your Burdock
Blood Bitters the improvement was so
visible that I waslastonished. I can now,
tnougn oi years or age, do a fair and rea
sonable dav's work." Fi
20 cents.
Another Lie Sailed.
Our Republican brothers- have been
very unfortunate so far in their cam
paign stories. First the Springfield
IlrpuLUe charged that Mr. Bookwalter
raved and swore when asked to sub
scribe to the fund for the decoration of
soldier's craves. The ItriiulUc was
compelled to publish a card from Mr.
Parsons, a Republican, denying the
stoiy. Next the Dayton Journul, whose
editor, Bill Bickham, attended the
Cleveland Convention with a well filled
bottle of whisky, charged that Profes
sor Geiger, of Antioch College, wrote
a book on the Sandwich Islands, which
bears Mr. Bookwalter's name as author.
Professor Geiger promptly wrote a card
to the Journal, giving Mr. Bookwalter
full credit for the authorship. Next
canio the Cincinnati Gazette ringing
the changes and charging in a childish
manner that Mr. Bookwalter had
changed his name from Buchwalter.
Tho Gazette lias had the fairness to pub
Usn the following correspondence
wbicu explains itself:
CHANGE IN THE NAMK OF BOOKWAI.TEK
THE FAMILY ORTHOGRAPHY.
To the Editor of the Cincinnati Cazftlri
Cincinnati, July 27. V ill you be
good enough to publish the accompany
ing letter to me from Jonathan L.
Throcmorton, of Chillicothe, 0.? Mr.
T., as well as myself, was born in Col
erain Township, Ross county, 0., near
Hallsville, went to school there, and
knew from our infancy most of the
Bookwalter family well. Ihe John
Bookwalter, who died at the ago of
eighty-five, was the father of Levi
Buchwalter, and tho grandfather of
Morris Lyons Buchwalter, of tho firm
of Tilden, Buchwalter & Campbell.
John's mother died at Hallsville a few
years ago in her 100th year. I trans
acted business for John Bookwalter,
as attorney, vears ago, and rememr.er
that he signed his name Bookwalter.
You were pleased to say in the Gazette
of the 21st: "Judge Yaple forgets, or
never knew, that the Ross county
branch of the family did not change
its name from isuchwalter to Uookwal
ter. People who change their names
are always weak about the head.
You will now perceive that I did know,
and have not forgotten, how the name
has been spelled by the Ross county
branch of tho family. The plain infer
ence from your iteration and reitera
tion of Bookwalter, alias Buchwalter
is that Hon. John W. Bookwalter
changed ihe spelling of his name by
reason of weakness in the head or from
an antipathy against Germans. I know
better, and submit whether it is can
did or fur to continue, without any
ground for so doing, the attempt to
create a little and contemptible preju
dice against Mr. Bookwalter.
Aefred Yaple.
Hon Alfred Yaple Cincinnati, O. : i
My Dear Friend -lour letter oi
23d inst. received, and in reply have
to Bay that ah inspection of the public
records of this (Ross) county shows
that the two pioneer trothers, Joseph
and Abraham Bookwalter, from the
time they settled in Colerain township,
this county, always wrote their names
in German, and that the records of the
various instruments of writing to
which their names are signed generally
spelled and wrote their names Buch
walter, sometimes Buckwalter, and
frequently Bookwalter. That the sons
of Abraham, viz: John. Joseph, Abra
ham, jr., Samuel, and Henry, spelled
and wrote their names Bookwalter,
and that four of the five sons of Joseph,
viz: David, Abraham, Jonathan, and
John, spelled and wrote their names
the same way Bookwalter but Isaac
L., the youngest son of Joseph, spelled
and wrote his name Buchwalter.
Of all the decendants of the above
named Bookwalters, I know of none
who spell and write their names Buch
walter, except Levi and Samuel D.,
grandsons of Abraham, and only sons
of John Bookwalter, who died at Halls
ville, in this county, in 1872, eighty
five years of age, and who always
spelled and wrote his name Bookwalter
up to the time of his death.
