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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, June 21, 1861, Image 2

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Kunnonrx muni ruuukwt.
GEO. W. Edlter.
nni.TIMDUB, OHIO.
TrIDAY MORNING. JUNE 81. 18C1.
a
Republican Views on the Result of
Republican Views on the Result of the War.
There aretes the' jettr-ae! tajs, 'comparatively
but few Republic topaperi .khch boldly uk
the fre-tod that the present "''"" cru"
.., .r.intt .Uverv. ' Bat newly ell of Ibem,
tbt Journal Included, strenuously Insist. that the
...Uaaandirwt crusade wintt slavery, and
that one of .Its Inevitable results will be the
t.: f avarv aleve upon k Souther
Nu. -'. '.V ;.'v
Th. SacssBlooiata charge that the Admiois
tratioa U making tu upon the 8outh for the
extinction of tlavery. .The Republican journeie
. .n.-pr- Thtsisiittsd. The Administration
It not making t tired crusade against slavery
hit It' animation will toMireetff acoompllsh
d aa una of the necessary consequences of the
war. We rejoice at fttU.tnd for this reason
urge the vigorous prosecution of the war, for
lavery has ale-eye been disturber of our peaee,
aid the country will new hare rest till W la
thoroughly exterminated.? ''
Such la substantially the tone of the leading
n l if in ril to the war and
slavery. This Is the oil with which they In
k. i.nhY of the flame, that is con
.t th. hravett of our countrymen, and
1.1 ... Hnlata. It mattera little
maaiug vui HWH t
. nr.it.a;ced and Incensed secessionist,
whether you declare that the war is carried on
j;J aoV.nat slavery, or that it must result In
. ii.tui.tnn. ir will make use of
1 is uner miuiui"""".
the declaration In either case as a firebrand to
kindle the flame of resistance and rebellion
Either position, too, is equally agreeable to the
feelings of the fanatical and crazy abolition
disunionist. He cares not a picayune, whether
the Administration seeks directly Ihe overthrow
nf lrv or not. so that tbat IS tne oeruuu uuu
eanence of its aots. This is enough lor him-
info i(?orous actirity all
CUUUgU IWmbv --O
.,!nl mallirnitv and hatred of hit nature
If the war is prosecuted, on the part of the
Administration, as the people have been led to
ni from its ofllolal declarations, there win
no more be an annihilation of the institution of
tlavery in any State without the consent of its
nnla. than there will be an annihilation of the
State itself. Slave-owners, like the holders of
other property, will undoubtedly suffer heavy
losses, that may reduce whole families to want
and poverty; but State laws regulating the re
Ution between master and slave will no more
be interfered with than those pertaining to the
relation between husband and wife, parent and
child, and guardian and ward.
the
Republican Views on the Result of the War. A Protective Tariff--The Blockade.
The "Confederate" States must be a happy
people! Tney now are enjoying the sweet bless
ings of a protective tariff in all its foroe. There
is not the least danger of any of the "pauper
labor" countries sending their cheap manufac
tured article into the "Confederate" States to
interfere with, or oppress their laborers, of any
class or color. Toey are enjoying the blessings
of rigid protection. How blessed a people they
must be. They have a decided advantage over
our fret laborof the North. We are only par
tially protected by that splendid specimen ol
Republican statesmanship! the MoaaiLL tariff,
while they have the prohibitory act of Mr.
Lincoln, in the shape of the blockade.
We shall expect the "Confederate" States to
become very rich, and thai manufacturers,
though there are not many of them, to become
wealthy, under the benign influence of the pro
tective policy.
Then, they have another advantage: they
are completely proteeted from competition by
the great grain growing valleys of the North
west. They will have the benefits or an rx
$it home market:: Their grain-growert will
not feel the ruinotu effect of competition in
the articles oi corn, wheat, pork, whisky, and
all those great staples which the Northwest
hare been in the constant habit of floating down
the Mississippi and its tributaries, to the de
struction of the agricultural interests of those
States!!
Then, again, it operates so charmingly on the
agricultural 'people of the Northwest. It en
ables the farmers to keep such abundant sup
plies of grain on hand! They oan have such
great consolation, in looking at their well filled
granaries and barns, and console themselves
with the idea that they are in no danger of
starving; and then again, If they have any poor
neighbors who have no corn, and no labor to
earn the money to purchase it, they can gener
ously give them a few, bushels, consoling them,
selves with the idea that they have only given
away that which was worth fen or ftMafy bents,
and no sale for it at tbat.
It has a healty effect on the warehouse men!
It enables them to keep their houses full the
ysar through, and to reeeive their charges for
storage, without the trouble and labor of put
ting on steamboats and railroads. What a
blt$ing these tariffs for protection aret "
HT The JWneJ gives the Memphis A
lanch as authority for saying that extensive
combinations of men exist In Ohio, Indiana and
Illinois, to overthrow the Administration, who
are only waiting an Invasion from the South to
raise np and act with tha Secessionists. The
Journal Indorses the statement of the Av
Ineke, and calls upon tha people to proceed
summarily to dispose of such combinations and
the men composing tbem. It talks very flip
pantly about treason and traitors, and invites
tha inauguration ot a "reign of terror" to dis
pose of them. If there be traitors in Ohio,
they should be exposed and banished; but the
proceeding should be according to the forme of
the Constitution and through the process of the
laws. The attempt which tha Jnrntl essays
very now and then to make, to excite mobs,
had aa well be dispensed with by that and kind
red Journals. ' They may arouse a spirit they
cannot quell, and probably they would ba th
. first sufferers from the process. If there baa
concern in Ohio, which from its past oourte, hat
entitled itself to the visitation of Judge Lvmcr,
It la the Ohio Sutt Journal, baoauat of its
known, notorious and offensive disunion enU
menta ; In view of which it ehenld be exeoad
lngly careful how it attempts to Instigate-and
foster a spirit of vloleuos and anarchy.
