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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, June 06, 1861, Image 2

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Murcrainrr mixza, real lakers ;
Thursday morning, june 6, i8cl
The Two Extremes.
.1 Hi
t " II is
commm to speak of oar revolutionary
sf.iJ'UVfc. lima thal"tr rd tueu'SSOUU" IBM
That
. . . .1 . - . 1 kIai1
trite saving may be appuea 10 me pre pra,
!i,ih.w nollUcat history." Thi In time twi
fc" ' trlei our patriotism end onr capacity for main.
i, gaining purs representative mil ilesnoorelie sjs-
i lem of government. : l w. ' determine w
our countrymen are sufficiently enlightened
Vi.llntln tr nreaerve from Wrleitttre tnat
'-ptkMlew legacy of Liberty and Unlohlwqneetb
d Aem bt their patriotic eirei.'
i j uOhi omplieated system, or rather a
tceoaiWoatlooo the two systems of a Federal
" a Government dver the whole people, and of State
... i . ' ' ' Iwi
' h- mbiiian aid In tha harmonious work
I eg Of tbee two systems', lie tbe value and real
'strenetli of our Union. J Both systems are tha
' ' "work of the people, and both most be preferred
la all their Integrity, to Becnre order, liberty,
hanolneea and aafety. '
k 1 The'powera of the Federal Government and
j ii out and defined In their several Constitutions.
t Tme love for the Union and for the righta and
" liberties of the people consUU in understanding
and lovini: and maintaining ihese Constitutions
not One or a part, bat all.
There are two extremes, alike dangerous and
fatal to onr -representative and demooralio in
stitutions. The one ia to attempt to array btatea
In opposition and resistance to the exercise of
constitutional power by the Federal Govern
ment, nnder pretence of preserving State righta
and the liberties and Immunities of the citizens
of the several SUtee. , Tbis ia the position as
snmed by the disunionists and secessionists In
the so-called seceded Sutea.. If successfully
maintained, it will overthrew alike the Federal
and State Governments, and destroy equally the
1 rights and liberties of the people aa citizens of
a common country, and aa citizens of individual
.1 . Clf.ll. '
The other, extreme Is to exalt,' out of a mor-
' bid and unenlightened veneration for the Uolon
the sphere of the General Government beyond
'"" the limits brescrlbed In the Federal umstuu
" tioni to the usurpation of powers clearly reserved
. to the State or to the people. . This Is a vor
, sex into which there la danger of our being
" whirled, In case of a fierce and protracted elvil
" war, ia which It will be requisite to etretch the
." pawer o( the Federal Government to the utmoat
verre of its constitutional limitations. But it
must not be permitted to go beyond that line, or
there ia no telling where It may stop. There
may be no serious cause for apprehension in this
direction now; bat the people, while defending
" the Union against disintegration, should also
,t zealously guard against any tendency to aa ua
; constitutional consolidation of federal power.
' He who truly loves the Union will cautiously
' avoid both these extiemee. lie will be aa seal.
-. . ous for preserving the constitutional rights of
the States and of the people, as be is for main
' teinine those of the Federal Government. All
' these are so indissolubly linked in" our republi
can system, that they must all be preserved, or
, all wilt go to destruction together. Our motto
io the present hour of trial should be The
Constitutioa of Ibe L'nioo and the Constitutions
of the States tbey most all be preserved and
, m.iniaiaed,as the people have ordained.
A Significant Rebuke.
. "'- In tbs north-eastern pari of the State, a num.
ber of papers (some of them of commandinc in
fiuence in the Republican party) have urged a
Uoioii State Convention and Union nominations
1 for the offices of Sute, so that onr next Govern-
er"ehoold be called by the nnaoimons weloome
' T of the people of the State" to the discharge of the
.' Executive duties. The papers referred to desig
: nate Hoa. David Tod aa the proper man for the
occasion, and the most ultra (Republican) among
tbem concede to him those high qualities, com
mending Administrative talent, patriotism and
integrity, which, are now demanded in pre emi
nent degree and to all which Col. Tod's old
, friends most heartily subscribe, knowing, as tbey
do, that he Is an ails and ah honmt man.
. uThis indication among Republicans ia not in
' the direction desired by the higher-law Joan
' BaowN men, and hence it is met by the Ashta
buU Stntinel with flat rebuke. That paper
of the 3i of June thus speaka on the subject:
Ta Vtnon Trf. Wt nolle a few of our exebwns,
maong them the Warran Vhroniel ana stationing tier
lunrini tha snttat of runnln Colon eaodidstea
, for Slat olfioeo. If the Kopoblieuia of Ohio hart
mind to out away all th labor they hart spent upon the
- 'rafomriof or this Btau, tnej win fiep low wn irap.
' l Al leatt tbtj bad better wait till Ihey se toffli otner than
,- ivMOfoco candidates oueraa in union uoaeu.
Questions About the Volunteers
PLAINFIELD, O, May 29, 1861.
I , Dsaa Bia: I write to know whether the Leg
Ishtlure passed- an act granting to the three
. - years' volunteers a bonnty of one hundred dol-
. lers each.1 '
V ' There Is a company now forming for three
it years or during tbe war, who are promised Ibis
i amount of bounty money, whilst there are some
. who discredit tbe storv.
Please publish the truth of these matter! in
. i 'your next weekly issue; also what provision was
made for the support of tbe wives and families
" volunteers. Yonrs,
R. L. BAKER,
G. W. MANYPENNY, Esq
Columbus, Ohio
, In reply to the questions propounded by Mr.
., Busa, we answer that there waa no provision
made by the State Legislature for bounty of
.' $100 to the three years volunteers,
, : .The general Government has assured those
- i who do volunteer for three years, ibat there
ahall bea bonnty paid then of $100 al the ex
; plratlon of the service. . That Is, however,
matter in which the State has nothing to do.
'. ui The Legislature passed an aot providing for
: . the relief of the families of volunteers, by the
levy of it tax In each county, by tbe board of
..county commissioners, not to exceed In tbe year
. 1861 one half of one mill en tbe dollar's yalua-
tlmrof the taxable property of the county, "for
I '. the purpose bf affording relief to the families of
tbe Obio Volunteer oiuitia mastered into the
service of tbe United States, under the requisi
tion of the President, or Into the aotual service
. of the State of Ohio." Tbat law will be found
, elsewhere in onr columns to-day, and to it we
'? refer our correspondent. ' "' -
1,
' ' A gentleman from Mempbls Informs ns
' ' thai General Beanregerd arrived there a few
; days since, and used great endeavors to keep his
' mwvemenis secret. Being a stranger, ana some-
" what observant, be attracted the attention of
tbe Vigflaoee Committee, who arrested him se
a spy and suspected person. The generalissimo
' of the Confederate torses had to tend for Gener
' al Pillow to Identify blm, and the hero of Ca
I m argo soon convinced tbe vigilante that tbey had
- dug their'ditch on the wrong side of the ram-
part of Memphi defenae, whereupon Beaure-
rsrd was discharged with apologies. Loui-
vilk y - -- b-i-v , ,
.! ., . ' . K-lii I'-. I .-49V .-. Ol I -
f ar a t ,'."'.. i !, ;'ai: jssX")
The Western Reserve Not to be
Waited on Any Longer.
