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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, May 02, 1861, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1861-05-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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fOLvVIL NO. 281. NEW. SERIES;
jm 1-w ii vi
COLUMBUS. OHIO. TMJKSDAY EVENING; MAY 2. 1861.
BIZ OOLLABS TZ2TZAH,
' InT&riAhlv la
I iwm ,;. . i-
rr i.-, .... .tr-. v.
yii I - I 7 ... ZA.
...III! II SB IV'V 1 I
s n isi K in '. mm
L I ri 1 1 rv II II 11 M II
D ALLY, TM-WEIKLY AND WEEI1Y
MANYPENNY & MILLER,
f UB1ISHJ BB A WD P B0PBIKI0BB.
CTOfllM Hoi. 86, 88 and 40, Hortn High Bt.
''.MUSIS INVARIABLY IN ADVAN01.
Dally ( . - IB 00 per year.
By the Carrier, Mr week, 12 eents. . .
trl-Weakly - - . . . t 00
Weekly,'; ;- : - , . 1 00
per,;
ear.
crnio ( Advertlelnv by the Square.
ns square 1 ye..,t"J0 00
One " UmoLthi 18 00
One " - 6 month IS 00
Dne " 3 month 10 00
Dn 3 montki 8 110
On " ' I months S W
One iqaara 3 weeki,
4 00
una
One
On
One '
One
8 week!.. 8 00
1 week.., 1 75
3 day I... 1 00
Sdayt... 75
Uniertloa 50
Dlsulaytii tdrertlitmente halt more than the ebore
rte. ,. .
AdvettUemonts leaded and placed In the eolumn ot
HpccUl Notice," doulU th ordinary raUt.
All .lutlcea roquirea to be published by lav, legal ratei.
If ordered on the Inilde exclusively after the first week
per cent, more than the above rates; but all such wll
tppear In the Trl-Weekly without charge.
Business Cards, not exceeding Art lines, per year, ln
do, 99 511 jiot line; outside i.
Nolleeeot uiee tings, charllablea oeletles, fire companies,
to., half price,
All trant'.tnt advtrtUemmtt mutt is paidor in
t'lvar ' t'i rule will not be varied from.
Weekly, eame price as the Daily, where the advertiser
sestlie Weekly alone. Where 'be Daily and Weekly
t re both used, then the charge lr th Weekly will be
n 'ir the rales of. the Dally - , '
No advertisement taken exoept for a definite period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
EAGLE BRASS WORKS,
i Corner Spring it Water Bte.,
OolumTaua OblOs
w.; B. POTTS & C07
ind Hahufacturer of Brass and Composition 0 as tings,
Finished Brass Work of all Description.
Electro Plating and Gilding!!
STENCIL CUTTING, &C.
febl "00-dly ' '
, , I1. A. B. SIMZIK8, .
Attorney ect Xjtxxxr
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Office Asjibn Building, opposite Capitol Square.
' ' COLUMBUS, omoj
' OOIL.TJM13IJS
Machine Mannlactoring Company
". .,' , ' MAROTAOTUUM Of .
STEAM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Caetlagv KUi -Gearing, Xaeklnery.
l- .c... I,i
:. f! Alio,
Xl.o.llxeoetcaL Worli
. or mar oiscairnoR.
.. . . COLUin DCS, OHIO.
0HA8.4MB08,'Hnp'. , , . , . f. AMBOB.iTreal.
deeli. lH58-tf k .;
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton & Indianapolis!
Through to IndlanaDolia without Change of Cart
and bat One Change of Can between
Columbus and Bt. Louis.
THREE TRAINS DAILY FROM COLUM
... Bus-
HRSTTRAIN. v. .
- ', (Dally. Mondays exoepted.) , '
NIOIIT XXrHHSS, a Dayton, at 8:45 a. m., stop
ping at London, Xenla, Dayton, Uiddletowp and Hamil
ton" arriviogat Cincinnati at 8:W) a. m.iDayton at 5:45
.., Indianopolisat 10: 4t) a. m.itt. Louis at 11:50
SECOND TRAIN. ,
ACCOMMODATION, at 8:10 a. m., stopping at all Sta
tloni between Columbus and Cincinnati and Dayton, er
riving at Cincinnati 11:02 a. m., Dayton at : 15 a. m.,
Indlanopolls af 3;SH p. m.
THIRD TRAIN.
DAT BXPKE88,at 8:30 p. ., stopping at Alton,
Jefferson, London, Charleston, Oedarville, Xenla,
Spring Valley, Oorwln, Morrow, Deerfleld, foster's.
Love land, Uillfordand Plalnville, arriving at Cincin
nati at 730 p.m.; Bt. Lonis at IS m; Dayton at 534 p,
a.; Indianopolisat 10:38 p. m.
;t J ' ' ''l. "' ' - ' 1 '' ' '
Sleeplnir Cara all Nlftht Tralna to
s5inclnnutl ana Indianapolla.
BAGOAGE CHECKED TIIROCGII.
for further Information and Through Ticket apply to
. . , . M. L.DOHKBH,
) Tlokst Aront, Colon Depot, Columbus, Ohio.
A. W. WOODWARD.
Superintendent, Cincinnati.
J
X
JNU. W. UUllKHi'I
r n WW""" .
Agent, Oolombnt,
JnlS
SOMETHING" NEW
j. til iiir.ii-i j vr..
HOW ARD & GO'S.
AMERICAN WATCHES,
CA.VU AT NO. S3, SOTJTri HIGH ST.,
and examine onr new ake ef .,
AMERICAN WATCHES, ' '
manufactured by i; 'nOWABO sic CO , Boston, Mas.
These Watches are far guior to anything ever offered
to the public heretofore. Having the exclusive agency,
1 can sell Uiem at prices to suit the time. I bar Just
reoelved alarge stock of ,
' AMERICAN TCHE3,: j ;j .; jj
nanufaetand by APPLEION, TEAOY, 00 1 alw, a
fine assortment of ; i v. ..; u.t .- .-i n
ENOLISH AND SWISS WATC11ES
. In. (sold end. Silver Oasei, at Panic prices.
janS1 H . 1 W.J. BAT API.
- ;:j'Jii..-juat Beeelredl .
1 AA tH GUEEPI and BltACK
lUU TAiAS too bag prim Bio Cone.
ISO pocket old Dutoh Government Java Coffee. '
1 S bag Ceylon OorTee.
SOObbta. standard White Sugars, eonslsUng of Pow
dred, Ohrashed, Sranalated A and Coffee,
SO quintals George hank OodOih.
BObbls. Mess and No. 1 Mackerel. 1
ft tc. yiek Salmon. - ; ' '
100 bx. Jyer Baisln. , . , , , ; ..
BOhf.boxdo do t .' .-. .
lOOqr.hok do de . M -lOO
il 01gri different brand and grade. -norlt
- " - - - Wat. aiePQWALP;
Me C. LILLEY- '
And Blank-Book Manafantnror, ..:
S0ETH HI0H. ITBZZT, COLUMBTTI, WHO
.marll-dly . ....
FAIT1IL,Y FLOCJU. ..