Regimental Appointments.
In another column we publish the appoint
ments of Regimental officers for the eleven new
'Regiments to be formed in conformity to the
President's Proclamation It will be observed
that General Hxnav B. Caaamoroa Is appoint
ed Colonel of the 18th Regiment. He la ap
pointed "from the volunteers," and hit bead
' quarters at Columbus.
May we ask, -which ttlnntien was heap
pointed from?
The Three Months' Volunteers—Why
are they not Paid!
Wa hare heard much complaint, of the bad
treatment of th three moo'the' volunteers, out
the following from the Cincinnati Timt$, shows
much worse state of things than we were
prepared for: "V ' -'A
"Bom three or four hundred of the thro month'mn
took their departure for bona yesterday, and among
them a toft number belonging to th Guthrie ttray Beg-
Im.nt. In Ana InatAnM. (tAmrlw An antlr OOmnanV (0.
lata Ganlain LiUia'a. marched to tha dSDOl ana tooa tn
ear. Other thro monUu' volunteer mam to leave th
rap unlit they are provided for by Government.
'iney claim inai mey un none weir uu j iut
Booth wtthoat per. an are wiiiib n oonnaao t
another month, but to be turnel oat upon the world
withnutaMnft lsnnlatt end anfeellne.
"Hondrede ol Uote m nava aireeny leii o ounp
hd not none enoegh to buj a world, if waihte bed
hMn h fni rov a nennv a-uMca imun. Deaoiiw.
uiaged and angry, uey took tneir aepanure. ma
it upon red-tape diplomacy, which hae thoe fer
ewtndled them of thetr jutt daea. Who will not feel
Indignant at th treatment of ear volunteer, when ve
aeeert the feet that many of thoe who earn to th lty
from Oemp Dennltoo yeeterday afternoon, latt Qignt
Hpt M nation aouee, bacaa tney nea no moncv
to pay for lodaini. and were too proud to beg I I it to
be wondered at that eo email a Drooortioa. eomp retire
ly, have been wUllng to join th Cincinnati Jloiimonti
forthewarf" . ,
Why hare these men not been paid, at least
a portion of their money 1 It it monstrous that
they should bo dismissed from the service, and
turned out of camp without meant to take them
home, or buy provisions for their subsistence.
Have the State authorities no money? If they
have not ean they not procure It for this abso
lutely necessary purpose?
If money can be found to pay the enormous
bills, made with contraotori who have made
such unreasonable profits, why cannot 'money
be procured to pay the volunteer soldiers thsir
wages, which for an sntlre month is but little
more than the profits on one single suit of
clothes, eblch will not hang together while they
are serving that month in camp?
Is there no money subject to be paid the sol
diers? If not, why do not those who have the
authority, raise money. The Legislature appro
priated mate million dollars to pay the ex.
peases of this war, and authorized the Fund
Commissioners to borrow it on the faith and
credit of the State, and "provided for the loan
by taxation. . , ;
The State should be perfectly good.- The
credit of Ohio has stood high with capitalists inj
times past. . The immense property of the good
people of the State is, in effect, mortgaged for
the payment of the debt which may be created
under the acts of the Legislature for war pur
poses. Why then can the money not be obtain
ed to meet the liabilities incurred by this state
of things?
The fact tbat it has beea squandered, and
bestowed upon favored peta wrongfully, will not
render the debt less obligatory, or its payment
less certain.
The fishing nun of the State have rallied
manfully, at the call oi the constituted author
ities of the country State and National but
they cannot be clothed, subsisted and paid their
wages without money. ' The fighting patriotism
of the State have responded nobly.. Where Is
the money patriotism ? Where ire the wealthy
men and Incorporations of Ohio? , Why do they
not step forward in this crisis of the country
and open their money bags? If the soldier is
willing to bare his bosom, and pour out his
blood, in defense of the Constitution and Union,
by which the lives, the liberties and the wialth
of the people of the State is protected, why
will not that wialth come forward and sustain
the soldiers?
We are aware that some have said, "we will
lend our money for the benefit of the soldier,
bnt not to be squandered as it baa been." This
is well to consider bnt the soldier must not be
left to suffer, because the State has been to
aome extent plundered. They must be paid
first. Those who have asade large profits on
contracts, can well afford to wait until the Fond
Commissioners csn raise the money.' ', .;
We have heard it intimated that onr capital-
lata are holding back, knowing tbat if the bonds
are not taken here now, at par, the Commission
ers will be compelled . to send them te New
York, to be sold for what they will bring in the
market hoping they will be able to buy them
at a lower rate. " ' ' ' ..
u . -r M 1
In this crisis of the affairs of oar country, onr
capitalists should not desire to take advantage
of the necessities of the State. ' It is not true
patriotism. A man who will not pour out his
blood for hit country, when necessary, is not re
garded at a patriot. How thould he be regard
ed, who will not lend his money, especially when
the people's farms are mortgaged for, its pay
ment? ir t. . '
Non-Intervention in Europe.