It seems that the Abolitionists of the Reserve
are still "considering"! the question whether
they shall furnUb any troops to fight for the
Union, the Constitution and. the Lawsi and the
Secretary of War has become tired of Gov. Dm-
lion's waiting for the contingents from that
quarter. Mr. IIautsjd; the editor of the Cin
cinnati GrnimereW. telegraphed Irom Weening.
ton City, on the 4tb instant, as follows, which
appears in lbs Oammneial of yesterday i
Tb BVeretary of War has written' a Miier vtvov.
Doankwn, la SeeldineUn hint not to wait oa Western
Hoeem (or troope, bat to take them as tha? cum, nam
Inr Cols. Sulllrao's,. gtauley autlhewi', and at. B.
Bays' Beg linenta, ai entitled to aoorptanc. m . n.
American Affairs in the British Parliament.
. iiwaweais.
The following notices of motions stand on the
order book of the British House of Commoua
for the 7th of the present month:
Bf Mr. Gregory To call the atteotioo of the Uoute
to the expediency of the prompt recorniuon 01 me oouin
1.. Tnf Mr. Wiliiaw lorater: To
call Ibeattealion of ths Hou to the ioeipeilleney of In-
terfferiogiBMhaliortboM eiuientoi iua umm ow
who are now In iniurraction agalnet their goTernment,
bv a recognition of the confederacy which tbty bsre form
d. Mr?Clifford: Oa Mr. rtnler'smollon, to call the
attention of th Uoute to th nature and character of the
Motteioa of (ho Blate In North America, said to b in
inanrrecUon agalmt their goreniment, and to lmpreat
pon HerMaJeity'aOoTernuientthe imnortanc of coo
tinning to obterv a strict neutrality between the con
landing parties. , .,
How They Talk at Richmond.
We have the Richmond Extmntr of the 31st
of May. The editor Is evidently chagrined at
the shape things were taking, and morUnedat
the occupation of Alexandria by the federal
tooops. We publish entire oneoftbe editorials of
the Exmntr, which will enable our readers to
see how they feel at Richmond:
Attack la alwais eaevand defense generally
dlffieult. So long as the South retreats the North
will advance, and up to the present moment
tbs provisional army of Virginia has done nothing
but retire In a masterly manner on the appearance
of the enemy. .
1 Be capture OI Aiexanuria can caen-iieu
powerful influence on the sentiment of lbs
North and tbe South. Up to that moment ths
Administration of Lincoln despaired of realizing
their calculation for the war. They com
menced it under tbe supposition tnat such an
enormous force would rush on the South from
tbe Yankee States at the first signal, that Vir
ginia and the other Border States wonld be
overwhelmed before their preparations for re
sistance would be completed or eveo commenced.
But tbe volunteer movement of the North never
came up to the mark they bad made for it. Du
ring the first week of ths war it was prodigious.
But Northern sensations ao net enaure, ana mis
one iell off with amazing rapidity. Latterly few
new regiments appeared, and most of those that
offered were so badly equipped that they were
necessarily sent back. Tbe capture of Alexan
dria, the passage of the bridge and the rive:
without trouble or danger, and the retreat of
our troops without any other shot than that
fired by one brave and deserted man, have
obanged the whole public sentiment of tbe North.
Tbe invasion of the South they now think a safe
and pleasant business. Tbey have only
to come and conquer; the only resistance they
now expect is that of tbe women they will out
rage and the ahop doors they will break open.
Under the influence of the news from Alexan
dria, we may expect to see tbe war fever of tbe
North break out in greater strength than ever.
We eball hear of another great upheaving ol
its dangerous classes, and more (ervid declama
tion from their Devil's pulpit. Cities to be ta
ken without bloodshed, booses to do plundered
without fear of absriffs, glory to be gained with
out expenditure in coffiins these allurements
attract our enemies as an open hogshead of sugar
draws tbe swarm of summer flies. All their
steps have an air of renewed vigour eince that
strange and unhappy event.
Alexandria, it ia said, was strategically inde
fensible. But for the South, it had better have
been birnt to ashes than fall a prey to the
Northern horde of robbers that now hold pos
session ol it. Had a lew hundred only of Yan
kees been killed in an attack upon it, the gain
our cause would bare been as great as toe loss
was signal. II wonld then bave been goeased
and calculated that this busjness of invasion did
not pay, aod that the debit of kicks was great
er than Ibe credit 01 coppers, nut, as toiogs
hsve gene for the last six months, the pleasure
and profit has been entirely Iheir own.
If the South desires to check this invasion,
its tiooDS must resist everywhere, with success,
or defeat, but at least with sanguinary determi
nation. That ia not all. Wo mnst stuck
defend. So lone as the people of the North find
that they have nothing to do but to send all tbe
troops tbey can raise to Virginia, take Southern
citiee, occupy Southern villages, outrage South
ern families, fine Southern citizens, and reap
fields of green wheat to make fodder for their
horses, as tbey bave done in the neighborhood
of Hampton, tbey will carry on the war till it
time to send the drummers of the Fall trade
succeed these other drummers of their Spring
invasion. But let them taste on their own ter
ritory the sweets of a summer campaign; let
them know by some personal experience of their
own what it ia to bave communications cut np,
business interrupted, fields ravaged and honses
onened bv the hostile hands of a rnde soldiery,
and the truth will make better progress in the
North than if advocated there with the elo
quence of Cbrvsostom and the courage of St,
Georrs. The best point for the defence
Richmond is Washington; the fields where the
victories of Virginia mnst be won are in Mary
land; the countries whence the invasion of
South is to be successfully ropuleed are called
Ohio and f ennejlvaaia. .
The New York Tribune's View of the
Character of Senator Douglas.
The New York Tribune, which, ss is well
known, wu always strongly opposed politically
to Mr. Douglas, in an article announcing his
probable death, paid tbe following handsome
tribute to bis character. It said:
"SutAToa Doughs. The loss of Stephen A
Douglas at tbis crisis, and there is little room
for hope of his recovery, must be regarded as
national calamity. With whatever faults of
character we would rather say of education.
Mr. Douglas was always and eminently ao
Amiucan statesman. Sprung from tbe people
and proud or ma origin prompt, intrepid, sell.
assured he wss the best off-hand, tit-for-tat
debater in A merioa perhaps io tbe world. En.
tering the political arena poor, undistinguished,
unfriended, without family influence, imposing
presence or personal following, in a mainly
etoutbern-born community to whom be waa a
stranger and a Yankee adventurer, be filled
before he was thirty-five years of age, the of
fices successively of State's Attorney General
Assemblyman, Register of a Laud-ofQce, Secre
tary of State, Judge of the (State) Supreme
Court, member or Congress (House;, (o wbicb
be waa ibrice elected al ter being once defeated
and finally entered tbe Senate of the United
States when but thirty five years old. We
doubt thst another American we are sure tbat
no other who ever began political life with so
few advantages ever held so many and such
desirable ale 'Jons osrore be bad passed tbe marl
dian of the appointed life of man. He has since
served fourteen years in the Senate, or through
out seven successive uongreeses, always evino
ine a vigor or intellect ana fertility or re
source which commanded the respect of antag.
onists and the admiration of his maoy devoted
friends'
Mm. GiNiRAt Haasisow. We are pleased
to state that Mrs. General Harrison, who was
quite ill, at the residence of ber son, Hon. Scott
Harrison, at North bend, is convalescent. The
painful apprehensions created by our notice of
tbe illness of this venerable lady, last week,
esn low give place to tbe assurance thst ap
pearances justify the agreeable belief of ber near
relatives and friends tnat tbey are to be blessed
witb ber presence among tbem, in comparative
Cincinnati
Enquirer, June 5
Enquirer, June 5 New State Loans.
