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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, June 19, 1861, Image 1

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COLUMBUS. OHIO, WEDNESDAY I0BNING. JUNE 19.186L
BIZ DOLLAES PEB TE1E,
Inrari&bly Is Advance F,
VOL. VIII.. NO. 9. NEW SEBIES.
lie
Hi
mm
iUILY. TEI-WEEILY AND WEEKLY
MANYPENNY ft MILLER,
PUBLISHIBB AND PBOPBIETOBS.
Q Office Not. 86, 88 and 40, North High St.
TERMS INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
Ually ' - . . . $0 00 per year,
" By iho Carrier, per week, 1 cents.
rrl-Weakly . . . 8 00 per year.
Weekly, - . . 1 00 "
crmv ol Advertising by the Square.
uesqnare I yei...$!0 00
Ore 11 B month! 1 01)
jue " 0 months 15 00
3ne 3 month 10 00
One !! month! BOO
One " I month. S 00
One equaro 3 weeks. .$4 00
One " S weeks.. 3 00
One " 1 week... 1 75
One " 3 days... 1 00
One . " 2 days... 75
One " 1 Insertion SO
Displayed adverllssmeot half more than the above
rates. '
Advertisement leaded and placed In the column of
Bpx-lal Notice," tumble the oriUnarv ratet.
All nutlcea required to be published by law, legal rates.
ir ordered on the inside exclusively alter the first week
per ceui, more than the show rates; but all suob wll
appear In the Trl-Weekly without charge.
Basiness Cards, not exceeding fire lines, per year, In'
da, ! 50 per line; outside
Notices of meetings, charitable ooletlos, fire companies,
fro., half price. - -
All Wamient advertleemenlt mutt bt paid or in
adtitmai tiwrulewlll not be varied from.
Weekly, same price as the Daily, where the advertiser
ses the Weekly alone. Where 'he Dally and Weekly
a r i both used, then the charge tor the Weekly will be
nv timratesoi tne uany
No advertisement taken except for a definite period
BUSINESS CARDS.
Fi a. b. smzm3,
Lttoxr noy ctt Law
AND NOTARY, PUBLIC.
Office Aiuins Building, opposite Capitol Square.
COLUMBUS, OHIO;
OOLUMIJ U O
Machine Manufacturing Company
UAKUyACTDRlCRfl Of
STEAM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Casting, Kill-Qearlng, Machinery.
ALBOi
or avur oEHciumoN.
. - COU IUBIJS, OHIO.
Oil AS. AM HOB. fiup't. P. AM BOB, Treai.
deell, IbiH-tf
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton S Indianapolii!
Through to IndianaDolis withobt Change of Cars
and bat One Chango of Cars between . ,
Columbus and St. Louis.
THREE TRAINS DAILY FROM COLUM
BUS. FIRST TRAIN.
(Dally, Mondaysexcepted.)
MIGHT EXP11ES3, via Dayton, at 2:45 a. m., stop
ping at London, Xenia, Dayton, Middletown and Hamil
ton, arrivlngat Cincinnati at 8:20 a. m.; Dayton at 5:45
a. m., IndlaoopolU at 10:4ci a. ui.itt. Louis at 11:50
V'n' SECOND TRAIN.
ACCOMMODATION, at 6:10 a. m., itopplng at all Sta
tion! between Golumbns and Cincinnati and Dayton, ar
riving at Cincinnati 11:02 a. m., Dayton at 9: 15 a. m.,
lndlanopolls af i;8H p. m.
THIRD TRAIN.
DAY EXPRESS, at 9:30 p. m., stopping at Alton,
Jefferson, London, Charleston, . Oedarvllle, Xenia,
Bprlng Valley, Corwln, Morrow, Deerfleld, Foiter's,
Loveland, Millfordand Plainville, arriving at Cincin
nati at 7:30 p. in.; St. Louis at lit m; Dayton at 5:35 p.
c; Indlanopolisai 10:3d p.m. .
Uoeplntf Cars on all Night Trnlna to
Ciuclnntl and ludiauapolin.
naar,Ti ciif.ukkd tiiiiocoh.
for further Information and Through Tickets, apply to
M. L. DOHKHTI,
Ticiet Agent, Union Depot, Columbus, Ohio.
E. W. WOODWARD,
Superintendent, Cincinnati.
JNO. W. D0HKRTV
join Agent, Columbus,
Juit Becelvedl
SAM HP- CII GHEEN and BLACK
lUU TEAS 100 bags prime Rio Conee.
1 AO pockets old Dutch Government Java Coffee.
1 5 bags Ceylon Coffee.
2 OH bills, standard White Sugars, eonshltog of Pow-
died, Ohrushed, Grannlated A and B Ooffce.
50 quintals George Bank Ooilflnh. , .
SO bills. Mess and No. 1 Mackerel.
6 tee. Pick Salmon.
100 bx. Layer Kaislns.
Oil hf. box do do
lOOqr. box do de
100 M Cigars, different brands and grades.
novtf wm. Mcdonald.
M. C. LILLEY
BOOK, iOXINnDEm.
And Blank-Book Manulantarer,
NOBTH B3QH STBXBT, COLUMBUS, OHIO
xuu-ll-dly
. Red,;White and Bine .
DELAINES,' 1
CALICOES, -uiBnoas,
SILKS,
NECK '11ES.
Just opened by
. . BAIN k BON,
pit : No. S9 South High street. .
A NEW HOOF SKIRT. .
c3 SOOT,
No. so, south niau BTREET. ,
Hare Just received a new make of HOOP SKIRTS
finished In a manner far superior to any yet introduced
for
DURABILITY AND GRACEFULNESS.
mhS3.
FAMILY
FLOCU.
TyyillTM WHEAT, BUANDEJB ,
" S O "VV FLAKK."
From Barnett Mills," Springfield, 0. th best brand of
Flour brought to our market, satisfaction guaranteed,
for sale only at WM. McDONALD'B,
noTiff ' lOtt South High street.