Of late years the opinion baa been rapidly
gaining ground In Earope, that amicable rela
tions and permanent peace cannot be maintain
ed among civilixed nstiona, as long as the Gov
ernment of one country olalms or attempts to
exercise the right of intermeddling In the af
fairs of another, dictating its domestic policy,
and even deciding, as baa been done in some
cases, who shall be its rulers. The principle of
non intervention, long kept under . ban, has
been persistently agitated for the last twenty
years, until England, long a notorions Inter
meddler in the affairs of other nations, has
been forced, through her press and her ministry,
and finally from the throne Itself, to recognize
the right of every people, without Interference
or dictation from any quarter, to manage their
own affairs in their owe way. -This la alluded
to in the last report of (he American Peace So
ciety, as a most signal encouragement to the
friends of universal peace and the recognition
of a common brotherhood of .nations.' "Its
effect," says the report, "ia the general wel
fare and peace of Europe will bs found In time
to be worth more than a hundred Waterloo or
Solferinos. Already has it checked, and at
length it may reverse, the policy of intervention
which has wrought so vaat an amount of mis
chief." . . ,
This principle of non-intervention applies
with the same and even greater force to the re
lations between States confederated or united
under one General Government. Ia fact, such
a Union cannot be long maintained in peace,
giving freedom and security to the private citi
zen, unless the principle in question ia generally
recognized by the people, and adhered to aa the
settled policy of the General Government.
Were our people, North and South, generally,
and were our State and Federal rulers, Ieglala
live, executive and ' Judicial," fully Impressed
with the importance, the necessity and the value
of this principle of non Intervention to the gen
eral peace, aaiety, happiness and prosperity of
our country, it is not probable that our present
suicidal war would last a month longer. Could
the people ba the disaffected eeotiena be disa
bused of the idea with which demagogue have
filled their minds, tbat the Northern States In
tend to deprive them of rights and of a species
of property which they have held and enjoyed
ever since they came into the Union could they
feel assured that such Is not the case, and tbat
they have been grossly deceived and mlaled, the
arm of rebellion would be palsied at once, the
weapon would drop from the hand of the 8e
ceesionlst, and there would be no more need of
shedding blood or destroying property far the en
forcement of the laws and . the preservatlea f
the Union. ... ,(: , : .. j ,-.. f. 1
W.vrsj " ! t
Non-Intervention in Europe. THE REGULAR ARMY OF THE
Non-Intervention in Europe. THE REGULAR ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES.
List of the Regimental Officers Appointed
to Command the Eleven
New Regiments to be Organized
Conformity with the President's
Proclamation.
GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 33.
WAR DEP'T, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
WASHINGTON, June 18, 1861.
I. Orcanization of . the eleven Regiments,
added to the militarr eatsblishmeit. In oonform
ity with the President's ft oolamation of May 3,
IUbl. The officers will all take rank in tbejir
respeotive graaes from may it, lObi.
THIRD REGIMENT OF CAVALRY.
Colonel David Hunter, appointed from II-
Unoie, late paymaster, with the rank oi msjor.
Lieutenant Colonel William W. Emory, Ma
ryland. Meiors uaniei u. Kucaer, nnoniiran: re
ward B. Wright, New Jersey.
FIFTH REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY.
. Colonel Harvey Brown, New Jersey.
Lieutenant Colonel Taos. W.Shsrman, R.
Island; late maj. 3d art., . v , .
Mafors Thomas Williama, Michigan; Wll.
Ham F. Barry, New York, late cepi. 2d art.;
HenayJ. Hunt, Ohio. , f .. t
ELEVENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Erasmus D. Keys, Maine; late major
1st artillery. -
Lieutenant Colonel jEdmund Sobriver, New
York.
Majors Delancey Floyd Jones, New-York,
late captain 4th infantry; John, G. Foster, late
captain of engiueers; Jonathan VV. Gordon, In
diana., ' ' i, "' ; .-';'.
TWELFTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
. Colonel Wm; 8. Franklin, appointed from
Pennsylvania, late caplaiu topographical engi
neers. Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Butterfield, vol
unteers. .. Majors Henry B. Clitz, Michigan, late cap
tain 3d infantry; Richard S. Smith, New York;
Luther B. Vruen, ublo. '
THIRTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
. Colonel William T. Sherman, Ohio. '
Lieutenant Colonel Sidney Burbank, Masea
chutetts. late major 1st infantry . '
Majors Christopher C. Augur, Michigan, late
captain m iniantry; norano u. wrtgnc, uon
necticut, late captain engineers; Charles Hill,
Ohio. . . .
FOURTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Charles P. Stone, appointed from
District of Columbia. ,
Lieutenant Colonel John F. Reynolds, Peon
eylvania, late captain and brevet major 3d artil
lery. . .
Majors George Sykes, Maryland; Crotius
R. Giddlngs, Ohio; William Williams, Pennsylvania.
FIFTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Fits John Porter, appointed from
District of Columbia, late bvt. maj. and a. a. g.
Lieutenant Colonel John P. Sanderson,
Pennsylvania.
Majors John H. King, Michigan, late rart.
SIXTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Andrew Porter, Pennaylrania, late
capt. and brt. lieut. col. m. rifles.
Lieutenant Colonel B. Rush Petriken, Penn
sylvania. Majors Cedmuj M. Wilcox, Tennessee, late
capt- vth Inf. ; Adam J. Slammer, Pennsylva
nia, late 1st lient. 1st art.; Sidoey Coolidge,
Massachusetts. .,- . .- , u,
SEVENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Samuel P. Heintzelman, appointed
from Pennsylvania, late maj. and bvt. lieut. col.
let. Inf.