Large State Loans are in tha market for war
purposes, flew Jersey advsrtisea for $500,000,
Illinois lor f i.uuu.uuu, Vermont for $500,000,
Indiana for 11,200,000, and Pennsylvania for
$3,000,000, a total of 16,200,000. They are
to os o per cent, stocas. i nis is irrespective
of $5,000,000 or $6,000,000 which will be
asked for soon by New York and Massachu
setts,.,,,. , ,'.'..,..; :,,
The Death of Douglas.
The newspapers of all parties aodfin every
quarter mourn the loss of PouaLts. AH re
gard bis death as a national calamity. From
the various notices in our exchanges of the sad
event, we copy the following from the Detroit
a - -
I Free Press and the Louisville Journal:
A neat calamity is upon the nation. Ste
nhee A, Douglaa is dead. The sllenoe of death
enters our heart as we write these lines, for
who eball fill bis place? We admired, loud
him, as we admired and loved no other great
an of our ceueratlou. A large party cluster
sd around bia giant Intellect as their . brain
and Ibelr heart. He was opposed aa no other
American atatesmsn has been opposed be was
sustained witn an inieusily of oonndence and
devotion none other awakened save Clay. Hi
name, bis acts, are now before the world for
ever. Tbe Inexorable destiny of genius Is now
bis. Civilized man will forever gaze upon and
criticise bim . No recall, no expedient, no new
fields all Is past for him He lives forever
aa he died. We have no fears as to tbe result.
Tbe great rebelllou which distracts the country
evinces that be knew Amsriosn institutions as
no other statesman has ever known them, end
above all, It baa nniied tbe testimony of the na
tion to bis devoted patriotism. We mourn for Ibe
count 'j aot rr nim. I be excitements of such a
lileaa bis make eveu tnree score years and ten
drift to the past with terrible rapidity. He lived
long enougn to be glorious not long enough for
tbe nation. Yet we are proud, and feel Ibat It Is
one of Ibe bonds which will strengthen the patii-
otio unity or tbe people that eveo Ma political
oppooeuts mourn his departure, and, in this hour
of national convulsion, weep as bitterly over
bis grave aa tbey wonld over the greatest and
Deal of their own.
We confess that there ia something terrible in
the idea mat ne is cone tnat bis massive frame.
bis iron will, were not powerful enongh to defy
even Death. The common lot of man seema
more certain now that it ia hla lot the King of
I errors more resistless, since be bag conquered
him- So great was Ibe man so marked by all
the intense energies of life and will that his
end will fall upon every ear as a wonder a
violation or nature.
"We ne'er shall see his like again."
—Detroit Free Press.
Stephen A. days the
dispatches have had tbe country between hope
and fear lor tbe result
done. A great man and a patriot Is gone.' lis
has been alternately applauded and denounced
by each section of tbe Union, for he was always
for bis country against motion ana fanaticism.
Many a good man al dioerent limes distrusted
him; but tbey didn't know the man. He was
honest, bold and fearlesa. He was ambitious,
it waa said. He never sought a high position by
devious paths. He foresaw, pernsps, better than
any public man, (he danger of the fanatical
movement In bia own section, and benoe be re
aisled it with nnoompromisiug determination.
What he apprehended came to pa9s. He made
his last efforts for peace in tbe Senate. He
dreaded the nse of force, and thought it
would be prevented. He trusted to tbe
sober second thought of the South to save
tbe Union, lie, however, when disappointed
in hopes of peace, naturally advised force to
II ia over; bis work is
SwXSOT izXn of
the country. His works now pass into history,.
and when tbe pissions or tbe hour subside, jus
tice will be done; but who will now stand up in
tbe Senate of the United States aud tell tbe
truth to bis country, with no fear or favor from
one section or the other 7 I be country bed rea
son to look to Douglaa for help in tbis dark
hour; but bis work is over- We shall not at
tempt to give a sketch of his history. The
country is familiar with its main features. He
bss left a name tbat will stand amongst tbe
brightest in the constellation of statesmen
Leuiimlle Journal
Jefferson Davis at Richmond—His
Journey from Montgomery.
The Richmond Enqttiret, of tbe .' 3lit May,
announces tbe arrival of Jiffis5on Davis at
Richmond, and detaila the events of hia journey
thither from Montgomery. Among other things
that paper says
. joobmbt or TaaaiDiMi oavia to Richmond.
to
to
is
to
of
Preeident Davis, accompanied by bia sid, Col.
Wlcfall, aod lady, and by Hoo. Robert Toombs,
of Ga., left Montgomery by cars on Sunday
evening last. They made no special etocosee
on me route, ano owing io previous severe in
disposition of tbs President, it was desirable that
bia trip to KicDmoua should oe as private as
possible.
At each station his friends endeavored to con
vey this information to the citizens, but It was
really to no purpose. No matter where tbe care
stopped, even though it was only for wood or for
water, throngs ci men, woman and children
would gather around tbe cars, asking. In lond
shoots, "Where is President Davia7" "Jsff. Da
vis, tbe old hero!" and he waa forced to make
his appearance and frequently to address them.
Then we conid see nanoKercniets waving and
gay Hags ana nonquota.
hen the flute-like voice of Da vis arose ddod
the air, boshed to stillness by tbe profound re
spect of bis auditors, it was not long before
there was an outburst off eeling whiob gave vent
in a tornado of voicee; these would break forth
in eonatant succession to tbs end of bis address.
Every sentiment be uttered seemed to well np
from nis nean, ana was received with the wild
est enthusiasm. When he conolnded, three
hearty cheers went up from the multitude
The crowd then shouted for Wigfall, and no
excuse was tolerated, in vain be would seek
some remote part of the cars; the crowd hunt
ed bint np, and tbe welkin rang witb rejoicings
as be aaaressea tnem in nis empnatio and ler
veot style of oratory. Next would be beards
orv for "Toombs!" He. too. eoueht to avoid
ths eall but ths echo would ring with the name of
Toombs I" "Toombs!" and tbe sturdy Georel
an statesman had to respond. His frank and
open manner came home to tbe hearts of all.
Whether in his own State, In South Carolina,
in Alabama, or NortbCarolina, "Rob Toombs,"
as they familiarly called him in Georgia, was
alwaya welcome when ne aa a reused ths people.
Ia Atlanta, Augusta, Wilmingtoa nod
Goldsborougb, the crowds assembled were very
large, and tha enthusiasm unbounded. At
Goldsborougb, while partaking of hia aupper in
tbe hall of the hotel, tbe table waa thronged
with beautiful girls, and many were bedecking
bim with garland of flowers. Tbe military bad
formed into squares to receive him form the
cars: euna were fired, and the band struck ud
inspirited martial airs during tbe interval of
aupper, , ; , ..-. :.
