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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, January 19, 1861, Image 1

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VOL. VII. NO. 193. NEW SERIES. COLUMBUS. OHIO. SATURDAY EVENING. JANUARY 19. 1861.
IB DOLLARS PE3 TXAB,
InTB.ria.bly Adraae.
a. -
me
10
--v. - V
1i)t (Dijia ' Statesman
DAILY. TEI-WEEILY AND WEEKLY
MANYPEY&MILLER,
pomrsM ns and proprietors,
iCT OBt Hon. 80, 88 and 40, Horth High 8t.
YSKJlb IN VARUM 7 IN ADVANOB.
trolly - $8 00 per year.
Bv the Csrribr. per week, MV5 cents.
IiIAVsjHV
S uu par year.
Weekly
1 00
rrin : AdvertiMlMK bf tne Hquare.
L , ue; r I yf li . . . (20 00
On riuar 3 weekt. .14 00
On " wekl..3U0
On " 1 week... 1 7S
mount Ul 11
6 nionthi IS 00
Jnionthi 10 00
1 month! U 0
1 mnotli. 5 00
Jut
ji. ,
lit
One " 3dayt... I 00
Ono " 8dayl... 7S
On " 1 Inaurtlon so
: vuplayd avertiinnfuU half more tbtn the abov
"i'dyrr.rwnent. Uadbd and placed lu the column Of
r!u Nullcea," tfpaoie is oratnary rmot.
n: ,i..ii(jiciilrec. to be publlihod by lw, legal rate.
It jred on tlielniiaeexciuuviiy aiier intunum
uci vtr.. s-nru than tii above rami! nt an men wil
r in iho Trl-n eeklv without charge
Sn.loe.e Cards, cot exceeding live line, per ear, to
tde, ti 50 per Una; outiide
Noilteiof metjllufio, chr.ritablat ocletlct, Are companies,
ft.'., hair prro.
AUtntrtltnt adrtrttitmtnt mwl M paid far tn
rs ruin win not ba varied from.
Weekly, iwe price aetho Daily, where iht adyertlttr
tti tie Weekivalon. v nere 'no uauy mu irmii
' an .tb nU, tben th. eharg In-the Weekly will be
al the rate oi tno uauy
No advertliemmt taken except for a definite period
BUSINESS CARDS.
EAGLE. BRASS YVOKKS,
Comer Npilnit k Water St.,
OolumtoUB, OHIO.
W. B. POTTS & CO.,
MAOZZINISTS,
And BUdu facta re rf of llrftM And Oompoi.tlon OutlDgt,
0;i.t....l Umb 1VnLr tit nil hwuflntintiB-
Electro Plating and Gilding!!
STENCIL CUTTING, &C.
feblMO-dly
A RESIDENT DENTIST.
ALL. TIlONKKEUf ItUNOTIIESEIl
Tice of a Dentinal, and fsvorlne Dr. B. with thf Ir
patronafre mny rely on harlnK jatUtactton glTn . Tae
fM) will be roiu'.rtMt on the eooiple'lon of an operation.
. 0Si four Ujort North of the American llctel, over
Rudiaill's Mat Store.
Colorohni Jan 7-1l
. p. a. b. smzi&a,
Attorney txt JLmc-w
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
OEoc Aai'v.i HulHir-g, oppoilte 0;:ltol Eqaare.
ooi.cMBca. onio.
UOliUMHUH
Machlnr- Masufactnrins Csnipauy
yy
HauuraCTUtrai or
STEAM ENGINES & BOILER?,
JJaitLiffj, Kill Osarinj, Hnchlntry.
JLTttvilsroctca. Worls.
c rvxstr crscaimoi.
coLiiMnrs, onio.
OHA8. iilbOS, t-2i t P. MB0B,.Treu
deoll. IH-W-tf
MILLINERY GOODS.
S20,000W0RTH
t OF
. Millinery' and Fancy Goods
RJl. WAUF. WOULD RESPECT.
fully Inform the Cltlteni of Cjlam'uui exd Vi
cinity that til Block or
FALL AHD WIKTE3 KIXLnTCRY
13 NOW OOMTLETS,
Aud fcolng particularly desirous of
y reducing: hl stock immvdl
X ntely, be -.rill Sell,
., ; FROM TUS DATE, AT .
CREATtY REDUCED PRICES.
;Leaca.l.e-js,
Y 0 0 CAN GET ' ; !
Bargains ! Bargains ! Bargains!
By Calling
AND
EXAMINING JI1S STOCK!!
1R SELLS EVERY VARIETY OF
MILLINERY & FANCY GOODS
.... TOOETHEH WITH A
Large Stock of Notions,
&0 , &0. '
rrpirloe mu and cball be aatia
, . factory. -
calITat
R. H. Ware's
' BONNET ROOMS,
ho. 08 east town the ex,
OOXjXJIVII3TJO,
OHlo.
oISM3fa - .
M. M. POWERS & BRO
' " DCALtal IN WFOKTID 4!in DOM8T10
1'IOIKN. .
- tOBAOOO.- '
ANt I AUTI01E8
Mo. 11 East Stat) Street, txlireen nigh and
' th Poit-OISc,0olumbui. Ohio. ' O0J:UUib
"lOLDEN Hll l. HIKTS, ii
QOLBES HILI. 8H1HTB,
J;.' 7 .- OOIiDHM BIIiL SHIRTS.
The Mttm of tha ahlri ar ntV. Th BftdlSI. Yokas,
. , (lvt ana baton n formed to fit th peraos with taw
and contort. Th mark upon' rich on detlgsatlnt; th
tit may b relied on a twine cornet, and eachahlrt Is
. luaraotead well mad. . A. full stock of all -qualities
., '. soDttantlr for aal at . . ' BAIN'H,
V . a org. . " ' Wo; W Sonlh High itraet. '".
T?ANCV BKEM RHK1,' 1
J . VANQY PRESS BILKS, 1
FANCY DH8S8 ilLM. '--
Wa an now o3erlni oar Immt ni oek f Inr'T)rM
Alike at nrlaaa lete IhtB Tr beier affand In thla ell.
