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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, March 11, 1861, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1861-03-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. :VH;:N0. 236.-NEW SERIES, . COLUMBUS. OHIO: MONDAY EVENING. .HARCE 11. 1861.
, ILX E0IXA1L3 pes YT? a"04 fli
1 1 :
ITal.blytadUTo
DAILY. TRI-WEEKLY AND WEEKLY
MANYPENNY & MILLER,
PUBLISH BB AKD f SOFBIXTOBI,
' ' "
ST Office Not. S3, SB and 40, Horth High Bt.
JrBM9 ISTAttUIHT IN ABVANOl. .1 T'J
Daily ". $8 00 ptrym.
" By lie Carrier, per week, VH4 eentt. : ,
TrUwejUv ... S 00 peryearrj
weeuy , . . 1 00
crni of Advertising by the Square.
ntninare1yi,..$20 00
On " U mouUn IB 00
Jo " 0 munthi IS 00
Dnfl 3 monthi 10 00
3ne i) monthi ' 8 00
On ' . 1 month. . S 00
One tqasra 3 weeki..4 00
On " SwMki.. 3 00
One . " . lweek... 1 75
On " 3dnyl... 1 00
On " dy... 75
On " 1 IswrUoa 50
SUplayed dTcrtlitnent talf son than th abort
rates. ......
Advertisements leaded and placed In th column of
Special Notloea," dmtblt th onUnary rata.
All notlees required to be published by law, legal rate.
If ordered on the Inilde exclnilyely after the fl rat week
per cent, more than the above ratei; but all inch wil
rpear In the Tri-Weekly without charge.
BaalneaaCarda, not exceeding fire linei, per year, In
Ida, V 50 per lino; outaide 1, -Notices
of meetlnga, chari tablet ocletlea, tire oompanle,
tc, half price.
All tramltnt advtfUttmenU mutt b4 jxriifor it
'lvanc4 The rule will not be varied from.
Weekly, earn price at the Daily, where the advertiter
aoathe Weekly alone. Where Tie Dally and Weekly
are both nand, then the-eharg twthe Weekly will be
a hi uiermteiot ne uany
Ho advertif eroent taken except for a deflnlt period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
EAGLE BRASS WORKS,
Cornet1 Spring Jc Water Sta.t r "
W. B; , POTTS 455: CO.,
TVEy,OTTTTriQTra.
And Manufacturer! of Braa and OompottMon OaiUnga,
, risunea uraia n sra oi ail vetenpuona.
Electro Plating ,; and Gilding ! !
STENCIL CUTTING, &C.
feWOO-dly ' 1 ! :
f. a. b. smznra, ;
, v AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Offlot Amboi Bulldinf, oppoille Oapltol Square.
' " ' COLUMBUS, OHIO;
ooiuxJiniixja w
flacbinc Manufacturing Company
r
MANcrAOTuuu or
STEAM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Catting, Kill-earlng, lUchlctry.
i V.tl- ' ALBO,
t.cvllxoctc3. 177"orlc
or ivnr pxacKirnoif. -
. ; COLVIIBIIS, OHIO.
OHAt. AM BOS, Bap't , - ' r. AMBOS.iTreaa.
deell, lHW-tf ,
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinsftti, Dayton ft Indianapolis!
Through to ladiauaDolie wihoat Change of Can
and bat One Change of Can between
- t , , vmmDui ana i
; f .-tJoiumDoi ana ai. iouia.
THREE TRAINS PAILY FROM COLUM
i . .. .BUS. , , . .
FIRST TRAIN: ;"
(Dally, Mondays exwyted . 1
NIGHT BXPHK88, via Dayton, at 8:45 a. id., stop
ping at London, Xenia, Dayton, Btlddietown and Hamil
ton, arriving at Cincinnati at 8:20 a. m.; Dayton at 5:45
a. m., Indlanopolis at 10:48 a. m.i 8t.. Louis st 11:50
P SECOND TRAIN. v.
ACCOMMODATION, at 6:10 a. m., stopping at all Sta
tion, between Columbaa and Cincinnati and Dayton. ar
riving at Cincinnati 11:03 a. m,, Dayton at 9:15 a. m.,
Indianopolliaf;ii8p. m. ' ,
THIRD TRAIN. , .. Z :A .
SAT IXPBK8B,at :30p. a stopping at' Alton,
JeSeraon, London, Charleston, Cedarvllle, Xenia.
Spring Valley, Oorwin, Morrow, Deerfleld, loater's.
Lovelaod, Millfordand Plalnvtlle, arriving at Cincin
nati at7S0p. m.; Bt. Lonl at 12 m; Dayton at 5:35 p.
(.; iDdianopOlltat 10:38 p.m. :-' ' ( .
Sleeptnir Car on all NIglit Tralne to
Cincinnati and Indianapolia.
B AGO AGC j CIIECKED , THBOCGU.
t fi ? -- 5 :
. lot further Information and Through Tickets, apply to
, - .-!-, M. L. DOUBBTY,
Ticket Agent, Union Depot, Columbus, Ohio.
Jj. VT. WOOD WARD,
Superintendent, Cincinnati.
( .! ; - JNO. W. DOHBliTY .a
Jnl3 ; Agent, Colamnus,
HOLIDAYS.
FANCIES. :
Such article U you ttrtr for your HUBBAND
Buch as yew need for rur W1M-'
Buchar3)ropr for your DACQHIER. j
Buch as your SISTER will praltt yok for ,' r, ,i
Buch a your BROTHER can tM. ,
Buch a you wmt for "TUB OMX TOU LOTI BBST.'
Buch a will be goo4 tot the H BLI88IO B ABT." v
Buch as all li for, '.('
May be found In variety. In my sew itoek of .
WAXtJUEM, ; CHAINS, i JEWELBT,
And general asortmnt of-
, Vaaev and Uaefnl Articles. ., ?
' a- - -rw-r rrwf 4 ' v
vvm. .Djuiiviw,
Ho. 10 Bnckereriilock.
December. 1E&0. ; i . i.- - ' - ' -
Jmt BeeolTvdl
AA'TtFi CH'GHEEIt and BLACK
lUv TEAS 100 bags prim Bio Cone.
1 r0 pockets old Dutch Qovenasaent Java Coffee.
J 5 taijs Ceylon Coffee. ...,..,. .
eOQbbls. standard Whit Sugars, consisting of row-
dred, Chroihed, Granulated A and B Coffee.
