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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, June 05, 1861, Image 2

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KAJTCTOTHT WUSB. rubllehsr.
ntcu. w. MASIH'"11''
UaUtor.
COLUMBUS,
Otno,
The U. S. Constitution Established a
National Government.
t. In tbiV ciitiU period of bur
. i reour to the fondamental
T-,:, .,. which our Government ii estafc
f. . . an,. RtIon of the hour Ii not merely
v..- n..,mimt it facto, but
whether we o -
..-.. h.w na f jure, or in other wortia,
" ... . .
k national iotwuiu
whether we hare
...-iftnuuneffe tht the Federal Gor
Wom.nt cannot coere. States, f bj Jjj
B,an that It cannot, by th. exertion of pb,sl
.i xu. oi.t Governmeuta, In their
force, compel mo
. ' Li nacitv. to do or not to do a par
rrrUit on is doubtless tenable.
ticuir -v., - - , Ht . no
But If they mean that the United states nesno
Mn.t;tntlooalor legitimate right to punish In-
r,MT.Tn Statis whet- portion of the peo-
. dWlduals In States wnere . pu
ple.unaer prewuiio
. . . . fiut. Conventions, have
State itegwrniu" v. r -
.a th.tr alleeiance to the Federal Got
, .A reaiat its authority, then they
i nn fulRfi. daDceroua ana un-
piftUi bllCLUIClT PO Ufve - w
tttutlanal crouod.
The Constitution of the United States is nota
mere Compact or League between the several
States in tb.eir capacity ss. sovereign States!
the neODle of all the
DUl H18Mlw""""" -- '.,., .
States, acting in their capacity as individuals.
The Union formed by the Constitution is not a
p....inn.hnta National Government.
The United States coLstitute not merely Fed
erated Republic, but one distinct and united Na
tinn. .."
That these portions are correct is clear from
... r i.. iaif In the nreamble, it is
UV UWHBUIUHIFU r
Au,ui t hft ordained and established by tbe
people of the United States collectively, and not
by tbe States acting separately, i w
T.orrUiafcnrA renreaents the people Individually
. ..ii. .A nni.R1.Kte.4aa such. Tbe
ana ooucufciTc,
m.mh.r nf the House of Representatives are
rhn..n direotlv bv the people, and though the
s.n.i. .r chosen bv the State Legislatures,
' ,,.. .r. not wnresentatiTes or delegates from
the State Governments, but from the people of
th neveral States. The State Governments by
themselves and separate from the people, have
nownrMtntationintbe National Legislature
The Preaident, as the Executive Head of the
NaMoc, la chosen through electors by the people,
..I . k. iKa Si,!, Governments, tie is am'
nhl. direotlv to the people, and may be im
peached through their repreaentatives in Con-
- T -A La ta 1m n A
greas for misconduct in oince. fu " -sense
responsible to the State Governments.
He may call upon the Governors of tbe several
States, as President Lincoln has recenwy uuuo,
, for aid in enforcing the laws; but he has no
power to compel obedience to the requisition by
any proceeding againat the State Governments.
Yet he is bound to take care that the laws be
faithfully executed. In discharging this duty,
he acts upon individuals, and not upon States,
We mkht eeumerate the various powers
lodged in the General Government and itj differ
rnt Dfoarlments, to show that it s a uoveru-
ment over individuals, and not merely over
.pr,.rate States. The eonatitution, or rather
the people through the Constitution, have con
ferred on it delegated and limited powers,- but
within the scope of these powers, they have
made it supreme. They bare established nnder
it, as the supreme authority, certain relations
between each individual and tbe National Gov
ernment, which it Is not In the power of any
State, or cf any number of States, to abrogate
and annul. These relations of allegiance, fideli
ty and obedience to a constitutional Federal
Government and toconatitntional laws, are bind
log upon every individual citizen in every State,
and can only be changed or modified by a change
in th Cnnatltution in the mode which the sove
reign people themselves have prescribed in that
instrument. .
It is said by Mr. Calhoun, who is high au
Mmritv with the secessionists, In his "Dis
course on the Constitution and Government
the United States," "that the people, acting
the same capacity and In the same way in which
they ordained and established the Federal Con
stitution, can, by their concurrent and united
. voice, chantte or abolish it, and estabiistt an
other in its place, or dissolve the Union, and
resolve themselves Into separate and disconnect
ed States." It would doubtless be competent
for the people of the whole United States,
their concurrent anl united Toice, to alter,
amend or even abolish the Federal Constitution,
since that Instrument contains an express pro
vision for its amendment by the will of
people of three-foortha of the States. Bnt
argument does not help the disunion or secession
cause; for It impliedly admits that It Is
in the power of a minority of the whole
of the Union to change or annul tbe relations
of the people to the Federal Government as es
tabUehed by the Constitution. -
It Is, therefore, clear that the anti-State co
ercion doctrine, as maintained by secessionists
and their advocates, has not the slightest foun
dation in the Constitution. States cannot ab
solve their citizens from the obligations they
owe to the United States Constitution and Gov
ernment, and !f they are falthlew to these,
are found in armed resistance and rebellion,
they must be dealt with as re bela std traitors.
The Business of the Country.
Tbe sudden " precipitation of the country
a warlike attitude, and the deep interest taken
by all tbe people in the events transpiring, con
nected with the snspenaion of business relations
hetween the North and the South, has had
moat depressing effect upon tbe trade of the
country; and has been very fatal to a large
number of business men. 'Every one seemed
for a time overwhelmed in confusion, and
man could form an opinion as to the proper
course to!pursue. Business was completely para
lyized, and business men did not appear to
their wayclaarly in any direction.',
We are happy 'to say, front indications which
must be disceraable to all, that-a gradual though
perceptible ohangs U taking place, and the bu
siness of the country is now reviving; and
that s necessary, in our opinion, to bring about,
without delay; a reasonable resumption or Mat
ness in all departments of llfe,and put energy
activity .where Indifference and Indolence have
had dominion for tbe past six or seven weeks,
Is confidence, faith end a united effort, and these
are within the reach of evercommunity.'
all put their shoulders te the wheel and
one united and energetio effort to put tbea
traded trafflo and commerce In notion, and
shall toon cease to bear the cry of hard limes.
Make effort, friends make it one and all
and be assured It will pay.
The Business of the Country. Amended Answer of Gen. Harney.
10 tne decision ot we ours, uuecr.u,.,.
inbmU. MbordlMtlm to the requirements of
th, conatitution and the laws of my country,
and prompt obedience to the judiciary, as wel
M to the commands of my superiors, are a part
Tho lollowicj Is the amended answer of Gen.
Habhev to the writ of Aa true eerput, In the case
of McDonalds ' v V '.
Leave having: been wanted to tho undersign
ed to amend his return to - the writ of Asiews
eorput heretofore granted on behalf of Emmet
McDonald, 1 deem It proper to submit us fol
lowing preliminary remarks: i
With no feellnoa or Interests in this matter
to swerve me from the plain path of duty, I
should, under ordinary circum.Uacea, submit
my return in a few words, Hut in me discus
sion had upon the question as to the sufficiency
Of my original return, a very wme ana iimur-
dinary range nas Deen jnauigea, idvoiviuk,
I conceive, li not id terms, at isasi ut impiu.
tion, my good faith and frankness in making it
out. .......
Proper reapeet for tbe authority or ibis court,
as well aa simple justice to mveeii, reuuer it
fit that I should be allowed a word in explana
tion and juitifloation of my course.
In making my original return, I intended and
undertook to state, that at the time of the lm
petration of the writ, or at any time since, I had
not the body of the petitioner in my custody,
power or control, and that I bad not tbe power
to nrodnca hia bodv before this court.