The wnoie country is a camp, un every
band we see soldiers and every day the cara
were crowded with them. From appearances
tbey are the nower oi tne south. 1 be ionrnev
of Preeident Davis from Montgomery to the
capital was one continnoos ovation. The whole
soul or the south is io mis war: and tbe conn
dence manifested in our President, In the many
scenes which transpired on this trip, shows that
tbe mantel of Washington falls gracefully upon
nis eneutaers.. i ?.., . v
Never were a people more enraptured with
their chief magistrate than ours are with Preai
dent Davis, and tbe trip from Montgomery to
Richmond will ever be remembered with de
light by all who witnessed it. . The eagerness
of young and old and of all classes to oatch a
glimpse of .him, or take him by the band, is
beyond description. Tbis trip bas Infused
martial feeling in our people that knows no
bounds. , i . ,-.. i 1 ; !.,(
While, however, there ia a rush to the battle
field in our elder States, which threatens to fill
up all Ibe ranks of our army, we must have
thought for the far distant . West, and give our
young sister States an opportunity to unite
their names in the history of our war. -on the
borders of Virginia.
. The Preeident and suite were welcomed to
Virginia by a deputation of tbe Governor of tbe
state and tbe Mayor or Kiobmond. -. These gen
tlemen reached tbe party at Petersburg, and ao
eompanied tbem to tbe oity. y , ,; , .
thi msiDitrr at thi hiw ram grounds. '
At about half-past five o'clock, President
Davis, accompanied by a oorteee on horseback.
left bis quarters at tbe Bpotswood House, and
proceeded to tbe New fair Grounds. Here a
large number of ladies and gentlemen bad a
aercbled, and on bis arrival greeted him with
tbe bearueet demonstrations or pleasure.
'. On leavlne hla aaddle. this President was sur
rounded by an eager crowd of soldiers and civil
lens, whom bs indulged to a band ahaking per
formance until tbe pressure became so great that
ha was , compelled to retire to the balcony
of., the .Executive Department, .where, in
response to the demands of ; the assembjsge,
-fe
lt--
A
J
delivered the following brief and pertinent
my menus ana riiow-iozrui-i nm
deeply Impressed with the kindness of yoar man
ifestation. I look upon yon as meiaat oeai nope
of liberty) and In our liberty alone is onr con
stitutional e-overnment to be preserved. Upon
your strong right arm depends tbe success of
onr eonnlry, ana, in asserting ine oiruirignt to
which you were born, you are to remember tbat
life and blood are nothing as compared with th
Immense interests you have at suite- Cheers
"11 mav be tbat you nave not long oeeu
trained, and that vou have much to learn of the
i .....
art of war, but I know tna.i mere Deata in me
breasts of Southern sons a determination neyer
tq surrender a determination never to go borne
but to tell a tale of honor. Cries of 'never !'
and applause. Though great may De the die
narlt of numbers, sive us a fair field and I
free fight, and tbe Southern banner will float in
trlumnh everywhere. Cheers. I Tbe country
relies upon yon. upon you rest tne nopea oi
our people; and I bave only to say, my menus,
that to the List breath of my life, I am wholly
your own." fTremendouscbeers. I
. . . . .i j e . U . 1 1 -.
, rresident Davis men reurau iruiu uie uaiuu-
ny.' Ki Benator vvigian; uov. Listener ana
Mayor Mayo followed witn orisi speeones, in
response to the calls of the crowd, after which
the President and suite proceeded to tbe adjoin
log parade ground , where a review of the
troops took place. ' '
Laws of Ohio.
AN ACT
Prescribing the Rates of Taxation for State par
poses, sud to limit mo levy oi iiocai taxea
for the year 18C1. y
Siotion 1. Be it enacted bw (h$ General At-
semMy of the Slate of Ohio, Tbat there ahall be
levied for the year 1861, in lieu of the taxes
now authorized by law for the purpose herein
named, on each dollar of the taxable property,
for the ordinary expenses of the public benevo
lent institutions and other chargea on the gene
ral revenue, one aud four tenths mills on the
dollar.
Sic. 3. Tuat for the year 1861, the levy of
local taxes on the dollar valuation of property
subject to taxation for tbe several purposes
hereinafter named shall not exceed tbe follow
ing rates, anything in any law to the contrary
notwithstanding. .; '
COUNTY TAXES.
For all county expenses, road, bridge and
poor purposes inoludsd, on such portion of the
valuation as wes not cicoou uno luiinuu vi wm-
lars, eight mills; and on such portion as exceeds
this sum, two aod one half mills.
SCHOOL TAXES.
For the bavment of teachers, purchase of
fuel, repairs of school buildings, and all gener
al aud incidental expenses for the mainte
nance of schools, except for the purchase of sites
and the erection of sobool buildings, throe
mills.
PROVISO.
It is hereby expressly provided that the above
limitations shall not Include any levies required
to be made to pay tbe principal or interest on
tbe funded debt or other existing debts or any
county or school district, nor so as to prevent
tbe county commissioners irom levying any tax
authorized by law to provide for expenses aria-
Mo Ji.-of
try; but sucb levies may be In addition to the
limitations of tbis act.
Sic. 3. Tbis act ahall take effect and be In
force from and after its
P.
Speaker the House of Representatives
JAMES MONROE,
President pro tem, of the Senate
Passed May 13, 1861.
AN ACT
property of such county, for the purpose of
To afford relief to the families of soldiers mus
tered into tbe service of the United States,
and in the servics of the State, nnder the re
auisition of the President. '
Siction 1. Be it enacted iy Me General At-
lemblyof the State of Ohio, That the board of
county commissioners or any county In tbis
State la hereby authorized to levy, in the year
IBM, a tax not exceeding tbe one-ballot one
mill on the dollar valuation of the taxable
affording relief to the families of tbe Ohio
Volunteer Militia mastered into the service
the United States, nnder the requisition of the
Presidents or into the actual aervice of tbe
State of Obio.
Sio. 2. That the said boards of county com
missioners shall,' respectively, constitute
board, for tbe purpose of affording relief to tbe
families of the Ohio Volunteer Militia muster
ed into the service of the United States, or into
the actual service of the Sute of Ohio, who
were residents of such county at tbe time of
enlistment. To anticipate tbe receipts which
may come into tbe treaauty, by virtue ot the
tax levied under the authority of tbis act, the
said boards are hereby authorized to borrow
from time to time, as msy be deemed neces
sary, such sums as shall not io the aggregate ex
ceed three fourths of tbe total sum of the tax
levied for this purpose, which sums so borrowed
shall be repaid witb interest, at a rate not ex
ceeding six psr cent., out of tbe money there
alter collected from auch assessment. The
fund raised by authority of this act shall be
distributed by said boards to tbe relief of said
families as their wants and necessities may re
quire, under such rules and regulations as may
bs prescribed by the rules and regulations ol
said board. Such rules and regulations shall
be adopted only by the concurrent vote in their
favor of all tbe members composing sucb board
The family of each soldier may, in the discre
tion of said board, be relieved from tbe date of
enlistment until one month after he is dlschsrg
ed from the service of the United States, or tbe
State of Ohio: Provided, however, if he shall
have become disabled or shall bave been killed,
or shall havs died in said aervice. tbe relief
shall be extended for one year after tbe date of
sucd disability or death. Tbe word family, as
need in this act, shall be construed to mean only
a wife, or minor child, or children, or a de
pendent parent.
Sic. 3. Tbe county commissioners of anv
county which shall raise a fund for tbe purposes
mentioned in this act, are authorized to transfer
any portion ot said fund tbat may remain nnex
pended for said purposes to the county fund
saiu county.
Sio. 4. This act to take effect and be
force h-om and after its
P. HITCHCOCK,
Speaker the House of Representatives.
JAMES MONROE,
President tem of the Senate
Passed May 10, 1861.