-rTTHITK AVIIEAT, 1H ANDES
' v b n o "vsr S'in a k in .
7TT7T
Proas "Barwtt Mills, "eprfngBsId, 0. th best brand ef
tloBrbrewgbv enr aaarmtr-BMnnwnon guaranwea.
foraslfMlya or W M.MODON ALD'S, . t t
' nov? ! i 0. loaU Bigh Street.
All an warere Jus opaswd at BAIM
de7ii. 1 - ' " po.waouta High stmt.
WORCESTER'S -
ROYAL QUARTO' ilteTlONM.
, 1 yii ill '' '" i i,i I . w ii..,1 i !, ,
The LatattThtt LargeitTho Beit,
The Cheapest Because the Best,
Tbe irioat Bellabi Standard Au
tttorlty ! the Eng-ltaa A,aBgnac.t u
8lDmdrtiIhtUnntSdv6aiortofOhU,
"TBI BBBT INQLISH DICTlOlfAR? IXTANT."
' , l - ,' ') !-i .'. ; -i library Mm MrywAsrw; r.
"Bsi are upwards of a nundred Tlouiant Words.
whoa moltlfarion meaning and derivations, together
with theli correct spelling, and pronnnelatlon r clearly
set before the ,.' i..,.,,.- ..!,, ; , . v
vtruxnnaii vommtrotai. , .
StadtnDtcltlont of (a Mmtbtrt of th OMoBtatt
Jtacrur AitooiMon, ....
Th undersigned, member of the Ohio Stat TeacTiers'
Association, adopt and aim to use In teaching, writing
and speaking, the orthography and pronunciation of
Worcester's Hovel Quarto Dictionary, and we rosst cor
dially recommend It as the most reliable standard au
thority of th Unguals language, a It I now written and
poken. ,, ...nrj. ,.tJ...'. ;-.iii,.
Loaia Airoasws, President Kenyon College i
H. D. Lasorrr, Superintendent Znevtlle Sdiiehf.
Thos. W. UiaviT, Bup't Hassllon Union BchSols.. '
H. V. OowDxav, Sup't Publlo Schools, Sandusky; i "
Johk Ltkoh, Bup't Puhllo Schools, Olrclevllle.-'
B. M. Saaroan, Principal Cleveland, femal Seaalna-
War. BflTCHXLL, Bup't Publlo School, Ml. Ublia.i '
Johk Oodsm. Principal Stat Normal Behool. Minne
sota. ...II.,.
Cvaos Nasoa, Principal lourth Intermediate Seliool,
Oinclnnatl. ' ... .
H. S. MaaTia, Bnp't Canton union School. 1 '
Sown haoit, Prlnolpal MoNeely Normal ScsbW.' '
Ku T. luru, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio Unlversiryl
Wat. W. KnwaKD, Sup't Troy Union School. '
A. Q, Hormiits. Principal West High School. 'Cleve
land. . " i '.
B. A. Norton, Associate Principal High School, Cleve
land '
Tbiodori BnaLigo, Principal High School, Oleve
nd. ' . ' . . :.i,r,,:
it. P. DomsTow, Principal Cleveland Instltntw, "
J. A. Oaarutn, President of Kleetlo Instltule, lit
ram. , . t it . , .
W. L. His.au. Prof, of Chemistry. Ohio weslevan
University. , '. j .'i.,..'
' H. H. fiaamr, Xz-0emmlsdonerof Oommoa Befools,
Ohio. . . t " i ','
Jamc Homo, Prof. Bhetorlo, Oberlln College, ii -Taos.
Hux, President Antloch College. . - , ., 1L.' '
O. W. H. OaTBOaaT. Prof. MathanaQca; Hlih
School, Dayton. . , . , . ..
8. O. CaoMsaooH. Prof. Lantnai. ' Olsh BchooL
Dayton. - ii'.v, i
,B. m. Baxisx, sup't union Bcnoois, Ashland. ;. r ,. t ,
Hon than 8lo Bvnirti otlur Prttidmtt of dlU.
Q4t, Proftuori, AutAorl and Jltingvltid Jctuoo
tort, Aacs tn4or$d Ms abov4 $tnUmmi.
PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES IN OJlO;
MiXirrTi Collxm "It I truly a magnl&oent-work.
an honor to the author, th nnbllahera. and the whole
eountry." President Andrews. . n .: ir .
Ohio WmiTaa UirvmsiTT.,,It exceeds mveiroMta-
lion. It will b my guide In orthogranhy and nnman-
elatlon, and will often be consulted by me for It at
ana accarate otnnuion. " r resident xnompaon
w. B. Icticno Coiito. "Heretofor wf ha need
Webster's orthography. At a recent meeting bf par
faculty, It was decided to change It to conform' to that
of Woroester' Boyal Quarto Dictionary." President
Oarfteld.. ...
Wevrema Bntava Cotisos. "I find It worth of
soraiai approDauon.- rreeioens aiuenooea. ,llv(l .
Oataug Collioe. "It more than meet my kpeota
tlona. I reoommend It a the standard authoritrin
orthoepy to my children and my pupil. " President
oi organ. ... , . , . . .. .
AvTiooa Oouaog. "I adopt and aim to bm In1 leach
ing, writing and speaking, the orthography and pronun
ciation of Worcester' Koyal Quart Dictionary.;'
Fraoldent Bill. ' V'
'la all my writing, sneaking. and teaching. I hven-
deavored to conform to the rule for ortbograptiy and
pronunciation as contained In Woroester'e Dlotlooary ,"
uorac sunn, late) President. ,. 1 4 j n .
KunroR Ooiuoa, 0wvtv . 'I most cord la!lv Ton-
mond It as the meet reliable standard authority' f the
cngusn language a it la now written and spoltsn-."
President Andrew. ' ,
' -. ' . . . ! I il . II
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS OF
Prm Ste. Anton Smyth, Qmmtirtoner of (Irmrtosi
Th Dletionarr is an tasDertshabl monument to 'the
learning and tndunrof lie author, and an honor avtb
world of lettera. Th WMchanloal execution Is far supe
rior to that of any ether Lexicon with which I 'sen ac
quainted." .1.1 . .1 1 .a . '
From So. U. B. Barney. Ea-OommUHotLtr ot
' ...
The moat reliable standard authority of the laa-
laate." . ... 1 . .4 :
i.ut . y.i
Xjeiadlns ZTeweipapersi of Ohio Say.
Fromth CltvMand Btrald of MarckW.v .'
Th orthography of the Woroester Dictionary W that
apni uy nw. ti nut wii wmwi. v. uiiuvuvh vi u.ia
country and angland, and conform to th general Usage
ot ordinary writer ana speexer. : .
Whatever Brelodicee may have existed prevlouityi a
careful study of this volume will Invariably be followed
by a warm appreciation of Its great merit, anda detlre
to add It to in wen seioctea iinrery, oe is targe or man.
It la library to Itself, and will remain an' Imperisha
ble reoord of the learning of Its compiler. :
Jromtlu OitiointutfiOommtroialo AprUWrr .