60) quintals Goorge Bank Oodflah.
gObbls. Mess and Ho, IMftCkerel", A
ft tea. Pick Balnion.' ' ?K
10O bs. Layer lUwIn,;.,)) rs J V Ml Of.JVi
ftO hf. bos do , .do ..(..j v ,af .R .:
KlOqr.bosdn .-... . -r. .',, ,cv u t
lOOMjaigars, different braaaj aiid grades.
nort7 WM. MoDONALD.
Mi :Cw LILLEY; JA
And Elank-EooX Jlann&atnrer,
jTOBTH EIOH ITBBST, COLTTXaTl, OHIO
xlMir
WniTE WHEAT BUANDED
SNOWriiAKB."
Trout "Barnstt Mills," SprlngSald, 0. th test brand of
jriour nrougui to our uuraet. Baniraction guannient
Tor sale onlv at WM. McDONALD'B.
novM7 . . . - - . iOB South High street.r
J CHIN I Ea, OUESal BIfcK.8, and all
una ei ntamonaoi ,
.t "Wlntw Dreisa Oooda. . ...;
we are bow offering at very low prices.
PBTBRBAIIf,
scSl. Ko. BS South High stmt
; STONE'SJBAZ AAR.
iLSTo. 4: GKvvnne Block.
P.' STONE & O'HAMA "
A BKNOWKECEIVINOTnFIBWIN
IYt SBB OOODI, and Invite the publlo to lnipect
tnem. 'no aucn aioca 01 uooai nai ever been brought to
thia market. The South, in oonaequenc of th failure
of th grain crop, hat not been able to purchase the ur
ualquantlty of rich goods, and this fact has forced th
Importers to sell them at publlo auotlon. Our buyer
nr. Bwnei oeina in new lorx at tneae lam aa ea. took
advantage of them, andw can and will sell our goods
uere, at Km man any on wno purcnasea two weeks since,
paid for them in New York. Our stook Is complete in
every department 01 . j . ' ,
ELEGANT DRESS SILKS,
. OTTOMAN VELOURS,
BROCHE VALENCIAS, :
! .'1
PRINTED MERINOS,
PRINTED COBUROS,
. . DYED COBUGS
BLACK ALPACAS,
, FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
ALL WOOL DELAINES,
P0PLIN9, PRINTS,
DELAINES
SHAWLS AMD CLOAKS!
Five Thausand Dollars Worth
Bought in One Day,
At one half the Coat of Impoitation.
LADIES' FURS,
In all Varletlea, of the Celebrated
IQanufature of C. O. Gun
; , there to Son.
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT,
Men's, Ladle and Children's Under Shirt and Drawers;
Ladlea, Missea and Children' Hosiery of all kinds, in
Wool and Lamb' Wool; Fleecy Lined and Cotton Gloves
oi every max.
AL0
A oemplete assortment of all the usual ratio
ties of .
LADIES' CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES,
OVERCOATINGS,
TWEEDS,
RIBBONS, '
, DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladies and Gent's Linen Cambric Hand-
kerchiefj, Ac, &o.
To nersons who eall on na. wa nladm nn. wnvda rn
show them the largest, best and cheapen stock of Goods
ver seen in mis market, or pay toem on dollar per
uuur WUIIV 1UVKIDK.
aeci-dljtawltw. BTONH fc 0 QABrlA
OHIO STATESMAN
housb,:
Ncs. 35, 38 & 40, North High St.
INCREASED FACILITIES
i
mimi HI DISPATCH
HAVING MOVED INTO MY
NEW BUILDING,
. 1 HAVE -,
MY
BOOK "& JOB DEPARTMENT!
; f WHILE BOTH HAVE BEEN
REPLENKEED THROUGHOUT
' WITH- ' ',
New Types, Borders, Ornaments, &c
UtOM Till piLXBBATXD 10UNDBT Of
C. T. WHITE ft CO.. NEW TOEK.
j " , THUS MAKING IT TH1 : J;,
Most Complete Establishment
j ' '' " IN THE CITY. ' ' :.'.-
I am now prepared to Execute all Order for
BOOK AND JOB
PEINTIlTGr,
WITH DISPATCH!
An4 in tto Most Approved Stylo of the Art.
' PABTIOULAB ATTBNTIOX PAID T0 . ,
MERCANTILE AP RAILROAD
I H. X 3ST TIN G-.
Bill of Ladlnr, ; Clrcnlar. 1 ' "
BUI Heads, Blanks, Deed,
Certificates, , Jtecelpt,
.c Drajr Xicketa, j , . Hegiatera,
HOW CARDS. & BILLS.' IN . COLORS,
CHECKS, '..
. CAMS,
. EXASIXGS,
NOTES. ''
ENVELOPES,
CONXBACTS.
Illustrated S how B ills!
WhTOTNTRY mWohANT8, f
Show Bills,' Eand Sills, label, Concert Pro-
grammes, scnooi ana College Bonem, Eo .
I tel Bills of jTaro, Invitations, o,
' - a . . .
ooli "W oir
jr ; OP EVERY DESCRIPTION
ScEool and College Catalogues,' " " "
Kiaoeuaseoni Pamphlets,'
j - 1 Conttitntions, Beports, Brlota, fti
Printing in Gold and Cblbrg
O 13 T, 3E3 JEL,
Printed. In JCvery Color on, ..,..;
nammqthlb
Tot onlyPresi of tha kind In Central Obife ;
ky faelllti for doing any and all of th abov deterli
Uons of work, as now nnturpassed, and satisfaction wdl
vtn-
iteed In all ease. -
'AU work furnished promptly ky th ttnia promlaed.
uvHAtui navinH.
IT OOLDBN HILL BI1IRTB,
1 GOLDEN BILL BHIRT8. ' '" - u
The patters of than third ar new.. Th Bodies, Yoke,
sleeves and bosoms are formed to fit th parson with eat
and oomfort, Th mark upon ach on designating the
sis may be relied on at beln c correct, and each shirt it
guaranteed well made. A fall I took of all quaUUei
tonstantlifbrialtat . . BAIN'S,
noviit. . . . No. t9 South Blgh street.
i ,;,.7atchei and1 Jewelry.::;
'riWiTASROnTliTEflT'Or "WATCll
ea. Clock, Jewelry, Silverware, Ao., kept constant
a hand at ,'" " " . ''
yon
. ... b. KIRKrATRICKT), ";.