Irish Linen Goods. ,
WARRANTED FABRIC
Linen Shirt Bosom Plain and fancy
Bulrtlng and Boiom Linens. - -.'
Linen Sheetings and Pillow Casings.
Linen Cambrics and Lone Lawn,
. Linen Pocket-bandk'fa, all slaea.
Linen Towellings and Diapers
. ' Linen Napkins and D'Oylles. . ,
Linen Table Cloths and Satin Damask.
. Linen Towels with colored borders. -Linen
Btair Coverings and Crash.
Forsale at low prices.
BAIN ae BON,
fcbn ' No. t9 South High street.
BO N N K T H , RIBBONS TABS, AND
BUOHFB, new style, Just opened by
.PI BAIN et SON,
aprllS , . No. 90 South Hlgb street. .
ALEXANDRES KID GLOVES.
All slaes ua colon Just opened at BAINS,
dec. II. ,M.gOBthnighitmli.
WORCESTER'S
ROYAL QUARTO DICTIONARY
The latestThe LargestThe Best,
The Cheapest Became tne Best,
"The ITIost IloliaL-io Standard Au
tborlty of tbe English Lanffuago."
Sia Hundred Eminent Educatort of Ohio,
"THE DEBT ENGLISH DICTIONARY EXTANT."
Literary Men Everywhere
"Ileia are upwards of a Hundred Thousand Words,
whoso multifarious meaning and derivations, tomtlier
with ttoli eorrect spelling, and pronunelatlon are dearly
Ml hftnrtk th mvmJ
Oinclnnali Commercial.
Read the Vceltiont ot tha Member of th Ohio Stat
Itaater e Association.
The undersigned, members of the Ohio State Teachers'
Aaaaclailnn. ailnnt and aim to use In teaching, writing
and sneakinc the orthography and pronunciation of
Worcester's Koyal Quarto Dictionary, and we most cor
dlallv reenmmend It as the moat reliable standard an
tborlty of the English language, as It is now written and
spoken.
Lorin Andrews, President Eenyon College.
M. D. LninrrT, Superintendent Zanesvtlle Schools.
Thos. W. IUrviy, Bup't Massllon Union Schools.
M. V. Cowdirt, Snp't Public Schools, Sandusky.
John Lynch, Bup't Public Schools, Olrclevllle.
S. N. BanroRD, Principal Cleveland female Semina
ry. Wm. Mitchell. Snn't Public Schools. Mt. Union.
John Osdxn, Principal Bute Normal School, Minne
sota.
Cyrcs Nuoh, Principal fourth Intermediate School
Cincinnati.
II. 8. Martin, Bup't Canton Union Schools.
Edwin RioiL, Principal McNeely Normal School.
Eli T. Tappan, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio University.
Wm. W. Edwards, Bup't Troy Union School.
A. G. Hop ins, Principal West Bigb Bohool, Cleve
land.
8. A. Norton, Associate Principal nigh School, Clevc
land.
Tuiodorr Stiruno, Principal High School, Cleve
land.
R. f . noMirroN, Principal Cleveland Institute.
J. A. GARriiLD, President of Electlo Institute, Di
ram.
W. L. Harris, Prof, of Chemistry, Ohio Weileyan
University.
H. H. Barniy, Ex-Cemmlsslonerof Common Schools,
Ohio.
Jams Monroi, Prof. Rlietorlc, Oherlln College.
Thou. Hill. President Antloch College.
0. W. II. Catbcart, Prof. Mathematics, High
school, Dayton.
B. 0. CROMiADen, Prof. Language, High School
Dayton.
8. M. Barkr, Bup't Union Schools, Ashland.
More than Bio Hundred other FretidmU of OotU-
gn, rrofettort, Author) and JfMinguuned Auuoa
tort, have endoried the above lentiment.
PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES IN OHIO.
.Marietta Oollwii "It Is truly a magnificent work,
an honor to the author, the publishers, and the whole
eountry." President Andrews.
Onto Wisixtan UNtviRsiTT.'1' It exoeeds my expecta
tions. It will be my guide In orthography and pronun
ciation, and will often ho consulted by me for iU neat
and accurate definitions." President Thompson.
W. R. Eclkctio College. "Heretofore we hare used
Webster a orthography. At a recent meeting of our
Faculty, It was decided to chanse It to conform to that
of Worcester's Royal Quarto Dictionary." President
Uartteld.
Western Rewrve Conroi. "I find it worthy of
cordial approbation.' President Hitchcock.
Oberlin Colliqb. "It more than meets my eipecla
tlons. I recommend it as the standard authority In
orthoepy to my children and my pupils." President
Morgan.
Antiocti College. "I adopt and aim to use in teach
ing, writing and speaking, the orthography and pronun
ciation or Worcester itoyai ynarto Dictionary."
President Hill.
"In all my writing, speaking, ard teaching, I have en
deavored to conlorm to the rules for orthography and
pronunciation as contained In Worcester's Dictionary.''
Horace Mann, late president.
Kxnvoh College, Gambiir. "I moat cordially rcoom-
mond It a the most reliable standard authority of the
English language as It I now written and spoken."
resident Andrews.
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS OF OHIO.
From Rev. Anion Smyth, Commiuioner of Common
acnooit in vnto.
"Th Dictionary I an Imperishable monument to th
learning and industry of its author, and an honor to th
world of letters, xne mecnanicai execution is tar supe
rior to that of any other Lexicon with which I am ac
quainted."
TVmm 77mi IT n. Kumj-it. Tfot-fTnmmiMtitmtr nf
acnoou in vmo.
"The most reliable standard authority of the lan
guage." WHAT THE
leading Newspapers of Ohio Say.
from the Cleveland Herald of March SB.
The orthography of th Worcester Dictionary Is that
used by most, If not all, authors of distinction In this
country and England, and conforms to the general usage
of ordinary writers and speakers.