Lieutenant Colonel Green, Massachusetts.
Majors Abner Doubleday, New York, late
capt. 1st art; William H. Wood, Massachusetts,
EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Henry B. Carrlngton, appointed
from volunteers. -
Lieutenant Colonel Oliver L. Shepherd, New
York, late oapL and bvt. maj. 3d inf.
Majors Henry 6. Burton, Vermont, late
capt. 3d art.; Edmund Underwood, Pennsylva
nia, late eapt.aih inf.; Frederick Townsend,
New Yote, w . -w-
NINETEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY.
Colonel Edward R. S. Canby, Indiana, late
maj.andbrt. I.e. lOthlnf.
Lieutenant Colonel Edward A. King, Ohio.
Majors Stephen D. Carpenter, Maine, late
capt. 1st inf.; Clarence N. Seward, New York.
' III. . Acceptance or . non-acceptance of ap
pointment, and, in case of-acceptance, hia
UrthpUct, eotand reridenee when appointed,
with bis full name, -will be promptly reported
by each officer to j the Adjutaat-General of
the army. . - '. - : ' ;" r - - ; -
IV. The officers of each Regiment will be
assigned to battalions and companies by their
respective ;,U)iooeis. ;- ine .letters oi compa
nies will be the same in each battalion of infan
try, running down from A to H, inclusive, and
nofurhter. . - .
V. The newly appointed officers will lose ne
time In making themselves thoroughly acquain
ted with- the army regulations, the tactics of
their several arm, and the various duties of
their profession. None will be nominated for
commissions to the Senate who have not proved
themselves, meantime, to be both -worthy' and
capaole of commanding the brave men under
them. That the department may be enabled to
form a proper judgment on this delicate point,
all commanding officersthose of regiment
and battalions more particularly will forward
to this office, in time to reeoh it by the 15th of
Jnly next, a statement, on honor, of the moral,
mental and physical qualifications for the ser
vice of each one of the officers belonging Ut ther
command. ., -.
VI. The recruiting for the hew regiments
will be commenced Immediately, and be con
ducted under the superintendence of their colo
nels, ia the States adjoining the headquarter of
each regiment All officers will accordingly, by
letter or in person, report forthwith fer orders to
tbeir respective colonels. 4 - i -.
The beadqnarlert of the different regiment
are established at the following plaees, viz: :
Of the Third Cavalry, at PiUeburg, Pennsyl
vania. . - ., ... ,.i ... :
Of the Fifth Artillery, at Harruborg, Penn
sylvania. ;.)....-. j-;:,!-.- i
Of the Eleventh Infantry, at Fort Independ
ence, Boston Harbor, Maasacbusetta. - -
Of the Twelfth Infantry, at Fort Hamilton,
New York Harbor, New York.' i.;i.f o.u -
.; Of the Thirteenth Infantry, at Jefferson Bar
racks, Missouri. ,1 -i .,
. Of the Fourteenth Infantry, at fort Trum
bull, Connecticut 'T. !.'.: . i i'-r-t
Oi the Fifteenth Infantry, at Wbeelinr, Vir-
glnla. ; ' '., y -; -. m -.
ur the sixteenw iniantry, at Chicago, Illi
nois. ,..,.,. .c' . i
Of the Seventeenth Infantry, at Fort Adams,
Newport, Rhode Island. ,.-.'-.
Of the Eighteenth Infantry, at Columbat,
OhiO. , ... ..,,( , .. . ' I , ' - :' -
Of the Nineteenth Infantry, at Iadianapolis,
Indiana.. ". r . . , . L
Estimates or slanka, and funds for the re-
eruHlna service of each regiment, will be at
once prepared, and ibrwarded to this office by
L. THOMAS, Adjutant General.
OFFICIAL, Assistant Adjutant General.
The Balloon Reconnoissance.
Thia afternoon, the 18th, the long-promised
balloon aacensiea for military purposes, took
place- The elevation attained was not very
great, tnouga it wae perfectly satisfactory aa an
experiment.. i 'ine eeronaute were nor. Lowe,
Geo. Burnt, of the Telegraph Company, and H.
U. Konnson, operator. - ine balloon waa con.
oeeted with the War Department by telegraph
The first message ever telegraphed from a bal
loon was then sent te the President of tbe Uni
ted states by Prof. Lowe. It was aa follows!
BALLOON ENTERPRISE.
WASHINGTON, June 17.
Ta m Picetuxr or tib Btatw: , ,.,
flta: Thi point of obeervation aomeiand aa are
Bearly fifty atfle In Siaaeter. Th elty, with It ilrdl
f DeapoMola, preaeat a oprt Meat. 1 tak great
pleaear la aeaaio; yoa WM nnt dlepatea aver MM-
irapDM Irani an aerial euilen, aaa in aeknoweMglagny
odebtedoeee to roar eneoaragemant fer the ovportnaity
ot demonetratlng th tTillebility of the aoleno of aro
aanUe la la aillui7 eerrto af the ooantry. , -
T. S. C. LOWE.
Mr. Linooln waa very much pleased with the
experiment, ind indorsed It as eertaln, ultimato-!
ly to prove of great value in military move-
New World.
Andrew Johnson at Cincinnati.