. Here are upwards of a hundred thousand werds--irood.
bad and indifferent whose multifarious mcantrigtj and
derivations, together with their cornet spelling aaal.-pro-nunclatlon,
are set clearly before the eye. The -work I
unquestionably the greatest Ihtsaurusof English WOJds
ever published. , 1 - -i ii " n.. i-Hik) cj.
from th CltvtloHd Plaindtaltr 0 St'pt. to, i5rj '
Evidently Woactsrna's Botal Ooaxto DicrteaaKT U
not only (As tost, but t ust work of (A kind etMT.f
MMcT.andosa by bo possibility suffer by compsrtaon or
controversy. ...'.-.,.i.iu. ,
.from tt1bt4doBlad4af MayW.
As to ntovuxciaTtoM. Woaoxma is tst BTAHDann
followed by our best authors; In definition haiaave
nothing to be desired, and In OaTnooaarar tt la sufficient
to say mat woacxeraa ean be sareiy iouowd. iu. ?i . 1
INGHARI tt BRAGG,' ll,;'i'y;1t,'
Pnbllaltera, Boakeellera 4c Statlaaera,
NO. 191 8UPIKI0R ST., CLITtLAND, QBIO;. .
THE MUTUAL BENEFITS
-lli'X.'.
LIEE INSURANCE COMPANTj
,. .' of -'! -
Dlrldend Jan nary 1 1 86 1 , 45 Teir 0?ait,
aSSKTI....,.,Vm;ZT 4i'jSlk'69,:
Statement Jannary l,180fvKA":
Balance, per statement Jtn. 1st, 1860 S3,06Jl'30
Keoetvea lor rremiom aur- . 7,
tat- the year 18t0 7B3.053 5S7'. J 'I : V .'
Becoived for Interest daring ' . -
the year 1800,.
...... 814,014 19
.'.iMi cm;
Total receipt for'iPofl.... $977,007 74 :.' ';!' 'if..''n
Paid Claims by Datb,2C7,050 00
:fV'iU HTl
raid rouble surreu- -
dered 41.111 29
iim: iCii .'
.'tl.,l .A .f.
..' ;i,' i(.ii .
,U'' ;.i:.:t
,.. . ..V
.' ; , ...
uj t;.
. 1,11.1 H jf!K!
.! II .II VJi.
Paid Salaries, Pott- .' . , '
X, Taxes, ' ,
nge, eto 31,050 St
Paid Commissions to J
Aienw.x .-. Pl.xa hi
Paid Physician' fees,1' S.U60 75
Paid Annuities......" 1,517 00
lng th year 1CQJ0O 75 505,001 03 .'.MUtHi
''j ' 1 1 11 ii.i
Net Balano January lst I!l......mt3,r4,53f (
' ' A8BIIB. '..tfAi.lJkw.:
Cash on hand ...'.-c: $0,0284" III i'-"l -vi ,U .
Bonds and Mortgage eaves
Sitate, worth double the .,11 U
amount loaned. ....t S,3J7,84l 68' ' n'l':'
Premium Note, on Foltciei ' .''' l.l.l A 'I .
In force, only drawing 0 per 'HIV .
cent, interest. 1,97,M4 17 .Jai4K
Beal Kstat .'.WU...' 90893 87 .1. art 11.
Loanson Scrip. ...."-..U' 4,93144 ,iT'M.lit'j(
Premiums. N otas an Cash, m .xi.llll)
ourof transmlssloo..'. 45,343 W tb' :i i'.MH .
1, ' ,Wa.lllT
.i total AJMt.....vw.w. neRiwso
7 til 5 Policies la fore, tnarlng......g,4e,o38
1,435 new PolWeehav been Issned during the year,'
- After a careful oalcnlatioa of the present value ot the
ouutandlng Policies of. th Company, and bavlnf th
aeoessary amount In reserve therefor, th Directors'
nave deetared a Divummd ef 45 per cent, on the Premi
Uns Tiaid at the table nM. ta all Doliclaa for life In foma.
Issued arte to Amary I. lti&O, payable aooordtag to the
arenent ml, of, th Company, , . , , ,,
.J?' all ktadsoflta'fjohttngeucfel,' PrcsfecU
""'J ' AreUoatrpp, wlU b lunlshed
WITHO'
pany.
: ' 'V1 "" " "' JMirsaa mil
B
J a-j sa j s a ,a. - ssr, a, iraQej n
eniariNUS, all Widths, or most oel.brated make,
offered In naaaaat wtet and Unn -i
aor offered la greatest variety and at very low prt
" earn as bum
aprue
Ko N teata Bifa (treeW
1 1 IISKI,
Dally, per year.. ,
Trl-Weekly, per year.
Weekly, per year
.8 00
. 3 00
. 100
Extracts from the Charge of Judge Leavitt—
Treason Defined.
We make the following extracts from the
oharge of Judge Liavitt to the Grand Jury at
the April Term of the United States Court
for the Southern (Ohio) District t
It Is In view of the presence of actual war In
the country that I hare deemed it my duty to
present to toe urana jury tucn views 01 tne
law. for the punishment of treason against tbe
United States, as will assist them in tbe inves
tigation of any charges which may be brought
to their notice, implicating any one in the com
mission of that high crime. I do not propose
to discuss the subject at any length, but shall
aim to present only tome of its more important
legal aspeota. 1 do tms not merely to am tne
ury in their inquiries, Dot also tnat true ana
oval citizens mav not lenorantlr and uninten
tionally expose themselves to tbe penalties of
tbe statute. '
No one who bae ever read tbe Constitution
of the United States can doubt that It waa the
Intention of its framers to create a National
Government, which should act - upon every
citijcen or every estate, ana to wmcn tbe alle
giance of every citizen was due. This Consti
lutlon, and tne laws passed In pursuance
thereof, are' declared to be the supreme law of
the nation.' ' Against tne government thus
created, its founders contemplated that the
crime of treason might be committed. In tbe
third section of artiole 3, of the Constitution,
this crime Is defined in these words: "Treason
against the United States ehall consist only in
levying war against tbem, or in adhering to
their enemies, giving them aid and comfort."
Then fnllowa a clause declaring that "no ner-
son shall be convicted of treason unless on the
testimony of two witnesses to the same overt
aot, or on confession in open court." And the
express power is conferred on Congress to pass
lawa for the punishment of treason. In pur
suance of this power, the first law on the
subject, which is still In force, wag approved
the 3Uth of April, 1790. Tbe first section of
this law provides, "That if any person or
persons, owing allegiance to the United States,
ehall levy war against them, or shall adhere
to their eoemiee, rivlne them aid and
comfort within the United States or elsewhere,
and shall be thereof convicted on confession in
open Court, or on the testimony of two wlt
neeeee to the same overt act of treason, whereof
be or tbey shall stand Indicted, such person or
persons snail oe aoiuagea cuuty ot treason
against the United States, and shall suffer
death," Tbat all the provisions of tbe statute
00 this subject may be presented at one view, I
will here refer to the second section, defining
ana punisuiDg too minor ouense or misprision
of treason, and which ie in these words: "If
any person or persons having knowledge of the
oommiesion of any of tbe treasons aforesaid,
sball oonoeal, and not, as soon as may be, dis
olaee and make known the aame, to the Presi
dent of the United States, or some one of the
Judges thereof, or to the President or Governor
of a particular State, or some one of the Judges
or t Justices tnereoi, tucn person or persons, on
ooqviotlon thereof, sball be adjudged guilty ot
misprision 01 treason, ana snail be imprisoned
not exoeeaing seven years ana nnea not exceed'
log one thousand dollars."