Whatever prejudices may have existed previously, a
careful study of this volume will Invariably be followed
by a warm appreciation of lis great merits, and a desire
to add it to th wall selected library, be it large or small,
It is a library in itself, and will remain an Imperisha
ble record of the learning of Its compi ler.
' from the Cincinnati Commercial of AprU SO.
nere are upwards of a hundred- thousand words good,
bad and Indifferent whoso multifarious meanings and
derivations, together with their correct spelling and pro
nunciation, are set clearly before the eye. The work Is
unquestionably the greatest Thesaurus of English Words
ever published.
from the Cleveland Plaindtaier of Sept. SO, 1800.
Evidently Worcester' Royal Qdarto Dictionary it
noi only the laet, but th best work of the kind ever if
sued, and can by no possibility sutler by comparison or
controversy.
From, the Toledo Hade of May S9.
As to pronunciation, Worcester is the Standaro
followed by our best authors! In definitions he leaves
nothing to be desired, and In Orthography It Is sufficient
to say that Worcester can be safely followed.
INIiHAin ti. DItAGG,
Publishers, Boolteelleraj St Stationer,
NO. 191 SUPERIOR ST., CLEVELAND, OHIO.
maiB
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT
LIEE INSURANCE COMPANY,
OP
Dividend Jannary l, 180 1, 48 Per Cent
ABBETS .3 J,813,556 50.
Statement January 1, 1801
Balance, per statement Jan. 1st, 1800 13,400,58 J 39
Received for Premiums dur
ing th year 10 $703,053 55
Received for Interest during
th year 10 814,014 19
Total receipts for 1PGA.... (977,007 74
Paid 0 ialma by DeaUi,9i7,050 00
Paid Policies surren
dered 41,111 SO
Paid Salaries, Pott
age, Taxes, Ex
change, .w S1,C20 54
Paid Commission to
Agents 51,335 30
Paid Physicians' fees. 5, Will 75
Paid Annuities 1,617 00
Paid Dividends dur
ing th year ......100,500 75 503,091 63 411,870 14
Net Balance January 1st. 1801 .13,813,558 50
- ASSETS.
Cash en hand.... S.CS84 IB
Bonds and Mortgage on Real .
Estate, worth double th
amount loaned '8,337,841 09 '"
Premium Notes, on Policies
in force, only drawing 8 par
cent, interest. 1,270,864 17
Real Estate V0.H03 87
Loans on Scrip 5,93144
Premiums, Notes and Cash, In
course of transmission. ... 45,843 75
Total Assets.
3,813,550 50
75T5 Policies In force, lnsnrlng......ga,426,538
1,435 new Policies have been Issued during the year.
After a careful calculation of the present vain ot th
outstanding. Policies of th Company, and having th
nooMtary amount in reserve therefor, th Directors
have declared a Dividend of 45 per cent, on the Premi
ums paid at th table rates, to all policies for Ufa In force,
Issued prior to January 1, 1H00, payable according to the
present rule of th Company.
Kate for all kind of Life Contingencies, Prospect
uses, Statements, end Applications, will be furnished
without cuAaua,at the Office or Agencies of the Com
pany. JOBT. I. PATTERSON, President.
, - fi,0.onoVEH, Vice President.
BEN. 0. MILLAR, Secretary.
11. U. WESON, .aVefif,
on inni " ' Wo Johnson Block,
March S8. 1801. , , , ljfl()11Ilnbui,o.
BLEACHED SHEETINGS, AND
SHIRTINGS, all widths, of meet celebrated makes,
now offered la greatest variety and yrylw prioes.
aprlll'"' ' Ho, W BoBm High stmt.
Ayer's Srsaqarilla
A compound remedy, designed to be the most
effectual Alterative that can bo made. It id
a concentrated extract of Pura Sarsnparilln,
bo combined with other tulitanocs of Mill
greater alterative power n to nM'ord on dlVf
tivo antidote for tho licenses Karsnparilln is
reputed to cure. It is believed that fcuch a
remedy is wanted by those who suffer from
Strumous complaint;, mid that one which will
accomplish their euro must prove of immense
service to this large class of oiirnlllictcd l'eliow
citizens. How completely this compound will
do it lias been proven by experiment on ninny
of tho worst cases to be fourd of the following
complaints :
Scrofula and Scuoroi.ous Complaints,
Ekui'tionh and Euuptivb Di;jH.m;s, Ulceus,
I'imi'mis, lli.oTcuns, Tumors, Salt Ruhum,
Scald Head, Syphilis and Svimiilitio Af
fections, Mr.ucuitiAi Uiseash, Duoi'sv, Nr.u
haloia on Tic Douloureux, Diiiur.rrr, Dys
pepsia AND'InDIOESTION, EllYHII'KLAS, UottR
on St. Anthony's Finn, and indeed tho whole
class of compluints arising. fi-m Impurity of
THE DlOOO.
This compound will BCjOiuul a great pro,
motor of lteulth, when tuken in the upring, ta
expel tho foul humors which foster in the
blood at that season of the year, lly the time
ly expulsion of them many rankling disorders
are nipped in tho bud. Multitude can, by
the aid of this remedy, spare themselves from
tho endurance of foul eruptions mid ulcerous
sores, through which the nytcm will strive to
rid itself of corruptions, if not assisted to do
this through tho natural channels of the body
by an alterative medicine. Clean.sc out the
vitiated blood whenever you find its impurities
bursting through the skin in pimples, eruptions,
or sores; cleanse it when you liud it is ob
structed and sluggish in tlu veins ; tleauso it
whenever it is foul, nnd your feelings will tell
you when. Even where no particular disorder
is felt, people enjoy better health, and livo
longer, for cleansing tho blood. Keep tho
blood healthy, and all is well ; but with this
pabulum of life disordered, thero can bo no
lasting health. Sooner or later finmuthinpj
must go wrong, and the great machinery ot
life is disordered or overthrown.