This distinguished Tennesseean and devoted
lover of Ihe Union wai honored by the people
of Cincinnati on Wednesday in the most, flat
tering manner. He made a brief 'speech at
the Burnet House in' the forenoon to several
thousand persons, and In the afternoon he spoke
briefly again to the audience wnonad called to
pay their respeots to him.-; The speech of the
afternoon we copy from ii I Enquirer, 'at fol
lows:' "
FeUaW'Ciilstnt:n reply to the cordial wel
come which has just been tendered to me,
through your chosen organ in reply to what
has been said by the gentieraan chosen Dy you
to bid me welcome to Cinolnnatl I have not
language adequate to express my feelings of
gratitude. can not Una language to tnana
you for the tender of good fellowship which
has been made to me on tbe present occasion.
I eame here without an expectation that such
a reception was In store for me. -1 had no ex
pectation of being reoeivedand welcomed in
the language, I may say the eloquent and fore
lble language, of your choasn organ. I am de
serving of no snch tender, so far as I am col
cemed. ......
v 1 might conclude what little I am going to
say by merely responding to and Indorsing every
single sentence which has been uttered on this
occasion, In weloomlng me In your midst. Ap
plause.. . i f !l
: For myself, I feel that while I am a oiticen
of a Southern State a citizen of the South and
of the State of Tennessee, I feel at the same
time that I ' am also a citizen of the United
States. Applause. J Moat cordially do I re
spond to what has been said In reference to the
maintenance of the Constitution of the United
States, in all ita bearings, in all the principles
therein contained. Tbe Constitution of tbe
United States lays down the baais upon which tbe
Union of all the States of this Confederacy can
and may be maintained and preserved, if it be
literally and faithfully carried out. Applause-
So far at I am concerned, feeling tbat I am a
citizen of the Union tbat lama citizen of the
United States I am willing to abide by that
Constitution. I am willing to live under a
Government tbat Is built upon and perpetuated
upon the principles laid down by tbe Constitu
tion which was formed by Washington and bis
compeers, after coming from the heal and strife
or a Diooay revolution. Applause.). -.
I repeat, again, that I have not language ad
equate to expreaa mv gratitude for and apprecia
tion of the kindness which baa been manifested
in regard to my humble self. I can not suffl
ciently thank you for the manifestation of your
approbation of the course I have pursued in re
gard to tbe crisis wbioh is now upon this country.
I have noworde to utter, or, rather, I have
words which will not give utteranoe to tbe feel
ingathatl entertain on thla occasion. Ap
plause j I feel to day, a confidence, in my own
bosom, that tbe cordiality, and tbe sympathy
and the response tbat comes up here lrom tbe
people of Ohio ia heartfelt and sincere. -1 feel
that, in reference to the great question now be
fore the people, those whom I now see. before
me are honest and sincere. Applause. I re
peat again, and for the third time, that I have
not laneuage in which I can express my grati
tude to you, and at the same time, in which I
can express mv devotion to tbe principles of tbe
Constitution and tbe flag and emblem of our
glorious union or Slates.
Tbe honorable gentleman expressed his pleas
nre in hearing tbe sentiments and language
which bad greeted bim, and be particularly al
luded to a remark made by Mr. Groesbeck that
the present was no war of a local or sectional
character, bnt simply a determination to main
tain the principles of Government; and after
alluding hopefully to the Union sentiment which
so largely prevailed in bis native State, and
prophesying that tbe hemp with which tbe Se
ceaaioniats had threatened bim wonld be more
likely to be used upon themselves, be concluded
a speech which we are sorry we have no space
to report in full, amid long and enthusiastic
cheers. - . . ? . ,
The Arrest of Secessionists.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT N. E. VIRGINIA.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT N. E. VIRGINIA. ARLINGTON, June 14, 1861.
Unless under the special orders in each case
oi a commander of brigade, or superior author.
ity, it te forbidden to any oincer or soldier witn
In thia denartment to arm, or attemnt to er
net, any citizen or citizens, under the plea of
their being secessionists, or for any cause what
soever, save tbat of being at the time in arms
against tbe United States, nor will any officer
or soldier, without the liko authority, forcibly
enter, search, or attempt to search, any bouse!
or tbe premises of any peaceable resident, or
otber person not in arms against tbe United
States. Tbe military ' police force will arrest
any one found trespassing, even, on the prem
ises or aoy citizen within tbe aepartment.
JAMES B. FRY, Assist. Adj. Gen.
Brigadier General Hurlburt.
, The President has appointed Stifhen II
HoaunaT, of Illinois, a Brigadier General.
He volunteered as Captain in one of the compa
nies of the ten Regiments was a candidate for
Colonel waa defeated, and then resigned. He
has received some notoriety as a Republican
politician. ' That is his qualification. , ' ; '
Gen. Schenck's Biography.
.
I
. Tbe New York Tirw of the 14th has' a brief
biography of Gen. Schincc. . It is, it seems to
us, too early in the war for military biographies
to appear; bnt still, others appear to think dif
ferently. Here is what the Timet tayt of onr
Gen. ScHCNoK: ' . . j . ' ! ' i
Baw.-GiN. Schenck. Brig. -Gen. Schenok,
who wai in command of the Ohio forcet In thia
unfortunate encounter, waa born in Franklin,
Warren county, Ohio, on October 4,1809 In
1837, be graduated with honor at tbe Miami
University, and for two years afterwards acted
as tutor in that Institution, leaving tbe post to
commence the study of Isw. : In 1831, be was
admitted to tbe bar and settled down in Dayton,
where ne naa since resided, ne held a seat in
tbe Ohio Legislature In 1840 and 1843; served
as Representative in Congress four terms, from
1843 to 1501, during which time he beld many
prominent positions on committees. President
Fillmore appointed him Minister to Brazil, and
dnring bis two years' reeidence there be nego
tiated several treaties. Since 1853, be hst been
Identified with railroad interests in the West,
ana recently was r resident or a line running
from Fort Wayne to the Mississippi River. He
has tbe reputation of being a determined and
brave man ; but apart from these characteristics,
hit Brigadier Generalhahlp seems to be tbe only
qualification which entitles him to lead troops
to oaitie.