Th atwutlon of th ladlea of thlt elty and Tloinlty la
aolwlted, ai onr ttoca ia Tory to rest ana complete in til
gradetof good la this line. rTitB4i, ,
bot4. N. M tooth High etreet.'
Eor MedlcaL Porposa. i
iTJlta BRANCCIEJ. WI5E9. CORDIALS, AND BIT
aas, trail "Bonded Warcnona " '
net. nouunaiJi,
or27
. lOd Booth Ulgh
ih Itreel.
fALTFJi: St TIIHEAD LACE MITTS
JUL of elegant' qualities tot Ladlei alao, Mime' Mitts
a gra Tanety at ... . .- mi
taayf) -.-
ANNUAL PROSPECTUS
WEEKLY
ONE DOLLAR
PREMIUMS FOR CLUBS ! !
THE WEEKLY OHIO STATESMAN IS FEINTED OH
Ji. 2SL JTMLTSktL O I" DE3! SHEET,
AT THE LOW RATE OF;
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR!
" PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
It ia an old and reliable Democmtio Journal, and, m h political paper, 1m
No Superior in Ohio or any other State!
n addition to Its political obaraotor, It is a tint class newspapc , furnishing its readers with the
GENERAL NEWS OF THE DAY,
An epitome of the stirring event constantly occurring at home and abroad, and choice misc!
laneons seleotiona. It also gives the latest and most reliable
From all the prinoipal marts of Trade and Commerce.
The Business Alan, (ho Mechanic, the Farmer and (he Laborer
Will each find their tastes and interests consulted and attended to in the columns of
THE WEEKLY STATESMAN.
During the session of Congress and the Ohio Legislature, the readers of the Wceelt Smiu
man will be furnished with a concise report of the doings of eaoh of those bodies.
During the past year, the circulation of the Weekly Statesman has increased very rapidly,
being now more than double what it was twelve months ago. It is our desire to extend its cir
culation, not only in Ohio,
But in all the States and Territories West of TJs!
In proportion as It is diffused among the people, its nsefulness will be increased; and we invite
our political and personal friends to aid us in giving to the WnEi Statesman u
The Largest Possible Circulation
Among the people. The price of the paper is so low that no Democrat need bs Without it. As
an inducement to friends to aid us in increasing the circulation of the Wseext Statesman, we
will give
A PREMIUM OF THIRTY DOLLARS
To the person who will, by the 1st day of January, 1861, send as the largest Club of yearly
subscriber, with the cash fur the aame; TWENTY DOLLARS to the person who sends us the
second largest Club of subscribers as aforesaid; TEN DOLLARS to the person who sends us
the third largest Clnb of subscribers as aforesaid; and to each person who sends as a Club of
ten yearly subscribers, with tlio cash for the same, we will send a copy of the
Weekly Statesman One Year without Charge!
(P Those who are willing to compete for the Premiums, or solicit subscribers for the States
man, can out this Prospectus out of the paper and attach to it a strip of writing paper, on which
to record the names of all persona who may become subscribers.
MAffYPENNY & MILLER,
rusLisnsns onio statesman.
OF THE
10 S 1 1 .
FEB ANNUM !
NAMES.
STONE'SBAZAAR.
IsTo. 4: Grwvnne- Block.
A. P. STONE & O'HARRA
ABEIVOWRECEIVINOTIIEIR WIN
TER GOODS, and loTlt in pabli to loepect
theji. No inch ainck of Oood hu Tr been brouiht to
thltmarkrt. Th Booth, in conteaucDC of Iht f.lluie
of th grain crop, hu not bean able to purcbate th ua-
naiquaotitir or ncn good, ana uiti rtctnasrorcea th
Importers to tell them at publlo anotion. Our bajer
(Mr. Stone) being In New York at thee large aalci, took
drantar of them, and we oan and will tail onr good
here, at let than any one wbopnrchind two wtoknince,
paid for them In New York. Onr ttock U complete In
ererj department of
ELEGANT DRE33 SILKS,
OTTOMAN VELOURS,
BROCHE VALBNCIAS,
PRINTED MEBINOS,
PRINTED CODURGS.
DYED COBOGSs
BLACK ALPACAS,
ORLEANS,
FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
ALL WOOL DELAINES,
POPLINS, PRINTS,
DELAINES.
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS!
Five Thausand .Dollars Worth
Bought in One Day,
At ono ball the Coat of Impoitauca.
LADIES' FURS,
In all Varieties, o( the Celebrate!
mannfatnre of C. O. Oun
there Sc. Son.
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT, -
Men's, tadles and Children Under Bhlrts and Drawert;
Ladlet, Mlteea and Children' iloelery or all kind,, In
Wool and Lamb's Wool; Fleecy Lined end Cotton Otero
of trery make.
ALSO
A complete assortment of all the rsual varie
ties of r -
LADIES' CLOTHS,
CAS3IMERES, t
TWEEDS,
FLANNELS,
RIBBONS,
DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladies and Gent's Linen Cambrlo Hand
, kercniefi, &o.,. &o.
To ntrinna wha eall on ni. wa tiled ire out word, to
bow them the largest, brat and cbcapcat dock of Oood
ever ten la this market, or pay them on dollar par
hour while looking. .
aeci-aiytaltw. biuas m u uinu.
GENUINE FAMILY LIQUORS.
WM. B.' MOREHOUSE & CO.,
: i Importars and Wholetalstitalersla
Brand ies, ' Wines,' Gins and Begars
beg 1t to tall the attention of the olttatnt of the Uni
ted Bute to their Fur Wine and Liquor, put up us
f their wa .upenrl.lon, for Family and Medical n.e.
In aatorted to ault euitomere. Club, Military and
other publlo bodies, who require to pnichai In larg or
email quantitlat, In eaakaor bottle, will he liberally
dealt with. Friv tlt lent on ayplloation. ,
OLD MOREHOUSE BITTERS.
''Becomtnetded by the flrttphytlelans as th bnt reme
dy known for Dyapepala, Indlgeetlon, Debility, and all
Perron Dleette. At a bererage, It I pur, whole
tome, and delicious to th taste. Bold by all Druggiiti.