1 1 1 w .w, poiu uigu stmt, uuiuluuub, v.
J wAla "paired. -.. a. , . ,,,
I lAVOk- DHRia 8lLHB,T-t (fMSiiW.'Sil
1 r' r-PANOY DBK88 BILKS. .
w ar now onsring our lmmrnn stook of Taney: Dfe
vw 'v!v . 7r " D'aT offered in this oily.
t,!?nUoB f.,thw'S?lM ' th, and vicinity as
(ollclted. aa our itoek tavery select and eomplete lau
grades of goods In this lln. P STB R. BAIN,
potM. We.B9ouuaightrt.
fin vi nil
j
a
o
, X
o
. at
- ,
00
r o
. T
o
p.
CO
BS
W
n
H
o
O
P-t
in
o
o
VTPl INVITB ATTBMTTnW tn fttmii tit Mi tnfiav
traordlnary ouret bj my ....'
PECTORAL SYRUP.
They are at home, and an ana whohaa donbta ean In.
quire of the person who have been cured by.lt.
DR. KETBER IB PRKPABID AT ANY TIMB Ti
EXAMINH LUN08 WITHOUT CHARGE; FOB ALI
TII0B1 WHO NEED BIB MIDIOlNJtB.
ATTEND TO TOOK OOLDB -A oaso of Bve years'
uuiuiuj cureu oy uu. ntlBBU'B rJSOlOBAL BlltLP
' ' ' Pitts ttmOR.ian. 11. 1800. '
Dr. Eitsir : My wife has been afflicted with a hd
oougn anu aimcuity or breathing, for fire or six years,
which , for several years back, had gradually Increased In
violence. The complaint has been hereditary, and the
had been treated by several physicians without any re
lief. In this stat of her case, I procured some of your
Pectoral Cough Byrun. IbonirhL the flrat tima. a en.
wu. wviMOf wu.cu relieved ner very mucn , 1 tnenoailed
and got a dollar bottle, which cured her entirely, and
uo ua uuw no trace oi ine former aisea, except weak
ness. I would also state that I used the medicine
elf to a cold and cough. The medicine cured ma b tak
ing on cote i express my entire satisfaction with the
meaicine, ana you are at llneru to nub ab thia If tnn
unmwuvig, nfll. vriiiBUtv,
Alderman Fifth Ward.
' Prrmtmoa, Nor. 18, 1858.
1R. UTID : Althoueh not an aitvomta nf P.lnt
ueaicinea, in cenerai. It aliorda ma nleaanra Inil.u-rih.
ble to recommend your Peotoral Syrup. As a medicine
It It well worthy the attention of anv rxrann whs mav in
any manner be afflleted with eought, colds and hoarseness
oi any una, ana lor tnt peculiar qualifications for re
moving all that disagreeable sensation attending a se
vere cold.
I have been, more or less. In my lire, atTeoted with the
severest of cold and hoarseness. At timet my throat
would become to closed aa to nrevent mv eneakln ihon
wui per, urn of taxing iew aoses oi in above Syrup
I..WUIVIB1I,,,UVBUHBJ,
In noommendini tul medicine, I must nnhealtatlnrt
say that It Is the best rented I ever found, nnmonin. tn
cur th above, nor shonld any family bo without this
Giuuuj luruLveases so prevalent.
lours, most respectfully,
EDWARD J. JONES, '
Cashier OlUsens' Deposit Bank.
4mwriu, 0., March 14, IPSO
I have need Dr. Kevser'a Couirh 8rnn rnr . h.l mnn
of several year tUndlng, and can cheerfully say it is
the best medicine for the same that I have ever taken.
J. W. Pllica. i
OOL. PRATT AND DR. KIVRETt'A PEfiTnniT
8YRUP. Dr. Kron-Dear Sir: Kwuae the delav of
my acknowledging the excellence of your Pectoral Cough
Djiuiinwisr. iiuoinaipionniB saying inat tt Is
an you say it is. xnoawawu tout tut oj mf tovgA
and th worst one I was ever afflicted with: I Lav uot
used more than one-half of th bottle, and. I can and do
wish that all who are afflicted would give ftVs fair a trial
as I have done, and they will be proud to say, "It Is no
quaca meaicine." i wouia not saner anouier. aneh an
attack ror any conskierallon, or at any cost. I am con
fident I can breathe mora freely than lev-r did. I shall
always acknowledge a debt of gratitude for inventing so
excellent a remedy. Yon are at liberty to nsa m nam
m uiia rcg.ru, as jou wins; proper St. rjtai'T.
messenger uommon Council, ritttburgh, Pa.
Plttaburgh,Mayll,1859. '
N. B I am no stranmr to m fellnw-eltlaena. and
who entertain doubts can eomult me personally.
Pittbrob. Anril 34. 18S7. '
BEAD Tnl TBUTn. Da. Knua: I have a dan.h.
without benefit among them AVer's Cherry Pectoral.
.uu um lAtcD .c.Brmi mm.cine. rar m. nan Milan
x purcaaaea irom ou a douj or vour FEur iaiiT.
BTBCP, and before ahe had used half a bottle sh was
renevea. ice second Dottle cured her entlrelv of her
cougu. - JUHMDABIN,
- BoMnson street, Allegheny.
: .1- 1 . ' ..( .1
1 . PlTTlBDaOH. DlMfflW. 31 lfttt
A ORE AT CURB BT DR. KKYSER'A rufiTOHAT.
BYBUP. I live in Peeblet township, Allegheny county.
I had a coughing and spitting, which commenced aoout
lb 4th of February last, and continued eight month. 1
employed the best phyaiotans in the countrv. and n.
cough continued unabated until early in October. At
mai um i was aavtsea to try your FKCTORAL COUGH
BYBUP, which I did, and after I had taken on bottle I
was entirely free from the combine and anittinv. I had
despaired of ever getting well, and I ihiok it should be
known inat una vaiuaoio remedy win do for others what
It has done in my case. JOHN 0. LITTLE,
witness B. M. kdir. Peebles townhlp. .
' ' i eaaTaw
! ' PattomT.., April 14, 1857.
