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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, May 10, 1861, Image 1

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COLUMBUS. OHIO, FKIRMY EVENING. MAY 10, 1861.
IIZ S0LLAS8 rzSTXAB,
InYftrfably In AdTtvne. gj
VOL VII. NO. 288. NEW SEMES.
..I ,1
i "1
I
b. amasr i ar as as w i i . . m. m u , a at - sv as m ' a m m m " ss n b . . ii i. -assets- m . mm v . ,
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DAILY. TRI-WEECIY AND WEEKLY
MANYPENNY & MILLER,
UBUBHJB AHD PB0PBIEI0B8.
B7 Office Mm. 88, 88 and 40, North High St.
"TITIM8 TNVARIABLT IN ADVANOB.
Dally 1 44 $6 00 per year,
By Utt carrior, per week, is
, trl-We3lflT . , . . , . S 0i
antt
0 per year.
WeeUy, " 1 00
trim ot AdrortiMinK by tbe Square.
nqunre 1 yi...$M 00
One " 0 montbi 18 00
3nt " C month! IS 00
3nt u ' 3 months It) 00
One t! month! 8 00
On " 1 month. 6 00
One iqutre 3 weeki. .$4 00
Ons " Swteki.. 3 00
On " lweek... 1 75
On " 3dayi... 1 00
One " Sdyi... 75
Ona " 1 Insertion 50
Diiplayed anrertlMBients half mora Ihtn the abor
mtes. " "
Advertisement! leaded and placed In the eolnmn of
Special Notires," dUmbU ikt ordinary rate.
All notices required to be published by law, legal rates.
If onk-rcd on the Inside exclusively after theflrstweek
per com, more than the above rates; but all inch wll
piiear In the Tri-Weekly without ohsrge.
Uusinens Cards, not exceeding five lines, per year, In
de, 'i 50 per line; outside
- Notlcpi or meetings, charlUbles ocletlei.nr oompanlei,
' kc, half prire.
All trantttnt adwHUmmii tnuit is paid for in
ttlvanct Tie rule wilt not be varied from.
Weekly, same price as the Daily, where the advertiser
seethe Weekly alone. Where 'he Dally and Weekly
t re both osed. then the charge lrthe Weekly will be
ailf the rates of the Vg ,
No ailvertiiement taken except for a definite period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
f. a. b. grams,
Attorney ctt Tjtxwr
' AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Offlce Ambos Building, Opposite Capitol Square.
COl.TJMBOS. OHIO)
OOLXJMBUO
Machine Mannfactiiring Compaoj
M A rtDFACTDltlSI Of
STEM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Caitlng, Mill-Gearing, Machinery..
L60, .
n.vili"oo,d 'W oris.
or iviar DtscairrioM.
COLCirillUS, OHIO.
OIIAS. A MHOS, gup't. P. AMBOB.lTrea.
deoll.lB.W-tf ,,: ,:
W r JoiTb ooo96 ooo oe Vjj' ) '
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton ft Indianapolis!
Through to Indianapolis without Change of Can
and but One Change of Cars between ,
Colnmbni and St. Louis.
THREE TRAINS DAILY FROM COLTJM-
j'. . -.-., - BUS. C .
firstTtrain.
- ' (Dally,. Mondaysexcepted.)
NIOnT EXtHKHS, via Dayton, at 8:45 a. m., stop
ping at London, Xenia, Uayten, Uiddletown and Hamil
ton, arriving at Cincinnati at 8:20 a. m.; Dayton atS:
a. m., IndianopolUat W:f a. m.jet. Louis at 11:50
9 SECOND TRAIN.
ACCOMMODATION, at 8:10 a. m., stopping at all 8bv
Uom between Columbus and Cincinnati and Dayton, ar
riving at Cincinnati 11:03 a. m., Dayton at 9: 15 a. B.,
IndianopoUl af p. m
THIRD TRAIN.
DAT EXPREB8, at 2:30 p. m., itopptng at Alton,
Jefferson, London, Charleston, Oedarvllle, Xenia,
Spring Valley, Corwln, Morrow. Deerfleld, Toiler's.
Loveland, MlUford and Plalnvllle, arriving at Cincin
nati at 7:20 p. m.; Bt. Louis at lit mi Dayton at 5:35 p.
m.; lodlanopollsat 10:3b p. m.
Hleeplna; rr On all Night Train to
Cincinnati and Indian:oli
BAGGAGES CHECKED THKOCOH.
lor farther information and Through Tickets, apply to
U. L. DOUKRTY,
Ticket Agent, Union Depot, Columbus, Ohio. .
K. W. WOODWARD,
. Superintendent, Cincinnati. .
JNO. W. DOHKUTI
JalS
Agent, Oolumbus,
SOMETHING NEW
HOWARD & CO'
1 AMERICAN WATCHES.
s.
0
At I- AT NO. 83, SOUTH HIGH ST.,
and examine our new maae oi
AMERICAN WATCHES.
manufactured by X. HOWARD k. CO., Boston, Man.
These Watches are far superior to anything ever offered
m the nnblle. heretofore. Having the exoluslve agency.
I can tell them at prioes to suit the times. I have just
received a large stock of. ..-
AMERICAN, WATCHES,
manufactured br APPLET0N, TRACT, fc CO ; also, a
fine assortment of
ENGLISH AND SWISS WATCHES,
In Oold and Silver Cues, at Panle prices. :
' jan23 , . ' W.J. SATAOB.
Juit Beeelredl
-i Art nF. CH CHECK and BLACK
lUvl TKA8 10 bags prime Rio Oonee.
150 pockeU old Dutch Government Java Coffee.
7 S bugs Ceylon Coffee.
SOObbla. standard Whlie Sugars, eoastotlng of Pow
dred.Chruaaed, Granulated A and BOoffee. ..
50 quintals George Bank Ood&sh. .
20bble. Meis and No. 1 Mackerel. ,
5 tea. Pick Salmon. . .
lOObx. Layer Raislna. , ,
50 hf. box do do' - . i .
l(M)qr. box do de . , ,
100 M Olgars, different brand and grades.
- nov27 , wm. Mcdonald.
M. C. LILLEY
And Blank-Book Manofantrirer,
ITORTH BISR ITXEET, COLUMBTJS, OHIO
rARlILY FJLOUH. .':
TtTHITK WHEAT) BRANDED
"SNO'VV'FLAKB." ' ',
from " Bamett Mills," Springfield, 0. the best brand
flour brougtil to our marui. eaturactloh guanuiteod
yor saie onij saitnuuvnAiiirs, .
noVJ7 ,,, , .,, 104 South High street.
a I.ETHtnitM KID flLOTEk.