The Death of Senator Douglas.
ORDER FROM THE WAR DEPARTMENT.
WASHINGTON, June 3.
ine followio,, order relative to tbe death
of Seuator Douglas will be issued to-morrow
irom me war department: ,
WASHINGTON, June 4, 1861.
a great statesman la this hour
oi pern cannot oe regarded otherwise than as
national calamity. Stephen A. Douglas expired
In the commercial capital of Illinois yesterday
morning at 9 o'clock. A representative of the
overpowering sentiment enlisted in the cause
which we are engaged; a man who nobly die
earded party for hla oonntr Rpn.tn. mh ..
got all prsjudioes In an earnest desire to save
ins jtepuDiio; a statesman who lately received
for the Chief Magistracy of the Uolon a rote
second only to tbat by which tbe President wu
elected, and who had every reason to look for
ward to a long career of usefulness and honor;
patriot who defended with equal teal and ability
the Constitution aa it cams to ns from anr f.th.
ers, and whose laat mission on earth wu that
rauymg tne people or his own State of Illinois
as one man around the glorious flag of the Union
has been called from the scene of life and the
field of his labors. ,
. Tbis department, recognizing In this loss one
Common to the Whole oonntr. and nrnfnnmlW
sensible of tbe grief it will excite among millions
uia, ooreoy aavises ue colonels or the dif
ferent regiments to have this order read in inn.
raw to their respective regiments, and suggests
u. tum wiors oi ine nepuoiio be craped In
mourning, in honor of the illustrious dead.
SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.
iiOt few man itU r A Iniul .11 Aim
o'uproiotment, passional, mental, or bodily
toil Or accident. Tha naoalnna kill man anma-
"wi nyen annnaniv. 'rna mmmnn itivm.
ion, Cbokd with passion, hu little exaggera
tion In t; forsren though not suddenly fatal,
"tod passions shorten life. Strong bodied
me often die young; weak men live longer
KM strongr for tbo strong nse their strength.
and the weak bave none to os. 'a V ' '"'
1 ii i . ' .. 1 , im 'If'.; i
Sfiter':.' -M j ':;. ;
SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War. Major General George B. McClellan.
..! In ..nt tit ' l.lantAnint danarll " SoOtt
.lands M.or General George B. MoClellan.
Ha Uharillv IM.tv.flwA amra Of ao. havlDC I
been born la Philadelphia on December 3,
1826. Al the are of sixteen he entered tbe
Military Aoademy at West Point, graduating
with tbo rank ol Brsvet Second Lieutenant of
Eoeineere.
Until tbo Mexioan war. however, be bad no
opportunity of distinguishing himself, acd then
"for gallant and meritorious conduct in the bat
ties of Contreraa and Cbernbusco," aa the or-
. .... . vi I
oera cipreasou it, ne was urevetea rirut uieu-,
tenant "for gallant and meritorious conduct
io the battle of Molino del Rey," on Sept. 8,
1847, be was offered a Brevet Captaincy, wbtcb
be declined. He was advanced to tbis rank,
however, subsequently, "for gallant and meri
torious conduct in the battle of Cbapultepeo,"
and received tbe command of a company of
Sappers, Miners, and rontoneera, in May, 1848.
At tbe close of the Mexican war he returned
to West Point, where he remained on duty with
the sappers and miners until 1851 . During this
time he introduced the bayonet exercise in tbe at
my. and translated and adapted a manual wbicb
has since become a text book for the service.
Durlnir the summer and fall or 1851 he super
intended the construction or rort Delaware, aud
In tha aucceedine soring waa assigned to duty
nnder Maior R. B. Marcy.ln the Expedition for
. it . i i-i . ii rna
tbe Exploration oi tne rtea niver. i nence ne
was ordered direct to Texas as Senior Engi
neer, on the staff of Gen. Peraifer F. Smith, and
was eneaced for some months In surveying the
rivers and harbors of that State. In 1853 be
was ordered to the Pacifio coast, in command of
the Western Division of tbe survey of the North
Paoifio Railroad route.
He returned to the East in 1854, on duty con
n acted with the Pacifio surrey, and was engaged
also in secret service to the West Indies. The
next year he received a commission la the First
Regiment of Cavalry, and was appointed a
member of the Commission which went to the
seat of war in the Crimea and in Northern Rus
sia. Col. Richard Deleft eld, one of his col
leagues, ia now an officer in the rebel army, and
and Major Alfred Mordecai, the third member
of the Commission, a short time ago resigned
the Sonerintendeney or tbe Troy Arsenal. Ma or
McClellan's report on the "Organization of En
ropean Armies and the Operations of the War,"
a quarto volume, embodying tbe result of his
observations in tne urimea, greany enhanced
his reoutation as a scientific soldier.
In January, 1857, weary of inaction, he re
signed his position in tbe army, to become Vice
President and Engineer of tbe Illinois Central
Railroad, which post be held tor three years,
when be was offered and accepted the Presiden
cy of the Obio and Mississippi Railroad, of
wbicb be was aiso uenerai superintendent.
When our domeatio troubles assumed formida
ble dimensions, Major McClellan's services were
at once called into requisition. Gov. Cnrlin, of
Pennsylvania, tried to secure tbe benefit of bia
ezDerience in organizing the volunteers from
that State, bnt tbe tender of the Major Gene
ralship of tbe Ublo forces reached htm Bret, and
he at once accepted It. Oa May 14th, be re
ceived a commission ss jvisjor uenerai in
the U.S. army, and now has command of tbe
Department of Obio, which comprises all of tbe
States of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, and that
cart of Virginia lying north of the Great Kana
wha River and west of the Green Briar River
and tbe Maryland line, with so much of Penn
sylvania as lies west of a line drawn from the
Maryland line to tbe northeast corner of mc-
Kean county.
It must not be taken for granted tbat be
would succeed to the Commander-in-chief of
the army, should that position unfortunately be
come vacant, because be is next in rank to
General Scott. This office is filled by special
appointment, seniority having weight only in
cidentally. Gen. McCIellan is now leading tbe united
States forces which crossed from Ohio into Vir
ginia on Monday night last, and tbe stirring
proclamations which he has issued to the people
that he can wield the pen as ably as be
N. Y. Times.
of
a
Tbe late Colonel Ellsworth, on receiving
notice from headquarters of the movement on
Alexandria (which cost him bis life), addressed
his regiment ss follows:
Boys, no doubt you felt surprised on' bearing
my orders to be in readiness at a moment a no
tice, but I will explain all as far as I am al
lowed. Yesterday forenoon I understood that
movement was to be made against Aloxsndrla.
Of course I was on the Qui sine. I went to see
Gen. Mansfield, the Commander at Washing
ton, and told him tbat I would consider Hut
personal affront if he would not allow us to
have tbe right of the line, which is our due, as
the first volunteer regiment sworn la for the
war. All tbat 1 can tell you is to prepare your
selves for a nice little sail, and at the end of
a skirmish. Go to your tents, lie down and
take your rest till 2 o'clock, when the boat will
arrive and we go lorward to victory or death.
When we reach the place of destination, act as
men; do nothing to shame tbe regiment, snow
the enemy tbat yon are men as well as soldiers,
and that you will treat tbem witb kindness until
they force you to use violence. I went you to
kill tbem with kindness. Go to yonr tents and
do aa I tell you.
of
in
a
in
a
of
.f
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Antonio Brothers'
GREAT SHOW.