I :- . WM. B. MOREHOUSE 00., Prop'ra, ;
.1 n.,4-i ;..--. .- I St t Esohaog Place, 1
' '.j, I?" Jeiwey City, K. J.
Th tAcrlbtr wlih to enrage a few act (t
men, aaLooal an Trailing AgenUfor their kotu, to
wnom liberal maocemenu will s onereo. wot pariw
Blar. d4ri a abor. T oot30-dSa
liWi.V. WilCill ' HV
X? arnr atyteti tBlhboa Bound, Bxtenilonanl Ia-dlantansat-
ik . . . . BAIN'S ,
ntMAV Mm m-mn mm mm
' mayw . ....... no. (V bowui aiuje want
NAMES.
Firo Insuxanco!
LIVERPOOL AND LONDON
Fire & Life Insurance Co.
37 Caitle itreet llrernool. 20 and 91 Poullry, London.
Offlca, SO Wall and 01 Fin atreeli, New York.
THOMAS HOODIE, Agent, Columbus, Ohio.
Paid up Capltnl, Nnrplue
and Heeerred rtinds (0,0(10,585
Inweaied Inthle Country over.. 800, j'0
nearly Hovoimo, over 8,600,000
IOThe Shareholder personally retpocilble for en
gagemenlaof thaCompaoy. All Director mntt ba Share
holders. Directors and Shareholder In Now York:
James Brown, Esq., Chairman, Iran sit Cottenet, Siq.,
Deputy Ohairman.
E. M. Aroh!bald,n. B. M. Consul, liueen Datllh, liq.
Joteph Oalllard. Jr.Eiq. II. Ortnnell, Kiq.
Alexander Hamilton. Jr., Eiq. E. F. Bandanon, Eiq.
Alu. Hamilton, Jr., Esq.,
Counul of th Boaid.
Alt rid Ttih, Eiq , Rildent Secretary.
Local Board In Cincinnati:
N. W. Thnma. Eiq. J. D. Jone,E,q. RufusKIng, Eiq.
Thompion Neare, Eiq. Bob't Buchanan, Eiq.
Th andnlirned, Agent In this city, will be happy to
recelr applicatlona for Ininrano In th abor Company,
AT THE CITY BAKE.
II can recommend It with entlr oonflilence to all dtilr
oua of obtaining protection agaimtL03a BY FIEE.
No Charge f&r Pollclee.
E07l8-tf TH08.M00PIE.
HOLIDAYS.
FANCIES.
Such arlloles a you duirt for your RUSSAN V
Such at you nttd for your WIFE.
Such at tnpfoptr for your DACOQTXB.
Such u your SISTEB will prattt yn for.
Such at your BROTHER canvtt.
Such st you want for THS ONE YOU LOTS BEST.'
Such ss will be good for th(" BLESSED BABY."
Such u all trat for,
Hay be fonnd In rarlety, In my new atock of
WATCHES, CHAINS, JEWKLKT,
PLATED GOODS,
And general auortment of
Fancy and Useful Articles.
WM. BLYNN,
No. 10 Buckeye AllooU.
Hrr-cmber, 16C0.
FAnilliY FLOUH.
"yyillTK WHEAT, BHANDEll
"SNO wFLAKE,
From "Barnett Mill," SprlngBald, 0. th bait brand of
Flour brouiht to our market, flatltfactlon guaranteed.
For aula only at WM. McDON ALD'B,
noru iuu Bonui uign nreei.
HoHdav Presents.
OA EICON, DeEAIlVES, ItlKIUNO",
CHSMTZCSI, UHKSS SIluKM, anrt all
kinds of fashionable
"Winter Drees Q-oodo.
we are nowofferlngat very lowprlce.
decfil. No. S9 Souih Hlub itreet.
Save Your Money.
T AM NOW RECEIVING SCBSCRIP-
J. tlons for all th Magailnea and Literary papers In
tne country ana out or it; among in former, in uorn-
hill. Tamnl Ra. tha All.nLia. Uamflf. flnriav PetArann.
KnlckerboOker, fioleotio, Blackwood, th Britl.h Quarter.
He, c, ao. Bnbacrlbera can get them EAULIER,
CHEAPER and fre of Poitere, by tending their Bru
crlpttont through m. RIODARD KaNNBDY,
decU . . 17 8Ute itreet.
WatcheB and Jewelry.
A FINE ASSORTMENT OF WATCH
ei, Olockt, Jewelry, BIlTtrware, Ac, kept eooitant
7 on hand at
1 It. KIRKPATMOK'S.
No. ICS, Sonth High Btreet, Oolumbu, 0
IET Watches and Jewelry repaired. . .
deol d3n.
GETLKraN8 NECK 1 1U,
, . . OBNTLBHEN'S NHCK TIES.
GENTLT.UEN'a NECKTIES.
Th aott deniable auortment la th elty and atnnunJ-
lylowprlcoi. " rETEn BAIN,
ngrt. - Ne. 89 South Ulgh itreet
T?EEGANT PLAIN BLACK. SILKS FOB
Hi btreet Bueiue. and atantlM; alto, Bleb Trlmmla
and Tamalt to match, at , , BAIN
ttarSS ... ".
A PPLGS! APPLKBI
V loo bblt. Chole Appi noetved ea eontlrnmeat
for SSI by MettEB a BBBTIB4DX,
,. - M N. High etroet
TXBHB.
Daily: per ear. 6 00
Tn Weekly, per .ar 3 OM
Weekly, par yea I 00
SPEECH OF HON. S. COX,
OF OHIO,
Delivered in the House of Representatives,
January 14, 1861.
January 14, 1861. Mr. Cox's Plea for Conciliation and Nationality.