Sarsaparilla has, nnd deserves much, the
reputation of accomplishing these ends. Hut
tho world has been egreginusly deceived by
preparations of it, pnrtly because the drug
nlono has not nil tho virtue that is claimed
for it, but more because many preparations,
pretending to bo concentrated extracts of it,
contain but little of the virtuo of Snrsaparilla,
or any thing else.
During lato years tho public have been mis
led by lurgo bottles, pretending to give o quart
of Extract of Snrsaparilla fur one dollar. Most
of these havo been frauds upon the sick, for
they not only contain little;, if any, Sarsnpa
rilla, hut often no curative properties whatev
er. Hence, hitter and painlul disappointment
bus followed the use of tho various extracts of
Sarsnpurillii which flood tho mavkct, until the
name itself U justly despised, nnd has become
synonymous with imposition nnd cheat. Still
we call this compound Snrsnparilln, and intend
to supply uucli a remedy as shall rc3cue the
name from tho load of obloquy which rests
upon it. And wo think wo havo ground for
believing it has virtues which arc irresistible
by the ordinary run of the diseases it is intend
ed to cure. In order to secure their complete
eradication from the system, the remedy should
be judiciously taken according to directions on
the bottle.
rnnrAnEt) r.r
DR. J. C. A YE U Cc CO.
LOWELL, MASS.
Price, $1 per Bottle Six Uottlcs for &3.
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral
has won for itself such a ronnwn for the cure i f
every variety of Throat and Lung Complaint, Oiat
it is entirely unnecessary for ns to recount the
evidence of ils virtues, wherever it has been em
ployed. As it lias long been in constant use
throughout this section, wo need not do more than
assure til people its quality is kept up to tho left
it ever hns been, nnd that it mny bo relied on to
do fur their relief all it lias ever been found to tlo.
Ayer's Cathartic Pills,
roa tixe cure op
Costimicss, Jaundice, Dyspepsia, Indigestion,
Dysentery, I'oul Slooiai ft, Jirysipctar, Headache,
Piles, lUicumtHvn, Eruptions and S'h'n Diteusei,
Liver Complain!, Dropsy, Teller, Tutors and
ball Jliemn, Worms, Com, xri'rr.lr.j, at a
Dinner I'ilf, nnd for I'nriyinj tho HlooJ.
They are jotfrar-roaled, fo tint tho movt reti:,i.
tivo can take tlir-tn plciiiitly, nnd tlicy are the
best aperient in the world for nil the purpose of a
family physic.
Price 23 conts per Tlox ; Fire bexca for $1.00.
Great numbers of Clergymen, Physicians, States
men, and eminent pcrsonatres, have hut their
names to certify the unparalleled usefiilnessof these
remedies, but our spaco hero will not permit the
Insertion of them. Tho Agents below named fur
nish gratis our American Almanac in which they
are given ; with nlso full descriptions nf the nhiire
complaints, and the treatment that should be fol
lowed for their cure.
Do not be put off by unprincipled dealers with
other preparations they mako moro profit on.
Demand Ayru's, nnd take no others. The sick
want the best aid there is for theift, and they should
have it.
All our remedies-are for sale by
ROBERTS Jl SAMUEL. Columbus.
And by Druggists and Dealer everywhere.
novv:iya,iwaw
CANADIAN & UNITED STATES MAIL
STEAMERS
TO AND ft UOrtl
LONDONDERRY, GLASGOW,
Liverpool, Montreal, Quebec,
and
JsTJLJ W , YORK.
The Montreal Ocean Steamship Company's first -class
full-powred01yde-bullt Steamer nil erf Sat.
lirdar from PORTLAND, carrying the Canadian and
United States Mall and passengers.
. NORWEGIAN. NORTH AMERICAN,
BOHEMIAN, ANGLO-SAXON,
NORTH BRITON, HIBERNIAN,
CANADIAN, N0VA8CO1IAN.
Shortest, Cheapest and Quickest Con.
veyanc sroaaa
aKJEBICA TO All FASTS OF STOOPS.
Hates ot PasasaKe to Europe,
830, 860, SO.
Will sail from LIVERPOOL every Wednesday
and from QUKBEO every Saturday, calling at
LONDONDERRY, to receive on board and land Uaili and
Passenger, to and from Ireland and Scotland.
irrThe Steamers ar built of iron, in water-tight
compartments, carry each an experienced Surgeon, and
very attention Is paid to th comfort and accommoda
tion or passengers. s uiey proceed airect to lun uun
DERT, th neat risk and delay of calling at St. John's
Is avoided.
GIskow paseenrers ar furnished with rats ratrago
ticket to and from Londonderry.
Heturn lionets granted reduced rate.
Certificate Issued for earrylng to and bringing out pas
senger from all th principal town of Great Britain and
Ireland, at reaueea raws, nymia line or (learners, ana
byth WASHINGTON LINE Of SAILING PACKETS,
leaving Liverpool every wees:.
Sight Draft for -CI and upwards pay-
aoie in Kngiana, ireiaua, scoi
. land or Wales. .
Tor tiamm. apply at the Office. 23 ItKOAII.
WAV. NeiV York, and 11 WATlill NT.,
Liverpool,
8AB2T k BEA&LE, General Agents,
Or to- J. R. ARMSTRONG,
nolO-lydaw ' Post Office, Columbus, Ohio.
EIKNHY KUBIII.EK,
(Late of Phalon's Establishment, N. T.,) Poprletore
th (tew I or rasnionanie enaving, uatr uniting
Shampoonlng, Curling and Dressing Saloon, East State
street, over th Post Offloo, where satisfaction will
be given In all th various branches. Ladles and
Children's Half Dressing don In th best style.
yl-dlv
SPRING CLOAKS AND IIASQINES I
NEW STYLES Main fc Son, No. s) South
High street, have Just opened new styles of Cloth Cia
cnLAas. Basodikeb and BAoaoss, made in th newest and
mint .t.H.h manner. - Also. Huverb IMaln
Hlaek. alllke. very heavy, designed eipressly for
HaatllisanaBiauM. iapri
BEAUTIFUL.,
AND CHEAPER TITAN EVER !