The crime of treason, aa denned In the Con
stitution and the first aection of the Act of 1790.
eonslata, first, In levying war against the United
States; seoond, la ednering to their enemies,
giving them aid and comfort. 1 As the statute
does not 'attempt to specify the cases which
constitute treason under either of these divi
sions, it is necessarily the province and duty of
tne tvourta 01 tne union to aeciae what laote
shall bring party within the penalty of tbe
statute. It is evidence of tbe true allegiance
whloh the people) of the United States bave
borne to their Constitution, that from the first
organisation of ths Government until recently
the acts of criminal disloyalty to it have been
of rare oocurrenoe. There are, therefore, but
few judicial decisions which can be referred to
as guides la giving a oonstruotion to the statute
of (treason. In the celebrated trial of Aaron
Burr, wbloh occurred in the year 1807, before
Chief-Justice Marshall, that learned Judge,
with bis ntual ability, stated his views of tbe
meaning of the words "levying war against the
United States." He remarks tbat. "taken most
literally, tbey are, perhaps, of tbe same Import
as ma woras raising or creating war," "Hut,"
be adds, "as those who join after the com
mencement are equally tne objects of punish
ment, there would be, probably, a general ad
mission that the terms comprehended making
war or carrying on war." No one can doubt
toe: correctness of tbis conclusion.' ' But tbe
eminent Judge referred to does not attempt to
specify the various acts that would bring a
party within bis Interpretation of the words of
tbel statute, mere are, however, a class of acts
so hnequlvooal in their character, as to be clear
of all doubt. - Actual service in the army of
tn enemy is cieariy an act or levying war.
And I entertain no doubt that the enlistment
of a soldier, with the knowledge that be was
to serve sgainst bis country, would constitute
ths crime of treason, if there was actual war
at tbe time of the enlistment. In Burr'a case.
tbe Court held that the facts In proof against
mm snowea nim gamy 01 conspiring to levy
war against his country, but that, however fla-
klttons his conduct, as there waa no ODen as
semblage of an armed foroe to carry out the
treasonable purpose, it was not levying war.
And on this ground he was acquitted. But
to guard against all misconception of the views
of the Court in that ease, the Judge adds: "It
is pot the intention of the Court to say that
no Individual can be guilty of this crime who
has aot appeared In arms against bis oonntry.
unitne contrary, 11 war De aotually levied,
that is, if a body of men be aotually assembled
fl th nnvnneA nf AtTinttno hw fnta a ,.Aaan.
abje purpose, all those who perform any part,
however minute, or however remote from tbe
scene of action, and who are actually la the
general conspiracy, are to be considered aa
traitors." in toe same case it is laid down as
onduestloned law, tbat when war Is levied
against the Government with Intent to over
throw it, "th holding eanv of th Government'
fort or iMp,or attacking the tame, or delivering
(Arm up to, rebel through lreachery,"ue direct acta
Of levying war within the meaning of the law.
Ana it is regaraea as equally clear tnat where
a military force is embodied lor a treasonable
turpow, if a commissary for purchases, know
og the object, and leaguing himself with tbe
rebels; should purchase supplies or provisions
lor tneir use.tDougn ne never saw tbe army,
would nevertheless be guilty of levying war.
And so, too, there ean be no doubt that if an
individual, whether actually authorized or not.
should open a recruiting station for tho enlist
ment or soldiers, or snouid aotually enlist men
for service la the enemy's army, he would be
guilty of levying war, though he never joined
vne oestue foroe. , Aoese are some or tbe oasea
In which direct treason may be committed, tho'
the guilty party bad never joined the enemy, or
pariioipatea airecuy in any 01 tne movements
of the rebel forees. ' The enumeration might
oe greauy, eaieaaeu, put tne cases stated are
periiapa aumcient to illustrate tne prinoiple
wbtcn applies, ana to wnitm tne attention of
the Grand Jury has beenotlled. "
, Before passing from the consideration of the
question what constitutes a levying of war,
within tho meaning of tbe Constitution and the
act bf Congress, it will be proper to notice that
ths crime of treason may be committed by an
organised ana violent resistance or tbe execu
tion of a- Jaw of th United States. Ths law,
In this aspect of the subject, is very clearly
and accurately stated by tbe late Judge Kane,
m charge to ths Grand Jury. He remarks
that "the exoreealoq tVeMRottrar embraoea not
merely the aot of formal 01 deolared war, but
any combination forcibly to prevent or oppose
tbe execution or inlorcement of a provision ot
the Constitution, two! ft publlo statute, if ae-
companied or followed by sa sot of forcible op
position in pursuance of such combination;'' and
in the case of the United States et. Fries, the
Court stated the law on this subject as follows:
"If a body of men oonspire and meditate an Iu
turrection to resist or oppose the execution of
anv statute of the United States by force, they
are only guilty or nign miaaemeaoor, put 11
thuv nroceed to carry auon intention into exe
cution by force, they are then guilty of treason
by levying war' . ' , . 3 .
1 will now briefly can tne attention 01 tue
Grand Jurv to the second Dart of the definition
of treason, included' in tbe words adhering to
the entmie of the United State, giving them aid
ana comfort. Tbe statote givee no specinca
tion of the acts which constitute treason nnder
this part of the definition of that crime. Nor
aan we avail ourselves of tbe aid oi judicial
authorities, , to any extent, in the investigation
of this aubiect. I am not aware that in any
of the ' prosecutions for treason in this country
tne woras noaer oonsiaeratiuu uo reumveu
an authoritative construction.! Ana 11 is tne
obvious duty of a Court or Judge, in consider
ing their Import, to guara against giving toem
a meaning - so comprehensive . aa to embrace
a ota of a doubtful or equivooal character. Tbe
words "adhering to their enemies, giving
them aid and comfort,'! leave no room to doubt
tbat treason may be committed by other means
than levying war. But it is not easy to state
or classify tbe precise . acts which, under tbis
phrase, oonstitute the crime. , It contemplates
tbe existence oi two facUi 1. Aaoariog 10 tne
enemies of the country. 3. Giving tbem aid
and comfort. Bat tbe first faot stated seems
to be Implied from the Mistenoe of the second.