Levi and Samuel D., as I have been
told, when they grew up wrote, and
have, with their decendants, since con
tinued to writo, their names Buchwal
ter, and that they did it so as to pre
serve the original spelling of the name,
or rather because that orthography
came nearer giving the correct pronun
ciation of the original n&me-Bookwalter;
and Levi and Sam. D. were followed
iu adopting their method of spelling
the name by two of the three sons of
their uncle, Samuel Bookwalter, and
by Rev. Isaac L. Buchwalter the young
est son of the pioneer, Joseph Book-
waiter.
The records here show that David
Bookwalter, the father of Hon. John
W. Bookwalter, as early as 1830, sev
eral years before John W. was born,
and up to 1839 after he had removed
to Indiana, spelled and wrote his name
Bookwalter, and I have no doubt that
he always spelled it the same way.
Yours very truly,
J. L. Throckmorton.
Price $1.00,trial size
How often persons have been annoyed
by burrs clinging to their dress or clothing,
and how seldom have they, when clean
ing them given it a thought that Bur
dock Root is . the most valuable blood
cleanser and purifier known, and is sold
by every druggist under the name of Bur
dock Blood Bitters. Price $1.00, trial
size 10 cents.
Hanchett & Carter,' proprietors of the
great 12th Lively, Chicago, in a letter
dated Deo. 5, 1879, speak thus of Ken
dall's Spavin Cure: "It is several years
since we bought the first of you, and we
do not hesitate to say it is the very best
article for spavins, ringbones, scratches,
splints, etc., that we ever used. "We
would not be without it in our large
livery for thousands of dollars. We pro
nounce it one of the greatest discoveries
of the age. It stands without a peer in
horse liniments."
Pope Leo'i Xestaire.
WAaaiNOTOX, Aog. 23. Tb following
correspoodet.ee by cable ia forwarded
from the State department:
To Hi. Iu. O. Blalna, Secretary f SUM.
Washington ;
Rome. Aug. 15. 1881. At U Holy
Father learned with painful surprise and
profound sorrow the horrid attempt of
which lla- President of Republio was the
victim, so now be ia happy to felicitate
bis fxi-cllency upou the news that hi
precioua life w now out of danger, and
will ever pray that God may grant bira
the speedy and complete recovery of his
health and long spare him to benefit the
United Slates.
The undersigned baa the honor to join
in these sentiments of sincere congratu
lations and wishes for bis complete re
covery. (Signed) L. Cardinal Jacobin.
Secretary Blaine replied:
Washington, Aug. 22, 1881 .
To Hit Eminence L. Cardinal Jacobin, Rome:
Please convey to bis holiness the sincere
thanks which this government received
the kind expression of his prayerful in
terest in behalf of our stricken President
Since the hour the message was sent, the
President's condition has changed, and we
are now filled with anxiety, but not with
out hope. The President has been very
deeply touched by the pious interest for
nis recovery show by all churches, and
by pone more widely or more devoutly
than by those of the Roman Cathclio
communion.
(Signed) James G.Blaine.
Secretay of State.
Relation of Railroads to Agriculture,
etc.
Mr. Edward Atkinson writes as follows
under this head in the September num
ber of the American Agriculturist: The
outside observer, who is neither farmer
nor railroad manager, but who can
weigh testimony, finds ample evidence
that the farmers of the East will not be
subject much longer even to what they
believe to be the abuse of railroads, and
"ensilage" is one of the great forces
that may make them independent. In
fact, if practical men may ever be per
mntea to inuuige in visions, the. visions
that may soon become accomplished
facts, of vast increase in the productive
power of land; quick transmission of
persons; if we can send light over a
wire; if we can attach to the same posts
another wire by which to transmit
power by electricity, so that each far
mer may perhaps keep a power, on tap in
his barn to cut his own fodder, churn
his butter, and do all tho heavy work,
if we are to accomplish here what is now
being actually done in France, that is,
operate an electrical machine by a small
water-power on the farm and run the
plows by the power developed by elec
tricity ; if, I say, all these things begin to
be apparent, that are so bewildering that
one even gets mixed up in attempting to
describe them, and is not quite sure
what relation his parts of speech bear to
each other1 why then perhaps the mil
lennium of . the economist is nearer at
hand than ft has been supposebbe; the
time when intelligence and integrity and
avery moderate amount Maber("will
insure so good a subsistence ' that it. will
not pay to be rich.. ..The evil to which I
refer is for every man to rush to the
Legislature and attempt to procure a
statute for remedying small difficulties
which, in the nature of things, are a
part of progress, and which time only
can cure. It is useless to try to cure
petty evils by statute which will only be
aggravated the more they are legislated
upon. Let any man ask himself whether
or not he would petition the average
legislature to provide by statute what
crop he should raise, what manure he
should use, what breed of stock he should
buy, and how much he should pay for it,
whether or not he should ensilage his
fodder; or who he should trade with,
and on what terms; or what wagon he
should use, and how much he should
pay for teaming in short let him con
sider that he may be as .subject to med
dlesome legislation as any one, and per
haps he will doubt that the averse. e leg
istator is competent to operate a railroad.