Mr. COX. Mr. Chairman. I onook fmn, .nt
for the capital of the greatest of the States of
tno great w esc. That potential seotton Is be
gnlunlnp; to be appalled at tbe colossal strides
of revolution. It has Immense interests at
stake in this Union, as well from its position as
its power and patriotism. We have had Infi
delity to the Union before; bat never in such a
icanui nuape. we Baa H in tbe East during
the late war with England. Even so late as the
admission of Texas, Massachusetts resolved
herself out of the Union. That resolution has
never been repealed; and one would infer from
much of her conduct, that she did not regard
herself as bound by our covenant Since 1856,
in the North, we have had infidelity to tbe
Union, more by Insidious Infractions of the Con
stitution, than by open rebellion. Now, sir as
acVAsrqueoee, in part.ol these very infractions,
we have rebellion itself, open and daring, In
terrific proportions, with dangers eo formidable
as to seem almost remediless.
From the lime I took my seat this session, I
nave acted and voted in every way to remove
tho causos of discontent and' to Rtnn Oia n.A
B.. v. ...viuuuu. n ma laresaoia, I voted
to raise the committee from each State; and I
voted against excusing the members who
sought to withdraw from it, beoause I believed
tben, that such a committee patriotloally con
stituted, as I believe it was, had in itmuohof
hope and safety; and because, to excuse mem
bers from service on it, upon the grouud of se
cession, was to recognize the heresy. I am
reidy to vote now for any salutary measure which
will bring peace and preserve tbe Unioo. He
rodotus relates that when Mardonius was en
camped in BBJOtW, before the battle of Plata,
be and fifty of his oflloers were invited to meet
tbe same number of Thebans at a banquet, at
which they reclined in pairs, a Peisian and a
Theban upon each couch. During the enter
tainment one of the Persians, with many tears,
predicted to bis Tbeban companion the speedy
and utter destruction of the invading army,
and when asked why be used no Influence with
Mardonius to avert It, be answered :
'"When on wolud glv Wlhful counieL nobody 1 wll
ling to teller him. Although many of u. Pfan$ are
aw of th end we are coming to, w .till go on. be
eaui. w are bound to our dtulny ; and thlt U the Very
hlttereit of a man't grief, to tea clearly, bat hive no
power to do anything at all."
Ibolieve, sir, that tbe events now transpiring
are big with disaster to my country. I nave
done my humble part for years to prevent them;
but I do not see now that anv cffjrt on m n...
DrAaa a R..Ali.tlnn A. . u - .1 . ' .
can avail, and this is thefcbttterest of a man's
grief. It Is in each a peril as this that the
heart spontakeoualy prays for a nearer commu
nication with a divino prescience. We Ions fur
some direetioo from a superior power, in whose
great mind the end is seen from the beginning.
At least one might with for some magic mirror
of Merlin, in which to see the foea of ocr
country spproach, so as rightly to guard Bgsioat
IUCIU.
Four States have, in so far aa they could, bv
iL.:. . . ... r .
luon u.u rnnu, Bcpantteu irora our federal
Union. This is one of tbe stern facts which
this Consrress has to eneoanter. The Govern
ment is passing through one of those historic
epoens moment to an nationalities. Our oros
perity baa made na proud, rich, intolerant, anrl
sl-euffloin'j and therefore proa. 40 be rebe
1 fo0. we bare waxed fat are doing well
"tempestuously weii.,- Ascending to the height
01 a aauouai gtory, mrougn a national nnuy,
we are in denser of fallinar by our own diaxi.
ness. We are called upon to break down and
thrust aside the very mentis of our ascent the
ConttltaUoniteell!
Ia such time, the bitter crimination and
vain threats and insults of party and of sections
are out of place. They should not turn the
people of the North from doing their whole du
ty tothe South: nor tbe South from a more do-
libreate review of its past, and a more pruden-
tiu view or ua perilous future, no man hag
the rlcht to say or do aueh t that will further ex .
asperate tbe public sentiment of the South.
No good man in the worth can oppose
any measure of honorable recs!9ion from
wrong. 1 oannot speak of South Carolina
In the tone and temper of some. She has
been a part of our national life. Her blood
is In our velcs; her Marions, Sumters, and
Pinckneys, are ours. Eutaw, Cowpens, and
Camden; are they not a pare of that glory,
wblob no more can bs separated from tbe Union
than the dawn from the sun? Whatever may
be our indignation against her, or our duty to
ourselves, let us remember that publio senti
ment la not to be reaobed by threat er denun
ciation. Our Government depends for its exe-'
cutlou on publlo sentiment. To that sentiment
alone, in its calmer mood, are we to look lor a
restoration of a better feeling. When that feel,
lug comes, it will be hailed like tbe sea-bird
which visited tbe sea-tossed cararol of Colum
bus aa tbe harbinger ol a firm-set footing be
yond! Other facts of a similar perilous character
will soon transpire. Georgia, Texas, and Lou
isiana, will assuredly follow tbe erratio course
of South Carolina. This fact must soon be en
countered. South Carolina has been singing
her Marseillaise, and the waves of the Gulf
make accordant musio in tbe revolutionary an
them. It but echoes tbe abolition of tbe North
and West; for scaroely had the song died away
on the shores of Lake Erie, before South Caro
lina took it up with a wilder chores! Extremes
thus meet. Extremes north have aided, if not
conspired, with extremes south, In tbe work of
disintegration.
That work will go on. I know that we are
very slow to believe In any sign cf dissolution.
We have faith ia our luok. We have trust in
a certain Inventive faculty, which has never
yet failed us, either in mechanical or political
expedients. Our politics are plastio to emer
gencies. Still I must warn the people of Ohio
that it la the well-grounded fear, almost the
foregone conclusion of the patriotic statesmen
here, that the work of breaking up will go on,
until the entire South thall be arrayed against
the entire North.
In view of these facts, I will discuss these
propositions:
1. That secession ts not a right in any possi
ble relation in which It oan be viewed; to toler-
eve it In theory or practice, is moral treason to
patriotism and good government.
3, That while it may not Involve suoh direful
consequences as other resolutions, still it Is rev
olution. 3. That every effort of conciliation should be
exhausted to check it, before force is applied.