A. All Uses and colors Just opened at BaYhs,'"
Ueo.ll.
No. 28 South High street.
T11E JTltlTTJAli JLUB .... ...
IN$URACE.-COMPMV
, jshbtw, york. , .
P.1 8. Winston, President. Isaac Asbatt, Secretary,
Net Caela Aaaote, Febroarr If 1801s
O0,000,000.,7ll-
mcrmt company is tux vmtsd statxsi
' IDAU th' Pro&ti are divided among the insuradII
Applications and Pamphlets okd tie haS by applying
FRED'K J FAY i Aoint,
ftrptnUr's BnUdlaf, 117. lanta Hlgn Itreet
pr.waiat
WORCESTER'S
ROYAL QUARTO DICTIONARY.
The Latest la Largest Tha Beit,
The Cheapest Became the Best, '
tTlio Moat HcllabJ" standard Au-.
tnoritr of th EngUab Laagaage." ,
8lt Hundrti Eminent Mucator of Ohio,
"TH1 BEST KNOtlSn BI0TI0NART IXTANT."
Literary Men Sveryxohert.
"ileie are upwards of a Hundred Thousand Words,
whose multifarious meanings and derivations, together
with theli correct spelling, and pronunetatlon are dearly
sot before the eye.'' . , , , . i ,v
Cincinnati Gmmeroiali
Head the Decltlont of the Memtert of the Ohio State
ftacher'i Auociation,
The undersigned, member of the Ohio Stat Teachers'
Association, adopt and aim to nse in teaching, writing
and speaking, the orthography and pronunciation of
Worcester's Roval Quarto Dlotlonary, and we moat oor
dlally recommend it as the most reliable standard au
thority of the Ingllsh language, a It Is now written and
spoken. -
, Loaiw Akdriws, President Kenyon College. '""
M. D. Ltoarrr, Superintendent Zanesvllle School!.
Tiios. W. HaRVKT, Bup't Maasi Ion Union Schools.
M. V. Oowdiii, Bup't Publlo gohoole, Sandusky. -'
Jown Lthch, Bup't Publlo Sohoois, Olrolerllle.
S. N. Sajtroan, Principal 0 loveland female Semina
ry. -.!.
Wat. Mitchill, Bup't Publlo Schools, Mt. union.
Joan Oodui, Principal Stata Normal School, Minne
sota. , .1..:
Orans NaaoM, Principal Fourth, Intermediate School,
Cincinnati.
H. 8. Martin, Bup't Canton Union School!. '
Eotrm Rraab, Principal McNeely Normal School. :
Km T. Tin-iK, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio University.
Wa. W. Kd wards, Bup't Troy Union School.
A. . Homin, Principal West High Bchool, Cleve
land. 8. A. Norton, Anoclato Principal High School, Cleve
land. Tueodori Btirmdo, Principal High School, Cleve
land.
R. P. Hcnirrow, Principal Oleveland Institute.
J. A. Gar? uld, President of E lectio Institute, Hi
ram. W. L. Harris, Prof, of Chemistry, Ohio W, esleyan
TJnlveraity.
H. H. Barrky, Ex Cemmlssloner of Common Schools,
Ohio.
. James Monroe, Prof. Rhetoric, Oberlln College..
Taos. Hill, President Antloch Oollege.
0. W. H. Oathoart, Prof. Mathematics, High
Bchool, Dayton.
B. 0. Crumbadoii, Prof, tangnage, High Bchool.
Dayton. ' ' ;
8. M. Barber, Bup't Union Bchooli, Ashland.
Uor than Sim Hundred other PretidtnU of ColU
gee, Profeeeore, Author and JHetingvithed Biveoy
tori, have endorted the above lenUment.
PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES IN OHIO.
Marietta Oolleo "It Is truly a magnificent work,
an honor to ths author, the publishers, and the whole
country." President Andrews. -,
Onto Weiletah Unitersitt It exeeeds my expecta
tions. It will be my guide in orthography and pronun
ciation, and will often bo consulted by me for Its neat
and accurate definitions." President Thompson.
W. R. Eclectic College. "Heretofore wo have used
Webster's prthography. At a recent meeting of our
faculty. It was decided to change It to conform to that
of Worcester's Royal Quarto Dictionary." President
Garfield. v :"
Western Rerrvr Oollioe. "I find It worthy of
cordial approbation." President Hitchcock.
Oberun College. "It more than meets my expecta
tions. I recommend It as the standard authority In
orthoepy to my children and my pupils." President
Morgan. ' . -.t t i-i,.
Aimocn Comal. "I adopt and aim to use In teach
ing, writing and speaking, the orthography and - pronun
ciation of Worcester's Royal Quarto Dictionary."
President Hill. ' -a i .
"In all my writing, speaking, and teaching, I bavs en
deavored to conform to the rnlea for orthography and
pronunciation as contained In Worcester's Dictionary.'
Horace Mann, late President.
'. KamroN College, Oanbtsr. 'I most cordially recent
mond It aa the meet reliable standard authority of the
Snglish language as It la bow written and spoken."
President Andrews. t. W
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS, OF OHIO.
From Rev. Anton Smyth, Commieeioner of Common
School in Ohio,
"The Dictionary la an taper tshabW monument to the
learning and industry of Its author, and aa honor to the
world of letters. The mechanical execution la far supe
rior to that of any other Lexicon with which I am ac
quainted. -
From Hon. H. JT. Barney. Ka-OommluUmer of
School in Ohio.
"The most reliable standard authority of , the lan
guage." . ....
' what ttir' ,;
Leading; Newspaper of Ohio Say.
From the Cleveland Berald of March 28.
The orthography of the Worcester Dictionary Is that
used hv most, if not all. authors of distinction In this
country and England, and conforms to the general usage
of ordinary writers anaspeaxers.
Whatever nreindlcee mar have existed previously, a
careful itudy of this volume will invariably be followed
by warm appreciation oi lis greai menu, anu s ueaire
to add it to the well selected library, be it large or small,
It la a library In itself, and will remain an imperisha
ble record of the learning of its compiler. .: .. a -
From the Cincinnati Commercial of AprU SO,
Here are upwards of a hundred thousand words good.
bad and Indifferent whoee multifarious meanings and
derivations, together with their correct spelling and pro
nunciation, are set clearly before the eye.- The work Ii
unquestionably the greatest Thesaurus of English Words
ever published.