. By some process of construction of language
Incomprehensible to me, my return has been held
insufficient, and my plain intention In making It
was not accompiiened.
To tbe decision or tne uourt, i cneenuuj
of
In
of my military education, and in accordance
with my principles and convictions of duty.
Tne constitutional ana legal huhbb remwg uu
executive or mllitarv officers are as Imperative
and nnvleldine in their requirements as those
resting on tbe Judicial omcers ot tne govern
ment, in tne oiscnare ot mese amies, execu
tive or militarv. not less than indicia! officers.
"muat er&dt) at nothing. sbrlnK Irom nomine."
In tha diacharira of the delicate and bleblv re
sponsible duties devolved upon me In this mili
tary department, I have endeavored to oonform
my action striotly to the requirements of the
Constitution and laws of my country, and faith
fully to uphold them with a scrupulous regard
to personal imerty, ana tne rignts oi property
within my jurisdiction. I shall continue to act,
whild i hold authority nere. reearatesa or ex
ternal clamor. I now nroceed to state all the
knowledge and information I have touching this
matter, and to make my amended return to the
writ of habea$ eorput in this case.
Of mv own knowledge I can state nothing
concerning the caoture and subsequent holding
of tbe petitioner, or ot bis suosequsni iransier to
another Jurisdiction, i nave neen iniormea,
however, that the petitioner, before and at the
time of his alleged capture, owed allegiance to
the government of the United States; that at
tha time ol hia Centura he ana otners, wun arms
in their hands, were eneaeed. in tbe State of
Missouri, in levvintr war against tbe United
States, that be was adhering to the enemies of
the United States, giving them aid and oomiort,
and that, while thus engaged, the petitioner was
eantured and taken and held as a prisoner of war
by the effioers and men under tbe command of
my predecessor.
I am furthermore informed that my predeces
sor subseauentlr fas he had an nndoubted right
. . r. a . . . . . . r r. 1
to do; transierrea tne petitioner tor eaie seeping
into tbe State of Illinois, and placed mm
charge of officers in command of General
McClellao, wbo then bad and now has com
mand of tbe militarv department of the govern
ment which embraces the State of Illinois, and
the netitioner from the time of his capture to
the time oi his transfer to the State of Illinois, aa
aforesaid, was, as I am informed, nnder tbe
proper control, custody, authority and command
of my predecessor.
w ith tbe cad tare oi tne netiuoner ana nis trans
fer. as aforesaid, to another jurisdiction, I had
no concern, neither was it done bv my order or
command, and all tbe foregoing occurred before
I had anv knowledge of tbe application lor, or
tbe granting of this writ.
Io making this statement, 1 desire it to oe
distinctly understood that I do not shrink irom
any just responsibility that attaches to me since
my assumption or me commtua oi wis aeparv
ment. On the contrary, "J crass at aorMwc,
aArtn from aofAiwo."
Bat a proper regard for tbe public service and
a high sense or duty require tost i snouia care
fully abstain from any eourse ef action that
might by implication or otherwise embarrass or
throw doubt upon tbe official conduct of my
predecessor. As to matters within my knowl
edge, I state that at tbe time this writ was
issued I bad not, nor have I at any time since,
bad tbe person of tbe petitioner, Emmet McDon
ald, in my custody, posssession, power or control.
My jurisdiction or authority does not extend ds-
yond the limits Of this military department,
ana l never naa, ana nave not now, any juris
diction whatever In the State of Illinois.
Thus matters stood up to the time tbe deci
sion of this Court was pronounced as to tbe suf
ficiency of my original return. Since then
have received orders dated juav lb, isni , irom
the War Department, relieving me from the
command of this military department, and I have
therefore no longer any power or authority
within this inrdiction.
Therefore, by reason of the aforesaid,! state
that I bave never had power or authority to com
mand any one to produce the body of tbe peti
tioner before this court, nor have I such power
power or authority now, nor have I the power now
to produce the body of the petitioner before this
court in obedience to the mandate of this writ,
nor have I had the pewer to do so at any time
since it was issued. I beg to state, in conclu
sion, that immediately after making my original
return to this writ, I communicated tbe fact,
with all other facte within my knowledge re
la tine to it, to the proper department of the gov
ernment, bnt np to this time I have received
reply to my communication. ,
WILLIAM S. HARNEY,
Brigadier General United States Army.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st
J. WEST THOMPSON,
Notary Public.
[Correspondence of the Philadelphia Press.]
WASHINGTON, June 2, 1861.
and
into
a
no
see
all
and
Let
ake
of
we
Many of our best-Informed observers begin to
think that there will be no serious resistance to
our troops in Virginia, and that tbe policy of re
treat will be maintained by the Disunionists, aa
far more agreeable than a crushing ana ingio
rious defeat. This is not my opinion. The con
snirstort mnst fight. That Davis, Stephens,
Mason, Hunter, and Slidell, bitterly realize
their blunder, I not only believe, but I know
it. We have only to recall the reluctance
with . which Davis left the Senate and
the ' Union; ; the conservative speeches
of Stephens, up to tbe very mo
ment of bis disgraceful desertion of the cause of
his country; the timid treachery and double
faced logic of Hunter; the brag of tbat immense
ass and bally, Mason, whose assumptions ol
superiority were In ridiculous contrast to bis
own transparent ignorance to find tio evidence
of this assertion. But these bold, bad Lien are
already suspected by their dupes. They have
always been distrusted by a great party in the
South. And, as debt, despair, and utter gloom
begin to settle upon the secession cause, those
who were foretd into thi cause will demand that
Davis and his Directory shall do something or
go to the wall. Bear in mind tbat tbe idea of
a divided North and a united South has been
rtl.nelled. I hat bttn ttwritd. We have no
Andrew Johnson in the free States, no Emer
son Etberidge, no frank Diair, no Snerrard
Clemens, no George. D. Prentice, to di
vide our solid column, because these men
when they speak and act in tbe South, speak
and tot against a fonl and festering wrong,
and because the creed of tbe people of the loyal
8 la tea le tbat of honor, gratitude, and liberty
But in tbe seceded States all is distrust and
doubt. Tbe other slave States are more then
divided, because those who there oppose seces
sion will do it alike with tbe ballot and cartridge-box.
Hence a bold forward movement is
demanded at tbe hands of Davis and bis set, to
save themselves. Yon see that Davis has at
last reached Richmond, i He is there in bad
health and worse spirits. . He is there a broken
hearted, bankrupt man. All his chiefs are sick
or sullen. 1 There is not one man in tbe whole
cabal that is not either ashamed or disgusted
with himself. They look noon tbe movements
of tbe North with terror and horror. They be
hold the awful power of tbe Government of the
United States, now rapidly developing, with
amassment and wonder. , They know that their
ealy safety is in fight, and fight tbey will, even
if it ie bnt one battle, and tbat their last on
earth. Occasional.
the Machiavellian Policy of Great
Britain Toward the United States.
I
do
Tha. details of the debate In the House of
Lords, on ,the 16th ultimo, aa received by the
Amarioa's mails, and published yesterday, give
us particulars, respecting tbe language used on
that occasion, ot tbe grareat importance, and
of a far more aggressive nature towards the
United States, than bad been previously re
ported by telegraph. Our correspondence by
tha America, published this morning, still fur
ther developes the offensive policy of the Eng
lish government.
Tbe Lord unancenor, wno is Hie amooriia-
tive exnonent of the Palmerston Ministry in
the npper House had not only repudiated the
maritime code adopted by tbe Treaty of Paris;
but had gone so far as to pronounce that the
United States has no right to punisn uritisn pri
vateers in Jefferson Davis' service as pirates!