4. That if the North does not do ber part
fully In recession from aggression, it will be
imnosaible to untie the northern people, or any
portion of the southern people, n repressing ee-
C66610D ... T
5. That if the South will make a patient en
deavor, equal to the great occasion, to secure
hnr rlohu in tne union, t oeueve in at sue win
succeed; and if she la then repulsed, It will be
impossible for ber to receive anv detriment irom
the North; but she will depart In peace.
. 6. If she go inconsiderably, aa some Slates
are going, the country may incur the' fearful
hazard of war. 1
7. If the South press tbe one hard overmas
tering question upon the North, and follow It up
with seizure of forts and revenue, oannonadlng
of our vessels and other aggressive acts, with
out giving an opportunity for conciliation, there
will be no power in tbe conservatism of the
North to restrain tbe people. No sacrifice will
be considered too great to make la the protec
tion and defense ofthe Union.
1. a Tk.t tn th npAunt atatfl of facta. BO lanff
as the revenues oan be collected on land or sea,
and the forts and harbors ean be commanded by
I
tbe Federal Government, that Government mutt
be, as to these matters, the Government at facta
as well as it jure; and that so long as this
sfofut can be maintained by tbe Executive, It
should be done by all tbe legal forces ofthe
Government.
9. Only when revolution becomes so formi
dable as to be Irreslstable, would it be proper
to Inquire whether coenon would not be bote,
suicidal to the Union and criminal te mankind.
I would not exaggerate tbe fearful eonse-
qenoes of dissolution. It is tbe breaking up of
afederative Union; but it is not like the break
ing up of society. It is not anarchy. A link
may fall Irom the chain, and the link may still
be 'perfect, though the chain have lost its
length and its airengtb. In tbe uniformity, of
commercial regulations, In matters of war and
peaoe, postal arrangements, foreign relations,
ooinsge, copy-rights, tariff, and other Federal
and national affairs, this great Government may
be broken; but In most of tbe essential liberties
and rights for which Goverment is the agent to
establish and protect, tbe seceding State has
00 revolution, and the remaining States can
have none. This arrises from that refinement
of our policy whioh makes tbe State the basis of
our instituted order. Greece was broken by
the Persian power; but her municipal institu
tions remained. Hungary has lost ber national
crown; but ber borne institution 1 remain.
South Carolina may preserve ber constituted
domestic authority; but she must be content to
glimmer obscurely remote, rather than shine
and revolve la a coosteuacea Dana, one even
goes out bv the ordinance of a so-called aover
eign convention, content to lose, by her Isola
tion, that youtntui, vehement, exultant, progres
slvo life, which la our nation alitt! She lore.
goea tbe hopes, the boasts, tbe flag, the muiic,
all the emotions, all tbe traits, and all the en
ergies, which, when combined in our United
States, have won our victories In war and our
miracles of national advancement. Her Go?.
ernor, Colonel Pickens, in bis lnaugnral, re-
gretfuliy'looks back upon tne inheritance south
Carolina bad in the common glories and tri
umphant power of this wonderful Confederacy,
and fails to nnd lsneuaee to express tbe feel
Ings ot the human heart as he turns from the
contemplation." The ties ot Drothernood, in.
teresta, iinetge, and mstory ar can to ne sever
ed. No longer are we to salute a south Carolini
an with tbe "idm untentiam di rrpubliea,"
which makes unity and nationality. What a
prettigt and glory are here dimmed and lost in
tbe contaminated reason ot man I
Can we realize It? Ia It a masquerade, to
last for a night; or a reality to be dealt with,
with the world'a reugh passionate handling lit
la sad and had enough; but let us not overtax
our anxieties about it as yet. It ts not the san
guinary regimen of the trench revolution; not
the rule ol aesigoats and guillotine; not tbe
cry of "Vivent U$ Rouget! A mort It gtn-
darmtiV but as yet, I hope I may say, tbe
peaceful attempt to withdraw from the burdens
and bonefits of the Republic. Thus it is unlike
every other revolution. Still it is revolution.
It may. accordine as it la managed, involve
consequences mors terrific than any revolution
since Government Degan.
If the federal Government Is to be maintain
ed, its strength must not be frittered away by
conceding tbe theory of secession. To concede
secession as a right, is to make Its pathway one
or roses, ana not 01 moms. 1 wouia not make
its pathway so easy. If the Government has
anv strength for its own preservation, the peo
ple demand It should be put forth In Its civil and
moral forces. Dealing, however, with a sensi
tive public sentiment, in whlcb this strength
reposes, it must not be rudely exercised. It
should be tbe Iron band In a g'ove of velvet
Firmness should be allied with kindaess. Power
should assert its own prerogative, but la the
name of law and love. If these elements are
not thus blended In our policy, aa the Executive
proposea, our Government will prove either a
garment of shreds or a coat of mail. We want
neither.
Our forts have been seized; our property la
ken: our titer torn down; our laws defied: onr
Jurlsdition denied; aod, tbat worst phase ol rev
oiution. cor snin sent unaer our nte to me re
lief of a soldier doing his duty, fired upon and
refused an entrance at one 01 our own harbors.
Would that were all! Tbe President Informs
us, in his last message, (bat-
In StitesurtfcA Artwnof ItctiUd. theforla. arienali.
and magazine! of the Vol'ed Btatei have been lelied
Tul.i by far th moitterlou nap which hu bean taken
lino the commencement of th trouble!. Thl publlo
properly hu long bean left without ganlioni and trooni
for lta protection, becauie no peraon doubted ita tecurtiy
under the Big of tht country In all the 8tala of th On
ion. Be.ldei, our imall army hat tcarcely been ennui-
lent to guarl ourramote frontier agajiat th Indian in-
cunioni. The aeiauraor tnu property, from all appear
iace, hi been purity aggrutivi, and not in rtsii
tanc to any atumpt to overc a dial or Statu to ri
miininti Cnio."
All tbat the President has done ia defenalvet
all that he baa resisted has been aggressive.