The average vield of wheat per acre,
as shown by the threshers' reports re
ceived at the omce of the Secretary of
State shows that the highest yield to
the acre was twenty one bushels in
Cuyahoga County; the. lowest four
bushels, in Lawrance County. The
average by counties is as follows:
Champaign and Miami Counties,
nineteen bushels.
Sandusky, "Wood, Mahoning, Port
age and Putnam Counties, eighteen
bushels.
Stark, Medina and Seneca Counties,
seventeen bushels.
Clark, Madison, Wayne, Summit,
Union and Shelby Counties, . sixteen
bushels.
Van Wert, Wvandot, Carrol, Darke,
Defiance, Erie, Franklin, ' Geauga,
Henry, Jefferson, Licking, Logan, Lor
ain, Mercer, and Trumbull Counties,
fifteen bushels.
Marion, Preble, Ashland, Columbi
ana, Urawiord, Hancock, Huron and
Lucas, ten bushels.
Paulding, Tuscarawas, Ashtabula,
Auglaize, Delaware, Hamilton, Har
rison, Lake and Montgomery, thirteen
bushels.
Warren, Richland, Allen, Butler,
Hardin, Clinton, Monroe and Ottawa,
twelve bushels'.
Pickaway, Perry, Eelraont, Fairfield,
Fulton, Highland, Holmes and Knox,
eleven bushels.
Williams, Green and Morgan, ten
bushels.
Ross. Muskingum and Coshocton,
nine bushels. , ,
Pike, Fayette, Athens, Brown, Cler
mont and Noble, eight bushels. ' , '
Meigs, Washington, Adams, Hock
ing and Guernsey, seven bushels.
Vinton, Morrow and Jackson, six
bushels.- ; ;., v ;' : . ? i-
The present probabilities for ; corn
are 70 per cent, of last year, or 74,
000,000 bushels against 105,000,000
last year.
Cot. Foster's Defeat Preiletel.
From tb BevDr.B. L. Suatoa' LMtcrto the
In tho midst of this array of parties.
what is likely to bo tho result in October?
The Republican party (or portion of the
ticket including ita bead) ia moat aurely
deatined to be defeated and the Demo
cratic party will triumph. It ia not my
purpoaebere to show how this will pro
mote temperance. Suffice it to aay that
many temperance men and women of
Ohio hope for nothing for tbeir cause
from either of the parties. Republican or
Democratic as such. The reason for this
I cannot now enter upon, I close by re
peating my judgment that the result in
October will be as above stated.
Ohio usually, aa between Democrats and
Republicans," ia a close State. Last Octo
ber, the year of the Presidential election,
up to the day before the State election
was held, the best-informed Republicans,
aa the whole country knows, deemed the
result doubtful. Mr. Hays, oneof Ohio's
most popular Qovornors. carried the State
for Governor in 1875, the year before he
was elected President, bv only some
2.000 or 3.000 majority. In 1877 the Dem
ocratic party carried the State, electing
uovernor Bishop by over 2U.UUU majority.
Such fluctuations, from local or other
causes, are common in Ohio. Such a cause
that of temperance, not local, but na
tional will defeat Gov. Foster in October
by a majority that will astonish the
country.
An Iowa Mastodon's Remains.
Dubuque (Iowa) Times.