Tennessee Election.
i
-I
?. The following is the vote of Tennessee on
the ordinance of lecesslon, t ; ,r. rTi .' "j j
THE TENNESSEE ELECTION.
The following I th vote Of Tenneee it the late elec
tion mere. ... .i r i . . . '.'.-
St Tennetiee...
Middle lenneeetet.
Wt Xennetwe.,.
nifji
. etoieno.
..i.)80 ,.
....M,0i3 ,
.....it5,ie4 "
nmon.
85.4H
C.2V1
4,500
94 097 V. 01H
J 36,448
" , - -. - ' r T . -
, aUjodty ...-.37,949 '
Xncladlni Oaap JDavta, Third Regiment, nitr Lynch
bnrj. llDclndief CeatpDaaeen, aeertHerkrrlll.-1
total vet 130,3i5-eJit? fotaeonaloa 57J48,
It Is said that the Confederate fences station.
ed at Lynchburg;, Ve., to the number of eight
Often thousand, voted for leceSsion'and' their
vote were counted in East Tennessee; other
wise the majority for the Union In that part of
the State wonld have been about 12,000. .
Free Negroes in Southern Ohio.
'. The Lawrence County Clipper, says:
, "According to the last census, the number of.
colored persons waa aa roilowa: ' "
.. OelltaCotitit.,..'..;'.. .;.?,,....'',...'. ...''.,TflM '
Jackeoa ....'.......'........,..,,.,,...., SM
Lewreeo" ..'...!.. i. ........ ant
'Filra " . " v.... 'J..IV B- I
. t . m' K .a ...
This it the4erder Cengreesional district onf-
the Ohio Rlver.he.mjijare lq; tbii region Is
quite efti&W. ' ' tMJ.'aiti4 ta .. i I
..Y140 '
.t.J..'308
1 CJ idj.a
tvq sv.:a
Letter from Col. Ted.
We are pleased to oomolr with (W request
Col. Tod, in giving plare in bur columns to the
loiiowing leittr worn mm. w ttn otners, we teit
well assured tlat our popular and distinguished
fellow townsman, with all hi well known ad
miration for the Hero of New Orleans, could
not have designed to compare President Lin
coln with the former, notwithstanding hit ap
proval of tha war polioy of the Administration
since the attack upon, Sumter. Mahoning Sen
tinel, . i 1 f
BRIER HILL, O., June 14th, 1861.
Dias You are right In doubting the
correctness of the truth of my speech to the
troops at Solon, as published .In tha Cleveland
Herald. Of course it Is aotin my power to
give you a true report of tbat speech, for on
such oooationi,, I always tpeak from the im
pulse of the moment. I remember, however.
distinctly expressing my approval of -the oonrse
President Linooln has pleased to pursue since
the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and of my
willingness and determination to give nis Ad
ministration aa oordial a support In- crashing
out, and putting down rebellion, as if my great
Idol, tien. Jackson, waa President or tbe uuitca
States.. .. m j :t ;. .: ' :.'"r-
As there were many strange to me in the
crcwd. I did announce my opposition to Mr,
Llnooln'i election. , At these points embrace all
the reported speech you seem to notice, will
tax you no further with tbe matter, except, to
ask the publication of this note. . .. ,
DAVID TOD.
T r.
ST What tbe Southern Confederacy asked
three months ago "Let ut alone." What the
Southern Confederacy aska now "Let us have
loan-" " :- " ' '"' ''
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
Head Quarters Ohio Militia and
t Volunteor JVLilitia. - - - 1
ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFKIOB.j
, t , OoLOMDue, June 18, 1801. j
Special Order . 3STo. 355.
Oomnlmary Oen 0. P. Buoklnehun. Ant. Qr. Mu
r Oin.Ohu. Whlttleaev. end Aeet. (tr. Meater A. D.
Ballook, are hereby appointed a Oommleeion to which
will be referred all qneetione connected with th cloth
int of troop by the Stat of Ohio, with power to decide
the came, aatject to me Bpprorei 01 iue voauuenur-ui
Chief. , .
u, B. VAinifluiufli
jeSO
AdJ't Qeneral.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.
The Public Works of Ohio.
Orrici or ths Lrnra or vni Puitic Woeii,) -OoiDMiua,
June 13, 1801. (
Till undenimed having become the Ltiiee of the
Publie Worke of Ohio, under the act of May 8, 1861,
and hiving entered into the poeeenion of takl Worm,
hereby give notice that in operating under (aid lean,
end diicharilna their dutlea under th eame, th buil-
nen will be ttaneacted with the pnbllo through ageut
Appointed by the Leeeeea, undereuch rnlee, regulation!,
rtetrlcUon and llmitaUona, u ahill be prescribed for
their goTemment..
Thoee Asenta for the nreient, will conilit of one Oen
erel Agent, a Treaeurer and Secretary, for the Oentral
Offlee at tha Leasee at Oolumbui: and the neoeieary
number of BuperintenitenU of Kepeirs ana uoueotor oi
Tolli on tne eerertl none emoracea in me icaie.