He proposea no aggression ; nor would 1 favor
It. - He would maintain tho laws and property;
what else can be do 7
These facts have to be met bow 7 Bv the
conquest of all the people of a State 1 By the
declaration and wager of war 1 I answer, by
the enforcement ol tbe laws and tbe protection
of our property in a constitutional manner. This
is the answer I have already voted in this
House, lu voting for tho resolution of the gen
tleman irom New Jersey. But la it asked, how
will you enforce tbe lawa and keep forts and
property, without war 1 I will answer s first,
repeal here every law making ports of entry at
tbe recusant cities or towns; and thus avoid as
much trouble as possible. That is in our power
Second, libel and oonfisoate in admiralty every
vessel which leaves such ports without tbe Fed
eral clearance. Third, collect the revenue and
preserve the property, and only use auch force
aa will maintain the defensive. But again It la
asked, la not thla coercion against a Government
it facto, established by the consent of all the
people of a Slate under an assumed legal rightt
answer, South Carolina Is not it facto the
the Government at to thttt Federal matter, so
long as tho Federal Government can hold her
harbors, shut in her ships, and collect the reve
nue. Who can deny that proposition 7
But still It is asked, will not the use of force
in executing the laws, and preserving our prop
erty, result in oivil war? Is thereany practical
difference between the enforcement of the law
when resisted by so large an aggressive power,
and the aotual state of war? Here ia the Sphinx
of our present anomalous situation. I do not
choose now to say what I will do. In case a cer
tain result followt tbe performance of present
duty I It la enough for me to now to-do the
duty oftthe present. But that judgment which
makes no disciininatlon between tbe enforce
ment of the laws and defense of property, and
tbe aotual state of war, must be palsied by un
due fear of consequences. There is nothing
more plainly dlsolcguished In the books, and la
experience, tban the difference between the civil
authority, and the war-making power. Tree,
tbe military arm may be Invoked to aio the civil
authority, but it must be subordinate to it in
many most essential particulars. It la then
tbe sword of the magistrate, and not of the
soldier. Says Chief Justice Taney, In the
Rhode Island case;
"Unqantlonably, a Stat may tut It milltaiy power
io pat aown a armeu in.urrvgiioQ 100 iirong to be con
trolled by th civil authority. Ih power I atnllal to
th txlilcne of ovary QoTeroment; ewentlal to lb pre
lemllon of order and fre Inatltutioa. and ia a nece a
rr to th State of thil Union, a to an other Qjr.m
m;nt.7 Howard, 4J.
Thla Government has bad Insurrections and
haa quelled tbem by the civil authority, with
the aid of the militia, and without martial law.
The Shay i rebellion and tbe western insurrec
tion ware put down by tbe pom eomitatut, the
writ 01 htoeai carpus was not suspended by tbe
United States. But even in extreme cases,
where the President may call out tbe militia to
suppress actual array and violonce, without a law
Of Congress authorising It, the force wsa only
to be nsed with a view to cause the laws to be
duly executed. All arrests were made nnder
civil authority. Trials were had as In civil
cases. In Pennsylvania, In 1793, the expedition
was not In Its nature belligerent; but It was to
assist the marshal, (7 Howard, 80 and 81.)
Washington enjoined strictly tbe subordination
of tbe military to tbe civil power, and went In
person to see that his orders were obeyed
Tbe verv genius and Btraoture of our Consti
tution would forbid the making of war, In lu
sense of aggression, against any State of tho
a
'
Confederacy. But, unles the power to enforce
reside somewhere la tbe Government, It Is vir
tually no Government at all. It wears a gar
ment of shreds. If the force is ef that Irrespon
sible kind called war, the Government U then
worse than a failure. It tben wears a coat of
mail . But if it have the force to maintain Itself,
and subordinate to Itself the military which it
may use in its defense, tben It is a Gore rument.
It tben wears tbe robe of State!
Tbe lime docs not jet call for threats of coer
cion by martial or other means, It only calls
for detecao from those who are aggressive. 1
would reserve this power of coercion, as Prince
Arthur bid his diamond shield. He ever
kept It out of sight, covered with a vail and
only uncovered it to flgbt Blotters and alien en
emiea.
I call this tecesilsS), revolution. I will not In
an American Congress, with an oath on my
conscience to support the Constitution, argue
tbe rliilit to secede. No such right oan ever be
bad, except by amendment of the Constitution.
legalizing such seceision. It la a solecism to
speak of tbe right of secession. It is revolu
tion; anil tbe burdea 01 prool is on mm who
begins lc, to show why be seeks tbe change.
The combined reason ofthe ages has fixed in
its maxims of thought, rules o govern tbe ac
tions or men and nations, which no one can
overrule without great criminality. These
rules require first that revolution must have no
light md transient cause. To overthrow a
despotism, such causes must be of crave weight.
A fortiori, what must be the grievance to Justify
a revolt against a Government so free as ours!
Besides, there must bs a reasonable bope of a
bappy aod successful termination. Otherwise
history, with her judicial prescript, will ban
those who begin it to an eternity of tctiibution.
There must be in every State tome power to
which all otbera wield competent to meet
every emergency. No nation can be consigned
to anarchy dj aome absurd contrivance, either
in theabapeof personal liberty bills or seces
sion ordinances. Ia America, we have a na
tional Constitution. Under It, we have United
States citizenship. To It we owe and swear al
legianoe, It may be a compact; but It la a
government also. It may be a league; but it
baa authority, "operative," aa Mr. Madiaon
holda,"directly on the people." It may reach
States as States; but it does more; it reaches
the people of the States through its (executive,
judicial and legislative departments. If It can
not declare war against a state, 11 ia neoause a
State is a part of itself, and not, quo ai hoe, a
foreign and independent State. Ita constitu
tion is tbe supreme law 01 tbe land; tuough, aa
Chief Justice Marshal aaya, (Wbeaton, 304,)
"the aovereign powera vested in the State
governmenta by their respective constituen
cies remain unaltered and unimpaired, yet
tbey remain so, except ao (area they were
granted to tho government of the United
States." I could cite Marshal, Jefferson, Mad
ison, Jackson, Story, Ducr, and Websteralmost
every student, expounder and exeontor of tbe
Constitution, to show these conclusions to be Ir
refragable. It is an absurdity to contend that
States, wbicb voluntarily surrendered sucn por
tions of their sovereignties as were requisite
for a National Government, can be equal in
power to that National Government. In tbe
name of the people, tbe Constitution asserts its
own supremacy and that of Ibe laws made in
pursuance thereof. U is supreme, oy tne con
sent ot Bouln Carolina nerseu, "over tne uon
stitatlou and laws ol tbe several States " Let
South Carolina, then,' attempt, as she has by
her ordinance, to annul her connection with this
national system, does she not usurp a power of
the General Government? Does she not infringe
on tbe rights of Ohio7 Is it not a plain viola
tion of tbe permanent obligation she is under
as one or its members r nay, sne not oniy
breaks her oath of fealty to the United States
Constitution, but sbe breaks ber oath to ber own
Constitution, which requires tbat oath.