The bones of what is known as a be
hemoth were found on the farm of Jer
ry Hopping, in Washington county,
Iowa, a few days ago. Mr. Hopping's
boys were bathing in a small creek on
their father's farm when they rasped
their knees over something they sup
posed was the ragged edge of an old
stump. They threw the chunk out up
on the bank, and, upon striking it a
few blows with a hatchet, found it was
bone and not wood. It is said to be
the shoulder bone of a behemoth. The
piece was 3 feet long and the joint 13
inches wide by 6 inches thick. When
Jerry detected its true character he
began explorations. He got out sev
eral ribs 5 to 9 feet long, 3 inches
wide, and 1-inches thick; two molar
teeth, the largest weighing 26 pounds,
13A inches long on the grinding sur
face, inches wide and 9i inches
deeep, with portions ot the socket or
jaw attached; several joints of verte
brae in the neck 17 inches long, 9 wide,
and four thick; an axis joint, 6 by 1
inches; parts of horn or tusk 8 to 10
inches in diameter and 6 feet 2 inches
long, and very brittle, the inner sub
stance crumbling like lime. The low
er part underground was smooth as
a cow's horn, and tapered in the same
way. It was broken on, and was 23
inches around at the base. He has
the thigh bone, 3 feet long and 18
inches thick. From the order in
which the bones were found Hopping
says the animal mired down and died
with head up stream. He has traced
the relices for a distance of 15 to 20
feet, apparently lying' as they fell
apart, the horn being under a spur of
10 feet high, which he shaved down;
the neck bones were under the roots
of an elm of good size that was un
dermined by the late freshets; the
shoulder-blade was in water about
2 feet deep.
WABASH, ST. LOUIS PACIFIC K'T
GOING WEST.
Hot , Thro' Kipraaa arr I.U4t. t.Sla m
', FaetLlae ,M " fctta
S, Pacini Ki-F. M.iL" ,M
" , iiiuIm t 1,44 m
"X7, Way Knight . ' u,aa U,aPm
GOING EAST.
Ho t, MihtnlntEiprMa srr. ,Mdep.S,.Sa at
" 4, Al)anllEipreaa-. " 9,14' .l.Viaa
, Express " 4,05 " 4, (Hi pas
" 10, Accommodation-... " - 7,00 7,01a aa
14.Fmfbt. 11.24 U.tfpaa
No. J, 3, 14 k 17 daily. OUum daily except Sun
day. Koa. 2 a 4 do not stop between Napoleon and
Toledo. No. atopa at Deuance and Dchanca Junc
tion and Antwerp only Ix-lwera Napoleon and Ft.
Wayne. No baKgage checked Airfreight train.
J. K. WITHERS. A (eat .
Napoleon, O.
BALTIMORE AND OIIIO RAILROAD.
Time Card In Effect May 25.1881.
EA8TBOUND.
KAMKS
OF STATIONS.
JACOBS OIL
E.. THECREAT -nf
UBEHEDl.
FOR " . '
RHEUMATISM,
Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago,
Backache, Soreness of the Chest,
Gout, Quinsy, Sore Throat, Swell'
' irigs and Sprains, Burns and
Scalds, General Bodily
Pains,
Tooth, Ear and Headache, Frosted
Feet and Ears, and all other
Pains and Aches.
No Preparation on earth equals St. Jacobs Ore
as a safe, sure, simple nod cheap External
Remedy. A trial entaile but the comparatively
trilling outlay of 50 Cents, and every one suffering
with puin can have cheap and positive proof of IU
claims. '
Directions in Eleven Languages.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS AND DEALERS
IN MEDICINE.
A. VOGELER & CO.,
Baltimore, Md., 17. S.
HOP BITTERS.
(A Medicine, not a Drink.)
CONTAINS
HOPS, BuCHIT, HIANDEAKE,
DANDELION,
AaoTHnrnKSTAsn BibtMktioai,Q,uai,i.
tiks or ali, oriutji Bit runs.
THEY CUKE
AH Diseases of theStomftch, Boweln, Blood
Liver, lildneyfl.and Urinary Organs, Ncr
; vouflneM, SleepleBBiiesaand especially
, xeinaie iouipituuui
$1000 IN COLD.
Vttn bo paid for a case they 'Mil not cure or
l.ulti .it fi.p anvt.hf nor tmmiw nr f nlm-li.tia
found in them.
Arte your druggist for Hop Bittern snd try
tuein before you sleep. Take no other.