OCR SPUING STOCK IN UNIISIJAL
ly largo and well aasorted . The very lntest pattern
from AMERICAN, ENGLISH and FRENCH Factories.
GOLD PAPERS AND BORDERS.
Gold and Velvet Borders,
SPLENDID DECORATIONS
SIDELIGHT
AND
FIRE BOARD PAPERS,
Gold and Painted Shades,
GOLD
WINDOW CORNICES,
BUFF, BLUE,
AND
GREEN HOLLANDS,
WINDOW FIXTDEES, all kinds,
CORD AND TASSELS,
BEAUTIFUL PICTURES
AND FHAMES.
RANDALL & ASTON,
XOOOovitlaXXlBl3.53t.
COLUMBUS, O.
N. B. Landlords and persons wishing quantities of
Paper will make money ly buying ct us. Country
Merchants and persons from abroad will do well to call
and see us. aprll 1 dSmcod R.&A.
Wholesale and Retail Depot for
FAMILY GjSOCEBtES
No. 108 South High Street.
Wisi, IIcDONALI),
DEALER IN
T E A.S
FINE & STAPLE GROCERIES
IN ALL ' HEIR VARIETIES.
Daily - rt-lva. of Good
For tho Full and Winter Trade
Of 1860-61
IOUi:T;ltM0 SINCERE THANKS
TO TUtt PUBLIC for past favors and patron
age, and being 1ILTEUJTIINED to MEUM'
a continuance of same by Htrict attention to
trade, and prompt delivery of Goods,
I would call the notice of the public to tbe fact that
having ,i Largo and well Selected Stock on
hand, and being in daily receipt of goods from the differ
ent markets, I flatter myself Out I can offer to the citl
sen of Columbus, or to any who may desire to purctase,
an assortment of articles appertaining to the GROCERY
trade, GMEtltlALEU by anyhoujo In the city.
The price and quality of the goods offered, I guar.
antce to erlve satisfaction.
Goods Delivered Free of Charge.
nov27.
wm. Mcdonald.
William jSl. t3-j.11
lOLViTIKl'Si OHIO
AtrlUCiJLTDRAL WAREHOUSE
And Se5d Store,
psalii m
GENERAL HARDWARE,
NAILS, GLASS, 8ASII, PUTTY, OORDAOl,
Guns, PiwtolN, Wood ,tc Willow ware,
nlherani i'nUwr Deltlng, lac Leatior, Do, and
king. enl-dly
ARRIVALS
OF
Spring & Summer Millinery.
Tho Steele Replenished
DAILY
FROM LATEST I IMPORTATIONS OF
NEW YORK.
MY STOCK OF '
Spring & Summer Millinery
Is now complete, comprising every variety of Millin
ery; also, a large assortment of Embroideries, Hosiery
and Notions, Ito., and In quantities and prices that canj
not fall to suit all who may favor us with a call. IJho
goods have been bonght at Panlo prices, and will he sold
at a small advance on cost.
MILLINERY '
Miss M. E.YOUNG, lato of New York Cltj,
will superintend th Millinery Department. Iler long
experlcnc? In tha most FasUonabl Establishment In
Broadway will alone be a warranty that sh will be able
to give entire satisfaction In matter of last to all who
may favor her with their orders.
The Ladle of Columbus and vicinity will please ac
cept my sincere thanks for their liberal patronage, and
I would respectfully tollclt a continuant of th same,
R. H. WARE,-
08 Enst Town St., Columbus, O.
aprll-d3m-eod '
Dissolution.
THE CO-PAKTNE1ISIIIP IIEKETO
for existing between th underslrned, under the
Arm name of ARMaTRONO ec TUOUPSON, was dissolv
ed by mutual consent on the first day ot April, lblll.
Th business of tbe late firm will be settled by E. B.
Aasrraoao, who continue the business at the old stand.
. , X. B. ARMSTRONG..
mayl8-d3. , . .8. THOMPSON.
WANTED. AOENT8 TO SELL
packages of STATIONERY and JEWELRY, at
price one-third less than can be purchased elsewhere
Call on or address (stamp enclosed) J. L. BAILEY, No
131 Court It,) Boston, Uall. -march 8:d3m.
(Ql)W Statesman
TXBHB.
Dally, per year .' 1 8 H)
Tri-Weekly, per tar 3 VO
Weekly, per yeai 100
Foreign Intelligence.
5th inat , arrived at Now York on Thursday
night about 12 o'clock. Iler Dews has already
been published in telegraphic summary from St.
Johns, N. F but we have papers of dates later
than those before received, from which we
mako two extracts.
THE LONDON TIMES' REMARKS UPON "AMERICAN IRRITATION,"
AND THE FARIS BREAKFAST.
[From the London Times, June 3.]