From the Cleveland Plaindtaler of Sept. 20, I860.
Evident!- Woecbter's Royal Qoarto Dictiohart i
not only the latt, trut the sen- work of the kind ever is
sues, ana can ny no possiDUify suuer oy comparison r
controversy. . , .. .. ,
From the Toledo Blade of May 29.
Aa to nonnnciATioN. Worcester is the Staxoaed
followed hv our best authors; in definition! he leavea
nothing to be desired, and in OaTaooRAnrr it li sufficient
to say that Worcester can be aafely followed. .
iNonAirx & BnAGq, ;',
PnMlaucra, Bookeellere Stationers,
NO. 191 SUPERIOR ST., CLEVELAND, OIITQ,
matO V i . ! il .!. l
to
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT '
LEE INSURANCE COMPANY,
CP .
DlTldeua January l 1 86 1 45 Pr Cemu
ASSETS. ....... . . J,81S,556 50,
Statement January l, I8ei ,
Balance, per itatement Jan. 1st, I860.,. .;. 13,406,58 1 39
tteoaivea lor rremiums aur
ln the seer 10. 1763.033 55
Received for Interest during
o : r. . ;
,n: f.. .
.! vm
it. i .
the year I860... 8l,0lf IB
Total reeelnts for 1800.... 1977.067 7
PaldOlalmsbyDeath,207,O5O 00
Paid Policies aurren .
dared ............ 41,111 an ' "
Paid Salaries, Pest- ' ' -
am. Taxes.
change, etc....... 31.620 54
Paid Commissions to -
.Ii. , '
Agent. ....(.. ai,a?5 30
Paid Physicians' fees. 8,M 75 " "
.1 : in jirf
Paid nnaltiee.-.. 1,317 w . ' v-'
Psld DIvMendi dur- .'
log the year .100,500 75 505,091 3
-111,078 14
Net Balance January lit, 1P01..'i.',.V..93,8i9,558 50
. ; , ASSETS, .., ,.;.r .,
Cash on hand , 90,0284
Bonds and Mortgages on Real
state, worth uoubw ino - i i - -
amount loaned...... 8,327,841 68
v. .v.
Premium Notes, on Pollciea i-i n
In force, only drawing o per
eent. Interest... 1,270,884 17
Real EsUi ...i... 90.8M 27
lioansonScrip.... .. . 5,03144
Premiums, Hotel and Oath, in .. ,.
.1 n
l.h. i
coune oi transmission.... v,m a
Total Assets
3,613,556
TST5 Policies la force, Insuring 96)420,538
1,435 new Policies bave been Issued taring the year,
After a careful calculation of the present value of ths
outstanding Policies of the Company, and having
ntoeteary amount in reserve tnereior, luo vireoton
have declared a DrvrDxiro of 45 percent, on the Premi
ums paid at lha tmhla mm. to all notlclaa for life In force:
Issued prior to January 1, I860, payable according to th
Rates tor nil kinds of life ConUhgenclesrPrcsneot-"
usee, B tatamcots, and AnDlleatlons. will ba furnished
without mutes, at the Office r igtaclee of. ths . Oonr
Pany.;
;?STUF- AnwRBOPreslrJenVi"
' V (tUT JlltM
DIHJ. O.MIIXHR, MorM.ryt
' ('' M EI
- V. RUV BHJ VIM PMltibnl- "uu
'vw lohnioa'Blocift 1
i , i ' 'Q"''""bns. f,
March 28, 18S1
, 1
BunavnB v enrETIHngKtvn
S1URTIN08, all widths, ot Bt eetebmted make
now offered In greatest Variety and at very low r rlreet
aprDS f..f y " ' rTe.MSothHigtjei,A
tlBKIi
Daily, per year.
...to 00
... 3 00
... 100
Trl-Weekly, per sear
Weekly, per year,
Policy vs. Sentiment.
' In both parte of the oountrr, these two are,
to a certain extent, antagonlstio to eaob other.
True .policy at the South would bare arrested
the precipitate itepa whioh have hurried seven
St tea Into open rebellion, and have left the
rest In a condition, to say the least, of hesita
ting disloyalty. The sentiment of the whole
South baa recently tended to sympathy with
secession; but this was owing not to original
and absolute dissatisfaction with the Union, but
to want of confidence in the North, resulting
from misapprehension and misguided passion.,
i At the North, on the other hand, recent events
hate bad no little influence so to modify the
course of sentiment, as to affect Injuriously the
policy best to be observed for the benefit of the
whole. We sincerely trust that the course of
feeling to which we refer is less aotive and
powerful than many imagine; we have that con
fidence in the right reason of our fellow-oitl-xens,
to believe that they will soon see bow
Imperative is the obligation upon them to carry
on this oonfllot with the intelligent and high
principled sobriety becoming freemen and men
capable of self-government.
'The misapprehension at the South has grown
out of an idea tealously inoulcated by the pro
moters of the rebellion, that their local institu
tions, and with them their very peace and per
sonal safety, were endangered. The feeling at
the North bas arisen from a Just belief that the
seceders, without sufficient cause of grievance,
bave begun a revolution, fatal, if not repress
ed, to all that is comprehended in the sacred
name of country. On this impregnable ground
we stand against them. But now, as ever be
fore, it is our duty as Christians and as men, to
disabuse the minds of misguided iellowci-tizens
of every mistaken impression which has led
them to commit this great error and wrong;
and to convince tbem, If possible, that we seek,
not their barm, but the common good. Thedif
ference between carrying on this great conflict
in the right spirit and the wrong, is that be
tween an honorable, happy and constitutional
settlement of a controversy lull of our own fate
and that of ooming generations of mankind, on
the one part and on the other, Irrepressible
anarchy, fatal to both parties fatal to civil
government and a gulf of wo and misery in
which all our hopes and interests are only too
certain to be sunk and overwhelmed.
In a word, the force necessary to be employed
mnst be guided by reason, justice, and law.
We seek our own rights we must not deny
them to others. We contend for the Constitu
tionthe contest must proceed upon Constitu
tional grounds. We fight for the honor of the
flagi-and as men of honor we must see to it,
that It is still the "flag of the Free," and un
sullied by any perversion ot that glorious sym
bol of our Union to purposes of injustice or
cruelty. -
Respect for the laws, reverence for the Con
stitution, undying love for the Union these are
our guiding stars to a final triumph, whether
Sained in peace or war, surpassing any other in
le history of the Republic, if we are only true
to the principles by which they appeal to every
noble conviction of our hearts and minds.