For it is impossible to suppose that "aid and
comfort" can be given to the publlo enemy, in
a criminal sense, , without adhering to that
enemy. It ' would seem, therefore, that the
only inquiry la : What eots are equivalent to
giving aid and comfort to toe public enemy,
within the meaning of the law. It Is clear
that the open and publlo avowal of opinions
hostile to the Government, and which are in
sympathy with tbe principles or measures of
those arrayed in open war againBt it, does not
constitute treason in the eye of tbe law. ouch
opinions are, nndoubtedly, evidence of the
want of loyalty to the Government, and may
involve moral treason, but do not imply tbe
legal guilt ot that crime. , There mast be the
overt act of giving the enemy aid and com'
fort; and such act must have a direct refer
ence to, and must be intended to promote the
treasonable designs of the publio enemy.
Without attempting to specify the. nnmeroue
acts fairly within the scope of the words ftotii;
aid and comfort to the enemy, I will refer to
some, eo unequivocal in their character as to
be clear of doubt, and which will illustrate tbe
principle applicable to thia branch of the law
of treason. . To furnish arms or other moni
tions of war, or to provide boats, vessels, rail
road cws or other means of transportation for
those arrayed in hostile opposition to the Gov
ernment, with a knowledge or tbe purpose for
which tbey are to be used, are unquestionably
acts involving tbe crime of treason. So, too,
inciting, encouraging or aiding others to en
gage in any of these treasonable acts, if the
treasonable motive appears, would be giving
aid and comfort to the enemy within , the
meaning of the law. It is equally
oertain that the communication of the in
telligence to an enemy, by letter, tele
graph, or otherwise, relating to tbe position
strength, movements or designs of any mili
tary force of the nation, with the intention to
Impede or thwart Its operations, or to eipoee it
to attack, capture, or other injury, is an aot of
treason, it has been already stated that the
purchase of provisions, stores and necessaries
for a rebel or foreign army, engaged In war with
the National Government, by a commissary of
porcnasee, la an (aet 01 levying war, incurring
the guilt of treason. And It is a practical
question of great interest ta ths pnblio, under
what ciroamstanoee the vender of provisions,
stores ana neceeearies la. implicated la the
crime, aa one who gives aid and .comfort to the
enemy. ' Without discussing tbis question at any
length, I may state tbat it is obviously not ev
ery sale of property to be sent to a State or
plaoe in possession of the enemy, though from
its nature adapted to the use of tbe armv.and II-
able to, be to appropriated,that constitutes an aot
of treason. But, ir the seller knows tbat the
property is to be so nsed.hethereby doerjjlve aid
and comfort to tbe enemy, and is within tbe pen
alty of the law. The criminality ot the aot de
pends, therefore, on tbis knowledge. If the
seller is apprised of the unlawful use to be made
of the property, the law Implies a criminal mo
tlve, whether the sale Is induced by sympathy
who tue eoHuiy, noatiuy to tne uovernment, or
the purpose of gain.
Ibeli rand Jury will bave noticed that the
1st section of the act of 1790 defining and pun
ishing treason, limits Its operation to persons
owing allegiance to the United States." We
are not to understand from these words, that the
crime can only be committed by native born or
naturalized citizens. Tbey embraoe all per
sons who are under the protection of the Con
stitution and laws of the country. All such
owe allegiance to the Government, and are
responsible for their treasonable acts aganlst It.
It is proper, also, to notioe the1 clause of the
section referred to, declaring that there shall be
no Conviction lor treason, "unless on the testi
mony of two witnesses to the same overt act,
or on open com etslon in Court.' - This provi
sion obviously has reference) to thetrlal after an
indiotment is returned. ' It has do application
to a preliminary investigation before an exam.
inlng Court or Judge, or a Grand Jury. If you,
therefore, nave toe oreaioie testimony of one
witness to an overt act of treason, it Will justify
the return of an indictment as a true bill.
I will now briefly notioe the minor offense of
concealing or refusing to give Information of
an aot of treasons It Is denned m the second
section of the aot of 1790, which I have already
quoted,' and ' is called misprision ot treason.
This section provides, In substanoe. that anv
person naving anowieage 01 tne commission of
the crlmeof treason, who shall conceal it or not
. , , ... . . . , . . .
make it promptly known to the oroner officer
of Government, ehall be liable to punlsbment by
nne ana imprisonment. - me woras or the sea-
lion are very dear ana Intelligible, and do not
require any exposition of their meaning. I may
remark, however, tbat in circumstance in whioh
it may be supposed ths higher crime of treason
may be committed, there is a probability that
persons may oe gouty 01 tne lesser onense. Tbe
duty of giving immediate Information of
treasonable aot is enjoined not only by tbe let
ter 01 tne statute, out is cieariy aedncible, irom
the high obligations of patriotism resting npon
every oitizen. And he that refuses to perform
this duty may be justly suspected of treasonable
designs. It Is obvious to remark that a failure
in this respect may lead to the most disastrous
results..'. : 1 '' "'' - ' ": - " '
I am not Informed to what extent the Dreaent
Grand Jury will be called npon to Investigate
charges involving etther of the crimes to which
I bave reterrea. 1 learn, however, that there
will be at least one case, not implicating anv
citizen of our own State, which may be brought
to their notice. ' Of the facta of this case I am
not advised, and cannot therefore give tbe law
In charge, witbja special reference to them. ' It
is probable tbat in any state of faots which nay
be proved, the law, as 1 have attempted to ex
pound it, will be suSoient to guide yoq In your
action. Allow me to suggest that your proceed
ings as Grand Jurors should be marked with
great calmness and deliberation, and wholly
aloof from the influence of prejudioe or passion.
Treason is tbe highest crime known to tho lawa
of car country, ana no one should be Impll
oated in Its guilt, even by the finding or
Grand Jury, without evidence justifying the
conclusion at least of it strong probability that
the oharge Is well founded, and with the rea
sonable expectation that it win do sustained on
a trial by a traverse Jury.' In nuoh a case, in
accordance with the law and ths solemn oath
you bave just taken, it will be your doty to
aot with fearlessness ana. inaepenaenoe, what
evermsy follow:"""' "' """
" j 1
. . 1 - . --.j .'
'' A' Sua it GiaL, A Sunday-school, teacher
askeda little girl who the first man was.'- She
answered that she didn't know. The Question
was put to the next, an Irish child, who answer
ed "Adam, sir," with apparent eatlafaotlon.
"La," said ths first soholar. "yott need not
feel so grand about it, ns wasn't an itunman.
Ths Wat the Pinnstltamia Dotchbt in
Fioht. When the Berks oonnty and other in
terior troops were on their way toward Camp'
Curtln, the officers had a conference over tbe
news of the taking of Fort Sumter, and the fact
that,' after thirty six hours cannonading, no life
was lost. One noneat Dutch officer could not
understand how this could be done; but another
officer, better posted In modern warfare,
assured him tbat It was all owing to the aston
ishing Improvement in modern science, which
had made the art of war so perfect that forts
might be battered down, and cities be bombard
ed, and yet not a single individual be killed.