Now on their ITifteerttU Annual
Tour.
THE PUBLIC ARE RESPECTFUL"
ly informed that this favorite Bhow will lire
EQUESTRIAN DEMONSTRATION .
A-t Coliimbus,
On the Old Show Lot oa Broad Street, on
MONDAY, JUNE 17th, 1861.
Afternoon and Evening Kntertalnment will be given,
at two o'clock and seven o'olock P. M.
ADMISSION, To Box.
" To Pit..
r BDecl
JAB. MKLVILLK, the Great Anatrallan,
ai'Li.a jkanktth ellbleb,
. MADAMB M1I.VILLB, , ,
- U'hh ZOVRA. -
NAT. AUSTIN, '
' TOM 08SORN. '"' ' ''
TOM TIPTON, ' '
JBRBY WORLAND,
PRANK At GEO. MILTILLI,
W. A. PON AT AN,
- BIO. DUVAL.
. J. W. PAUL. -
With a numerous Corps of Auxiliaries, all nnder tb
personal superintendence of th managing proprietors,
th ;
' ANTONIO BROTHERS, ''
Who discipline and tact hav aleyated this elan
amoaeinente to a Standard'! BLUAnu, BKrinK-
ktBNT and PBBVIOTION, to which all other Oompa
ale wonld vainly hop to attain
' AUDI JPIUNOIB, Agent.
Jon 6',SUAltw , '
F
SUNDRIES.
lARINA, , , ... . TAPIOOO,
Btgo . . Arrow Hoot, . ,
BlotPlour ' Bootoh Oat Meal ' ,
Pearl Barley . Bplit Peas
Cracked Wheat ' ChoootaU
Cooo .... Broma,ete.
Cream Tarter, Bod ' '
t fig - Prune .-'
Seed lew Rallies - reh Tomato
Paohs , Chreen Corn ! "'
frekh Caon'd Prult of yonr description!
Jelllesof all kinds;
Flavoring Extracts of all MM.
. Onm Drops; Mixed Candies; -
' Almonds, filbert, Peoon Nuts, ' ' "
Bngllih Walnuts, Brasll Nuts, etc,
o87 , wm. Mcdonald.
REPELLANT OH ' WATER-PROOF
CLOAK CLOTHS. Also, other makes ef Sprint
Oloak Cloths, In all deiirabi mixtures Blndlne. Tas
sel and Buttons to match. . bain at Bun,
aptilS j.? ... , ,. tr.,uu High, ire
..50 Oente
..SS OenUj
11 ,.h.J
........
f
vlHEW ADVERTISEMENTS,
I T lfl V K. H I TROnVS.
w" r-v v-f-
WRITTEN PROPOSAL ffllx'BE
V V received at th ofuc ol A. P. Bullock, Mtq., Mo.
11 West Beoond street, Olnolnnatl. Ohio, until soon of
MONDAY, JUNE 10, 18C1,
tit furntih Refutation Cloth for Army PinH.'Orercnt
Blouse and Shirts, or for said arUclea of Beady Mad
rjlnthinev JThe maaufaatur. make and malarial to he
wholly of Ohio products and labor, Th oloth to be all
wool.. Camples of to lothing may be at-en at th abey
naned office. The tun oi nm aeurary nna rat per
j -i-- .i AuU L. tUd In IKa if ...
on Mnnwm hwm - r I -.m
quantity oanaot be definitely nxeu. nidOara
naned office. The tun
rat deliyry and rate
i.
should
nui-irii fur uh article eenarately.l t . j
' 1 n. .3 limtMlltBB.V -
TAm t Quarter w utr uea'l
r ( i
A. D. Bollock,. ' 1 1 1
Purchasing Agent.
Columbus, June i, 1801. JuneS:dtd
Cleveland Herald and Plain Dealer copy a timta. 1
EXTRAOnDtNAnY BABCAtNS!
BAHST&SON;
HO. 29 SOUTH BIOH 8TBEKT,
ARB NOW' OFFERINO !
1 tOOO yards Super Plain Black Bilks at tl OO-vals
.$1 85 peryard. ,i ' '
2,500 yards Traveling Dress and Mantle Goods.
18 t8 cents vain 20 cents per yard.
3,000 yards White Brllllantes at 12 1-2 cents-
value 20 cent per jard.
3,000 yards Pine and Doaaettlo Ginghams greatly un
der value, "tl .1- . .... ;t t
LARGE AND DESIRABLE LOTS OF
MOZAMBIQUE!, BAlZORIKU, ; '
CHILLIS, FOULARD : SILKS, j !
XHOLISH BAREGES, LAVELL AS, j
LA WHS, CALICOES, FOPLIHB,
. AND ALL OTHER
New and Fashionable Dresa Goods
In th most desirable styles and at very losers prices
3vxnrTxxjXsv.oi
Of all materials, mad In th most stylbh manner after
I tb latest Paris Faihlont-the most elegant styles In
me city.
may 30
BAIN SON,
No. 39 South High street.
Slimmer Under Garments.
LADIES LISLE TJNDEH VESTS."
- Ladle Oaoie Merino do. do.' , i
Oints Bilk Drawers and Shirts.
Gents India Oauie Drawers and Bhlrc .
Cotton "
" Oause Merino Under Shir's.
' Whit and Brown Drilling Drawers.
Whit Linen urawers. ' '
Ixtra large Under Shirts.
" Bupeilor ingliihHalf Ilose
" Long Stockings.
" Fancy Cotton Half Hots.
Busnendera. , r '.
" Oolden Hill Bhirla. .
For sale ia great variety and at moderate
priess, by... I
BAIN Ac SON,
No. 99 Sooth High street
may30. '
i
!
Ohio White Snlphnr:' Springs,
DELAWARE CO., OHIO.
This Favorite Resort will be open
for Visitors, ' 1 i
' June 10,1061.
raMiLiis Dismiss ioaidiko ssaua tbiseasos, ran si
. ACCOMMODATED AT BIDOOra SATIS.
FOR BOOKS OB IDTOBM ATI05,
' ADDRESS
, . . . j. a'bwaynie,
Lewis Center P. 0.,Deliwara Co., Ohio
may 28;d1mo. ...
a
it
an
of
SPECIAL NOTICES.
MANHOOD.
BOW I08T, HOW BESTOBID.
JUBT PUBLISHED. ON THI NATURB. TRtA
MENT AND RADICAL CUBE OP SPERMATORRHEA
or Seminal Weaknea. Banal Debility, Nervousness, In
voluntary Emissions aod Impotency, resulting from
Belf-abuie, to. By Robt. J. Culverwell, M. D. Sent
nnder seal, In a plain envelope, to any address,post
paid, on receipt or two stamps, By Dr. uuab. J.u .
KLINE, Kl Bowery, New York. Post Office Box, No
4,566. ' mar81:3mdfc
MOFFAT'S LIFE PILLS.
In all eases of eostlvenees, dyspepsia, billions and liver
affections, piles, rheumatism, fever and agues, obstl
nata head aches, and all general derangements of health
the Pills bay Invariably proved a certain and speedy
remedy. A single trial will place th Life Pills beyond
the reach ofoompetlUo In the estimation of every pa
tient. Sr. Moffat's Phosnlx Bitters will be fonnd equally ef
Bcadous in all eases of nervous dcUllty, dyspepsia, bead
ache, tb sickness Incident to females Indelicate health,
and every kind of weakness of th dlgestlv organs,
lor salebyDr. W. B. MOTfAT, 335, Broadway, N. T.
and by all DraggiiU. i. saaySl-dfcwly
Tbe following i an extract from
letter written by tb Bay. J. B. Holm, paster ol tb
Plerrepolnt-Btreet Baptist Church, Brooklyn, N. T.,to
the " Journal and Messenger," Olnolnnatl, 0., and speaks
volumes In favor of that world-renowned mrdlcln, Ms.