No one will be surprised at tbe irritation which
now provaila among Americans on the subject
of the disruption of their Republic It is a
great calamity, and it is the first that has be
fallen them. In the records of fiction it is al
ways the giant who shouts and writhes uncon
trolably under pain, and in real life we find tbe
great, the fortunate and the imperious often
agitated beyond mcasuro by the first shock of
misfortune Tbe people of the United Slates
have, tiuco the early days of the Republic, ad
vanced without interruption from one success
to another. Tbe laws which prescribed to na
tions as to men that good shall be checkered
with evil that sunshine and storm shall suc
ceed each other in worldly aff.iirs seem to be
suspended in tteir case. By slow and painful
stops, by long struggles, have countries like
bnglaud or trance won their prosperity, remov
ed the obstacles to freedom and civilization,
and asserted for themselves a leading place in
(no world, in our own land, for Instance, In
spite of tbe glories of successful war, of wide
spread commerce, and of great intellectual
achievements, society was burdened till within
tbe lust tew years by an ever-present uneasiness
arising from the knowlcdgo that the laboring
classes were exposed to much suffering, and
wero habitually sullen and disaffected. Then
wo have had heavy taxes, and usoless wars end
ed by peaces almost inglorious; we have had to
deal with rivals in Europe, with rebellious mil
lions In Inpia; we havo been checked by our
own colonies; we have bad, for tho sake of more
important matters, to bear with the petulanee
ot the Americans themselves. The communi
ties which grew up beyond the Atlantic have
passed through nono of tnct-o trials. No wonder
that their preachers and moralists Bhould as
sume that they were placed on the Dew conti
nent to carry out a special design of Providence,
for race, climate, geographical position, and the
state of Europe have combined to give them a
prosperity beyond the dreams of the most ar
deut patriot who fought with Washington.
With tbe whole North American Continent in
their bands either actually or as soon as they
oboso to granp i ; with a range of territory in
which every production of temporateor tropical
climates could be riaturalized; with the whole
world coming to tbcm fur corn, cotton, and gold;
with coffee and sugir, and even wine and tea,
among the staples congenial to their soil, and
witn tbe hungry or restless crowds ol Lurope
pouring into the country to do its rough work
and to be fashioned in the next generatiua into
educated and alert Republicans, the Amcripan
Uuion seemed to be aovatioicg to inordinate
prosperity and power, without any of tbe trials
which have hitherto been deemed Inseparable
trom tne pursuit ot greatness.
We are among those who thick that the
Americans of tbo North have no reason to de
spond as to the future, beciuse certain comuuu
uities of slaveowners, differing from them in
interests, habits and temper, have resolved to
withdraw from political fellowship with them.
The ill-iudced assertion of a youne member of
Parliament that tho " the RcpubUoan bubble
had burst," gave an opportunity tha other eve
ning for Lord John Russell to express what we
feel sure is tho real feeling of Englishmen on
what is passing in the Now World. We can
not exult in the humiliation of America, not
only becauso it would be no subiect of exulta
tion, but becauso we do not believe that there is
any real humiliation. That whatever may be
the result of this war, the people of the North
ern States must remain among the most power
ful and wealthy in trio world, is eulhciently
plain to every cue who considers the true causes
of .National gicatneas. Whether Southern
Senators and Representatives be sent to Wash
ington or not, New Fork must be tbe commer
cial metropolis of the continent ; Chicago must
be the Queen of the Lakes i tho tide tf Euro
pean immigration must flaw to the temperate
regions of the North ; climate and bolter social
organization must mako the Northern States
Individually far more important communities
than the Southern. But it is useless to expect
that the Northern Americans should look so
philosophically on the subject. With them the
Union is a word of magic power. It has made
them grasp much nnd yield much, assert extrav
agant rights and abandon tho most obvious
principles. It has made them conservative
politicians at homo, while their irritable patriot
ism baa been always on the point of embroiling
them with foreign nations. To maintain tbe
Uuion the North has yielded to all the forward
ness of the booth as to a spoilt child ; and, in a
land where ambition aud the love of train are
strong enough, men have given up honor, power,
the possession ana ine distribution ot emolu
ments, in order that an obstinate and turbulent
section should be bribed by success, into com
placency. JNow that all has failed, the Indie-
nation and bitterness aro extreme, and we, the
English people, who trom tbo first hour ol tbe
dispute have been guarding ourselves from any
act or word which could seem like partisauship,
are not to be spared. The American giant at
the first twig of pain, breaks forth against
those who are near bim, both friends and foes.
The BrltiBh Government aud the British Press
are the objects of violent animadversion wher
ever the Northern Americans come.
. We learn by .telegraph that Lord John Russell's
recognition of the Confederate States as "bellig
erents," has been discussed "in a tone highly
hostile to England." Other rumors, though
perhaps not accurate, show the spirit in which
tbe striotly legitimate and necessary course of
our Government had been received at the North,
It was reported from Washington that the Fed
eral Government bad resolved to declare war
against any Power that should Interfere In the
present dispute. But the most singular instance
of this groundless irritability is to be found in
a meeting of American residents at Paris, held
at the Louvre Hotel, and addressed by two, at
least, of Mr. Lincoln's diplomatists, in language
full of anger towards this country. Mr. Cassius
Clay, whose letter we published somo time Binco,
reiterates his opinion as to the vengeance which
is in store for the rebels, and intimates that a
similar chastisement may fall on sympathizing
England. Where and wnen that sympathy has
been expressed he does not show, and he would
be unable to show. But he assumes It, and tells
us that its punishment will come from the com
bined forces of the United States and France.
"When England mingles the red crosses of tbe
Union Jack with the piratical black flag of the
Confederate States of America, will not just as
certainly tbe Tri-color and the Stars aud Stripes
float in fraternal foldsl Can Napoleon forget
St. Helena, etc I" "Does the Times understand
met" he asks in another place. Mr..Burlin
game, the Minister to Vienna, follows with less
violence, but In similar language of complaint.
It show bow inoapable of reflection tbe North,
cruers have become through excitement, that
this gentleman resents it as an Insult to bis
country tbat Lord John RusBell alluded to the
precedent of the Turks and Greeks, which Mr.
Burliogame calls "comparing us to Turks," as
if when a reported case is cited to support a legal
decision it is intended to draw any comparison
between the character of tbe former and the
present litigants- "The French," says Mr. Bur
iingame, "do not mock at us In our supposed
calamity;" they do not speak of "belligerent
rights in such a way as to leave as to Infer that
they would make merchandise of our misfor
tunes, and open all thalr ports' to the pirates'
prize." "England has, it appears, forgotten the
ties of consanguinity." The resentments ot
America tgalnst her baa died oat; fit is neither
kind nor wise to rouse them again with tenfold
rancor." "A few traitors " wno have rebelled
because they were outvoted, will toon be pnt
down, and then England may regret tbe part she
nag taken.