-The policy adopted by the Administration
will lead popular sentiment right. We refer
our leaders to the letter of Garret Davis, late a
member of Congress from Kentucky, detailing
his recent conversation with Mr. Lincoln. The
President is resolved to perform his constitu
tional duty; and in the discharge of this, he
will bave every patriotic heart and hand in the
North at bis service. The language of the
President, as given by Mr. Davis, deserves to be
pondered and dwelt upon. It Is well calculatca
to) give assurance to the South that the iears rf
interference , witn tneir domestic usages are
groundless,' and that he intends to take no
measures but those required of him by the
Constitution, the laws and his oath of office.
On the contrary, it furnishes his pledge that he
will defend their rights, and thus holds ou', to
them the strongest inducements to dismiss their
pprebensions on this score, ana since tnese are
groundless, to return to their allegiance. He
said
'That he Intended to make no attack, direct or indi
rect, upon the Institutions or property of any State; but,
on the contrary, would defend them to the full extent
with which the Constitution and laws of Congress have
vested the President with the power. And that he did
not Intend to invade with an armed force, or make any
military or naval movement against any State, unless
she or her people should make it necessary by a formi
dable resistance of the authority and laws ot the United
States."
And this declaration, so distinct and unquali
fied, is of the utmost consequence in another
point of view, since it is totally counter to the
harsh and vindictive spirit which a certain class
at the North is disposed to indulge and encour
age. - We have never supposed the Administra
tion could bave any sympathy with that spirit,
which, if carried out, oould only be fatal to the
Union cause. '
Uln alluding to the hesitation of Kentucky to
famish troops, according to the requisition up
on her, Mr. Lincoln based his regrets upon a
broad foundation, well adapted before lone to
call Into effloient action the reviving spirit of
loyalty In the Border State. He told Mr. Da
vis he greatly regretted that Kentucky
Had not acted m to the principle of her great states
man now no more, and for which she cast her vote In the
late Presidential election, 'the Union, the Constitution,
and the Enforcement of the Laws.' "
' For these erand objects, therefore, Mr. Lin
coln, and with bim bis administration, are to
carry on the government. More than this we
cannot ask; and they are amply enough to stir
the whole national heart, it is unquestionably
in -response to this ennobling principle, that
hearts and arms bave so readily obeyed the oall
of the eovernment. There is id this no subju
gation of the South, no reduction of their States
to the condition oi conquered provinces, no ex
termination of their Inhabitants by tire and
aword. no Interference with their domestio in
stitutions bat the protection of all their rights
and privileges hnrter the constitution and the
Union, and an invitation to them to lay down
their rebellious weapons and bid their country
return onee more to peace Boston Courier,
50
Whit of thk SlavisT It Is reported that
Got. Spragne bas returned to their owner, Hon.
George W. Hughes, of Washington, three slaves
that followed the Kuoae isiana regtment some
ten miles, hoping to escape. We also bare a
report from Fort Monroe that they are much
annoyed by fugitive slaves seeking refuge there,
bat In all cases they are returned. This action,
and the proposition or Uen. Butler to suppress a
nexro insurrection, may seem monstrous to
som harum ecarum zealots, whoegard this as
an opportunity to periect wnat Jonn Brown tail
ed to accomplish; but If there is one duty we
can owe the South now, or that we do owe the
world and each other, It is to show that our sole
and only object is the maintenance of the Con
stitutional Government, and that we will not
war npon any local institutions that do not stand
in hostility to the government, and least of all
will we turn barbarians and inoite slaves to the
murder of women and children.' To do that
would sink us to a level with the Sepoys of In
dla or the maddened butchering hordes of Syria,
No none ot thisi we go to war to sustain tbe
national banner, and the National Government,
and our own acts must show, and will show, bow
riMlnded hal been the South in lunnofllne? that
we wished to violate their rights, disturb their
interfere with- their local
property, or
ana nanus. ntuouryjon it erata.
' DmocBaTl in thc FiEiD.- The Harrlbbnrt.
eorresDondent of the New York Herald states
that at least two-tnirasoi tnose mat are enlist
ing in Pennsylvania voted the Democratic tick
et. The Cleveland Plaindtaler savs that ot tbe
companies whioh enlisted In the Western Re-r
serve (Glddings District), five to one were
Democrats. W do not regara this as any thin
atranse. for the Democrat were always, an
oder all clrcomBUDoes,'' the warm friends of
ijthe Ulon,JPMftfca, rMiv
Adventurers of an Aeronaut.
FROM CINCINNATI TO SOUTH CAROLINA IN NINE
HOURS.
np-nf T r.. R. Lowe made a balloon as
xmolrm tmm Cincinnati on the SOth of April,
atnrtinn-ahnnt five o'clock in the morning. He
nnuxri nrr n&rta of Kentucky, tbe Cumberland
mnnnulna. and nart of Virginia. Ha thus de-
alhia tha Uttflt mrtlon of his trl II : '
F.oilno- nnaa Imb I should set into South
Carolina before! oould get out of the current
formed by the mountains, 1 aiscnargpa quau
tity of ballast and again ascended, with the
hone of clearing them to the north. I continued
tn AUnriaro-A wefr'ht and let off gas until I at
tained an elevation of 25,000 feet above the
sea. Here the thermometer fell to 10 degrees
below zero; the water, frnit and other things
Cm. nrl it rednired all tbe doming and
blankets I had to keep sne warm. , '
It was now twelve o'clock, aed I could die
tincniah thA hln ocean in the eastern horizon
Not having sufficient ballast to remain at that
great altitude, trie Daiioon gruuij u o
to within twelve thousand feet of the earth.
Hnrn the current was a little SOUtb Of efllt
Auain. and Itnnwlno- that the coast in that di
rection was an uninhabitable swamp, and being
desirous of landing near a railroad, I concluded
to descend and looTt out a good plaee. I heard
tbe firing of cannon, and concluded I was near
same village; and on nearing tbe earth, over 4
plantation, caused great consternation among
the inhabitants, who seemed to be entirely un
acquainted with such a scene, and it was some
minutes before any one could be persuaded to
approach; and when they did they would not
render me any assistance, put vurcawueu ue
struotlon to the hellish'' contrivance that bad
frightened them so; but I learned of tbem that
I was in the township of Spartaneburg, near
the line of North and South Carolina. They
would not believe that I had sailed from tbe
State of Ohio that morning, and Informed me
that thev would be very thankful If I would
leave, and ordered the negroes to let go of the
ropes they were holding.