Wikiud'i Sooth im Starr roa Cummin Tmamai
'"We see an advertltment In yonr columns of Mas
WmsLow's SooTHnia Bvaur. Now we neyer said a word
In favor of a patent medicine before In our life, bnt w
feel compelled to say to yonr readers that this Is no hum
bug ws atva tbsu it, amb kmow it to all it
claims. It is probably on of th most successful medi
cines of the day, becaua It Is on of tb best. And those
of yonr readers who hav bable can't do better than
lay in supply." . ot47:1ydfcw
'' Tb CODSUnipUTCKJ.
The Advertiser, having bees restored to health In a few
weeks by every slmpl remedy, after having offered ev
era! years witb a sevn lung affection, mi that dread
dlsea. Consumption Is anxious to make known to his
fellow-sufferers th means of cure.
. To all who deslr It, be will send a copy of thepreeerli-
tlon used (free of charge), with the directions for proper
log and using the same, which they will And a sou Oca
for Comdhrioh, Asthma, Baoncnma, to. Th only
object of the advertiser fa sending th Prssorlptlon Is
benefit the afflicted, and spread Information which beoon.
calves to bs Invaluable, and he hopes every sufferer will
try bis remedy, as It will cost tbem nothing, and may
prove a messing. - -i
Parties wishing ths prescription will pleas address
' ' Hav. EDWARD A. WILSON,
' j Wllliamsburgh,
' Kings County, New Yoik
oct3:wly . .. . ' v - .
JL
jT
I
li . -i A.F.
PBIOKS BXDUOXD
from ths Hew York Observer.! ; ' "' !
As all parties manufacturing Sewing Machines are ob
liged to pay Mr. How a Ucena on eaeh machine said,
and an a'so compelled to make returns to him, under
oath, as to th number old, bis books give a correct lute
in it. Prom this reliable source w hay obtained th
following statistic. Of the machines mad In th year
lt, then wen sold, ... , ,.H.,'N-.. ,.' : ..-
By Wheeler Ac Wilson. .....1.. .81,305
" I. M. Singer Co 10,WJ I
' . rt rovr As Baker W I
Showing tb sales of Wheeler k Wilson to bs double
moss oi any ouar uosspany." ' ' "
Awarded the hlftert preurtoms at he L' 1
(,-. Vniwd Blates Vain of U56, U5 and I860;
. r . : aleoat the , ...
.'(' Ohio SU4 fain ef 185Bl8M
! . and at nearly aU tb 0uty Pain fa th Itet.
Our price, at thelet rwlocMoti, art a tow at any
foe tticA auehtaM now sold, and bnt a trlnt higher than
th Interior two itrvaxl oAoM sffcA wiaeAftMt, now
forced upon th mrKtj ..... ,
Tb WBBELBB. At WILSON MAOHTNB mak th
Laos S-tiow the onlyen which cannot be rare ltd. It
I Auk on Both Sionof th foods, leaving no rdat or
Aonm(A wvUrMd.
AUmaektnet eemranted S feart, and inttrmeUon
given In their nse, free of cherry. a
. - H. CBABy,S High St., Columbus, 0.
, ' ' WM. 8UMNBB At CO.,
. dcj-awd3mfcwm tlkt'i Opera Ho, CinclnnEU.
MALTESE At THREAD LACE HITTS
f elegant .MllUe for Lad; also, Mie Mitts
areec varieiy ,,,i4 L.lt ... ,
;ajS3.Ji i
J OAH.D.
Ujrn amibioan watch comiuhv, of Walt
ham, lfass., begs to call th attention of th publioto
the following amphatlo reommodatlon of Waltham
Watches, by th leading practical Watchmakers and Jew.
elers throughout th United Slates. Th snilr Hit of
ttgnataies Io It It quit too long for publication la one
advertisement; but th name printd will be noog-
slfed by thoee acquainted with th Trad as being In tb
highest degree respectable and and Influential. At their
establishments may alwkys be found tb genuine Watch
es of th Company's manufacture, In great variety.
Signature from many cities and towns not fully
resented In this list will appear Io a future adver
ment.
., , . TO THI PUBLIC.
Th undersigned, practical Watchmakers and dealers In
Watches, hating; bought and soli American Watohc ft r
a number of yean cast, and haying dealt In all kinds o f
foreign Watches for' a much longer period of time, bej to
stat that they have neyer dealt la Watches which, ss a
olass, or In Individual Instances, hay bees oresatli-
faolory to themselves or euitomers, whether In reepcet e f
durability, beauty of finish, mathematically coneot pre-
poitlons, accurate compensation and adjustment, or of
jtnt tlmt kteping reeulti, than those manufactuted by
the Waltbam Company.
I. ORITTINDBN, Cleveland, Ohio.
WM.BLYNN.
JAMBS J. HOBB,
n. JENKINS Ac 00.,
BHQ08 St SMITH.
WM. WILSON UcGRIW,
DUBMlfcOO.,
O.OSUAMF,
PLATT.
KING Ac BROTHKR.;
T. At B. M. BDWARDS,
f. J. AL1XANDBB,
JOHN H. MOBBa!,
A. IIEPPLKK.
W. H. RICHMOND,
H. D. KAYS,
A. B. OILLITr,
8. D. 1ILLBBTON,
B. CURRAN,
J. W. BROWN,
. . TUU1N,
BAB8B At HUL.M AN
A. P. BOYNTON,
WM. If. MAYO,
1. NORTHBY,
A. W. fORD,
WM. 80HRRZER,
Cleveland,
Oolumbui,
Z taurine,
Cincinnati,
Delaware,
Warm,
Chicago,
La Ball,
Peoria,
Bloomlngton,
Deoatur,
Springfield,
Qulncy,
to
M. VOX.
WILLARD k H AWLKY,
N. HAIQHT,
H. D.B08ENBBBO,
0. A. BURR Ac CO.
B. B. ETTBNIIEIMEB Ac CO.
WM. B.TAYLOR,
w. w. Hannah,
H. R. Ac H. 0. CARPENTER,
H0BK1NB Ac EVANS,
HAIQHT Ac LEACH,
JAMES BYDB,
JOHN H. IYES,
WILLIAMS Ac CO. ,
J. N. BENNBT,
A, B. BTORM8.
WM. B. MORGAN.
HENDERSON BHO'S
i. A. CLARK,
BLOOD St PUTBA An.
JENNIN08 BRO'S
JOHN J. JENKINS,
W. li. W1LL1AUB,
A. WARDEN,
L. 0. DUNNING.
OHA8.B. WILLARD,
W. P. BINOHAM Ac CO.,
OHAS. 0. VBENCH.
J. NoLANB,
0. A. DIOKBNSEN,
0. H.BASCOMAc CO.,
J. M. BTANBH.
ADOLPH MYERS,
THEO. V. PIOKERINO,
GEO. DOTY.