D I. C. 1 s an absolute and Irreslstlblecure for
Drunkenness, uso of opium, tobacco and
narcotics.
aaajBBBBBBsl Ssnd fob Circular. Bbbbsbssbsbsi
All above sold by diWIiti.
Hop BltUn llff. Co., HocbeiUr, N. I., A Toronto, Out.
sepl-81-lyr.
Lv Chicago
Avilla .
" Garrett.............
- Auburn
- Hlcksviile
- Mark Center
- Sherwood
Ddnware B
- Defiance
- Hol;ate
- Dehier. ........
- FoiHuria
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Snnduakv
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Ar Chicago Juuc.
Shelby June
Mansfield v
Mt. Vernon
Ar Newark
Colnmhu....
Lv Columhui
Newark
Zaneavillu
Cambridge..; ,
Barnesville
Ar Bellnlre
Wheollnc
Var"hliiztuu
Baltimore
Philadelphia
New York
MAIL
EXFH'S.
4 V0AH
4 08
4 45
5 00
5 10
5 14
5 30
6 00
6 25
7 a
1 67
8 15
7 85
8 W
9 20
10 (15
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12 05PM
1 18 -3
80 -
12 25 -
1 35 -
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3 18 -
4 IS "
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6 30AH
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3 50 -
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sum's,
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a so
WESTBOUND.
NAMES
OP STATIONS.
Lv New York
Philadelphia
Baltimore
Washington
Wheeling
Bellaire...
Barncsvillc
Cambridge
Zanesville
Newrrk
Columbus
Lv Columbus
Newark
Mt. Vernon ,
Manpliokl
Shelby ,
Monroe ville
Ar Sandusky
Lv Chicago "June . .
Republic ,
Ar Tiffln
" Fostoria
Deshler
" Holgate
" Defiance
" Delaware B
- Sherwood
".Mark Center
- Hlcksvillo
Auburn
Gurrett
" Avilla
" Chicago
Chic'eolChR. ftl bay
expii s. line, express,
8 30
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1 52 ..
12 01 ..
12 Iopmi
12 50 ..
1 80
1 50 ..
8 00 ..
V M
6 02
.kEAS?l0UND--NewTortFat u" dily with
through Sleepers from Chicago to New York. Wash
ington aud Baltimore Mail daily, on L. E. and C. O
DiviainTIO innn U.! Tl . -11 . ..
r-" iuium uiuu( uiuur. ui visions aaliy.
except Sunday, wit through Sleepers from Colum-
- v. noumgtou anu .Baltimore
Rvtlf... rial!., a., r, ! . . - . . .
..u v.. vi. uiviHion; on oiner imiaions
daily except Sunday. Through Sleepers, SandUBky,
- ., v, voi- ouuuov. au ouier trams
daily, ezcept Sunday,
WEST BOUND.-Chicago Fast Line dally, with
through Sleepers from New Tors, to Chicago. Chica
go iMail daily, on Main line and C. O. Division; on
other divisions daily, except Sunday. Through
Sleepers from Grafton to Sandusky daily, except
Saturday. Chicigo Express daily, on Maine Line
and c. O. & L. E. Divisions ; on other divisions daily,
except Sunday, Through Sleepers, Baltimore to
Columbus dnilv. ill hn..aia j.n.. . o
day. L. M. Cole, O. T. A., Baltimore.
v. . E. Rkppkbt, Pass. Agt., Columbus.
C. K. Lord, Gen. Pass. Agt., Baltimore.
TAKE A RIDE
-OVER THE
T 33? Ik
-AND YOU-
WILL DISCOVER
. Why it is termed the Popular
PASSENGER LINE
OF AMKBICA,
9 ?( (i MILK8 OF ROAD, reaching In the most
A U VVf direct manner all of the
GREAT CIFIES OF THE WEST
Running the FINEST PASSENGER EQUIPMENT
and the most extended THROUGH CAM SYSTEM
ou the contineut.
THROUGH TICKETS
TO ALL POINTS
EAST, 1ST, NORTH OR SOUTH
And Baggage Checked from starting
poiutto destination.
For Maps, Time Tables, or any Information, call
on or address
J. E. WITHERS, Tloket A'gent,
Napoleon, Ohio or
J.C GAULT, H. 0. TOWN SEND,
Gen. Manager, Gon. Pass. Agent,
ST. LOUIS, MO.