A WONDERFUL CURL Some time aao. an eld
neighbor of Bin was very 111. with a bad conah which
every one supposed tobeoonsiunDtion. Ilia relatlvx
aoia m tnai no naa taien every remedy they beard of
wimoai oeneui; nis oromer came to as mm ale, and all
were eonurmed In the belief that he could not live. I
had about the third of a bottle of your Peotoral Byrun.
k:k r Li j i ., . ., r
,wm uub, Mia i. vouroiy ourou mm, 10 wo SttOU
hhment of all. What makes th can more remarkable.
it the extreme ago of the man, he being aboalelthty years
old. I have no doubt the Pectoral saved hi life.
! ' JtHMN'aiNlI8.
DR. KJYSEB'S PEOTORAL SYRTTW Ht'pr'.Tna-
VILLB. Please sendm another supply of your valu
able "Pectoral Syrup." ' Almost rcrybody around us
has the cold and are inquiring for "Dr. Keyset's Pectoral
Byrup." W have (old sixteen bottles last week, and are
now entirely out. Mr. A. Alter and Mr. P. Maher, both
of Blairsville, Pa , tell us they would not be without It
In their families. In fact, all who us it one want It
again. . - Yours, respectfully,
J ' J. t). WATTZRBON it SONS
January 30, 1860.
... ' : , o .
ANOTHER NEW CERTIFICATE DR. R-EraaV'a
PECTORAL BYBUP. I had been troubled with aoough
and cold lor several week so bad was it that I annul not
sleep. 1 had th advice and prescriptions from three of
the best physicians in th city, whoa 1 oould nam, but do
not do so. I finally procured a bottle of you Pectoral
Byrup, which cured m entirely,. . Signed, . ,
J W.BIMONTON,
' S3 Liberty ttreet, Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 9, 1808.
'STOP THAT!O0UGHING."-'How can Xk UV n
to Eeyser'son Wood street and get a bottle of his Cough
Pectoial, and If that don't ear you, your case must be
desperate indeed." this Is a specimen of the oolloquy
en hears almost (very day in sold catching periods of
uio jur. ado we can, irom acinai experiment, cheer
fully concur in the adviser's admonition as above, for m
have tried th "Pectoral,'' In amoetttubbeni ease, with
entire success. Near two weeks ago we went to Pittsburgh,
with on of th most distressing, contrary, mulish, un
ubduabl cough we aver experienced since our advent
upon this mundane sphere. We eougbed steadily and
laboriously for on whole week, in hopes of tirtnfV out,
bat it was no go. In fact it seemed rather to hare im
proved by practice, and to have acquired ttrengfh.poten
ey and dittrtttibUity by the operation. In this stage of
th siege, we eon jhed oar way to Keyser's, 140 Wood St
procured a fifty oent bottle of th Pectoral)" took it
acco'rdlag to directions, and In forty-eight hoars we were
master of the field, the enemy . having unconditionally
surrendered, after a brief but unequal eonfllctwith so
lonnioaDi an adversary as sveyser'a arsons "Ooagh
Pectoral." ihrovntvill OUpper, 14, ie, ., .
DR. EBYBKR e PEOTORAL BYRUP I nreoarad and
uiu uv ir. uauuua u
. aaiMa, tiu n ood trett.
ritttburgh.Fa.
llav,HMh Dt L
K7 Bold in Columbus by ROBERTS at SAMUEL
rpOOTHAOHC UEKIEDY.
. r ' . n t ,
A BtTUK C17RB3.
t a
prepared and told by
' Price, tleenla. . .
r? . 9 I. ' n i .- 2 - K, fi
ri.OBO.H.'KBTBERi
. u.',. .' i --- ... r ...
140 Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa.
HT Sofd In Coluabu by BOBIBTJ fc BAMUIL.
ootil7:SuwdUm. . . . , , ,.
; JAe. M. M'JLEa. .,.,. . WM. U. JUSBUBAUX.i
M'KEE tSt RESTIEAUX;
AND
-VI.
P1TODTJCE .1 DEALERS,
" MO. 84 North High Street,' J" ,;
t . onLrrMwrriL nrrrrt.
HATE OH HAND AT WHOLmTE
and Retell, FINEST STAPLE ARO0BRIE8,
FLOUR, SALT, TEA, COFFEE, BUGAR, TOBAOOO,
BHGARB.Eto.Ito. Our 8 tock. ha beon purchased in
ABSieni vine uurmg ui, ayiu,
and our main endeavor Will be to offer Inducement to
CASH M OXSBa Which are not taotltd by any Bouse la
c I hi
unvuy, oecw
-i TIIMIi ,
, Dajly, per year... r,'"M',4-,l','...S0
. Triweekly, per rear. 3 00
' Weekly, per year w,n.i.,....... 1 00
SPEECH OF HON. JOSEPH JONAS, OF HAMILTON
COUNTY.
HALL OF REPRESENTATIVES.
COLUMBUS, Feb. 26, 1861.
Hon. Joaifh Jonas: ff(fST-Th undersigned
reBpeotfullr request, for p'obiloation, a copy of
the learned, able and eloquent speech delivered
by 70a on yesterday afternoon and this morning!
in tha House of Representatives:
L.8LU8SEB. n B. H. BROWN.
M.8.0LAPP. 'JOB J. MU8S0N.
JOBNM. COOVER.' - J. E.CHA8E-.
B. HUTCHKflON. WILLIAM JE3BUP.
WM. B. TANNEYUILt. M. 8TIEKB.
WM. BLEEEIB. JAMES M. STOUT.
W. B. WOODS- . . W. J. FLAGS. ..
EDl A PABROTT. , A. 0.V0RI8.,
WM. 8. WOOD. ' N. A. DEVORB.
JOSEPH f. WRIGHT. JOHN' BEARS.
BEO. L. CONVERSE. WM.JONE8.
T. A. PLANTS. PATRICK BOOERg,'
Sfiioh or Joicra Jonas, or Hamiltom Couirrr,
in the Houei or RiriMENTATivis, Feb. 25 &
26, 1861.;,.,
. . , . . ,
The House bill No. 850; "To prevent giving
aid to fugitive slaves." Pending a motion to
indefinitely postpone, Mr. Jonas said: , ..