Beine desirous of setting near a railroad, I
threw out a bag of sand and commenced to as
cend. At that moment one of the bystanders,
seeing the bag of sand fall, sang out, 'Hello,
stranger, come back; I reckon you bave lost
your baggage." I arose 7,000 feet, and there
remained until I was waited some twenty miles
further to the East, which occupied about half
an hour more, during which time I beard many
discharges of what I took to be muskets. Not
knowing, but being apprehensive that tbe globe
over my head was the object of the firing, I
prepared for making all the signals possible
when I should again near the earth, but while
I was thus elevated I had no fear, for It was
impossible to send a ball within a mile of me.
When within half a mile of the earth I heard
loud cries of terror, and saw people running In
all directions; but I was determined to land for
good this time, let come what would, and in
five minutes more tbe anchor took a firm hold
in a short scrub oak, and the car gently touch
ed the ground. Thus fast, the globe gently
swinging to and fro, presented a very life like
appearance. I soon noticed some heads peeping
around tbe corner of a log bnt that stood near
by, and In which there seemed to be persons In
great distress. I called to them to come and as
sist me, at which they took no notice until I
threatened to cut loose and run over them, after
which two white boys, three old ladies and three
negroes, in a body, ventured within twenty feet
ot me.
At that moment a gust of wind caused the bal
loon to swine over near the ground, and a gener
al stampede took place, which caused me to
abandon all hope of getting any assistance; but
after telling them it was fastened to a tree, and
would not hurt any of them, they again ventur
ed op, in company with a stalwart looking young
woman, six feet men and well proportioned, and
took hold of the edge of the car. I inquired
what was tbe matter in the house, and was told
that several old nersons were craving, as thev
thought the day of judgment had come. 1 then
asked if there were any white men about. They
said thev expected them every minute; that they
saw the great thing coming, and bad run for
their guns. Ibis was ratner an unpleasant
piece of information, and I was determined to
keep as large a crowd around me as possible.
Ia a few minuets men with muskets began to
collect, but seeing women, children and negroes
surrounding tbe air traveler, there seemed to be
no use for firearms; so I discharged the gas un
molested, and packed np the machine ready to
leave. By this time several more rough looking
fellows arrived, and threatened destruction to
the 'devil that could travel through the air one
adding that bo had followed ten miles, and had
shot at it six times without any effect.
The tall young woman aforesaid assured me
that there was no danger, for all the men then
in the neighborhood were cowards, as all the
brave ones bad gone to the wars, notwithstand
ing they all declared they were not afraid; how
ever, promising to give myself up when I ar
rived at the village, they consented I should
leave under a guard of nine men. Procuring a
team, we started for Unionville, a village nine
miles distant, and arrived that evening, halting
in front of a stone building with a small check
ered window. A council was held with the
jailor, who positively refused to allow any
such animal as tney aeacriDea to come into the
building. 1
I was then taken to a hotel, and soon found
persons of intelligence, who assured me that I
was among irienas, nere i remained over tne
Sabbath, and was called npon by many persons
of fine eduoatlon, who Informed me that of all
the places In the South, the spot where 1 landed
the inhabitants were the most ignorant, for
thev could neither read nor write.
The next morning I started en route for home,
but news bad reached Colombia, the capital of
South Carolina, that a man bad brought papers
from Cincinnati, Ohio, only nine hours old. I
was therefore at first arrested on suspicion of
being a bearer of dispatches. r
This brought together a number of learned
and scientific gontlemen, who at once knew me
by reputation, and saw, my position, and t was
immediately , released, and funded with" a
passport by the Mayor of Columbia, .From
this time until I reached Cincinnati, no more
impediments were placed In my.way.
Protection of the Troops from Sun Strokes.
We are Indebted for the following imoortant
practical suggestions to tne non. s. it. Hag
gles, wno nas a son serving in tne seventn
Regiment:
Experience bas showni that troops serving1n
warm climates greatly need protection from son
strokei often quite as dangerous and fatal as
the fire of the enemy.
The judicious care and toresigbt or the Brit
ish officers in the recent campaigns in India and
ia the Crimea, protected their soldiers from the
danger, by thick white linen can covers, having
a cape protecting tne Dace or tne necK, wnicb
reflected instead of absorbed the heat of the
sun.
The redone in and about WasbinetoD, lav
from latitude 37 dee. to 40 dee., In which onr
troops may soon take the field, have an average
temperature quite aa high as Chat of Sebaatopol
in latitude 45 dee. ' : '
An exact pattern of tbe cap-cover osed in the
Crimea was furnished last week, by a British
officer, to an association of patriotic ladies in
this oity, who have already completed one thou
sand for the nse of one of our regiments at
Washington. .
Another association ot lames nas since enter'
ed on a similar labor of love, to supply tbe same
number to another reeiment. '
We trust that these examples may be follow
ed. without delay, nntll all our troops shall be
protected from needless exposure and hardship
on the scorohing plains of tho South. "
i . There is no difficulty or delay in forwarding
these cap-covers to the regiments. ' A travel
ling trnnk of ordinary size will hold at least
eight hundred, and can be sent by express
twenty tour nours i lmti.
Scascitt or FiacussioN Cars. There ts
rreat scaroity of percussion caps in the Southern
Confederacy, and a heavy bonus is said to have
been offered by the State authorities of Virginia
to any one who will establish a percussion sap
manufactory in mat state. 7 ... , ,?, c
in
a
STONE'SBAZAAR.
No. 4 Gwvnxie Block.
A. P. STONE & O HAMA.
A HE NOW REOEITINO THEIR WIN
TUB GOODS, and invite the public to Inspect
them. Mo inch stock of floods has ever been brought to
this market. The Booth, in consequence of the failure
of ine grain crop, B&i not been able to purchase the us
ual quantity of rich goods, and this fact bas forced the
Importer! to cell them at publlo auction. Onr buyer
(Mr. Stone) being In New York at these large Bales, took
advantage of them, and we can and will sell our goods
nere, at less than aoy one wno purcnasea two weeks since,
paid for them In New Vork. Our stock is complete In
every department of
ELEGANT DRESS SILKS,
OTTOMAN VELOURS,
BROCHE VALENCIAS,
PRINTED MERINOS,
PRINTED COBURGS,
. DYED CO BUGS;
BLACK ALPACAS,
ORLEANS,
FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
ALL WOOL DELAINES,
POPLINS, PRINTS,
DELAINES.