The Oentral Agent ihall be the principal executive
officer of the Lenee. and ehall hive charge of tbe gen
eral builneee office at Colnmbue. He ehall hav auper-
vlilon over the builnen of the Leieee with the public.
ind aa euch agent ihall execute all contract, except
thoee for labor and materiaie oonneotea witn tne oraioa
ry repair of the Mveral Work. and be ihall audit and
Kttle all acoounti.
The dulle of th Treaiurer and necretary ihall be
juch a an anally diicharged by eimtlar offieera In other
caiee. .
Tba Superintendent! or Heroin ihaii, on tneir re-
tpeclive dirliionl, have power to employ and dlecbarge
ell luborcunatee ana uooren, ana to parcneie an won
and material! neoeeatry in the ordinary repair of inch
divliion, and the eame ihall be under their ipeciai ai
notion and management.
' The Oolleoton ot Toll, Water Benta and fine, an
Inveated with all th authority and power, provided in
the lawi of the State and the regulation of the Board
of Public worki. made for that purpoie, when eucn vol
lectori acted under appointment and authority from the
State. - ....
Mo Individual member of ths Leiteea ihall have the
right to transact buiinei In the name of lb Lessees,
with any penon or person, in any other manner than
through the appointed agent, unleae specially autnorn
ed by Ihe Leaiee lo to do: nor ihall any one of th p
pointed agent have authority to transact any business
in th nam of tha Leeeeee, except in the particular
branch of the bueioees confid - M , mmi sunjcci to
br restriction! and limitation ol nu agency.
No authority to borrow monev on the credit of the
Leisees, ehall ever exist In any Lenee, agent or other
employee of the Lesttei, unless th same ihall be con
ferred by a unanimous vote, of th Leeeeee, at a regular
meeting, and the amount so authorised to ba borrowed
ipecltted In the order and enured on the Joernal.
Qio. W. kUnTrtKKT Is the General Agent of the
Leaseei, BnuAkua K. Barra, Treaiurer, and Jonn
Jotci, Secretary. . . ,
The Bnperintendenta of Bepelr are!f
On the M. t H Canal and W. BfcM. Boad Josira
Coorta, Tboma Browk, Wa. Jactioii and Alius L.
Bacios. '
On th Ohio. Walhondlnc and Bocklgg Canal! and the
Muskingum Improvement Bohsst II. Hosan, TnoMa
bilur, Drams mcUauthy, BTLveincR Msdbirt and
Evwaan Ball. " . . .
The Col lectori on the Canals, Muskingum Improve
ment and Maumee Boad, are the lam that were in th
service of the Brate at tbe time of the execution of the
Lease; bnt all the aforesaid agent hold their appoint
ment at the pleaiure and option of the Leneet,
,, KENT JAKVI8, "
" JOSEPH COOPER, r
"; .' ,','. Tt'M. J. JAOKBON, ' '
. ' ' -ARNOLD MBDBBRY,
' TnOM A8 MOORE,
THOMAS BBOWN,
tetieei of the Pnbllo Worka.
Jel4-d3lw3w . '; , . . .- (
1861. 1861.
1861. 1861. Summer Arrangements.---Time
Changed.
GREAT NORTHERN AND EASTERN ROUTE.
CLEVELAND, COLUMBUS, & CINCIN'I
'-rli , aavat
RAILROAD.
Connecting at Onetllo With th PITTSBURGH, f T.
WAYNE at 0BI0AQ0 RAILROAD ' - r
For Pfttiturgh, fMlaMphta and EaUtmoft. Alio
for Fort Waymomi CMoago. "
Connecting at Cleveland with tb LAKE 8H0BB RAIL
ROAD -Fer
Dunkirk, Bnffalo, Albany- Bea
ton and New fork. .fV L
THREE TRAINS DAILY, ? ;
i EXCEPT BUND AT,- j rv'.V. .
from Columbua, In eonnectlon with TcaIdI on th
UTILE Flfami AND COLCnBIIl
AND XAvNlA BAI1iBuADS,i ,
I fS . ' IIB8T TRAIN. ,
NIOHT EXPRE88. Leavei Columboiat 140 t;Ul
will leave paeaenger at alt ititlon eouth of Gallon,
top at Delaware, Ashley, Oardington and Ollead, and
at ill itatloni north of Gallon, arriving at Cleveland
at 8:Otl A. M., Dunkirk 3:00 P. M., Buffalo 4.24 P. M.
Albany 3.20 A. M., New Vork 8:35 A. M.. Boaton 9:30
P. M , Pittsburgh via Crestline 8:S0 P. M , Phlladsl
phlaS:)0 A. at. Chicago vU Creetllne at 7 :UO P.M. .
BIOOMD TRAIN. ,M.i- :"
BMBW TORK EXPRESS Leave Columbni it'lVIO
a. m. Will atop at Lewie Centre, (for Whit Sulphur
BprtngiX Delaware, -emrdtngtea, Gallon, Orwtline Bhe
by. New Loodon. Wellington and Grafton, arrive, at
vieveiana ai p. m.; AnnaitK, :so p. m. Bur
tata, 10:45 p. m ; Albany, 8:13 a. m.; New Yoik, 1.-45
p. ot.t uoiion, : p.m. inn Train oonneel at She!
by for Sandunky, and at Oiaftoa for Toledo, arriwina a
oledo at 8 40 p. m. , r.'