The honest Dutoh eon of Mars listened atten
tively and in surprise at such remarkable re
sults. Suddenly his face reddened, and, with a
blow of his fist upon the table, which sounded
like the discharge of a Columbiad. he exclaim
ed, "Den, by tarn, dey bad petter notpring town
our Datcbmaos, for dey are so tam sntupld mlt
science, dat dev could not go into a fight mitout
killing somebody." Philadelphia Ledger. ,
A Szoidino Orrioia or New Enqland Osi-
om. Captain Andrew Taleott, United States
Topographical Engineer, a native of Connecti
cut, end who was educated at West Point, and
afterwards stationed at Fort Monroe, Va., baa
gone to Richmond, Va., to superintend the
manufacture of arms, so., to be used sgainst
the Government. His skill as an engineer
stakes blm a valuable acoesslon to the army
His treachery will surprire his friends and fam
ily. He is a brother of Col. Taleott, who was
lately dismissed from the srmy as a defaulter.
His son was lately employed on tbe Washington
aqueduct. 1 "
Size or the AucaioiN Flao. The standard
of fltgs for the army is fixed at six feet six ln-
obes In length by four feet four inches in width;
the number of stripes Is thirteen seven red,
and aix white. The blue field for the stars is
the width and square of the first seven stripes,
four red and three white, and these stripes ex
tend loom tbe extremity of tbe field to tbe end
of the flag. The eighth stripe is whits and forms
a pieatant reuet to tne blue ground of tbe field
Tbe number of stars is thirty four; one being
auaea on tne aamission 01 eacn state, - -
STONE'SBAZAAR.
iSTo. 4 Ghvynne Block.
A. P. STONE & O'HARRA
A BE HOW RECJEL'TING THEIR WIN
XA XKJt 000 UB, and Invite the pnblio to Inspect
tbem. No such stock of Goods has ever been brought to
this market. The Booth, In consequence of the failure
01 tne grain crop, nas not been able to purchase the us
ual quantity of rich goods, and this fact has forced the
Importer to sell them at publlo auction. Onr bnyer
(Mr. Stone) being In New York at these large sales, took
advantage of them, and w can and will eell onr good
uro, m mm uian any one who puronaeea two Week, since,
paid for them In New York. Onr stock Is complete In
every uepanzneni 01
ELEGANT DRESS SILKS,
OTTOMAN VELOURS,
, BROCHE VALENCIAS, . -',',
! .. PRINTED MESINOS,
: y , PRINTED COBURGS.
! DYED COBUGS;
! ORLEANS, ,
I FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
: 1 ALL WOOL DELAINES.
. i - POPLINS, PRINTS,
.. - j .: ... ii .... : , UaiaAlttES,.
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS!
Ifive Thausand Dollars Worth
sJ;. Bought in One Day,
A halt the Coat at Iaapajtsatloaa.
LADIES' FURS, '
In all Varieties, at tbe Celebrated
manafatare el C. G. Gaa
I . there V Sen, . - 1 . .
"I ' ' ,
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT.
Men's, Ladles and Children's Under Bhlrta and Drawers;
Ladle. Misses and Children' Hosiery of all kinds. In
Wool and Lamb's Wool; fleecy Lined and Cotton Oloves
of every make.
ALSO
.1
A oemplete assortment
ties Of ..; : .) ; .
of all tbe usual varie
LADIES' CLOTHS, '"'' -
I CASSIMERES, "
i ' OVERCOATINGS, '
FLANNELS,
I ' RIBBONS, " . ' '
j- ' ' DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladies and Gent's: Linen Cambria Hand-
wrcMea, fto..&c.
. . 0 . ..'Ill, 1
TO persons Who call On aUkWaoledn nnrwnnta
show tbem the largest, best and cheapest stock of Good
ever seen In this market, or pay tbem on dollar per
hour while looking. ......
oecl-dliitawltw. - BTONB At 0 IlaKItA.
Our Cough, Old, Hoarton, Jnltu
na, anylrUation orSormet of the
threat, JUUevtth Smoking dough
On Omrumption, BronKeUit, Attha
ma, and Catarrh, Clear and giv
ttrtnoth to th voie of
1 PtllSlilO "PEAKERS, '
and BINUEKH.
Tew are aware of ths Importance of cheeking a Cough
r "Common Cold" In Its first stare: that whli-h in ihi
beginning wonld yield to a mild remedy, If neglected,
oon attacks th lung). "Brown' Bronchial Trochu,"
containing demuloent Ingredient, allay Pulmonary and
BROWN'S
"That trouble In my Throat. lTa whfi-it
th 'TKwJjss' are a speelBo) having mad me
TB0CHI8
often a men whisperer." - 1
H. P. WILLIS. -"I
recommend their at to Poauo Braax.
BROWN'S
aa." .- - - - -
T ROOMS
,, - ?-.RBV.-jV4JHAPIN.
"Have T) roved extrenelv aerTtnuhi. r
BROWN'S
Hoaasma."-
BBV. HENRY WARD BBKOHKR.
"Almost Instant relief In the distrain?
TBOOniSl
labor ot breathing peculiar to Aernau." -.
BROWN'S
v. A. U. EQGLtiSTOH.
"Contain no Opium or anything loluri
TSOOEIS
on." -DB. A A. HATES.- .
1.'! . OhmUtt, Botun.
A sunpl and Pleasant combination r
BROWN'S
1
Cooans, fco."
TROCHHSl
. - DB. a. J. BIQKLOW, "
' ' 1 Barton,
"Bensflolal In Baoxciims." 1 .... M
...):. I J. F.W,IANI,
. . . . ' Botton.
"I have proved them excellent for Himk
BROWN'S
IBOOmtS
BROWN'S
itmOocan.". . -,, . ,
BBV. H. W.i WARR1N, ,
.' . l ' ' , Bolton,
"Beneflclsl when comnelled ta mak aur.
TROCHES
BROWN'S
fering from Coin." .. v .
, JLSV. B. r. J. ANSERSOW, '
. 1 . . St Lout.
"trmoTOa. In removing Hoarseness and
Irritation of th Throat, so common with
TROOHXS
BROWN'S
Braaaiasand Bmans.'' ' - - -
TR00H13I
Prof. SI AOT JOHNSON.
BROWN'S
teacher of MusioVsonthera
. " ' Vernal College.
TROCHES
"flreat benefit when taken before and after
BROWN'S
preaching, as they prevent Hoarseness. From
tneir past enect, l tntng ther will be of ner-
TBOOHIS!
manent-advantage to me," - - ".- '
BBV. 1. ROWLEY. A.M'l 'V
BROWN'S
President ef Athena College, Tenn,
TROOHEBJ
ITSoU by all Druggist at TWENTY
v 1ITB OBNTB A B0X.O"i '
t HOBlRTSh BABKTir,," ' ' '' ? ':
-. 'ii' Dmgglst, B4 North High street,
J..-: ! ..:i'j S,l.SAMOkH. 00.. ,t ri! ,
M South High street, Columbus,
lML?Mrk 'oocLs;';
Tit;
TTrimnsTiiii riRRin - M
VY . Linen Bhtrt Bosons ' Plata and raa'ef ' 1 0
(' ! r Shirting and Boeoas Linens.-. .. . i
i Linen Sheetings and Pillow Casings.
", : -. Linen Cambrics and Long Lawn. '
.'l- ; . 1 i l! ,.' . Linen rocket -handkrfe. all else .''