Am I referred by members of my own party
to our platform and principles indorsing the
Kentucky and Virginia resolutions 1 Am 1 told
that the sacred principles of State rights
deolared by Jefferson ana Madison, as a check
against the usurpiions of a consolidated Federal
Power, allow tbat each State may so Judge of
tbe Infraction ot tbe Destitution, ana tbe
means and measures of redress, tbat it may tro
out 01 tne union 1 luesw Virginia Bum a.ea
tucky resolutions ar misinterpreted. Judge
Marshal, however federal bis views, in a letter
r . I T r l XT'. . , I-
to Judgo Storv of July 31, 1BJJ, Calory's Lite
and Letters, p. 135,) is sn honest witness to this
misinterpretation. Hsaayst .
'The word 'Stat rlsbt.' at expounded by th reioU-
tion. of 1798 and tho report ot 17U9, oonitrnod by our
Leguiatara, baa a charm against which all raoniog i
vain, inoi reioiuuoos ana inai ropori oonimaui Ui
ereed of every politician aho hop to rite in Virg.nla;
and to question them, or tx to adopt tht construc
tion given bythtlr author, la deemed political sacrilege
This Government was intended to be perpet
ual. It was adopted in toto, and forever. Says
Mr. Aladiaon :
"The ldeaof referring the right to withdraw wa itart.
td, condildered, and abandoned; won than rejected. 1
Judge Marshal says:
'Th Intrnment was not Inttaded to proTlJemerely for
the ex aenole 01 a tew yean, out waa to endure tnrouin
long lapaeof agu, th event of which were looked up
la th UMrutaoie aeuree. 01 rioviucoc.'-
It was,, therefore, provided with means for Its
own amendment. By the Legislatures of three
fourths of the States, there is a means of
amendment; and In that way alone oan a
State withdraw. Nullifleatlon and secession,
said Mr. Madison, are twin heresies, and
should be hurried in the flame grave. Well
said General Jackson, that secession did not
break a league, but it destroyed the unity of a
nation, hence, he argued that It is an offense
against the whole Union. - To say tbat a State
may constitutionally atoede, Is to say that tbe
constitutional elements were poisoned at tbe
birth of the nation and ot malice prepense, were
intended to kill our national life I Suoh reason
ing overthrows all government. It is to affirm
tbat tbe tribunal appointed for the arbitrament
of mooted questions under the Constitution, or
tbat the mesne for ita own amendment, ah.aU be
set aside at tbe pleasure of one ofthe parties to
be affected. Monstrous sophestry I Are gentle
men of the South aware that It Is from this twin
heresy that the Republicans have drawn their
arguments for their personal liberty bills and for
. 1 . f . 1 r , , t mt
their repudiation of tbe fugitive slave law 7 The
very cruet justice 01 uoio, so recently reinaora
ed lor bis seditious decision in tho Oberlln fugi
tive case, bases bis adjudication on tbe usurpa
tions of the Federal Government. He, like
South Carolina, denies that "the deoisions of
the usurping party, lu favor of the validity of
lu own assumptions, can settle anything "
(x ports, Busline! 1, 9 Ohio State Reports, 227.)
He warns against tbe "praotioal omnipotence of
tbe Federal Government by making autboritive
tbe juudgment of its judicial tribunals." He
sang the Marseillaise in his ermine, from tbe
supreme beneb, as Scuta Carolina kings It In
her convention. -
I would, therefore, guard against tbe least re
oognitlon ol tbie right of secession, or of nul
lification, which is tbe lesser type of the same
disease. - It would, I say, destroy all govern
ment. It would dissolve tbe united mass of
powers now deposited in the Union Into thirty
three separate and conflicting States; each with
a flag, a tariff, an army, a foreign policy, a di
versity of Interests, and aa idiosyncrasy of ideas.
Nay, that would ba tolerable; but it would do
more and worse. It would disintegrate Slates,
counties, towns; tear oiUes ftom their places
on the map; disorder finances, taxee, revenue,
tariU.i and convert mis uorio, now so lair and
firm that it seems built on tbe earth's base, aud
pillared with tbe firmament, into a play bouse
of cards, built on a base of stubblo. It would
thus destroy the established order.- v And
Is suoh order among men, with a view to per
manency, nothing? Tbe North has rights,
property, la teres la, relatione In the South, not
to be surrendered without loss 1 and the south
in the North, eiee etrae. - Ia thla nothing 7 la
depredation ot - property) - depression 01 bnii
ness. loss and lack of employment, withdrawal
of oapltol, derangement ot ewrrency, increase of
taxes, miseartUKO ot - public works and eutcg
prise, destruction of State eredit, tbe lots of that
national symmetry, teograpiii, ttreoim, Dame,
honor, unity, and alerv, whioh, publlwus tell us
are themselves the creator' end guardians of
eaah, eredit, and eommeroe are these coose
Queoces nothing 7 Barely sucn a taut ot com
plicated Interests ths growth, of years, cling
lng, with root and liber, to the eternal rocks of
publlo stability cannot bs uptorn without great
struggle and stupendous orlme.
to bb oomtinobo
GHEAT ATTRACTIONS
AT
nHHIN.nl
WM. RICHARDS
A GAIN NOTIFIES THE PEOPLE OA?
e vumuiwiuauu wsuuiiiv, tuu M at aWOrV laWtt VI tU
one of th bost itock of
DRY GOODS
ver offered to their dlacrlmlnatlnc aaa aalaaua arith
great care, and purchased at Paals Prle. a fkl Iba-l
fled In laying, no man can offer greater ladooemeat to
th "reedypay" buyer. Hliltneof
Ores s (Jo ocl s
li complete, conilitlng of all tbs latest styles sad he
portatloni.