Mr. SriaKia: It is with some heeitatloi, af
ter listening to several eloquW speeches, I arise
to reply, not being an orator, or acquainted with
rules of Loglo or Rhetoric j but I do presume to
have some knowledge of the rules of common
sense. The debates on thia bill have taken an
enlarged space, and wandered far from its proper
range. It is not debating the bill, but abatract
questions. We are also discussing a compromise
by which we can harmonixs with our Southern
brethren, and more especially with the Border
States. I well recolleot, Sir, about 24 years
since,' the dreadful calamity which befel the
Moselle steamboat Some circumstance caused
me to be present on the banks of the Ohio, not
far beyond the present site of the Clnoinnati
Water Works, and curiosity prompted me to
stay awhile and observe the proceedings of a
body of Oerman emigrants, about sevenly or
eighty in number, consisting of men, women and
children, grouped together, with their luggage,
near the tirer. A raft of timber was in front
of them. They seemed wailing for somo con
veyance. A fow minutes elapsed, when, round.
ing a point, appeared the Moselle, under a head
of steam. She approaohed the shore, and from
the raft embarked these hapless strangers.
The steam whistle was heard, and she drew off
from the raft. Scarcely had the. wheels been
put in motion, when, horror! she blew up with
tremendous explosion, and more than two
hundred souls were Instantly launched into eter
aitjl 2 The sight was too horrible for descrip
tion. The alarm spread, and In a few minutes
the bank was crowded with despilrfog relatives
and lamenting friends.' The sged would heave
their measured lamentations, whilst the young
gave utterance to quick and impulsive eiclama
tlons of horror and affright; timid and soft heart
ed women would sicken at the details of the ca.
lamlty, and man's stern heart would quicken at
the recital. " The whole nation was start
led by the shock,' and ninny of our' citizens
were In mourning for the dead.; The inquiry
was at once instituted, How did It happen J Up
on whom rests the dread responsibility of thia
trageoyi . ....
If our people are so semitive to an qoccrreo.ee
of this kind, how is it to be accounted for that
they are so heedless of the mighty events now
erowdtog npon net , We bad hist but one steam
er, amongst thousands which piled on our riv
ers, and navigated our coasts, and lake; and we
had lost but two hundred of our citizens, when
millions congregated, In onr cities and popuk.
ted our States. That was but at a mere speck
on the horizon, compared to the , volcano about
to explode under our feet. Ts it because we dis
like the Union T I answer, no I The people love
the Union, and have every reason for ,so doing
Whatever .could be accomplished by artificial
means, has been accomplished. Under our glo
rious Constitution, we hare defended our homes,
our liberties, and our commerce, and gloried
over cur enemies, both by sea and land. We
were the pattern' Republic; and as a govern
ment we were respected and feared by all Ho
nations of the civilized world; with our man
ufactories ; and our minerals, With our products
from the North and the Wcsty and. our cotton,
sugar, tobacco and rice from the South, we em
ployed more shipping, and our commerce was
greater than that of any one nalfoh OT .the earth.
What Is our condition at present 1' The glory
has departed, and we are likely to become a
by-word and a reproach among the nations.
How has this great change been brought about?
It is the work and agitation pf demagogues and
anatios. - .mU n '
I have listened, Mr. Speaker, to the sentiments
and higher-law broached, by the gentleman
from Meigs, and IhaTe paid attention to 'the
Abolition doctrines promulgated .by the Rev,
gentleman from Huron.' I would now esquire,
who entailed upon us 'the curse of slam?!
The) answer Is, .Northern ' men and Northern
ships.; 1 : Whoi .continues, this Jtotrid.) trade!
Echo Says, Northern men and Northern ships. J
Yea gentlemen, the descendants, of the Pilgrim
Father, hypocrites as they are, after rolling in
wealth and luxury from th!r Illegal trade) after
entailing on the Bouth this corse; they -would
abolish slavery,'and deptive them of iheir prop
erty, and learing the' negro at urge, plunge
their vlotlmB Into irremediable rutn. I am not
in favor Of elaver'y.and would not own a slavjj on
any account.. , cut, wis is , not. toe .question.
Slavery In the Sonlh Is an institution, and the
framers of the Constitution guarded their rights
and their property.:.; We hare Infringed upon
the'fuglttve slave law w have deprived them
of their legal harv la the Territories we are
not willing they shonld pass through 'the State
with'i',l,hoir . body-jemntd,'; ' Tbesi'. ;8ervauta
generally have been bora and brought up with
their young matters, a childreni an afltdtion
and attachment springs up between tho'master
and bis valet, and. between the mistress and her
waiting-maid, and the nurse for her children.
Would you deprive them of "this 'innocent and
amiable luxwywben,by the prorlsbps of the
bill before the Hoose, they dan be protected in
such domestic property 7 ' It will be no lost, bat
A benefit to tie free States tVjugb which those
lammes may.paa, ., , t-vijlfjA
'.Suppoae we compromise) with our Southern
friends, and' kilo them to fry If they can set
tie the territory south of 38:30 Let us pass this
bill which is pow before ua, which wlU protect
their property la the fugitive elevetbenpeace
and brotnetiy lovewm prevail on onr borders.
If we still remain obstinate and uncompromis
ing, as jrort as wo now stand here, the Border
Slave States5 will also: secedo, and civil war
will prevail in all Its enormities. ' I will refer
you to England and Scotland before their union
Ypa may suppose that peace may be kept with
them by treaties. No, gentlemen, where you
have slavery on one sido of the border, and
freedom on the other, peace can never prevail
Cren whilst the two governments (England
and Scotland) were at peace, Invasions and raids
were an .every day affair; murder, rapine and
devastation were the order of the day.
; The Democracy of the North and West are
opposed to slavery, but we respect the rights of
the South.
Mr, Speaker, if I understand the gentleman
from Huron, he would like to have the whole
raoe freed at once. Why, sir, It would be worse
than the inundation of the northern barbarians
which overwhelmed the Roman Empire.
have seen it stated, that when the British Par
liament dissolved the apprentice system in their
West India Islands, Jamaica became a scene of
riotous behavior, and had it not been for the
strong military ganuens, the same scenes
might have been enaoted as in San Domingo.