M. B. SMITH
A. B.YAN OOTT,
JOHN ELKIN9,
H.N. SHERMAN,
8. O.BPAULDINO,
W. A. OILB8,
REINEMAN Ac MIYRtN,
SAM'L BROWN, Jr.,
W. T. KOPLIN.
GEO. W. STEIN,
GEO. B. TITUS,
HEOKMAN Ac YOHE,
GEO. STEIN,
E. J.LA8CELLE,
SAM'LGABM AN,
JOSEPH LADOMUB,
J. J. BLAIR,
GEO. W. McOALLA,
VUANOISO. POLAOK,
G. M.'ZAHN,
GEORGE HELLBR,
P. P HBLLEK,
E. AUGHINBAUGn,
8. T. HOPf MAN,
J. O. BANNA,
0. T. ROBERTS,
J O. COLON,
OHAS. L. VISHEB,
B. U. Bt. OLAIS,
R. Ac A. PETERSON,
DAVID LAVERAOK.
W. T. RAE,
ENOCH P. BILLS.
HEN BY B. JAMES,
T. S-LITTLE,
CARBON Ac BRANH0N,
THOS. GOWDEY,
A. W. PYLE.
SIMPSON Ac PRICB,
V.W.SKIPP,
i. Ac A. GARDNER
W.O.DEFBIEZ,
MAURICE ot HENRY
JEHU BYLVB8TBK,
J T. SCOTT Ac CO.,
T. B. HUMPHREYS,
K.A.VOGLER,
P. W. LEINBBCK,
J. W. MONTGOMERY,
BENJ. E.COOK,
B. OHILDB,
DEXTER At HA8KINS,
E.D. TI8DALK,
ALBERT PITTS.
ELLIS G1VPOBD. .
V. W. MAOOMBEK,
J.J BURNS,
JES8B SMITH,
T. M. LAMB,
8. N. STORY,
LEVI JOHNSON,
ANDRBW WARRIN
O.W. VOGQ,
amos sanborn,
john barton,
john McGregor,
W. H. BOOT.
JOHNB. 80OTT,
N. MOODY.
WM. KIBKHAM, Jr..
L.D. ANTHONY Ac CO.,
PELEG ARNOLD,
THOMAS 8TBBLB Ac 00.,
HEMINGWAY Ac STEVENS,
WM. BOGEBB Ac BON,
0. J.MUNBON,
E. BENJAMIN,
J. B. KIBBY.
GEORGE BROWN,
E. B. HUNTINGTON A CO.,
B. A. WOODFORD,
H.D.HALL.
JOHN L. BMITU,
JOHN GORDON,
J. 0. BLAOKMAN.
JAB. R. AYRES,
BHERBURNBJ SHAW,
L. B. H ANDERSON,
B. KNIGHT,
N. G. OABR, '
GEO. W.DREW A 00.,
B. J. MELLIBII.
W. 0. 0. WOODBURY,
REUBEN BPENCBR,
WM. B. MORRILL,
BIOHARD GOVE,
JONATHAN HOBUIR,
N. W. GODDARD,
OHAS. B. BACON,
V. M. HARDISON,
TWOMBLY Ac SMITH,
MOSES M. SWAN,
J. A. MBRBLLL
JAMBB EMERY,
8IMK0N BLOOD,
HENRY H.UAM,
ROBERT N. BODGE. '
HBNBY McKBNNBY, . .
J. T. HOWL AND,
TOMPKINS Ac MORRIS,
0. 0. WILLIAMS,
Q. 8. A G. L. ROGERS,
D. E. LUCY,
D. G. HALL,
BRINSMA1D A HILDRETB,
0. H. HARDING,
T. 0. PHINNKY,, ,
A. A. MEAD.
J. 0. BATES, ' ' i'
J.H.MURDOOK,
0. 0. OHILDS,
0. H. HUNTINGTON,
POSTBBGROW,
W. K. WALLACE,
LE ANDES AMADON,
0. S. JENNINGS,
GBEQOR A 00., '
8. OOCKRBLL, ' . . : i
A. N. HALL,
ROBERT WILKIR,' ". 'V ?
Gelene, '
Jacksonville,
Cherry Gnv
Preeport,
Peru,
Canton
Byracuss,
Newburgh,
Boehester,
N. Y.
Utiea,
Hudson
Trost
OewTga,
Auburn,
Valrport,
Oanandalgna,
ii
Poughkeepsle,
Batavia,
Auuterdao,
Baratoga,
Albany,
H
Goshen,
Penn-Yan,
Catiklll,
Indianapolis,
Ind
Bicbmond,
Ttrre Heut.
Bullivan. .
Plymoulb,
Kalamaioo,
Detroit,
Mich
Mllwsuker,
Hacine,
Beloil,
Janesvllle,
Prairie duChien
Pittsuurgh,
Norriitown,
Barton,
.i
Allentown,
Weetcbester,
Wllliamspoit,
Chester,
Lebanon,
Harrbburg,
York, .
Lancaster
Beading
u
Ohambersburg,
Ureentborg,
Newcastle,
Bbensburg,
Mauch Chunk,
Athland,
Indiana
Be ran ton,
Patarson,
Newark.
Bordentown,
Tnnton,
Onmberland,
Puuukl,
Naahville.
Springfield,
Clark rville,
Savannah
St. Louis
Wis.
Ps.
N. J.
Md
Tenn-
Ga.
Mo.
it
Wheeling. Va.
Richmond, "
Salem, N. 0.
ii
Newberry, 8. 0
Northampton, Mass.
New Bedford, "
.1 i
Taunton, "
i
Vail River,
II !
Glouceater, '
Salem
Worcester, "
1,
i ii .
Waltham, "
ii
Lowell,
Lynn, "
Lawrence "
Plttofield, : "
.i
Greenfield, "
Springfield, "
Providence, B, I
E. Greenwich, "
Hartford, Conn.
.. .
ii
New Haven, "
it
i, i
i .
Danbury. "
ii ii
Mlddletowa,
, i
New London "
Bridgeport, "
Walarbury, "
Sanbornton, N. Hi
Concord, "
i ii
H II
II ' U
Hanover,
Oianmont, "
H . II
Exeter, "
Laooola, "
Nashua, "
i ii
Dover,
So. Berwick,
Baoo,
Augustej
Portland, '
Baokiport,
Rockland,
Partem oulh,
.
Auburn,
Bath,
Bangor, '
,
Gardiner,
Hoalton, -
' Lewlston,
! Burllonton,
Bradfora,
Mootpelier,
IforlhfleU,' '
Woodstook,
Bt. Johnabury,
St. Albans,
Cheleea, : ,
Newbury,
Bellows Palls,
New Orleans,
i.
Niteb.es,
Milford, ,
Toronto,
Al.
!
Vt.
Miss.
Del.
O.W.
Oadtion.' As our Watch is now xtenitTeljr counter
felted by foreign mannfactnrers, w have to Inform tb
public (list no watch is of oar1 production which Is nneo-
companlsd by a eartlfioat of paularaeas, beailog th
number of the walch, and signed by ear Treararer, B.
1. Bobbins, or by (Mr predecessors, Appleton, Tracy A
OS. A il l
As these watches An for sals by Jewelers generally
throughout th Union, the American Watch Company
do aot lclt orders for slngls watches.
; -'J;sdZ - WBMHI ft APPLITON
WholrlalS Agents, No. IBS BroadwS i-
p9 4 6, A, ft , o, f , m. Ii. . ,u

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