' -AA, Muaaaw,
both plain and faney, and In great vartoua.
Satinets, Cloths and Casaimeres,
IN Q0ANT1TII8 TO SCIT TRC SfANV.
PRINTSI
PRINTS ! ! PRINTSI!!
rains to ndiiirom too tminoH.
Sheeting. Shirtlnr. Tloklne. Towellno-. Cotton A Wool
Flannel, Gentlemen'! furnuhlng Goodt, ate., Ac, at
GREATLY REDUCED PRICE9!
HOODSlfHOODSII!
BEAUTIFUL ONE! ,Jtf BtCllVEO BV XXrBBSS.
BALMORAT SKIRTS;
4 yaro wide admitted by all to be Iht
Best, Nicest and Cheapest,
in mtrket. Don't fall to get on.
jiememMi tne piao and call 100 n al
258 South High Street,
Ntaa raicNO.
deolS-lmd WILLIAM RIOHARDi.
MM
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton 4 Indianapolis!
Through to Indianapolis without Change of Cora
and but One Change of Cars between
Columbus and St. Louis.
THREE TRAINS DAILY FROM COLUM
BUS. FIRST TRAIN.
(Daily, Mondavi exctJ.)
MIOIII IXPBIC88, via Pay ton, at S'5 m..atop
ping at London, Xenia, Dayton, IJIddletown lid Hamil
ton, arriving at Cincinnati at &TO a. .; Dajtoa ta4t
a. m., Indianopoll at 10. td a ro.;tt. Loulaat 111.6
P B' SECOND TRAIN. , :
ACCOMMODATION, at 0:10 a. a., (topiing at all !
tiontbetwoen Colombo and Cincinnati and bayton, ar
riving at Cincinnati 11 US a. m., lit; ton at li a. m.,
Iruliauopoliiaf38p. tn.
THIRD TRAIN.
DAY EXPBE38,at 8:30 p. m., .topping ai Alton.
Jeffenon, London, Charleston, OcdarvllU, Xenia,
Spring Talley, Corwin, Morrow, Seerfleld, totter'.
Loveiand, tllllford aod Plalnvilla, arriving at Cincin
nati at 7:80 p. m.; Bt. Louii at 18 m; Dayton at J 35 p.
m.; IndlanopolU at 10i3S p. m.
Sleeping? Oars sn all Night Tralas to "
Cincinnati and Indiatnapelie.(
BAOO AGE CHECKED TIIBOVOB.,
Por further icformatton and Through Tlokaf. apply to
M. L. DOUBBT?,
Ticket Agent, Union Depot. Oolumbaa, Ohio,
i. w. woodwajld,
Superintendent, Cincinnati.
jno. w.dohbrTx
JB Agent, Coinages,
. .
THE
WEEKLY OHIO STATESMAN
HATING A CIRCULATION
LARQES BY RYERAZ TB0UUND3
Than any other paper In Ohio, ouUlle of Cincinnati
Offers Facilities for Advertising
Which CANNOT PAIL to bring
Speedy and Kemaneratlwe Metnrne
To tho who take ad rat. tag of thra.
THE WEEKLY STATESMAN
D UtrUmted aa It It through every Pott Office In Ohio,
Reaches a Large Class of Readers
VTho patronage It valnablt, and who teUoa mi the
Dally Edition of city Journelit and at only
A Limited Somber of Advertiiemeiu
Art Inserted In It eclumat, appoprlately and
HANDSOMELY DISPLAYED!
Tsrr caimoT ran to
Attx,ot Attention
OP ALL I
WHOLESALE DEALERS
Advertising In the WEEKLY STATESMAN will Aa
It advantagon In
THE INCREASE OF TRADE
Which 1 almoet certain to follow an txtanilv diKtmka
aUoa of a kntwiadg of their bualneai
AMONG C0U5TRY LEAIEES J
ADVERTISEMENT! INTB5D1D POR
The W3eklv Statesman
Bhould bt handed In before Priday noon.
HAOLB WHOT.ira 4 T rffi
LOOKING GLASS STORE.
JOSIH7A COW PLAN D,
Manufacturer and LValtr, No. A3 Sonth Pourth Bt.,
i at Haan .1 . k ... . , . .. .... '
w.Kwu miu vueewai, roiiaaaipiua.
TirilEHE ME OFFF.MW. it tnu
J"!"11 " variety of Looking Ola, In
Qilt, alahofany and Walnut Praat, Larg irene Plat
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I00ETH0 GLASS FLATZf BT THS BOX,
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Ooode packed In th Sanwt nana, aad InMr4
against Unrakag.
JOSHUA C0WP1AID,
S3 South Pwrta Birawt.
angtKMda. Philadelphia.
IIE1B.HY KtXHEER
(Lei af Phaloa's BiUtllahaMot, BT. I.,) f joprktor
th New York FaAhlonabi Shaving, Tlalr Catting
Shampooalng, Carting and Draiog Saloon, Ho. IS
. But Slat etreet, near to Poet OflMe, Sret Boor,
where utiifactioa will b given at all tht Variou
branch. Larilee and OblMran't Hair Diwtrlaa; dona
.. In the beel tyl- SB , . . . j;VIdl?
PAHI9 CLOAiaS AND PALtiUTS.
kind. In th moat (tylUhaad alrnnt manner. A
mw Invoice Jo.t opened by - PBTIB. AIN,
dw.ll. Nn. M Sooth lilghetrwt.
THE RECEPTION nooi SK.IHT.
Th aott anHMful and elenal aklrtA .rr-j t-
al. A nw lotJut pnd by PBTl a BalN,
dee.H. W South High trewl.
' ''i 'iil .

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