Many years aince, commercial pursuits caused
me to visit Port au Pilnoe, in the Republio of
Hayti, (San Domingo). President Boyer (a
quadroon) was unable to keep his felIowcItizens
(about 1 millions) in order with less than
thirty thousand soldiers distributed in the sever
al towns and garrisons. On the Sunday after my
arrival, a gentleman, a quadroon merchant, to
whom I was consigned, (who, by the way, was
educated in Baltimore) conducted me. to the pa
rade ground, where about four thousand troops
were reviewed by the President. The privates
were black, all the officers were white, or near
so. On remarking to the gentleman the cir
cumstance, he stated that the offloere were all
quadroons; that the blacks made good servants,
but bad masters; he also stated that their
intellect was not sufficiently bright, neither
would they submit to individuals of their
own color. I found them louneine- about
the city; and they appeared to be lazy,
idle loafers, spending their time at bil
liards and gambling tables, day and nieht.
quite vicious and immoral. Several of my
American companions agreed to accompany me
on horseback into the interior, and we repaired
to the mountainous districts, and viewed what
were formerly splendid plantations and country
seats, dilapidated and nearly in ruins; the pres
ent owners idling and basking in the sun. We
conversed with several, who stated they had
plenty to oat and drink without working. Thoy
lived on plantains, bananas and oranges, and
sometimes a little flour and salt pork from the
clty which they procured by raking up the coffee
beans which lay mixed with dirt and stones
under the coffee trees or bushes, uncultivated
and nearly ruined. This was the greatest su
gar and coffee Island in the West Indies under
the French government; the curse of slavery
had been followed by unconditional emancipa
tion, and they are now perfectly demoralized
and fast returning to barbarism. Under the
French planters, they were a woikiog and hap
py poopie. Bee toe contrast. Let us cast our
eyes on Africa, their native country, the King'
dom of Dahomey, for Instance, the young king
or wnloo lately came to the throne, and offered
np a thousand of his race as an hecatomb to the
manes of his dead father. None of yon oan
deny that their condition Is bettered under servi
tude with the Southern planters. '
Let us Uk another view. Have the free col
ored people in the free States bettered them
selves or their condition? "The answer might
be looked a -la oar poUoe reports, Have thev
become industrious, moral and' good citizens?
L:ok at their brothels, and the vagrants about
our streets, lanes, and alleys, enquire) of our po
lice officers concerning them, your information
will be that they are a nuisance to society, and
those portions of the cities they reside In are dens
of filth, corruption and debauchery. ' '
I acknowledge thero are many exceptions to the
general rule, bat those are principally composed
of, the Intermediate colors. Agitation has been
the means of rendering their situation under
their masters considerably' worse than It was
heretofore; I recollect, before the agitation
commenced, maqj years since, Kentucky was
considering the question of grn&wl emancipa
tion, and a bill was introduced) their leg
islature for the purpose of amending their State
Constitution for that purpose; and was lost by
vary small majority, Agitation in (he mean
time commenced, and the next legislature In
definitely postponed the subject by nearly a
unanimous vote, and so the opportunity was
lost; and thus, you will perceive, sir, that the
agitation by tha abolition party, Is Inimical to
emancipation. If they expect to carry out the
principle of gradual emancipation, they must re
frain from, any and all agitation. If yon wish
for peace and harmony throughout our beloved
country, compromise with the Border States. V
Are we to ruin our glorious , republio for the
sake of an inferior raoe? Are we attain to Buf
fer for that race,' as our flrat parents did when
expelled from the Garden of Edent - I will now
refer to a remark made by the Rev'd gentle
man from Huron, when 'quoting from the com
mentaries of Adam Clark. He discovered that
Clark htd protested against the Devil, "and
that he had never before met with suoh a pro
test." I have tha pleasure (9 present the gen
tleman with another protest from the same au
thor.' Adam Clark, In commenting on the first
verse of the third chapter of Genes Is, declares
his belief that the serpent was not a Snake or k
Devil, but, was probably an Orang-outang. - He
wa getting near the truth, but seventy years
since, in England, he dared not approach, near
er, but having entered, .bis, protest, he Devil
andBfttanwas discharged, by him; for ever.
The.. Rev'd gentleman, from: Huron wUhes to
know who la .SixtauT.and. yitbeUi not an evil
spirit? and bow. I get over , .the description of
him In the book of Job, Mr Speaker, with the
permission of he. Houie,,.J wlll ptay my
argument a few, minutes, to, answer the gentle
man from Jiuron. X,st nt turn to the first of
Job, sixth verse "Now there was. a day. when
the sons of God came to present themselves he
fore tha Lord, and . Satan came also emoug
them,", Now, it appears that Satan, must bare
been the chief of the sons of God, for the Eter
nal addresses him -alone and In very familiar
terms. -1 refer yon to the whole chapter, and
would, now .enquire pf 'tfcegentlemaa from
Huron, If he considers tho Prosecuting Attorney
of our criminal courts an evil being? , la he not
the most respectable officer, of the court? and
does not the Judge consult with him occasion
allv?J Then, oanparing temporal with Spiritual
objeoUdwhy cannot Satan be a son and servant of
Godf He performs his benest, and Is the accuser
of mankind at the footstool of the Deity . ' We
or
it
of
3,
find him again in the same capacity, and before
the same court, accusing Joshua the High priest,
Zech., ch. 3. v. 1 At 2 Satan appears to have the
most honorable place in the court of the Eter
nal, at "the right hand," and Joahua clears him
self by the assistance of his guardian angel,
and is pronounced not guilty, and the prosecutor,
Satan, is rebuked, not having made out his case.
"I I would further remark, before I leave the
Book of Job, that In several Important passa
ges, where the word in Hebrew is positively
Bless or Praise, it is wrongly translated, in the
present version of the Bible in common use, as
a Curse; thereby rendering the text wrongfully.
But the Catholic version of the same passages
is correctly translated. Having, I hope, sat
isfied the gentlemen from Huron, I will proceed
with my argument. '
Now, a serpent is a reptile, and whenever be
is described or mentioned in other parts of the
Scriptures, by this; name, nacAtift, it Is always
as a small reptile; but this must have been
reptile of a larger growth, and stood up on its
feet, before the Lord. It had the organs of
speech, and a reasoning-Intellect. We find it
In familiar conversation with Eve, and, with all
tho low "cunning of a negro, it beguiles the
weaker vessel. There are a number of species
of the serpent, but we are not Informed which
It was.' The large snakes or serpents are nam
ed in Hebrew,- Tahnim We will now refer to
the description given In the 3d Chapter of Gen
esis, verte 1, (literally.) Now the Sorpent
was wiser than all the Beasts of the field;"
therefore, consequently he must be the connect
ing link between Adam (the man) and the
Brute or Beast. The Hebrew word naekath Is
composed of three letters (consonants), and ac
cording to the vowel points attached, may have
three different meanings; at all events, a ser
pent Is a reptile, and cannot stand on its tail;
has no organ of speech, nor reason log intellect.