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS!
Five Thausand Dollars Worth
Bought in One Day,
At one liall the Cost of Inspoitation.
LADIES' FURS,
In all Varieties, of tho Celebrated
nannfatare of C. O. Gnn
there Sc Son.
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT,
Men's, Ladle end OhlMren'i Under Shirts and Drawers;
Ladles, Misses and Children's Hosiery of all kinds, in
Wool and Lamb's Wool; Fleecy Lined and Ootton Oloves
of every make.
ALSO
A complete assortment of all the usual varie
ties of
LADIES' CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES,
OVERCOATINGS,
TWEEDS,
FLANNELS,
RIBBONS,
DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladies and Gent's Linen Cambric Hand
kerchiefs, &o., &c.
To persons who call on ns, we pledge our words to
show them the largest, best and cheapest stock of Goods
ever seen In this market, or pay tbem one dollar per
hour while looking.
decl-dlivtawlt. btom et U111K1A.
Cure Cough, Cold, Hoartenet, lnilu
enta, any Iritation orSorenet of the
J hroat. Believe the Hawking Oough
in Oontumption, Bronheitie, Aetha
ma, and Catarrh, Clear and give
tlrength to the voice of
PlTllLlU KPFAKEHS,
and SINUEHN.
Vew are aware of the importance of checking a Oongh
or "Common Oold" In Ite Brat stage; that which in the
beginning would yield to a mild remedy, if negleoted,
soon attacks the lungs. " Brown' t Bronchial Trochee,"
containing demulcent Ingredients, allay Pulmonary and
Bronchial irritation.
BROWN'S "That trouhle In my Throat, (for which
the 'iroCAee are a speciucj naving made me
TROCHES often a mere whisperer."
n r. WILLIS.
BE0WTT8 "I recommend their nse to Public BeaK-
ers."
Tnoansa bev. e. chapin
"Have proved extremely serviceable (or
BEOWN'S noARSiwsas."
i REV. HENRY WARD BEECHES.
TROCHE9I "Almost instant relief in the distressing
llauorol Dreaining peculiar to asTniia. ,.
BROWN'S! RBV. A..O. IOGLBSTOH.
"Contain no opium or anytning Injun
TROCHES ous." DR. A. A. HAYES,
vtemut, Moium.
BROWN'S "A simple and pleasant combination for
Looons, kc
TROCHES SR. u. r. BIQELOW,
Motion.
BROWN'S "Beneficial in BRowmms."
UK. J. r.W.LANH. .
TROCHES Boston.
"I have proved tbem excellent for Wnoor-
BROWN'S moOocan."
KKV. 11. W. WARREN.
TROCnEB e Boeton.
"Beneficial when compelled to sneak, suf-
BROWN'S ferlng from Com."
RBV. B. P. J. ANDERSON,
TROCHES St. Moult.
"BrrECTual, In removing Hoarseness and
BROWN'S Irritation of the Throat, so common with
BnuKERsand BiKonts."
TROCHES Prof. STACY JOHNSON.
Zrfl vrange, Ua.,
BROWN'S Teacher of Music, Sonlhern
Female College.
TROCHES
"Great benefit when taken before and after
BROWN'S
preaching, aa they prevent Hoarseness. From
their past street, X ttiinu tney will be of per
manent advantage to me."
TROCHES
RRv. B. ROWLEY, A.M.,
President of Athens Oollege, Tenn.
BROWN'S
TROCHES
irpSold by all Druggists at TWENTY-
ROBERTS k 8AMOKL.
Druggists, 21 North High street.
8. E. SAMUEL St CO.,
65 South High street, Columbus, 0.
mar7-deodlm
TO BUSINESS MEN.
A N EXCELLENT CHANCE GOR
1Y reliable business men to secure a profitable manu
facturing business, requiring but a small capital In lis
establishment ana proiecution.
The manufacture consists In the application of s pe
culiar composition or enamel to common red bricks, and
a variety of other building material, ornamental archi
tectural finishings, ceilings, tiles for floors and for
rooting.
This enamel may be tinted of any color, from the
purest while to the deepest black, with all the colors
and shades between. It Imparts to the articles to which
It la applied a hardness and durability almost Incredible,
and a beauty surpassing that of the rarest and most costly
of the variegatea marbles, ana, nniiae tnem. is imnervi-
ona to moisture, and will never fade, ataln. or deterior
ate, costing but a fractional part oi tne price of ordinary
marble.
ltia also valuable ror table ana stand tops, mantle-
pieces, monuments, and an endless variety of other arti
cles of staple use. The process of applying tne ensmel
s s mnle. wnue tne articles enameiea win command e
ready aale, affording large profits. Respomible parties
may procure licenses tor manutacruring nnaer the pat
ent for any city or prominent town in the United states.
bv anolying to the subscritier. A small tariff on the ar
ticles manufactured will be requ'red for the use of ths
Invention. Circulars giving full particulars will be for
warded to an applicants. -
The superior merit and beenty of this enameled build'
tmr material to anything in use has the nnaualified In
dorsement of many of tbe most eminent architects and
sclentifio men of this ana other cities.
for particulars address
JOBBJSOir PBALi;
General AgcnU for Enameled Building Material,
ap9 d3m. S3 NASSAU ST., NEW YORK.
FIRST
OPENING OF THE SEASON ;
OF
SPRING- AND SUMMER GOODS
AT P. ROSE'S.
I AGAIN OFFER TO THE FUIILIO
"an entire new stock of Goods in my line. Just purch
ased in New X or a at wecneapeet pttnio races ,au oi wntcn
I shall sell at the smallest prouta, ror uaah. Sly custom'
an and friends are respectfully invited to call and exam'
Ine my Goods and Prices, aa I am determined to sell as
cheap or ohcaper than any other house in the oity; and
aa I do my own Cutting, and superintend my own busi
ness, I feel assured, from my long experience in busi
ness, to give general satisfaction. The finest ot work
men are empioyea, ana an won uuue smcuy to time ana
on abort notice, and warranted to fit. Strangers visiting
onrclty would consult their interest by giving me a oall
before purchasing elsewhere. f. R09
f. R09B.
Merchant Tailor.
' mareh89-dly
Cor. High and Town sts.