He added that tbe war of the Confederate
States acalnet the North was a lust one, and
their right as belligerents was "admitted. " His
words are: "Ho one (t. ., no fcoeusn suo ecti
ought to be regarded as a pirate lor acting nn
der a commission irom a etate aamuiea to oe
entitled to the exercise of belligerent rights,
and carrying on what might be called a juttum
bellum. Anybody dealing with a man nnder
those circumstances as a pirate, and putting
him to death, would be guilty of murder." Lord
Klngedown followed the Lord Chanoellor.and an
nounced that "England had recognized the se
seceding States as a body poaeeeaing the rights
of a belligerent;" that the "extravagant order
of the Washington government in reference to
privateering was a mere orvtum fulmen;" or, it
not, tnac it "was a piece oi Daroarny wnicn
would raise an outcry throughout the whole civ
ilized world." Eirl Graoville.a member of the
Cabinet, threw In hia aneer at the blockade of
the Southern coast, aaaerticg that "mere paper
blockades would not be recognized;" and com'
mented upon tbe "agreement of Paris as not
effeotuating a change in international law, ex
cepting aa regards those Powers which signified
their acceptance of it," thus ignoring the last
clauae of the Paris treaty, by which those wbo
might hereafter" accept it were placed on
oar with those wbo had done so
II tnose reers wno aanere to tne raimers'on
Ministry were thus explicit In their quasi-bos-
tility to tbe United otates, the lords oi tbe oppo
sition were still more so. "I spprebend,' said
the Earl of Derby, " that if there is one thing
clearer than another, it is that, by the law of
nations, privateering is not piracy that no ea
aotmenton tbe part of any one nation can make
that piracy ,as regards the subject1 ot another
country, which is not pirscy by the law of na
tions, or by tbe law or that country. Tne jVorfa
rn SUM . thcrtfote, mutt not be aflouxd tn
tettain that opinion." "It is very important,"
he added, "that ber Majesty's government
should not commit themselves to the doctrine
that tbe United States are to lay down tbe prin
cipie of a universal blockade, and that that
blockade would be recognized by ber Majesty's
government." Lord Chelmsford commented
uoon the serious steps taken by the British Cab
met. 1U " aumituuic buv wuuicuvrthu otatca w
be entitled to tbe rights of belligerents," bnt it
was clear that "Southern privateers could not
be treated aa pirates." Tbe Lrl of Lllenbor-
ongh was of the opinion that some of them bed
been "hanged already," and feared tbe oonee-
auencea of the converaation that had taken
place, which, by tne way, nis own interpella
tions gave rise to.
AH this means cotton, cotton, cotton, and a
greedy craving, on tbe part of the aristocracy
and governing classes of Great Britain, to hum
ble a nation, become a first class Power In tbe
world, through tbe force of democratio melitu
tiona, Tbe insidious representations of Lord
Lyons, similar to those ot eir Henry Uulwer
some years ago, bave contributed to confirm the
Idea that the United states can be insulted
and her wishes disregarded, with perfect im
nunitv. The press ol London, and, to a still
greater degree, that of the manufacturing dis
trlcts of England, bas fallen into a panic re
specting tbe probable effect upon trade of a
blockade of the Southern ports; and the con
juncture is deemed a favorable one to decry
and vilify ns, ana noia us np to tne worm as
destitute of either energy or strength. A re
cent English reviewer of American aflalrs
speaks of ns in the following complimentary
maimer;
Tb hlitory ot tha American sovernmcnt, a iocs No
vember 8. baa beer, on of the mott pitiable tint ever
dtograceo. a nation. BKtanan atdbc na fotrtarlng trea
son till be ihnnk from the menactof apectra he had
ratted; yielding Aod temporiaioir when Annum wu re.
qulitd; firm when flrmntM could on! exMpente; final
ly neutrml. irrwolote, vacillating: slt-nlnc away fcil
country's commercial intereite as ni lat act of official
Incapacity; J.tncoln'1 aiiuminr a power wnicn nu tea roe-
ly ubttance enouih to out even the faintrat shadow
over thsie Bute, which profeis to acknowledge It; pro
claiming hia power'nen to the nation and to tbe world
In hit lnaaiural addrtn: hia administration menaced
and paralyied by the acta of ita predeceaaor; ntliher
taking tbe last atep nrmiy on ue pain oi eurrenear, nor
the fint on that of the Inevitable recognition of tha
new confederacy; Incapable of (lying a eiatlnct affirma
tion of ita righta and porpoeea; eacrinclng tbe laat rem
nant of national prettlge and atrangth; descending into
tne lowest aeptna oi national nomination; great in son
etty of pnrpoee, contemptible in total incapacity for ac
tion: the Union llaelf railing to pieces under the weight
ol Ita own Institution!, the yannted federal tie no atrong
r In an emergency than a rope of aand, and the federal
government a symbol of confusion, humiliation,' and
contempt. In tha eight of the armed despotisms and con
stitutional monarcoies oi aurope.
The pamphleteers of France discoursed lust
so of Great Britain, in favor of the cause of tbe
colonies, previous to the expedition of Count
l'Estaing. Volunteering in tbe colonial army
bad already been winked at, and such moral aid
as Great Britain is now rendering to tbe Mont
gomery government had been rendered. Fi
nally, the mask was thrown off, and a French
fleet aided in securing our independence. Eoe
land calculates npoo acting with impunity to
wards the United States now, as Louis XVI. did
towards herself three-quarters of a century
since. Let ber remember, that the Revolution
of 1776 reacted so terribly upon France, that
tbe dynasty which governed it, with the proud
aristocracy tnat surrounded the .Bourbon throne,
were swept away aa moths before a whirlwind,
ere the lapse of a single decade, and tbat there
are signs of outbreak visible in Great Britain
which would lead to proportionably greater die
aster. Tbe duty of the administration,
Washington, is, In the meanwhile, dear.
immediate understanding should be arrived
through Mr. Adams, with Lord Palmerston;
hostile attitude assumed by the Court of London
should be changed; and the course that has
been pursued by Lord Lyons should be marked
aa it deserves, either by giving bim bis pus
ports, or obtaining from bim a proper amende
tbe mischief be has made. A. i . Herald.
The Origin of Coal Oil.
- At a meeting of the Manchester Geologioal
society, November xu.ieou, mr.fc. w.uinoey
F. R. S., F. G. S., read tbe paper on "Dorin
Holland Moss," In wbiohhe discussed at length
the origin of coal oil. His views coincide ex
actly with those of Dr. Stevens, Published
page 370 of tbe last volume of the Scientific
American, and these views were generally sup
ported by the society In the discussion which fol
lowed.' After considering and rejecting otler
explanations of the origin of tbe coal oil. J
Binney sayst 'These circumstances led to
conclusion tbat it is produced by tbe decompo.
sltion of the upper bed of peat, where It Is over
laid by the sand."
Mr. Dickinson, F. G. S., said that it Is not
all uncommon to observe mineral pitch or pe
troleom oozing from a stratum of coal Id
pits, distillation having taken place In tbe
where external neat could nave no mnuence.
Mr. Binney stated that "Petroleum or rock
oil ia found in various parts of the world in
Eurman empire, on the banks ot tbe Irawaddi
are powerful springs of it; it is abundant
Persia; it occurs In Batbadoes; at Tegernaee,
ia Bavaria; In Anvergne, near Claremontt
Swltierland, near Nsufchatel; at Anlano,in
aly; and In Sicily; and near the volcanic Isles
of Cape de Verde the sea is sometimes covered
with It." - ' '.