But this individual is a responsible being, is lia
ble for all its crimes. It was older than Adam
and Ere, knowing the will of God, and being
able to distinguish between good and evil, It en
tloes the weaker vessel, being a pure, Innocent
personage, nnused to guile and falsehood. It
raised her female cariosity, (which Is proverbi
al,) and beguiled her with a lie.
This was an unpardonable crime (in this
world), and the punishment was commensurate
with the crime. Now, let us examine what was
the punishment; 14th and 15 ;h verses: "And
the Lord God said unto the Serpent, Because
then hast done this, thou art cursed above all J
cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon
thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat
all the days of thy life. And I will put enmity
between thee and the woman, and between thy
seed and her seed. It shall bruise tby head,
and thou shalt bruise his heel." This was not
only a curse, but a prophecy. This is an east
ern emblem of the lowest stage of slavery. He
is to humble himself to his master's feet, and
eat the offAlla from his master's tafle. "The
seed of the woman shall bruise tby head, and I
thoa shalt bruise his heel.'- This Is also em
blematic of slavery; the slave creeps to the feet
of his master, takes one of his feet and placea it
on his head.
I will now appoal to those who are acquaint
ed with ethnological researches, that the cra
nium and anatomy of the black man are as dif
ferent from the white man as that of the ape
or baboon. I acknowledge the negro to be of
the genu homt, but not of (he alms speoiei' as
the Sematlc raoe. This is not a theory special-'
mine, but ono adopted by many of the learned
savans and philosophers of the present sge. I
will give a few of tho names of these great men
for reference: Professor L. Agaselz, XL. D.; W.
Asher, M D.; Samuel. G. Morton, M. Delate
Secretary of the Academy of Natural Science
aed Philosophy at Philadelphia; Professor H- H
Patterson, Rosselllnl, Lepsus, ' author of the
the Book of the Kings of Egypt; the great ling
nisi and philosopher, Chevalier C. F. Bunscn,
and I refer you to his great work (lately trans
lated from the German), "Egypt's Place In UoL
versal History ;"and lastly, 'Types of Mankind,'
'Ethnological Researches' by Nott and
Gliddon. ' " ' ' '
By Investigating Genesis we will discover
more than one race beside the Adamio. We
find that when Cain was driven from the pret
ence of God and his parents, that he found a
wife, (although Adam and Ere had no daugh
ters at that time;) be also built a city and call
ed it after his son Enochs Query, where did
Cain get his wife? Who were the inhabitants
that dwelt In his new cltjtWho were the par
ties that assisted in building said city? Again,
Genesis, Ch. VI , v. 24: "There were Giants In
tha earth in (Aos days; and also after that,
when" the" aonsjof. the Codtn (plural? Uebrt)
"same in unto the daughters of Adam, and
they bear children to them, the eame were
mighty men, In the totrU tf oli (Hebrew text)
men of ' renown." We have reason to believe
these Gianta were at leaat fourteen feet high.
Deu'y. Ch. III., v. lh "For only Og, king of
Bashan, remained of the remnants of Giants;
behold, his bedstead was a bedstead of iron; is
not in Rabath of the children of Amnion?
Nine cublta was the length thereof, and four
cubits the breadth of it'. A cubit is about 23
Inches. There are several other passages prov
ing the race of Giants the remnant of those
who were in the antedeluvian i world, so that it
appears there were races which escaped Noah's
flood. The historical records and settlement
Egypt go back far beyond the flood.
Baron Bunsen,ln his valuable work on Egypt,
states that there are no hleroglyphleal or monu
mental records whatever of Noah 'a flood. ) In
the Preface of "Egypt's Plaoe in History," vol.
p, II, he says "that Egypt was Inhabited by
man who made use of pottery about eleven thou
sand years before the Christian era." .'.We also
discover, through this great author's works, the
age of the first ZoroasterVthe Bactrlan, and the
historical notices In the Vtndidad and Zand.
The Zaroastorlan tradition about the primeval
land and the emigration of , the Tyranians, Arl-
ana and Ianlans, In consequence of a convulsion
of nature, their journeys from the north-eastern
parts of Asia, their settlements in Mogul Tar
tar?, China' and India.' He plaoea the Garden
Eden, with its great' valley, In Central Asia,
between four great rivers , which he names; he
considers the flood, by what he deems and de
monstrates as positive testimony, to have flood
ed only .beWeeaf- the Artulnian and Himalaya
mountains whioh are mora , than SO.UUU reel
above the seaT "Mount' Ararat, upon which the
Ark rested, wee only covered by fifteen cubits
of water". The Garden and Valley of Eden were
totally destroyed by the inundation, the soli be
ing entirely washed away; ft noworms the bar
ten and sterile steppes of Independent Tertary.
Buasen also' state "that the three following
1 I I ! ,.'
these, will be established in the foarU volum. , 82
of hi. work:,.... ,., ',.:-.,......,.i, 'm
a w th ,minlr".f th AIaUa
stock from Western Ada is antediluvian. 4
Stand. That the historic! d.lure, uiiuC-
eonslderablo part of Central Atia cannot knreM
occurred at a more recent period thai the tenth !.,t
millennium B. C. M .. v
-,, . " . .. a siil fi e J
TkUrd. That nan existed none, th. i, t .
about twenty thousand years Bj 0..; ,.
sclenoe of geology la now so well define! an4 . . 'I
derstood, that it has become a legal study U all . ; j
the sobools and college. It l.no Wei an t, -i
gumeotwith the liberal clergy, that this world. -Vt
was created In six literal days. Whea we ex- . i
amine the Hebrew text of tha Scripture. oriUoal 7
ly1, and compare them with scientific diwveriea, -J
we feel satisfied that Mosea had a greater 3
knowledge of the sclenoee than wa necessary, iUti
in that Ignorant age, to reveal to jnanklnd: : I 1 ,1.
refer to that beautiful prayer of Moses, IC. ; :
rsaim.T. a. "ror a thousand year, in thv airhl l
are but as yesterday la thy eight." Thus, yoo. . i
see, lam a true believer In iLe Bcvipturca t
of the Old Testament. The gentleman from.