SPRING CLOAKS ANT BASOINES
O NBW BTYLKS Bail is Sc Sen. Ho. 9 South
High street, have Jus t opened new styles of Cloth Oi-
cnbiES. Basatiinfl and Bacons, mads in the newest and
nnat atvllih manner. Also, super rsaam
KletcK Ml IKa, very heavy, assigned expressly
Mantillas and Basqnines. . . ., lapnu
A OAXID.
TT AVIWG THIS PAT 'HOLD CR
UL I
Stock ot Groceries to 0. 8. DBHINQ . we cheerfallv
rooonmsna nun hi our vm pauuui ana menus.
. Tuva. WaUU ft mm,
: .Colombo Mai wth, laBi-tpi-atr,. ...
t
I
Scrofula, or King's Evil,
is a eoiiatitutioiuil .disease, a corruption of the
blood,' lir tvliiuli tliis.iiuid becomes vitiutal,
weak, huil poor. Heing in the circulation, it
pprvniln the tvliole body, and may burnt out
in diiuse on uny purt of it. No orgun ia free
from itn iillai'k, nor is there one wliith it may
not dost i oy. Tlif Hciiiritlou4 taint is variously
cau: !'d by ini ri'tiiiiil dist-uxp, low living, dis
ordered or unhealthy food, impure nir, filth
and iiltliy habits, tho depreaaing Vices, and,
above nil, by the tvnereal infection. What
ever bo iU-oi-igin, it' is hereditary in the con
stitution, du.wendmij " from parents to children
unto the thud and fourth (Feneration ;" indeed,
it seems to lie the rod of Him who says, "I
will visit the iniquities of the futherg upon
their children." . '
Its ciibets commence by deposition from the
blood of corrupt or ulcurous matter, which, in
the lung-, liver, mid internul organs, is termed
tubercles; in the glands, swellings; and on
the Biirliii c, eruptions or sores. This foul cor
ruption, which genders in tho blood, depresses
the energies of life, go that scrofulous constitu
tiou not only suifcr from scrofulous com
plaints, but they have far less power to with
stand the attacks of other diseases; conse
quently . vast numbers perish by disorders
which, although not scrofulous in their nature,
are utill rendered fatul by litis taint in tho
system. Host of the consumption which de
ciniiileB the human family has its origin directly
in tliis scrofulous contamination; and many
destructive diseases of tho liver, kidneys, brain,
nnd, indeed, of nil the organs, arise from or
are aggravated by the same cause.
One quarter of all our people are scrofulous i
their persons are ir vaded by this lurking in
fection, nnd their health is undermined "by it.
To cleanse it from the system we must renovate
the blood by an alterative medicine, and in
vigorate it by healthy food and exercise.
Such a medicine we supply in
AYER'S
Compound Extract of Sarsaparilla,
the most effectual remedy which the medical
skill of our times can devise for tins every
where prevailing and fatal malady. It is com
bined from the most active remedials that have
been discovered for the expurgation of this foul
disorder from the blood, and the rescue of the
system from its destructive consequences.
Hence it should be employed for the cure of
not only Scrofula, but also those other, affec
tions which arise from it, such as Emjptitb
and Skin Diseases, St. Anthony's Fine,
Rose, or Erysipelas, Pimples, Pustules,
Blotches, Blains and Boils, Tumors, Tetter
and Salt IIiieum, Scald Head, Kinoworm,
Hhkcmatism, Syphilitic and MeucuuialUus
easus, Ditorsv, Dyspepsia, Deiui.ity, and,
indeed, ai.i. Complaints aiusino from Yitia
ti:o ou Impure Blood. .The popular belief
in " impurity of the blood " is founded in truth,
for scrofula is a degeneration of the blood. The
particular purpose and virtue of this Sarsapa
rilla is to purify and regenerate this vital fluid,
without which sound health is impossible in
contaminated constitutions.
ATER'S
Ague Cure,
ron the speedy cube or
Intermittent Fewer, erFeverandtgne,
Remittent Fewer, Cklll . Fewer, Dumb
Asrue, Periodical Headache, or Blliowe
Headache, and Billon Fever, Indeed
for the -whole claaa of dlaeaaea ortglnnt-
mg in otiiary ntrangemeat, eamea uy
the Malaria, of Biiaamatle Conntrlea.
We are enabled here to offer the community a
remedy which, while it cures the above complaints
with certainty, is still perfectly harmless in any
quantity. Such a remedy is invaluable in districts
where llieso afflicting disorders prevail. This
Cubs" expels the miasmatic poison of Fever
and Aoub from the system, and prevents the de
velopment of the disease, if taken on the first ap
proach of its premonitory symptoms. It is not only
the best remedy ever yet discovered for this class
of complaints, but also the cheapest. The large
quantity we supply ror a dollar brings it within the
reach of every body ; nnd in bilious districts, where
a ever and Aoub prevails, every body should
have it and use it freely both for cure and protec
tion. A (treat superiority of this remedy over any
other ever discovered for the speedy and certain
cure of Intermittents is that it contains no Quinine
or mineral, consequently it produces no quinism or
other injurious effects whatever upon the constitu
tion, 'those cured by it are left as healthy as if
they had never had the disease.
i ' .1 . : . .L .
jr ever mu nue ia uui uiuuo tne consequence oi
the miasmatio poison. A great variety of disor
ders arise from its irritation, among which are
NeuraMa, Rheumatism, Gout, Headache, Blind
ness, "looihache. Earache, Catarrh, Asthma, Pal
pitation, Painful Affection of the Spleen, Hyster
ics, rain in the Bowels, Colic, Paralysis and De
rangement oj tne acomacn, ait or wntcn, When
originating in tins cause, put on tne tnfrrmtcrenr
type, or become periodical. This " Cure " expels
the poison from the blood, ana consequently cures
them all alike. It ia an invaluable protection to
immigrants and nersons travelling: or temnorarilv
residing in the malarious districts. If taken occa
sionally or daily while exposed to the infection,
that will be excreted from the system, and cannot
accumulate in sufficient quantity to ripen into dis
ease. Hence it is even more valuable for protec
tion than cure, and few will ever suffer from Inter
mittents if they avail themselves of the protection
this remedy affords.
Prepared by Dr. J. C. AYEB & CO., Lowell, If ass.
ROBERTS et SAMUEL, Columbus,
And bv Dnigrlsts and Dealers everywhere.
novwiya.tiretw . .. .