These aneechea are worthv of Derosa), because
they show the spirit In which the Northerners
are inclined to look upon the neutral attitude of
bogland. A strict, unvarying neutrality has
been observed bv tbe Government and by Par
liament, while the only opinions warmly ex
pressed in tbe press nave been those which
were adverse to the Secessionists. And yet
this, tbe only becoming courso which could be
taken, Is now imputed to us as a crime! Tbe
Unionists are in fact enraged that we presume
to be neutral. While one of their own States
in warning both Federal sod Southern troops
from its territory. w , a fuieieu nation, are iu-
velshed aeainst for presuming to exercise the
same discretion; and while Servia and Monte
negro would claim tbe laws of war la a contest
ith tbe i'orte, we are to deny them to ten mil-
lions of people, Inhabiting a region more than
ten times as largo as Great Britain. If this
be the temper of the Northerners now, what
will it be some months herjee? It is plain tbat
the utmost care and circumspection must be
used by every man or party in Eugland to avoid
giving ofiuuuc to either of tbo two iuceuscd bcl
ligerents.
PRIVATEERS IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH PORTS.
House of Commons, June 3 Mr. 0. W. Fos
ter abked if tbe Government would allow pri
vateers, sailing under the flag of the Confeder
ate stale?, to bring prizes into Urilieh ports.
As for the Uoited States, he did not believe tbat
they would authorize privateering.
Lord J. Kussell replied that, alter consuming
the law officers of tbo Crown, the Government
bad decided not to allow ships of war, or pri
vateers of either party, to enter tbe ports of ihe
United Kingdom or its dependencies. He bad
communicated with the French Ambassador on
the subject, and bad ascertained tbat Frauce
would pursue precisely the same line or conduct
which it bad done for two centuries, under
which no privateer, as long at the French re
mained neutral, could stay in a French port be
yond 24 hours, or dispose of its cargo thero.
In reply to Sir J. raklngton, Lord J. KusBell
said that propositions, In accordance with the
Congress of Paris, had been sent out to the
United States, and he was daily expecting an
answer.
The Law of Blockade.
[From the London Times.]
contest
and the South is to go on we must watch our
selves very narrowly, or we shall be certainly
involved iu it. We have two parties eagerly
bidding for our aid and jealously watcbiof our
actions. We have merchants and shipowners
sharply alive to tbo opportunities of turning any
circumstances to advaulage, and ready to test
every . point in the law of blockade - 1 be real
business of this war is indubitably the blockade
of the Southern ports not now, perhaps, for
the last cotton crop is, for the most part, stored
in our European warehouses; but in a few
months tbe question will be whether the North
can hermetically seal tbe South, and then Lan
cashire will be hungering for cotton, and the
federal States will be fainting for tbe supplies
by which it should be paid for. But even al
ready we see tbe commencement of future dif
ficulties. Tho American news we published
yesterday pictures to us a single American war
steamer cruising off the harbor of Charleston
and declaring a strict blockade of "the whole
Southern coast of the Uoited States of Ameri
ca " Tho Niagara boards the Liverpool ships
and warns them off the eoaBt, and she is strictly
within her belligerent rights in bo doing. At
other times she is engaged in most exciting
chase of other less obedient British craft which,
under the hope of a good freight, stand tbe risk
of a race, and sometimes make good their en
trance into the blockaded port. As lime wears
on these chases will become much more numcr
oub, and if Governor Seward baa already had
occasion to utter dark threats against tbe French
Emperor for some fancied tendencies of a South'
era character, we may expect what theseora
plicationa will be as soon as it becomes tbe di
rect pecuniary interest of every merchant and
shipowner of Europe to break this blockade of
a quarter ot a continent, it win De louod very
difficult to keep sealed what all the world has
an interest in breaking; and we cannot hope
tbat tbe watchers win always maintain an un
failing good humor in dealing with the hosts of
evaders. Wemayoepchd upon it tbat we shall
soon have a revival ol those old questions bo fa
miliar in our history. What the law of block
ade is no one knows. True it may be read in
treaties and may be found laid down in text
books. But these text books bavo not tho au
thority to be derived from consistency, and have
never been obeyed in practice. They have for
the -most part been written by two different
schools of jurists, the subjects of warring Pow
ers, and the subjects of neutral Powers. All
the authorities ot this country are in favor of
the most geuerous interpretation of the rights
of belligerent Powers, for we have always been
belligerent; it has always been our interest to
give a belligerent Power the strongest possible
rights over neutral ships; aud our Prize Courts
have always been laying down doctrines which
the rest of the world repudiated as illegal and
untenable. The consequence is that we shall
now find ourselves in a false position in all these
questions. We shall be bound by our own de
cisions, which will tell against our own inter
ests as neutrals, and we shall have to submit to
rules of maritime public law which very much
increase tho evils we must necessarily endure
from tbe blockade, however inefficient, of the
coast which is to us so important both for ex
ports and imports.
We should bavo no right to complain of (his
if thero were really any code of maritime law.