CRAY'S SPECIFIC MEDICINE.
TRADE MARK The Great En-TRADI MARK
gusn nemeay. An
unfailing cure for
Seminal W e a k
ness, Spermator
rhea, Impotency,
and all Diseases
that follow as a
sequence of Self-
Abuse; as Loss
of Memory, llnl
BEFORE TAHIIB.ver.al Lassltude.AFTEH TAIINO.
Pain in the Back, Dimness of Vision, Premature Old
Age, and many other Diseases that lead to Insanity or
Consumption and a Premature Grave.
tSSTuU particulars in our pamphlet, which we de
sire to send free by mall to every one. fThe S peel
no Medicine is sold by all druggists at $1 per package,
or six packages for $5, or will be sent free by mall on
receipt of the money, by addressing
THE GRAY MEDICINE CO., '
Sold In Napoleon by D. J. Humplirey and aMdroRglsti
aery where, . , , fanls-'ai-ly
Horth Western OMo
Railway Line.
OPERATED BT THE PE55A. CO.
CONDENSED TIME TABLE.
Nov.Bth, 1880.
GONG EAST.
TATIOSS.
Toledo ....
Woodllh)
Bettville..
Tiffin
Swanders.w
Rockavay
Bloom Till
Cars-others
Vernon...Hw.
Mansfield ....
Pittsburgh
A llooni .,
Harrisburg
Baltimore.......
Washington.,
Philadelphia.
New York.
Boaton. .....
No t. No. 6. Tiala A
Ex.Buod'y Ex.bn'y Ex Sund'y
.1V p-BB. O.B& a). SB.
t.M
- 441 -
5.1a -
- 6.24 -
- 5.81 -
- 6.40 -
5.55 -
- .42 -.
Arr 7.15 -
3.15 a.i
f.U
.89 -10,28
10.41 -10.47
1066
11.08 -II.
48a as.
12.15p.m
, 7.80
t SO - ll.Mp.m.
12.88 PM 4.1oa.m
6.20 p. ia 7.30 -
7.62 - a.oa
.45 7.40 -t.I8
p.m. 10.35
(.00 a.m. 6.00p.m.
5.45P.BB.
42 -
7.80
T.68
UOINO WEST.
STATIONS.
Pittsburg....
Mansfield...
Vernon
Carrotbers..
Bloomvllle..
Kockawar...
8 wanders....
Tiffin ..
Bettsvilie
WnmlvlllA
Toledo
No.l.
DAILY.
Ex.Sun.
.Leave 12 06 a.m
. " 6.45 a.m
. 7.28 -.
" 8.10
. - 8.25 -
8.88
8.50
.15
9.58 -
10.40a. (n
,.Arr
N.7. Tiffin Ac'n.
daily. daily.
Ex.Sun ExSun
, v.16 a.m.....
, 6.10 p.m.,
6.42 -7.20
- ,
.7.85 - ,
7.42 ,
7.47 - ,
7.59 -
8.23 -
9.05 "
9.50p.m.
7.00a.m:
10a.ni,
6.00a.m.
flTTheonlyline running the celebrated Pull-
mmP.l...unt.i..,ulunin. n .7
- --. . ... .,., iv'-i'iuK v,i B I r U 111 11 R n 8-
fleld to Pittsburg, Baltimore, Washington, Phila
delphia and New York. Through ticketsand bag
gage cuecxs to all pointseast.
E.A.FORD.Gen.TicketAg't
Delphos & Burlisgton Railroad
Time Card No. 2 Taking Effect Jan.
IU, 138U.
WEST. EAST.
No. 1 No. 8 STATIONS. No. 2. No. 4.
m&e mx'd mfte. mx'd.
4 30
a. m.
8 00
10 17
10 82
10 40
11 05
11 19
11 SO
11 34
11 41
12 01)
12 20
P. M. a. M.
No. 17
12 30 6 00
13 44 fl 22
1 00 6 52
Toledo
Holgate.
New Bavaria
Pleasant Vend....
Contintl Switch..
Dupont
Evansville
Huntstown ........
Mountana
Fort Jennings...