It will be remembered that Dr. Stevens' ex
planations of the origin of tbe -coal oil was.
tbat the coal or other oarbonaoeons deposit
decomposed by the operation of natural force
oroducinr results similar to those which eoonr
when the coal is distilled in a retort for tbe arti
ficial manufacture of oil. Some difference
opinion waa expressed by the members of
Manchester Society, In regard to the necessity
of external heat to effect the decomposition
coal. Some geologists believe that tbe decom
position takes place spontaneously from
natural disposition of the elements of organic
compounds to fall asunder. Scicnfiw Ameri
tan .- '.- !v ;"..'! I. x.r : ..:..-..') ; ' ::.,
lion'. Jobn J. Crittenden has been nominat
ed for Congress, by acclamation, In tbs Ashland
District, by ths Union men who, no donbt, will
reflect honor, on Kentucky by .triumphantly
looting bin.1' " ' ' 4 " "
What it is Coming to Already.
[From the New York Times, 30th alt.]
THE NEED OF A PERMANENT STANDING ARMY.
The eiberlenoe of nearly a century of do-
meatlo quiet, the apparent absence of causes of
Internal disturbance, and tbe traditional foreign
policy of our Government "peaee with all na
tions; entangling alliances witn none" naa lea
our people to tbe belief that we were an excep
tion to the rule which requires etner nations to
maintain a large standing army to act either as
local police, or to resist foreign aggression. We
are suddenly awakened irom mis aream. At
the very moment our faith was the strongest in
the permanence of our happy condition, we were
nursing in our verv bosom a treason, whiob, for
time, threatened to blot us irom the net oi
nations.
We recovered from the stunning blow, and,
with unexampled celerity, placed a hundred
thousand men in tbe field, to be immediately
followed by another hundred thousand. Our
first task is to subdue; next to preserve order.
This for a time must be an enforced one. Tbe
great element of discord still remains, and muat
be watched by a powerful foroe.- Confidence Is
sentiment or slow growm, ana it taxes an
equally long time for a subdued party to forget
its defeats and heartily fraternize with the con
querors. We shall gladly extend amnesty to
all who lay down their arms; but we can never
again allow ourselves to be surprised ana near
ly overthrown.. ; If slavery remains undisturbed,
we must not forget that this Is tbs sole cause ot
tbe rebellion, and that it may breed iurtner
disturbance. Men broucht np under its influ
ence differ radically Irom those nurtured in
freedom. Tbts natural divergenoe must i be
counteracted, as far as necessary, oy lorce.
Should tbe alive be oartiallv freed, we muat
remember that be is of a different race from
ourselves; tbat there will soon be 5,000,000 of
them within oqr bordara, rendering necessary
by way of precaution, a strong arm to meet our
anomalous condition, which unites tne totany
different raoes under one government.
To meet suoh a necessity, wetmust immedi
ate!? commence the organization of a standing
army. ' We cannot afford to can auaueniy into
tbe field citizens deeply immersed in induatrial
pursuits, involving, as tbe summons does, dis
turbance and loss by which, In a few weeks, tbs
labor of (years may be sacrificed, without the
oossibilitv of anything like an adequate com
pensation in the shape of pay-roll. Tbearmy,
hereafter, muBt be made a projettum, in wnicn
the officer and soldier embark for life, and who
look forward for promotion from tbe efficiency
and qualities displayed. We cannot afford to
take a General, a Uolonel, or a private irom
lucrative occupations, and discbarge them in
three months or three years, without tbe least
provision for their support, or compensation for
the eacnnces tney maxe. we are lonunate in
having such a class to oall upon to put down in-
surrectioni but peace, when conquered, muat be
maintained by an adequate standing army, adopt
ed as their profession by those wbo enter it.
It ia, of coarse, mortifying,' sfter all our
boastings, to confesi (bat In this country, as in
others, order must be maintained by foroe. It
is by no means agresable to assume the hardens
which this necessity imposes, naa it not oten
for slavery, we should bave realized tbe highest
ideal ever formed of na. We have fully prov
ed, by tbe results achieved in the Northern
States, tbe value oi ires institutions ana tne ca
pacity of the people for their maintenance. Bat
we have united, under tbe same Government,
the most oerfect freedom aod the most irre
sponsible of despotisms. These opposing Ideas
or systems, in their natural antagonisms, have
come into desperate collision. Freedom must
be at tbe expense u detending iteeit ana tbe
Government, and of i educing the despotic eie
ment'.to submission srd order, from which free
dom its ell will be iu time evolved. We shall
then have another triumph In demonstrating
that i.-eedom Is power, and in this way add to
the debt which humanity already owes ns.
[For the Journal of Commerce.]
Habeas Corpus.
I like your leader of tbis morning on this sub
ject, but regret that yon did not rebuke tbe Tri
bune and rtii tor endeavoring to convey the im
pression tbat Judge Story's opinion was, that tbe
President had authority to suspend tbis writ
Tbey onote from bis Commentaries one para
graph, which is as lollows: "It is Obvious tbat
oaaaa of a peculiar emergency may arise which
mav justify, nay, even require tbe temporary
auaoenaion of aov right to the writ;" but tbe
learned luriet Immediately adds: "As it has
frequently happened in foreign countries, snd
even in England, that tne writ has upon various
pretexts snd occasions been suspended, whereby
persons apprehended upon suspicion have suffer,
ed a long imprisonment, sometimes from design,
and sometimes because they were forgotten, tbe
right to suspend It is expressly confined to cases
of rebellion or Invasion, where the public safety
may require it. A very just and welcome
restraint, which cuts down at a blow
blow a fruitful meana of oppression, capable
being abused in bad times to the worst of pur
poses. Hitherto no suspension of tbe writ bas
ever been authorized by uongrees since tbe es
tablishment of the Constitution. It would seem,
as fA power is given to Congtett to lutpend the
writ of habeat eorput in eate of rebtllicn or in-
carton, that the right to juagt melher the exigency
had arise must belong kxclosivilt fo that body
He adds, in a root note, tbat Jefferson wss always
opposed to suspending the writ in any case
whatever, declaring himself in favor of "the
eternal and nnremitting force of tbeAa6rai ear.
put Istci." "Why," he asks, "suspend tbe writ
in cases of rebellion and insurrections T If the
public safety requires that the government
should have a man Imprisoned on less probable
testimony in those than in other emergencies.
1st him be taken and tried, rataien and retried.
while tbe necessity continues, only giving bim
redress against Ibe government for damages."
it li remarkable tnat the ooly attempt by Con
gress to suspend the ' writ was in the time
Burr, and a bill was reported, but there were
the House of Representatives only 19 votes in
its Isvor, 11 4 againat It.
Astounding Forgeries in Washington,
Washington County, Penn.n-
Flight of the Perpetrator.
[From the Pittsburgh Chronicle.]
for
on
(r.
the
at
our
bed
the
in
A series of bold and extensive forgeries have
just been brought to light in Washington, Pa.