REMOVAL.
Doyle c3 Oo.
ATE REMOTE D THEIR OFFICE
to the South-west corner of High and Friend
streets,
"XTP3r A. IRS"
And will continue to keep on hands a large stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES.
The attention of Merchants and Dealers It respectful
ly Invited to our stock. . , 8. DUYIjB et Co.
narohtHiatuijuiyai. ;
NEW HOOP 8K.IRTV .
No. 89, SOUTH HIOH STRUT. :
Bave Inst received a new make of HOOP BKIET9
finished in a manner far superior to any yet Introduced
for ' " ' ' ' -
DURABILITY AND GRACEFULNESS.
mh S3. '
TRAVELLERS!
TTTHEN von ro to New York , drive direct lo the
TV ' BjntJiUBUresAre bbuubh,
BROADWAY, COBNKR Of HOUSTON 8TEET
Conducted on ths f "' ;i "
BUBOPBAKPLAN.
Good fare, Good Booms, Prompt Attendance, and Mod
erate unarges.
BINOUt ROOMS SO OTS. ft OTS. and ti PER I; AY
; DOUBLE ROOMS and PARLORS I ,.10 to S3.
Meals as ordered. This Hotel has all the appointments
of the best hotels, a most central location, and Is healed
throughout hy steam. BAMUEI, E. Hl au,
marchtfdam . . . . proprietor.
' i HESHY KCEIILEKs
fLateof Phalon's Establishment, N. Y..) Proprietor
the Mew lore raatuonaoie Shaving, Hair unttlnt
Bhampoonlng, Curling and Dressing Saloon, East Bute
street, over the Poet Office, where satisfaction will
be given In all the varioas branches. ' Ladles and
Children's Hair Dressing done la the Best style.
lysi-diy ;
Til. At IV AND FIGURED BLACK
XT DRESS BILKS, ot every grade. The saoet selest
assortment In the oltv. nnd et most reasonable rates.
. . HAjn et sun,
aprllS v. Kr . Ho. 59 South High street.
ni.tlilSKT PT.A Sri BLACK BILKS IOK
,. i i j street bawiaar and Manilas; new. innnma
' tad tassels to siasnb. t - . 4 .
!. .-u ' i -
.7,,:, :
BEAUTIFUL,,
ANp CHEAPER THAN EVER!
OUR SPRING STOCK IS UffUSCAL
lv larre and well aaurted.' The ver latest Daturas
from AMERICAN, ENQLIBH and 1KB X OH factories.
GOtD PAPERS AND BORDERS.
Gold and Velvet Borders,
SPLENDID DECORATIONS,
j SIDELIGHT
' ;! . AND
FIRE BOARD PAPERS,
Gold and Painted Shades,
GOLD
WINDOW CORNICES,
BUFF, BLUE,
AND
GREEN HOLLANDS,
WINDOW FIXTURES, all. kinds,
CORD AND TASSELS,
BEAUTIFUL PICTURES
AND FRAMES.
RANDALL & ASTON,
lOO Qoxvtla UlsHSt.
; COLUMBUS, o.
i
N. B. Landlords and persons wishing qnantltlss of
Paper will nuke money hy buying ol ns. Country
Uerchtnta and persons from abroad will do well to call
and sea us. (sprll 1 dSroeodl K.fcA.
AIUST BE SOLD!
ALL THE GOODS
AT STORE
Ttyovn Street,
jsl.t pniOBs
TO SUIT THE TIMES!
WAR! WAR!! WAR!!!
OWING TO THE WAR BETWEEN
the Union and the Bunny South, I have concluded
to sell out
ALL MY GOODS,
IVEN
B33tsO"W COST.
( The stock consists of the largest lot of
WHITE GOODS,
' In the city of Columbus;
JACOSETS,
CAMBEIC8,
BSILLIANT8,
ESSERALDAS,
MUIXS.
PLAIDS.
BOIT FIKISH CAMBRICS,
COLLARS, EDGINUS, BKIBT BRAID,
HOSIERY, PIUS. BtJITONI,
BC8PE5DER8, HOOKS AHD ETES,
and all kinds of
NOTIONS AND SMALL WARES;
the best HOOP SKIRTS In Columbus, and at the
j lowest price,
i Wholesale and Retail.
: Then, ladles, all, both great and small,
vome, give me a can,
And then you'll find A. At. E. Btohjhi
In all bis Glory.
A. M. K. 8T0RRIB, Agent,
Remember the War I No. 81 Town itnaL
: aprU:dSm Columbus, Ohio
NEW ARRIVALS
OF
Spring & 1 Summer, Millinery.
The Btook Replenished ,. .
'' 'DATT.'Y' . '
FHOIB LATEST IMPORT ATIOIfS4 OF ' 4
P W, .YORK. ' ; .
' MY BTOCK Of
Spring & Summer Millinery
Is now complete, comprising every variety ol Millin
ery; also, a large assortment ot Embroideries, Hosiery .
and Notions, ko., end In quantities and prices that can 44 1
not fall to suit all who may favor ns with a call. The '
goods have been bought at Panle prices, and will be sold
at a small advance en cost. : . ,
; MILLIHEB Y. ;
Miss M. E, YOUNG, late of New' York City,
will superintend the Millinery Department. ..Her long
experience In the most VashionSble Establishment in
Broadway will alone be a warranty that she will be able
to give entire satisfaction In natters of taste to all who 4
may favor her with their orders. ' . ' ' 44 1
The Ladles (Oolnmbns and vkinity please ao- .
eeptmy sincere thanks for their liberal patronage, and
I would respectfully solicit a continuance of the same. .
M R. H. W ARE, t r
68 E Tswa Bt., Celnmkns, O.
sprll-dSnveod w f . .
' Irish Linen Goods. , '
WARRANTED FABRIC
Linen Bulrt Bosoms Paln and Fancy
' Bhlrttng and Bosobs Linens. .
i ; , Linen Sheetings and Pillow Casings.
.., 1 Linen Cambrics and Long Lawns.' 4 '
; ; . . Linen focketianda'fs, all sites.-:
- Linen TowellingsaadDlapers
, . ji jjjjjj Rapfcin, and D'Oyllea.
H Linen Table Olothsand Batin Damasks.
u'"1" mum, vwmiuriw. v.wu.
, , . . for sale at lowprtees.
1 ' BAT ft SOW,
km ' ' - Xo.MsVmU-.Hlsa street.: :
..it
i-4T

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