0 ; -'.v v'i I.".' .!. Llaea TowelhageandDlaoeia.
.11 . r.iim NuUm ui n'n.iu. ..
i tinea Table Clothe and Satin Damask. "
i . Linen Towels with colored border.
Line BtaUr Qovertarsaed Graeh. t u
Xii-J.rS WW ewB saw JSSBB. I. 'Iftl
ssitn sc Bun.
V. w So tub. Utah street,
Acer's Sarsaparilla
A compound remedy, designed to be the most
eneotuai Aiterattv that can be made. . It is
a. concentrated extract of Para Snrsaparilla,
so tombined -with other substances of still
greater alterative power as to afford an effec
tive antidote for the diseases Soisaparilla is
'reputed to cure. It is believed that such a
remedy la wanted by those who suffer from
Strumous complaints, and that one which will
accomplish their cure must prove of immense
service to thia large class of our afflicted fellow
citUens. How completely this compound will
do it has been proven by experiment on many
of the worst cases to be found of the following
complaints : '
ScuoroLA and Scrofulous Complaints,
Eruptions and Eruptivb Diseases, Ulceus,
Pdiplbs, Blotches, Tumors, Salt IUeum,
Scald Head, Syphilis and Syphilitic Af
fections, Meucurial Disease, Dhopsy, Neu
ralgia or Tia Douloureux, Debility, Dys
pepsia and Indigestion, Erysipelas, Rose
or St. Anthony's Firb, and Indeed the whole
'class of complaints arising from Iupuuity of
ths Blood,
Thia compound will be found a great pro
moter of health, when taken in the spring, to
expel tho foul humors which fester in the
blood at that season of the year. By the time
ly expulsion of them many rankling disorders
are nipped In tho bud. Multitudes can, by
the aid of this remedy, spare thcmsolvea from
the: endurance of foul eruptions and ulcerous
sores, through which the system will strive to
rid itself of corruptions, if not assisted to do
this through the natural channels of the body
byj an alterative medicine. Cleanse out the
vitiated blood whenever you find its impurities
bursting through the skin in pimples, eruptions,
or sores; cleanse it when you find it is ob
structed and sluggish in the veins ; cleanse it
whenever it is foul, and your feelings will tell
yod when. Even where no particular disorder
is felt, people enjoy better health, and live
longer, for cleansing tho blood. Keep the
blood healthy, and all la well ; but with this
pabulum of life disordered, there can be no
lasting health. Sooner or later something
must go wrong, and the great machinery of
lifo is disordered or overthrown.
Sarsaparilla has, and deserves much, the
reputation of accomplishing these ends. But
tho: world has been egregiously deceived by
preparations of it, partly becnuso the drug
alone has not nil the virtue that is claimed
for lit, but more because many preparations,
pretending to be concentrated extracts of it,
contain but little of the virtue of Sarsaparilla,
or any thing else.
During late years the public have been mis
led by large bottles, pretending to give a quart
of Extract of Sarsapnrilla for one dollar. Most
of theso havo been frauds upon the sick, for
they not only contain little, if any, Sarsapa
rilla, but often no curative properties whatev
er. Hence, bitter and painful disappointment
has followed the use of tho various extracts of
Sarsaparilla which flood tho market, until the
name itself is justly despised, and has become
synonymous with imposition and cheat. Still
wo call this compound Sarsaparilla, and intend
to supply auch a remedy as shall rescue the
name from tho load of obloquy which rests
upon it. And we think we have ground for
believing it has virtues which are irresistible
by the ordinary run of the diseases it is intend
ed to cure. In order to secure their complete
eradication from the system, the remedy should
be judiciously taken according to directions on
the bottle.
:ii. - prepared bt ..! .
DR. J. C. AYEK & CO.
1' i " ' LOWELL MASS.
Price, At per Bottle 1 Six Bottles for $9.
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral
baa won for itself such a renown for tho cure nf
every variety of Throat and Lung Complaint, that
it it entirely unnecessary for 11 to recount the
evidence of its virtues, wherever it has been cm
ployed. As it has long been lit constant use
throughout this section, we need not do more than
assure the people its quality is kept up to the best
it ever has been, and that it may be relied on to
do for their relief all it has ever been found to do.
' 'Ayer's '..Cathartic Pills,
. !.:.. roa TnB cues of , . .
CoHiveness, Jaundice, Dispeptia, Indigestion,
DyeenUry, Ibul Stomach, Erysipelas, Headache,
Pit, Rheumatism, Eruption and SJiin Diseases,
Liver Complaint, Dropsy, Tetter, Tumor and
Salt Meumr IForror, , Goirf, Jb'eumlgia, at a
Dinner Pitt, and for Purifying the Blood.
They are sugar-coated, so tlmt the most sensi
tive can take them pleasantly, and they are the
best aperient in the world for all the purposes of a
famly physic. . . , , .. ,
Pries 25 cents per, Box; Fivo baxos for $1.00,
.:'Oreatnumhersof Clergymen, Physicians, States
men, and eminent personages, have lent their
names to certify the unparalleled usefulness of these
remedies, but onr spaco here will not permit the
insertion of them. The Agents below named fur
nish gratis our American Almanac in which they
are given 1 with also full descriptions of the above
complaints and the treatment that should be fol
lowed for their cure. .
Do not be put off by unprincipled dealers with
other preparations they make more profit on.
Demand Ayer'8, and take no others.' The sick
want the best aid there is for them, and they should
have it. 1 1 :
All our remedies are for sale by ' .
' 1 ' ROBERTS A BAMTIBL. Colnralm.
And by Druggists and Dealers everywhere. . .
nov:iya,tweiw :
I i REMOVAL.
S. jDoylo cto Oo.
TT
AVE
BEfffOvED THEIR OFFICE
XI to th
Bouth-woet corner of High and friend
streets,
' . . r.:.c ;:ul
UP STAIRS,"
And will continue to keep on hand a large stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Th attention Of BfKhuta aid Daalera la reanantfnk
ly Invited to our stock. ;. , . 8. DUYLI Co.
marcbW.'dlllljalySl. ,
NEW HOOP SKIRT. . .7 ' .,
eto son, :
: j fliv ' : No. tt, 80TJTII HIGH BIRBIT.
Have Just received a new make of HOOP SKIRTS
finished In a manner far superior to any yet Introduced
DURABILITY AND GRACEFULNESS.
I -An i TRAVELLERS!
TTHBlf yoa t to Wew Tort , drive direct to fh
.VV; km.. ' , SniTHSUMAN HOUSE,
BH0ADWAT, OOBKER Off HOUSTON STRST '
ic"i ''1 ..'.;' 1" '-. i Condoctedonthe ';..,;).,..''. ' '
i !kubopban.pan. ,
' Hood Tare, Qood Rooms, Prompt Attendance, and Mod
erate Charge,. - . . .' . , . ,
B1SGLI ROOMS SO CTS. 75 OTS.and SI PBK lAY.
"'DODBaVi ROOMS and PARLORS l,MMo S3.