The operator was a man named J. W. Smith, a
resident of Cross Creek township, and widely
known in the neighborhood. It appears that
for tbe last lew years be bas been operating in
ths live stock and produce business, and, in that
capacity, bas sought and obtained frequent ac
commodations for considerable sums of money,
several of bis immediate neighbors becoming
indorsers. In this way things have been going
on for some time past, the' artful operator all the
while managing, by the prompt payment of
some of bis notes and tbs renewal of others, to
keep np nis creait ana secure tbe entire confi
dence of those with whom he was dealing. Fail
ing to meet a note whloh matured in one Of tbe
Wheeling banks last week, however, notice of
protest was sent to tbe persons whoas names
appeared as Indorsers, when it was found for
ths first time that their names had been forged
to the paper I This of course led other parties
wuv ueiu uie uuwe av uiaao iu(mry, ana awn
brought to light the astounding fact that al
ths indorsements UDon which he had drewn
funds were daring forgeries. It turns out thl
bis indebtedness npon this sort of fraudulent
paper to different parties about town amounts
to about ?4,uuu, made np tbusi Notes dis
posed of to Dr. F. J. Le Morns, of Washington,
$14,000; toWn. Smith & Bon, S3,000i to
Franklin Bank of Washington. tl.OOOi to
Wheeling Banks, $5,000; to Wellaburg Bank,
$2,000 Besides tne foregoing, all of which
are forgeries, Smith leaves other liabilities be
bind bim amounting to some ta.uuu or I1U.UUU
Tbs eoonndrel has, unfortunately for Justice,
made bis escape to parts unknown, and there
seems now bnt little probability that bis cap-
turs will soon ds effecteo. . ue bas not been en'
gaged in business for some time, and It Is anr
miaed that be took ths greater part of his ill-
gotten gains wuu Dim in uia mgnt.
of
tbe
of
tbe
Not So The story going ths rounds (bat ths
Marshall Houae, Alexandria, wbere Col. Ells
worth waa ssassslnated, was tha stopping-place
of General Washington, Is a jniaUke. It was
General Hefielbower'i City Hotel, oppeaits
Federal Hill.whers ths Father of his country
formerly occupied rooms wnen ' in Alexandria.
xneaa rooms are now nsea as pariora. ,
A sword is to be presented to Colonel Rob
ert Anderson by tbe Union members of tbs
Kentucky Legislature. It Is now on exhibition
at Louisville. The scabbard bean the Intcrip-1
tram Presented to the gallant soldier and
true patriot, Colonel Robert Anderson, by tbs
oltlzeos of bis native State."
.11-
The Hon. Emerson Etheridge.
[From the Louisville Journal, May 28.]
aware
stand taken by the Hon. Emerson Etheridge, of
Tennessee, upon the great questions whloh are
dividing tbe people of the South at the present
time. He, with his compatriots, Johnson, Nel
son and Mavnard, returned to their conatltuenta
in Tennessee, at the closs of the last session of
Congress, snd raised his warning voloe against
secession. . nut even bis powertui logio ana win
ning eloquence were not potent to stay tae oe
strovlng wave of disunion; so firmly and so se
curely bad the politicians planned and consum
mated their wicked sohemes. Etherldee. how
ever, made a gallant fight, and our people honor
bim for biapatriotism. The announcement tnat
be was in the city and would address tbe citi
zens of Louisville, attracted many thousands to
tbe City Hall last evening. ' . c -' '
The distinguished speaker commenced hia
addreaa with an allusion to the dlstraoted condi
tion of the country, congratulating himself and
bis audienoe tbat he stood upon Kentucky soil,
a State that was vet loyal to tbeUnlon a State
In which a oitlsen may freely express his honest
convictions, snd tbe sequel proved now lairiy
and freelv and fatally he dealt with Seoesalon,
and how eloquently aod feelingly he portrayed
the benefits and glories of the American Union.
He clearly proclaimed himself for bis country,
first, laat. and forever. Havins but recently
come from a State in which anarchy reigned
supreme, be could better appreolate the bless
ings or political liberty wnien were yet vouch
aafed to Kentucklana. and which he felt Ken-
tuckians had tbe natrlotiam. the eallantrv, and
the power to perpetuate. He drew a picture of
Kentucky in Her proud position as a sister in tne
Union of the States, of her wealth, of ber use
fulness as an asylum for the oppressed of both
sections of our unhappy and divided country, and
of her grandeur in after days when she bas safe
ly outridden tbe storm wnicn wreck ea tne irau
er sistsrhood around ber.
We have not tbe time at this late hour to fol
low the eloquent speaker through the two hours,
so brief to his andlence, during wnicn ne aeait
deathly blows to tbe apologists oi dissolution,
and sooke such cheering words of comfort and
assurance to the friends of the Union. He was
withering in hie denuneiatioo of rebellion, pow
erful In argument, ready ana illustrative in an
ecdote, and fervid and glowing in eloquence
Since we have beard Mr. btberidge, we can
with some feeling commiserate tbe wily and
sagacious Adkins, who fell in a late political
contest beneath tbe herculean blows ot our gal
lent friend, who encouraared. amused, and edl
fled ns laat evenine. Etherldee is a tower of
strength, aod bis master mind will be felt in the
great battle for civil liberty tbat is wsgtog in
tbe land. -
When Mr. Etherldtre. in spite of the efforts
of bis audience to induce mm to continue, con
oluded. the Hon. Robert Mai lory was called up.
In bis peculiar style, which is ever happy, Mr.
Mallorv pledged Kentucky to stand by tbe true
patriots of Tennessee In their efforts to restore
and preserve tne union, ana tne rouna ot tnree
times three cheers, which qualified the an
nouncement, but showed how sincerely the
great heart of tbat vast audience beat in re
sponse to the patrlotio sentiment.
[Correspondence of the N. Y World.]
[Correspondence of the N. Y World.] Steamers New York and Northerner
not Purchased by the United States
—Peerless of being a Piratical
Craft.
MONTREAL, May 28.
now in port, were reported In your paper as
havins been purchased by the United States
Government. This is incorrect. These fine
steamers were owned in Ogdensbnrg and were
sold in mod faith to Mr. Small, of St. Johns,
N. B. Being American vessels, they are nnder
tbe control of tbe U. B. uonsui, ana tne papers
are now In his hands nntil satisfactory proof is
afforded that the vessels are Intended for the
leeitimate onrposes of trade. The former own
era are above all suspicion of doing anything
for tbe "aid or comfort of rebels," and through
onthave behaved in a straightforward manner.
Mr. Small will no doubt fnrnieh satisfactory
of
evidence of bis good intentions, as tbe steam
ers will remain in port for a fortnight for fitting
out for the tea vovage. There will benoun-
nMeaaarv detention.
The iron steamer Peerless was also reported
as having been bought by the United States
Government. This is also Incorrect, as
Government bas never authorised aov such pur
chase. She is a British vessel, and was sold
the Bank of Upper Canada to a Mr. Wright,
New York, and bas sailed lor viueoec, ana win
shortly bs at sea. Strong suspicions are enter
tained tbat ebe is intended for the Southern reb
els, snd will require looking after. Tbe Peer
less may be all right, but there is everything
oonneoted with her to excite suspicions. Her
destination iasaid to be St. Johns, N.U. Strangs
tbat a ship building port like St. Jobns should
all at once become tbe -purchaser of foreign
steamships at good prices. Either the trade
St. Johns bss become suddenly expanded,
these purchases are made witn no good Inten
tions.
From the Montreal Advertiser, Thursday.
"
The atnamer Peerless exneditionalv shinned
Quantity of coal on Sunday night, and cleared
out of tbe harbor before next morning, ine
New York was still in port yesterday.
[Clippings from the Augusta constitutionalist, May 30.]
of
In
PmsoNAL. Hon. Robert Toombs, Secretary
oi State, and Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Attorney
General, left this olty for Richmond, Vs., on
Tuesday night laat. Hon. L. P. Walker, Sec
retary of War. passed through yesterday morn
ing. Mrs. vavis, wile or msiaent uavis,
with three of their children, arrived in our city
last evening, and left soon afterward to join
ber husband in Richmond, Vs. She held a
brief reception in tbe cars of the South Caro
lina Railroad train, and was welcomed by
quite a number of ladies and gentlemen.