Delphos ,
A. SI.
8 25
1 25
8 25
8 87
9 04
10 10
11 00
11 10
11 25
11 35
12 10
2 00
7 40
1 61
1 69
2 15
2 51
3 10
8 15
3 25
8 80
8 62
4 62
Delphos ,
Laudeck ,
Venadoio
Rhasta
Abanaka
Bchiimm
Willshire
Decatur
Peterson
Gath
CurryviUe ,
Craigville
Blufton
Warren :..
P.H
S 00
2 42
2 27
2 20
1 53
1 40
1 30
1 23
1 18
1 00
12 40
A. at. p. at.
No. 18.
12 80 4 00
3 35
8 OR
2 1
1 30
1 18
12 47
11 35
11 00
10 50
10 85
10 25
9 60
8 00
No. 15. No.l SOUTHERN No. 2. No. 16.
mx'd (mfte DIVISION. mx'd. mete.
Me A V, t M. p. w
4 00 7 15 flelphos. n 45 6 45
7 I" Shanes Crossing.. (30
12 15
12 00
11 84
11 08
11 02
10 47
10 10
9 63
9 49
9 89
9 34
9 15
8 20
SOUTHWARD. NORTHWARD.
No- T. No. 5 No. 6. No. 8.
M'l&Ex. mxu M'lfcEx. mx'd
r.H. A. M. , STATIONS. a.m. p.m.-
1 42 - 6 55 Covington 11 06 5 6!l
8 40 8 50 Dayton 9 15 4 on
All trains run riiilv Rnnitavn nwi a.
rf , D ww.tu. aiuu uv
signal.
W. W.RHODES, Gen'l Passenger Agent.
R. G. BUTLER, Gen'l Manager.
Columbus Toledo Railroad
The SHORT ROUTE BETWEEN
L AKE ERI E
AND THE
OHIO JRIVER.
Summer Arrangement.
Taking Effect May 22, 1881. ,
Three Passenger Trains Dally, (Sundays excepted
SOUTH BOUND.
'Mailand
Columbus Exp. Express. Accoramd'n
.... 6:00a.m. 10:40a. m. 5:55 p.m.
Leave
Toledo...
Arrive
Fostoria 6:lfia.m.' 12:03p.m. 7:18p.m.
Carey 6:45 12-4 .. , 7:49 ..
U. Sandusky...... 7:20 .. 1:10 8:25
Bucyrus 11 '14 .. ' 6:42 .. -
Marion.,., 7:58 .. 1:48 .. 9:05 ..
Delaware 8:46 .. 2:86 .. 9:51 .
Oolnmbus 9:40 .. 3:30 10:45
Lancaster ... 5:00p.m. 5:00 .. ' 9:46 a.m.
Logan 6:48 .. 6:48 .. 10:29
Gallipolls 9:18 ... 2:16p.m.
Pomeroy 10:05 8:10 ..
Athens 7:00 .. 7:00 .. 11:35 a. m
Parkersburg. 2:00a.m. '4:55 p. ni
Marietta 2 :80 .. 6 :20 ..
Cincinnati 8:00p.m. 8:00p.m. 6:56 a.m.
AiouiBviue 2 :4o
Leave
Columbus
Arrive
Toledo
Detroit
12:20 night. 11:35
Nortli Sound.
5:30a.m. 12:30 p.m. 5:00p.m.
. 10:10
1:30 p.m.
6:05
8:15 p.m.
10:00 p. m.
1:19 a.m.
All trains arriving In Toledo, via other lines, make
close connections with the South bound trains fifths
Columbus and Toledo It. R.
Direct connections made in Union Depot at Oolnm
bus for Newark, Zanesville, Pittsburgh, Wheeling,
Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia; also for
Dayton, Cincinnati. Louisville, and all nointa Smith
and Southwest.
Pullman Drawing Boom and Sleeping Oars from
Columbus to Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia;
without change.
Trains will arrive and depart from Toledo at Colum
bus and Toledo Railroad Company's Depot, Summit
Street.
W. H. HARBISON, Gen'l Ticket Agent.
G. R. CAKR, Gen'l Sup't.
For the Best
-AND ALL KINDS OF-
JflB PMTlIIj
-CO TOTHE-
Northwest - Office.

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