Heals as ordered. This Hotel has all the appointment
of th best hotels, a most central location, and Is heated
throughout by steam, SAJLUXL 1. MBAD.
Vnlh94?.:- .'V..s.v.'U Proprietor.,
'I .. ' 1 '!'.''' 1
....j .,(ii'j' HENBT KtKBtBUt. h'-U'v, V-
(Ut ef Phalon' lstabllshment, N. T-0 Pmnrletore
tne new xora rastuonable Bhavhis. Hair 11.11,..
Sbampoonlng, Carting and Dressing Saloon, Bast State
wtrees over tne roes unm, wner tatisfactlen trill
b glvm In all U. Various branches. Ladle tni
vmiamn' ataig vreaemg oon in tne best style. ,
JySI-dly . . . ' .
PJVAl W ' AN I FIGTJREn BLACK
BRBS8 SILKS, of Sverv grade. TbA most select
aasortmact la the oily, o4 Msaotrsannahl rates. ..j
u ITU m. a VT
aprtlS,
ll.'ll ' t 1. - J'
Ko. tt South High street.
ELEGANT PLAIN BLACK SILKS FOR
Btreetliskeaun and slanUas: alee. Blob Trimmln 1
1 ad Taseei te aaatek,t ,-, ? , s . 1 BAXH
aaaySS .
'
.
tnfjl ! i
i BE AUTIFTJti. ;
AIND CHEAPER THAN EVER!
OUR SPRING STOCK IS rNCSIf At-.
t large and well aewrted. Th very latest pattern
from AMERICAN, BNuLIBH and ffERXOH faotafta.
GOLD PAPERS AND BORDERS.
Gold and Velvet Borders,
iENDID. DECORATIONS,'
SP
I SUDEILIGHT
j . AND '
FIRE BOARD PAPERS,
i
j Gold and Painted Shades,
: GOIaD
WINDOW CORNICES,
BUFF, BLUE.
AND
GREEN HOLLANDS,
WINDOW FKTOBES, all kinds, ,
CORD AND TASSELS,
j BEAUTIFUL PICTURES
AND FRAMES.
1 .
RANDALL & ASTON,"
1 ...
lOOSoutUHlffllSt.
' COLUMBUS. O.
1
N.jB. Landlords and persons wlsal.g qoastllle f
Paper will make money by buying at as. Oomotry
Merchant and person from abroad will do wall t call
and teen. aprll l-dSmeod R. AA.
x
Ml ST BE SOLD!
ALL THE GOODS
AT STORE
I Town Street.
TO SUIT THE TIMES!
WAR! WAR!! ; WAR II!'.
OWIWO TO THE WAR BETWEEN
theDnlon and the Bunny SouUi, I have ooooluded
ALL MY GOODS,
I ' BTfjf
nnLow ooot.
Th stock consists of th largut lot of
WHITE GOODS,
la the city of Columbus:
JACONETS,
CABBEICS,
BBJLUAsTTS, .
ESSZBALOAS,
XITIXf,
vtimi
boit rnnsH cambrics, '
vULL&RS, ED81KUB. IXLKT BIATD,
hobieet, ran. BTJTTObTI,
8TJSPERDERS, HOOKS AkTD I YES,
and all kind of
NOTIONS AND SMALL WARES;
the beat HOOP SKIRTS InCelombaa, aad at lb
lowttt priot, ,
Wboieaavle and ftetatll. . ,
Then, ladles, all, both great and small,
Come, giv me a call, - - ' 1
And then you'll find A. X. K. Sroaau '
In all hi Qlory.
a. W. X. BTADwvm a.
I
Remember th War I No. 01 Town street.
aprll:d3m
Colombo, Obie.
TO BUSINESS MEN.
A TI EXCELLENT CHANCE EOR
reliable bnslneee men to secure a profitable nil- ''
facturlog business, requiring bat a assail capital u in .
estaklishment and pro.ecaUon.
The manufacture eonstste la ths sppUsaUoa ef a pe
culiar composition or enamel to oossmon red krioks, and
a variety or other building malarial, ornaaMntal archl
teotaral finishings, ceilings, uls for Boers and for -roofing.
Tbisenemel may be tinted of any aoler, free, th
pnreit white to the deepest black, with all the o1m
and shades between. It Imparts to the articles te whloh
It Is e piled a hardneea and durability almoet IswrWlkt,
and a beauty surpassing that of the rarest and moot aoetly '
of the variegated marbles, and, ultke theat, la ampervt
on to mot, lure, and will never fad, stain, Aatsrior-
10. cnuiii ou a iraciionai part a tne price ef ordlaair
marble, ... ;k4... ,
It l alto valuable for table and stand top, maalle
pleces, monument, and an endlaas vmH., mi aih .m- .
elee of staple use. The process of applying th enaatel '
1 simple, wkits th article enameled will Mounaad a
ready sale, affording large proSta. Seapontbl parties
may procure licenses for uanuraatnrln Milar th. M.
ent for any city or prominent lwn la the United State, .
hy applying to the subscriber A small tariff on the ar
ticle manufactured will be required tor th use of ah
Invention. Circular giving full particular wUl ha for
warded to all applicable. .
Th superior merit and betaty of Bile tnameled build
ing material to anything In uss he th nqallfitd bb
dorsement of msny of ths most eminent architect and
seiemtfio men of this and other olUes.
far particulars address - '-'.. .1 .
0HII0 ii IAl,t.'
General Ageau for KoameiedluUit of Materiel,
ape 3m. , , S3 HAB&ATJ ST.. SIW TORC, .
i'--:vu-:jX first;"'; "r..;:-. ':.
SPRING, ANDSlJMEli GOODS
I AGAIN OrFEtt TO THE PUBLIC ' '"''
"an entire new otook of woods la my line, J as Meek- '
ased la Hew Torkal the cheap panic ratee.eli of whloh
I shall tail at th. smallest prints, for Cash. My euetssa
ere and friends are reepectfnlly Invited te call aad exeat-:t
In my Qoods aad Price, as I am determiaed te eell as . .
chsaporohtaner thsa any other koueein Otelty;and
as I do my own Cottlng, and superintend say ra bast-. --.
nss,I fsl assured, from my long .xpertaa tabual
osea, to giv general eathfaetiaa. The fineet tassfc-' " !" "1
memar emplojied. and all work don strtolly t Urn aad
on short notice, and warranted to fit. Stranger visiting
ouretty woaild tnalt their metres thy giving saej a call 1 .' 1
bafors purthaaing slaswti&re. (! . f. a.t,
' " ' Merchant Taller, ''' '
aaarcbSlrdly -" 1, Cor lllih aadTewa sta. r t
D BHING CLOAKS AN It BT T't I
OIMSW STYLES Ssaatfs V ben, Ko. ttttBcuti.
High street, have jMioponed sjewslyln, of Cunt Ci
ODLaa. Basqoma and Bacqoas, su'.'o in ti e -,! and '
most- tyllh snaaaer. Also, ho ,itrk Alwt
lilatchv sttlka, very beavy, dMiiMd exprmly tut
kUntllta and aasqulne. aprilS
9''l
;' 'v
I 0'

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