Brigadier General W. n. T. Walker, of this
city, bss been ordered to Pensaoola, and will
repair to that point forthwith. Several
members of the Government passed through
tbe city last night on their way to Richmond,
Va. President Davis' war borso passed
through this city last night, on his wsy
Richmond, Va. Accompanying the animal
tbe President's ssddle, on the horn of which
a compass', to be used in case the rider should
lose bis way.
Paying ron Tin PumDia. The Wheeling
InUUigencet slates that the gentleman who
owned the horses recently captured at Harper's
Ferry, had been fully remunerated by the officer
In command, Colonel Jackson, who gave him
check on a bank in Winchester for the value
tha horses. He drew the money, went to Bal
timore and traded it off for Wheeling money.
Mr. Renick, of Ohio, who owned the cattle
whloh were eantured at the tlme.was also renaid
in full, and, barring the trouble and annoyance
to which be was subjected, is satisfied.
Slaves Riooonixco as .Faonrrr r thi Ad
sunibtSatiow. 1 he retention of slaves as eon
traband of war mnst be on the basis that
are property. Nothing else can be contraband
ot war. We bave this species of property effl
daily and formally recognised, and the deed
dens in soon a form that it can't be taken back.
LeuiseUc Democrat. " - ' " '
Ginisal Scott's Bibthdat The first
June waa tba 75th anniversary of the birthday
of the veteran and hero, Lieutenant General
Winfield Scott. - : .. .. ; -I '
F
f , '
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
rtOrlDITIOlv Of THE OHIO STATE
J Treasury at tha aloaa of business, May 11, 1861
Balance Oeneral Rerenne gund 47,371
Canal fund 8,467
, ". Sinking fund 69.334
Bute Common Bobooiyuud.... ....... 148,411
District School Library M . 1,034
National Road , , 4
. Military . . " SOJM
' 3 per cent. ' - IS
Bank Redemption - " 1,381
" BenocaCo. Bank " 1,103
" Olty Bank Cincinnati " I. WW
Canal Bank Cleveland, 8,063
Balance In Treasury ......1307,506
Tha above named balance consists of tbe fol
lowing Items: 1 ' ' ' ' "
By Coin 181.474 95
ny Currency... ....... ......... j,ii,KJ4 uu
n. T. Bsehsng....
By National Road Stock
Due from free and led. Banks. .
Cert. Dep. on Belmont Br. B'k.
Oompta. Dfts. oa County Tree's.
in trasaiia.......
A. P.STOtTl, TrtM. oBtftit.
B. W, TAILBR, 4Kt. of State, -i
9,631 00
60 87 "
138 B4
4000 00 .
14,000 00
17,000 00 1307,596
Jone6-d.lt,
NEW? ADVERTISEMENTS
CLOTHING FOR OHIO TEOQPS.
W KITTEN PROPOSAL. WH HB
received at the office of A. D. Bullock, Kiq., Me.
IS West Second street, Cincinnati, Ohio, until noon 9!
MONDAY, JUNE 10, 18C1 ,T
tn fnrntah Regulation Cloth for Army Pants. Ovenoata.
Blouse and Bhlrts, or ror said aruoiea or Hsasy Hade
Clothing. The manufacture, make and material tone
wholly of Ohio products and labor. The cloth to be ail
wool. Samples of ibe clothing may be seen at the above
named office. Tbe tin of Brat delivery and rate per
day thereafter should be stated in tbe proposals. The
quantity cannot be definitely Szad. .Waders shout
specify for each artlols separately. ,..
.' lAjt't duarter-aiaaUr Oep'l.
A. D. Bullock,
Purctieelne- Aaent.
Columbus, June 4, 1861, June3:dtcl
.Cleveland Herald ana i-iaio Healer copy a times, j
EXTRA08DINABY BAUCAtNOI
BAIlSTc&SON;
HO. 29, I0TJIH HIGH BTEEBT, v
ARE NOW OPFBBINOl
1)000 yards Subor Plain Black Bilks at 1 00-valea
1 Caper yard..: -, .. ' :
2,500 yards Traveling Dress and Mantle Goods at
19 18 cents veins 20 cents per yard.
3,000 Tarda White BriUlantea at 12 1-3 canta-
value SO cents per) ard.
8O0O yards Fine and Domeetlo Ginghams greatly on
der value. . ,, .
-ALSO!-
LARGE AND DESIRABLE LOTS OF
..J ' . 1
KOZAKBIQTEB, BaXZOBIffSS,
CHALKS, I0ULABD BUM,. . ;
ENGLISH BAEEQES, LATEIXAB, , ;
TAnnvs raTTrnK. 1K1PT.TW8. "
AND ALL OTHER
New and ITagMonable Droaas Good
Id the moat desirable styles and at very lo vers prices.
Of all materials, made In tha moat stylish manner after
tha latest Parte Fashions ths most elegant styles In
tha city.
BAIrT tc BOH,
may 30 No. 29 Booth High street,
Summer Under Garments.
LADIES LISLE UNDER VESTS.
ladles Ganse Merino do. do.
G snts Bilk Drawers ana bBlrts.
Gents India Game Drawers and Bhlrts.
Cotton . " " 1 .
" Gauie Merino Under Shir's. '
White and Brown Drilling Drawers. .
i' 1 White Linen Drivers.
' Ixtra large Under Shirts. . , .
" Bupeilor Ingllsh Half Hose.
' Long Blockings. ' -
" Fancy Cotton Half Hots. . .. .
; Suspenders. . n '. , '
" , Golden Hill Bhlrts. , ... " .,
For sals ia
great variety and at moderate
prints, by
may 30.
. . ;. .; ; . . . !
' BAIN St SOU,
No. 89 Booth High meet.
Al! 117I.,tA C,1nl.Ti.'
1iiIU tfllHO UUIJIIIUI ajyiUlgSj
DELAWARE CO., OHIO.
This Favorite Resort will be open
for Visitors,
June 10,1001.
FAMILIES DISIXISO 10AADIKO DOSIHO TBE IIASOH, CAR BE
. ACCOMMODATED AT SEDDCSD BATES, ' .
FOR BOOHS OR INFORMATION,
ADDRESS
jr. a. BWATHiE,
Lewis Center P. 0.( Delaware Co., Ohio.
may XB;aimo.
tbe
by
of
of
or
a
SPECIAL NOTICES,
MANHOOD.
HOW LOST, HOW RESTORED.
JTTflT PTTBLT8HED. 0! TBI WATTTM. TUBA
US NT AND RADIOAL OURS Ot SPERMATORRHEA
or Seminal Weakness, denial Debility, Nervousness, In
voluntary Emissions and Imnotency, resultlnt from
Self-abase, ate. By Robt. J. Oulvenrell, M. D. Sent
nnder seal, In a plain envelope, to any addraes.peet
ald. on receipt or two stamps, oy Atr. uuab. j.u .
I LINK. 187 Bowery. Mew York. Post Office Box. No
4,380. - mar31.-3mdfcw
MOFFAT'S LirB FILLS.
In all oases of oostlveneea, dyspepsia, billions and live'
affeotlona, piles, rheumatism, revets and agues, obetl
nate head aches, and all general derangementa of health
theas Pills have invariably proved a oertaln and speedy
remedy. A single trial will place the Life Pills beyond
the reach ofoompetitlon la the estimation of every pa-
Bent. .'. ,
Dr. Moffat's Phanlz Bitten will bs fonnd equally at
leadoua In all cases of nervous debility, dyspepsia, heal
ache, ths sickness Incident to females In delicate health,
and every kind of weakness ef the. digestive organs
For aala by Dr. W. B. MOflAT, 33S, Broadway, N. T
and by all Druggists. ' mayZJ-dkwly
, ....