Huron inquires, If I am a believer, why do I i
speak to inconsistently in opposition to Scrip--ture
and the lawe of God with respect to mr
views oa slavery? I do not speak to opposition.
and when I approach that part of my argument H
I will folly answer the gentlemen. " . ...i. . 'J
Before I leave this section of Bay arnatent. ' "'
permit me to say that I consider the chronology ' "
of the present version of the Bible Irtcorrect,.'
and Archbithop Usher having followed It, eon- -
sequently our present vulgar chronology of the'
schools la also incorrect. It is well known to 0
the literary world that Ptolemy Philadelpkus, -King
of Eygpt, prevailed with the High Priest 1 '
at Jerusalem to send him a correct copy ef the '
Hebrew scriptures, and also seventy of the most '
talented linguists in the Hebrew aod Greek Un-"
guages, for the purpose of Its translation. Thev '
arrived at Alexandria, In Eygpt, with a perfect "
copy of the tame, and were shut up la a palace" l"
in the Isle of Pharos. After a considerable 'J
time the translation waa completed, and many -copies
were permitted to be taken from it for' 1
the Alexandrian and other Jewish communities. "" '
This was the famed "Septuaglnt." When we :,t
compare our present Hebrew copies, our Eng-' '
llsh version, the Septuaglnt, and Josephut'ohroo- -' '
ology, the following Is the result: r-t
caiATiow or van wobld. ' -
Tear.
1M
i.US
BeDtuatlnt comnutatlon. B. fl...
Josephus.
Jowlsh (seder Olom) computation. B. 0..
English Bible (Usher, Lloyd A Oelraut) B. 0 4 003
Chevalier Bunesn, in hi "Ervpt's Plao la Col- , . Vr-i
wrsal History," vol. 9, nag 578, hit computation. , , ,
from hieroglyphic woids, plaoe Menet (Itssraim) ' ' r 1 ''
first King of Agtpt, B. 0... .' (43
Consequently, w must adopt th Septuaglnt.
Jotephus, the Jewish Historian, nearly agreeing ' .
with th Septuaglnt, must have had a correct He- . , ,
brew copy, by which sufficient lias I given for. '
populating th world and eettling Egjpt bef on ' ;
Menea reigned, being 943
Whereas, if we take th English V rat on, we shall ' -
only have to spars. tgf
Yet, w have, according to th Bible aecount, Mo-
ah't flood B. 0 I Stl 4
....... j.ot
It Is very evident that the Jewish scribes, af
ter the period" of the Septuaglnt, and after the '
destruction oi Jerusalem, did not pay canon at- - r
tention to copying chronologloal etatemente; '-'
and consequently, had made mistakes of 1,943 " '
years. How tunny mistakes they had made '
previous to that era we are not Informed. One "
proof I will give of the Rabbinical mistake, in
ohronology. Fromthe destruction of Jerusalem '' J
by Nebuchadnezzar, to the second destruction by ' 1
Titut Vespasian, they make It only four bun-R
dred and ninety years. All other chronologies, '
Including Jotephus, do not make It lew than ail 1 -
hundred and forty-seven jeare, making a differ-
ence of ona hundred and nlnafv.uwan I--i' 1
that short period. ".1
By request, Mr. Jonas gave way for a motion
to Uke a recess until next mori
"lag
at 10'
o'clock.
Oa the re-assembling of the House, after tome " ''
Introductory business, the discussion of House 'f :
Bill 350 was resumed , and being entitled to the " ' ''
floor, Mr. Jonas continued hit argument as fol-"'
lows: 1
Having recapitulated the point, of yet-
terday, I proceed In stating the proofs which I
had produced, not only from the Bible, but also. 91 1
from etbnol oglcallnvestlgatlone, proving that''
the negro is not a descendant front the raoe Of Jr:l
Adam; and from many clreamstancea which
have and can be brought to bear on the enbjeot, o' '
we sballjind ourselree approaching the eooclw-'
slon that the animal of the otwwa kmnt, hart
Ing the organs of speech and reasoning fccl- i. 1
tie, designated aeAA, or serpent, It no otbet "
than the negro; consequently, he la the being "-a
who waa the original cause of aln, miser and "-1
death in th It world. And now, Mr. Speaker,
shall we again permit this race, eurce? xf 7otf, "'
to bring1 misery among us, civil war, rapine,
murder, and the dissolution of this glorious Re- '
public? Had we not better compromise In aoy
form orshape with our Southern brethren? Lei
us not deprive them of their property. tats""
this bill, not only to protect the personal propA ts
erty of the Sonth.but the real property alse.belng -
the soil of the North and West, and let us not
have anything to do with the accursed thing. r-M
The Reverend gentleman from'' Lake' put! the 1
following ' queries: ' Is ' not- the "negro -le-,,w
scended from Cuth, the eon of Ham? Does 1 cl
not Cosh - mean Ethiopia? And wte -W ''
not the Hebrew name for' Africa? ' la an
twerto the tint, I say no; for thedewwocV '3
ante of Cash were fair.' Nlmrod, the might?
hunter before the Lord, was the Son of Cosh. :T"
With respect to the second, it Is always traie-t
la ted wrong; In proof of it, beside Nlmrod in "L"
Assyria, we find the bulk of the deaoendanU ol " v
Cush aettlad in the ' Interior of Arabia, ;; '
aloof the aborts of the Red ' Sea and orsitt: di
of the Indian Ocean. Chronicles, Chapter 14;
verse0. There cam e out a great army from Cobb,
translated wrongfully Ethiopia. 1 Asa, King of
Jadah, met and defeated them, and drove '4
them back into Arabia . The third query I answer
yet; because It wae considered to be the iawrn
of , the negro, whoso Egyptian name waa KapA tm
14, (meaning "wicked bertmlaa ") ' The land ow
of Negrotia beyond Abyssinia, was always eoa--aidered
their land and country, and Whence the f
Egyptians ; procured thtm and told tbem?--'3
throughout Asia, as eunuchs, to guard -thalr '!
harems and.women'e apmrtmenbs." Assong the
paintings disoorered In the ancient tombs of tha; 3
Egypuaas, the segro waditcorerei tabondt 'tT
at aalave. 'Ths gentleman, la support f his.
queriee. quote. Jeremiah, chapter 13, terse S3,uw
'Can the Ethiopian .change hie akin, or the ?T
Leopard his spots r 'I aokuewlodg ttiii al-
ludea to the aegro, the Kathl of ' the EgyptUn. --1
They had become very numerous traong the 3.
Atiatict la the time of Jeremiah. Ercry power
fill man bad a guard of eunuchftall tha doV,f
scendantt of Ham, the father ef Cosh, ware of:
the Ssmatio race, fair and white; la tome In-
.1-1

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