But there is no such thing. If we were at war
to-morrow, we should have no chance of en
forcing against the neutral nations the rules to
which we ourselves ate about to submit- Pe
dants may look for the law of natious in tbe
frolics of text writers, but practical men will
seek for it in the facts of history. When we,
as belligerents, have sought to enforce our rijtht
to take an enemy'a goods out of friendly ves
sels, we have always been met by a great league
of all the maritime nations, and bave been
obliged to abate our pretensions. We bave
never found it to much purpose to quote the
most revered authorities in our favor. Den
mark, and Russia, and France and Spain have
aiways been ready to make a codo for tbe occa
sion, and that code we have been compelled to
accept. We have kept it up as an old principle,
just as we kept up our claims to bo Sovereigns
of France; bnt it has never done ns any practi
cal good, and it is now likely to lead us into
considerable practical oilUcuity. There can be
no dispute among those who have looked iuU
the subject tbat we bave never read the marl
time law of nations as tbe French have read it,
and that at no poried has the practice of Europe
been uniform even upon the most important
principles which guide us in our dealings with
other nations when at war. -
All this tends to future difficulties. It is at
this moment tlre-anxionSTTCBire of every ootid
cal party in this country to avoid being in any
way implicated in what is now going on beyond
the Atlantic. Never did any people look on
with calmer or more judicial mind upon anv
event passing outside their own land than do the
British people upon this Amerloan quarrel.
The prevailing feeling is one of simple regret
we sympathize witb tne exaggerated resent
ment of neither party. .But we bave hitherto
felt no immediate cd'eots operating upon our
selves, t We cannot answer that our thoughts
would be calm, or our judgment as impartial,
If all Lancashire were blockaded by the fleet
which blockades the Southern ports, and if the
ships which keep those ports closed were at the
tame time keeping closed the workshops of
mancnester ana oneateia. The law of blockade
might then come to be discussed in a very dif
ferent spirit. Now, while it is yet time, it is,
we think, the duty of the Governments of Europe
to come to some general understanding upou
this subject, aud to agree to propositions which
shall form a real publio law. , We are, for the
first time, a neutral Power: we hope to remain
so; we no longer fool it to be a vital interest to
sustain exaggerated pretensions in favor of bel
ligerent Powers. . We draw near now to those
Srinolplet with which we have always iu former
ays been in conflict, and we might esoape many
difficulties which are not far ahead If wo could
give universal authority to some well-considered
exposition of tbe law of blockado, the rights
ol neutrals, and tbe description of artiolcs con
traband of war.
The Chances and Fortunes of War.
It will be well In tbe beginnings of tbo war
which is just opening, for our people to reflect
upon the situation of affairs, and to be prepared
for reverses or success, from day to day, as
the war progresses. We fear that In tbe enthu
siasm attendant upon the preparations for the
war, and the patriotic ardor with which our brave
men bave rallied in response to the call of their
country, the character of the struggle has been
too often overlooked, and that the possibility of
occasional defeat, as well ss of success, hat not
sufficiently entered into our estimate of tbe fu
ture. In a war where the material of the con
tending armies is so very similar, and where
tbe same brave deeds wbioh attend one party,
are quite sure also to bo displayed by the other,
the victories cannot be all on one side, nor the
defeats confined to either of the combatants.
Tbe war ki which we are engaged Is the most
important and formidable ever undertaken on
this Continent; and whether we consider tbe
number of troops employed, their character for
bravery and military ardor, or the issues to be
detcrmided by tbe results, few of the European
wars bave been equally important. We must
bear in mind tbat this i not a war of Kings or
Emperors against rival Kings and Emperors,
but a struggle of tbe people of one section of
tbo country, against the people of another sec
tion, in which each feels a personal interest in
the result, aud brings to the battle field all the
energy and personal prowess which such a spirit
is fitted to inspire. In such a controversy,
where the parties may be supposed to be equal
In courage and personal bravery, and where both
sides seem to be equally well supplied with ar
tillery and munition ot war, and commanded
by equally accomplished and skillful officers, it
will indeed be a miracle if the fortunes of war
during tbe pendency of the conflict, and partic
ularly in ils earlier stages, do not alternate be
tween them. .
It is tbe part of wisdom to be prepared for
whatever may await us In this unhappy strug
gle. Especially should wo entertain the proba
bilities and prospects ot severe losses in our
gallant army. Paiufulasis tbe contemplation
of such a theme, its realities will be lorctJ
upon u, whether we are prepared or unprepar
ed. We havo the utmost confidence in tho
troops composing the Federal army, and we
think they aro generally commanded by officers
of good judgment and courage. Doubtlees
there are exceptions, as must unavoidably be
tho case in collecting a large army hastily iroin
volunteers, but the bravery and courage of
American soldiers are proverbial, and they will
generally fight if a fair chance is offered. But
tbey ai e to meet foea equally brave, and olten,
by force of numbers, position, strategy or other
causes, must experience reverses and suffer
losses which will cause the hearts of friends
and countrymen to bleed at every poro. Let
us anticipate and be prepared for these things,
and above all, do not let us complain, without
good cause, ot those, whether officers or com
mon soldiers, wbo may not be able to secure
the laurels of victory in every encounter with
tbe enemy. Time settles and determines fucli
questions with great accuracy; and whilo we
manifest a deep interest in every rumor and ev
ery authenticated accouut of tbe battles, great
aud small, which will occur irom tinio to nine,
it is well to caution the public against receiving
tbe opinions of seusatiou correspondents and
news agents as conclusive data, upon which to
form a judgment respecting the conduct of tbo
respective parties.
The accounts already published of the affair
at Great Bethel, near Fortress Monroe, are tuch
as to cause pain to every heart. It is melan
choly thus early to record the loss of brave
men prompt in the discharge of duty, but wo
mu4t accept it as prt of tbe great drama to be
enacted ou American toil, and in which ourowu
citizens are to have so conspicuous a part.
Thero are lossorn to be drawn from each cir
cumstance, however trifling, connected with the
war. This last engagement, where quite a
number of our soldiers wero killed and a great
er number wounded, proves wbat bad been made
apparent in previous but less important engage,
ments, viz., tbat tbe enemy is strong in artille
ry, and tbat hU battciies are generally well
served, and quite effective. Unless the reports
of our officers are erroneous, almost every bat
tery of the enemy has more or less rilled can
non, of great power and range. Where tbe.e
were obtained is something of a mjstery, but
their presence indicates the preparation whieh
N. Y. Journ.
Commerce.
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THE REVISED STATUTES
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