Tba following It aa extract Irom
letter written by the Rev. J. BY Holme, paster ot the
Plerrepolnt-8 treet Baptist Church, Brooklyn, N. T.,to
tha "Journal and Messenger," Cincinnati, 0., and speaks
volumes In favor of that world-renowned medicine, Mas,
Wmsuw's BooTans Svaor roa Gauaan Tektbumi
"Wa see an advertisment In voar 00 turns of Mas
Wrjrsiow'a 80OTHIM BraoF. Mow we never said a word
In favor of a patent medicine before In onr life, but we
feel compelled to say to your readers that this is no hum
bug WB RAT. TRIED IT, AND I0W IT TO SB ALL
claims. It Is probably one of the moat successful m edi
ct nes or the day, because It Is ens of tha beat. And those
of vour readers who have babies can't do better than
to
was
is
a
of
is
'
of
lay ma supply." . eex:iyuw
-1 Te consumptives.', i
The Advertiser, having been restored to health In a few
weeks by a very simple remedy, after having offered aav
era! years with a severe lung affection, and that dread
disease. Consumption Is anxious to make known te his
fellow-sufferers the meana of enre.
; To all whs desire It, he will send a copy of tba preecrli
tlon aaed (free of charge), with the directions for prepar
ing and using tha earns, which they will Snd a aoaa Oca
for Goran vmoa, Asthma, BocinfiB, Ao. The only
object of the advertiser In sending tha Prescription la
benefit tha afflicted, and spread information which he oon
oelvea to be m valuable, and ha hopes every sufferer will
try hia remedy, as it will cost them nothing, and may
prove a blessing.
Parties wishing the prescription will pleas address
Rsv. IDYVABD A. WILSON,
. . Williamabunb,
Kings County, Mow Voik.
oetlwly
TalXlOsOTllb'
39
34
10
30
43
11
SS
01
50
W
84
M
05
.
65
PBICII XIDTJCIO .. : -I
;!.. 1-ni
nfrom ths Mew York Observer.
As all parties manufacturing Sawing Machine, are ob
liged Is pay Mr. Bows a license oa each machine sold,
and are a 10 compelled to make returns to him, under
oath, aa to the number sold, hia books give acorreotstate
ment. Irom this reliable source we have obtained tha
following stalls tioa. Of tha machine asada 10 the year
ltuv.taera were sold,- .-ii- , . ,
. 1 By Wheeler at Wilson ..81,305
. , t ' I. M. Blnger et Go ,. 10,93 I
; 1 : Arovor et Baker 10.SBO
Showing the sales of Wheeler fc Wilton to be iouX
anoaa 01 any ouar company., n- - ,wt :ji;-i 1: u:
Awarded the hirheet preahiiae at the ' , - - i 1(3r-.
, , United States lain ot 1H68, i and lBovi
,- - i ' ! . also at the- n . -. -.v
,, . udio Bute fairs of Jto ana loom r
, and at nearly all the Count- lairs in th. State
Our sneea, at tha late reduction, r ? at any
loot MtcA machine now told, and bat a til Be higher than
the Interior w thread chain eHcA macMnte, now
forosd npon the market. - '' .'.-...;-.(
The WUHLtl St WIXSOU MAOHIKB makes tha
Look Sticm the on ly 0 ne which cannot be raveled . 1
la Aula oa Born Bisaeof tha goods, leering no rMo or
ehatnotkt4r.eide. '
AH machtnee warranted S years, and inetmoUon
given In their use, free of ehenre. - -
, - H. CRARI, 61 High St., Columbus, 0.
- ' WM. SUMMBB 00
decJ-9swd3mfcw6a Pitt's Opera Hosse, Glnotnaa.
MALTESE THREAD sVACB MITTS
of elegant qualities t Ladles) alee, MIW Mltsi
a neat varlstw .-. t i BAIN'S.
fljTCHl 4MBIOAH WATCH COUP ANT, of Walt-
taa,alAsa.,bastoeall ths attention ot tbs publloto
(he following emphatle recommendation of Waltnam
Watches, by tha leading practical Watchmakers and Jew
elera throughout the United Statse. Tha entire list of
algnat'utea to it is quit too long for publication in one
Advertisement; put the names presented will be recog
nised bj; these acquainted with tha Trade as being In th a .
highest degree respectable and and influential. At their
eslAblishments may always be fonnd the genuine Watch,
ee of tha Company's manufacture, la great variety.
'Signatures from many cities and towns not folly
resented In this Hat will appear In a future advor
ment.
XOXHirTJBLIO.
Ths undersigned, praetloal Watchmakers and dealers In
Watches, having bought and sold American Watches U t
a number of years (ut, and having dealt la all kindao f
foreign Watches for a muoh longer period of time, beg te
state tbat they have saver dealt la Watehaa which, aa a
class, or in Individual instances, have been mora satis-
factory to themselves or euitomers, whether la respect 0 f
durability, beauty of Bnlsh, mathematically oorreet pre
portions, accurate compensation and adjustment, or of
fint tlmt-Ueping retultt, than those manufactured by
tha Walthem Company.
a
to
;
1
I
N. B. ORITTBNDKN, Cleveland,
WU. BLTNN, Columbus,
JAMES J. ROBS, Zanesvllle,
B. JENKINS A CO., , Cincinnati,
BRQOS Ax SMITH.
WU, WILSON McGRKW,
DTJHMi 4tOO.,
O.OSOAMP.
0' PLATT, '
KINO ac BROTHER
J. T. Al B. M. SDWABUO, '
f. J. ALIXANDSR.
JOHN H. WORSE,
A. UEPFliBK.
W. B. RIOHMON0,
H.D.KAYS,
A. B. OILL1TT,
8. D. UI.LE8TON,
J. B. OTJRRAN, '
J. W. BROWM, -
B. B. TOBIN,
BASBB HUtSMAM,
A. P. BOYNTOM, ......
WM. M. MAYO,
I. NORTH EY,
A. W. PORD.
WM. SOHERZER,
J. M. fOX,
WILL ARD StHAWLBY,
N. BAIQHT,
H. Ji D. R08BNB1BQ,
0. A. BURR fc 00.
1. 8. BTTENHRIMEB St UU
WM. S.TAYLOR,
W.W.HANNAH.
B.B.AD.O, OARPBNTBB,
HOSEINS at BVANB, '
HAIUHT at LEACH,
JAMES BYDB,
JOHN B. 1VE8,
WILLIAMS at CO.,
J. N. BENNBT,
A, 8. BIO KM 8,
WM. 8. MORGAN,
HENDERSON BRO'S
J. A. CLARK,
BLOOD A: PUTMAN.
JENNINGS BRO'S
JOBN J. JENKINS,
W. H. wiliLIAate),
A. WARDEN.
L. 0. DUNNING.
OHAB. 8. WILLABD,
W. P. BINGHAM t CO.,
OHA8. G. FRENCH.
J. NcLANB,
0. A. DIOKENBEN,
O. H.BASCOMfc CO.,
J. M. BTANBII,
ADOLPH MYERS,
Til HO. 1. PICKERING,
GEO. DOTY.
U. 8. SMITH
A. B. VAN COTT.
JOHN ELKINS,
H.N. SHERMAN,
8. 0. SPAULDIflO,
A. GILlB.
RKINEMAN JtMIYRAIf,
BAM'L BROWN, Jr.,
W. T.KOPLIN, .
GEO. W.BTRIN,
GEO. B. TITQB.
HEGKMAN et YOliE,
GEO. 8IEIN,
B. J. LABCELLB,
SAM'LGARM AN, '
JOBEPH LADOMC8,
J. J. BLAIR,
GEO. W. MoOALLA,
FRAN0I8O. POLAOK,
0. M. ZAHN,
GEORGB HBLL1R,
P.P. HELLER,
B. ACGHINBACGH,
8. T. HOP. MAN,
J. O.HANNA,
0. T. ROBERTS,
J O. DOLON,
OHA8. L. PISHER,
R.M.Bt. OLAIa,
R. A A. PETERSON,
DAVID LAYBRACK.
W. T. BAB.
BNOOH P. BILLS,
HENRY B. JAMBS,
T, 8. LITTLE,
CARSON St BRANNOIt,
TH08. GOWDEY,
A. W, PYLB,
BIMP80N et PRIOB,
Y. W. BKIPP,
j. As a Gardner
W.O.DEPRIEZ.
MAURICI ot HENRY
JEHU BYLVEBTER,
J X, BCOTT At CO.,
T. B. 11UMPUREYB,
B. A. TOOLE R,
t. W. LEINBEOK,
J. W. MONTGOMBRY,
BENJ. B. COOK,
8. CHILDS,
DEXTER St HA8KTNB,
B.D. TI8DALB,
ALBERT PITTS, ' ' -
BLLIS GIPPORD.
P. W. MAOOMBRR, ,
J.J BURNS,
JB88B SMITH, ,
T.H.LAMB,
8. N.BTORY. .
LEVI JOHNSON,
ANDREW WARRBN
0. W. POOG,
AMOS BAN BORN,
JOHN BARTON,
JOHN MoOREGOR,
W. M. ROOT.
JOHN B. 8C0XT,
N. MOODY.
WM. KIRKHAM, Jr.,
L. D. ANTHONY et CO., .
PELHQ ARNOLD,
THOMAS 8TEELB ec CO.,
HEMINGWAY At 8TIVEN8,
WM. ROGERS 4t BON,
O.J. MUN80N,
E. BENJAMIN,
J.B. KIRBY,
GEORGB BROWN,
B. S. HUNTINGTON It CO.,
B. A. WOODPORD,
H. D. HALL.
JOHN L. SMITH,
JOHN GORDON,
J. 0. BLAOKMAN,
JAB. R. AYRES,
8UERBTJRNB SHAW,
L. R. H ANDERSON,
B.KNIQUT. , .
N. G. CARR,
GEO. W. DREW It CO.,
8. J.MELLI8H,
W. 0. 0. WOODBURY,
REUBEN BPENCBR,
WM. B. MORRILL,
BIOHARD GOVB.
JONATHAN BOBMIB,
ST. W. GODDARD,
OHAB. B. BACON,
P.M. BARDIBON,
TWOMBLY St SMITH,
MOSBS M. 8WAN,
J.A MERRILL "
JAMBS BMERY,
SIMEON BLOOD,
HENRY H.HAM, V -
ROBERT N. BODOB.
HENRY McKENNBY, 1
J. T. HOWLAND,
TOMPKINS As MORRIS, -0.
0. WILLIAMS, ,
G. 8. it O. L. ROGBBB,
D. 1. LUCY, -1 : - ;
D.O. HALL, '
BRINBMA1D at HILDRETH,
0. H. HARDING,
T.O. PHINNBY, j
A, A. MBAD, -
J. 0. BATES, - r
J.H. MURDOOK, , ,
0. 0. CHILDS, "-' -0.
H. HUNTINGTON,
POSTBBGROW,
W. K. WALLACE,
LBAJNDBS AMADON, ,
0. B.JSNNING8,
GREGOR at CO., ,
B. OOC KRELL, ' ' , '
A. N. HALL,
ROBERT WILEIR, , !! -
Ohio.
,( -
M .(
H tt
Delaware, "
Warren, '
Chicago, "
La Salle,
Peoria, "
H
M (I
Bloomlngton, "
Deoatur, "
Springfield, 11
Qaincy, "
,4 (I
Galena,
Jacksonville,
Cherry Grove '
Preeport, "
Peru, "
Canton "
Syracuse, N. Y.
Newbnrgh, "
Bocfaester,
.. it
' "
TJtlca,
Hudson "
, Troy, '
Oawego, -
Auburn, "
,
Falrport, "
Canandalgna, 14
4, 14
Ponghkeepsie, "
4.
,4 44
Batavta "
Amsterdam, "
Saratoga, "
Albany, "
41 41
Goshen, "
Penn-Yan, ,,
Calsklll, '
Indianapolis, Ind,
4, U
M
Richmond,' "
Terra Haute, '
Snlllvan. '
Plymouth,
Kalamaaeo, Mich
Detroit, "
,4 44
Milwaukee, Wis.
Racine, "
Belolt, "
Janesvllle, "
Prairie duOhien, "
PitUburgh, Pa.
Norristown, "
, ,
Kaaton, ' "
,4 M
4 44
Allentown, "
Westcheeter,
Wllllamspoit, "
Chester, "
Lebanon, "
Harrlsburg, "
York, "
Lancaster "
Beading "
44 44
Ohamberaburg, "
Gresnsburg, "
Newcastle,
bensburg, "
Mauch Chunk, "
Aahland, "
Indiana "
Scranton, "
Paterson, N. J.
Newark, "
Boidentown, "
Trenton,
Cumberland, Md
' Pulaski, Tens.
Nashville. '
Sprlogfleld,
Olarksvllle, "
Savannah - Ga.
St. Louie Mo.
ii
Wheeling.
Richmond,
Salem,
M
Va.
It
N. 0.
4
8.0.
Newberry.
Northampton, Masa
New Bedford, "
4. M
Taunton, "
4. .4
PaU River,
44 4,
Gloucester, "
Salem , "
. WoroesUr, "
Waltham,
44
Lowell,
Lynn,
Lawrence
Plttefield,
.4
Greenfield,
Springfield,
Providence.
B. Greenwich.
1. 1.
Hartford, Conn.
14 4t
New Haven, "
44 U
. t
( .1
. D anbury, "
k. 44
Mlddletown, "
44 ,4
New London - M
Bridgeport, "
Watertmry,
San born ton, H. Hi
Concord, '
Hanover,
Olaremont, .
, Kxeter,
Laoonla,
Nashua,
44
Dover,
So. Berwick,
Ma.
Angus tat
Portland,
' 1 BackspoH,
Rockland,
, Poitsmoath,
t "
; Auburn,
Bath,
1 Bangor,
i . .
Gardiner,
Hoaltoa, -.
Lewlston,
; Burlington,
. Bradford,
.MootpeUer, :
kTorthfleld. '
. Woodstook, . "
St. Johnsbory, "
St. Albans, -Chelan,,
,, a ., .,
Newbnry, i. , " :. ,
, Bellows Palls, "
, New Orleans, la.
14
I Natohes, . i i Mlas.
Mllford, . leu
Toronto. ' ' 0. W.
K 2
Tt,
Ii
1 '
Citrnox. As onr Watch Is now extensively coaster
fatted by foreign nannfaettuari, wa bjve to Inform the
public that no watch tt of onr pronation which Is nnao
eompanltd by a oertlfloate et snolnaness, bearing the
Dumber of tha wateh, and signed ny war Treaaeurer, S.
1. Robbina, or by oar iwedeoxaiaois, Applaton, Tracy St
!AUeW watchai krs lot sale by Jewelers snrall. 1 .
Ihrosgaonf the tfifloi, the iMSrtM Wslch Cmmf1 j
io net solMU Ordtit for stagis watches.
L':.- BOBBINS tt APPL1T0N
WhoiiaaleAsai,Ko.l8roalwa . ,
fiViliv'ViTifB'V'
U
1 1.
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