- , , . THIBD TRAIN..! "i , ' . . i v v -
MAIL AND ACCOMMODATION Xeavea Oolomhn.
atK.au p. m. Will atop at all station Booth of
Bbslby, and at New London. Welllngtoa, . flrafton,
aa xwrea, arriving aa uieveiana as n-.M p. at-t Dun1
kirk, S:00a. as.; Buffalo, S.-80 a. m. Albany, 80 a.m.
NewTork, 7aW p. m. Boetoa, 11:45 a m.t Pittsburgh,
fa Crastlina, at 11 Sip. m. Philadelphia, 1:00 p. m.,
Chicago, via Oreetllna, 8:45 a. m. ThK Trala eonaeet
at bhelbr for Bandoskv and Toledo, arrivlnw at Toih
a, o.ix p. at. .. v . tin.-. i
Fluent Bleepiny Cari ar run on all
' KigntTrami to Chicago, Sew :
BaMago CtitcJctA through to Jfew Tort an& Eotion
I vmuna; auo, p rMiadtlpkto ana '
Ent Xorkvid OmUin. - - -
6-i 3 (RETURNING, u .
Night Exp real trrlva atCohimbui at.. ,11:15 1. tf "
Cincinnati Express arrive at Oolumbui at 10:50 A . If.
, ABWUMUWlUfH .Aficn ! VOIUmOUl M ,W
jr. n.
Fa,, ae iw a, by anyoti..; Bnte.
Atl for Ticlett vie Cttttlintar CtftUni,
:jV'i ' B-B. PLINT,
Cuperlntendent, Cleveland, Ohio,,
! u'.' ;l..iMESPATTERg01l,.Agnt,.
'-WY V. '. 'i ' i ..Columbua, Obio.
Oolnmhul, nn 17, IBM. , . ( , . ,
f nMti '"t
Canton .MattiTT
-4 Whiter. ' ftet sttt
4 - Whit Chocked of superior nnaiitr.
t fid ;e-:n i '
Tor sal try
BAIN
e,:-ji .twH
'i i,o
RAILROAD. EAST.
RAILROAD. EAST. CENTRAL OHIO
AND
AND Steubenville Short Line
RAILROADS
RAILROADS COMBINED!
' CONNIOIlNaiT BEIMIB WITH IH1 .
BALTIMORE & OHIO,
! AND 111 P1TTBBUEGH WITH IM I i i
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL
IlXXLEOAD: .
I0BM1N0THB
t
Shortest, Quickest & Most Reliable
i Route td all Eastern Cities I
, " Trains Leave Columbus as follows :
i ' '""MOMtINO IXPEEBS
teavtt Oolnaabn i SOA. U. from Union Depot, via
Bellalie or Btenbenvlilei arrive at Belleiro, 10.20 A.
U.i ateabanviile. 13.S0P. H.i Plttebonh, 3 40 P. H-;
Marrlibnr. 1.10 A. kt.i via AUtntown, arrive at MW
Tork 8.00 A. At.; via JPAUacLtlpMa. arrive at Phila
delphia, 5.10 A. M.; Mew York, 10.30 A. 11. Connect
aieo at uarruDurg or vaiiuaore, airiingai a-
i'. i . 1 -
SleeDinar Cart attached to thii Train
WWiln flnltimtui.. ran rilritlv thrAUffh td Belllln or
Plttebnrgh without ehante; and Paaiengert via Allen
town arrlr in Sew York at 8 A. M.,
irPXWO HOURS IH ADVANCE Of; KOBTHIRN
LINKS.
This Train also oonnects at Bellalre with tbe
Baltimore and Ohio fteilroad.
'I ' . . PITTSBUEGH IXPBE88.
Leavea Columbni 11 S3 A. M , from Union Depot, via
BtenbenTllle; arriTea at Newerk, 18 50 P. M.: Coihoc
ton, S.1S P. M.; Bteubenvllle, 6 P. H.; Pitteburgi 8.40
P. It. ITPThli ii the only rout by which Pueenger
oaa leave Omelnnatiat 7 a. i. go tnrougn to rim
burgh In daylight, without change ol earior aeiay.
:.?" PA1T LINI .--tA-
Leave! Columbua 9.1S P. M., from Union Depot, via
Bellalre: arrives at Newark, r. ai. saneiviiie
4 33 P. M : Bellalre .7 ,S5 r. nl.: rittaourgn, li.ta r
M.: Harrlabnrr. 0.00 A. M.: via AUentovn, arrive
at. New Tork. 4 P. M.i .via FAiladelpMa, arrives
Philadelphia, 1.10 P. M.; New York, P. M, Thla
Train alio connect! at Harriiburg for Baltimore, ar
rlvlnratl P. M. . n I
- Thli Train run through to Bellalre or PlttburgwlUt
ont change of Can: and from Pittsburg then I no
ohang of Oar to Philadelphia, or via AHentown to
New Tork thui offering
The only Route from Columbus to Baltimore,
Philadelphia, or New York, with. only
j t r one change of Cart. ;
By this Train Passenger arrive In New Toik fin
hours to advane of the Northern tint.". i -
Thli Train also connect at Bellalre with the Baltimore
and Ohio B. B.' r -..Mi-.. :' . .-e-..
BTThis Route la 1 30 miles' ahor'tor to FUtsburc;,'
and 'more than 1UU miles shorter to
New York, thsn Northern Linct.
Baggage Checked Through to all im
poit&nt rointi East.' . .
, ASK BOB TICKETS VIA , ''
! BELLAIRE OR 8TEUBENVILLE
Tickets Ceod ever either IXente,
Jel6
'- JSO. W. BBOWN,
Oen. Ticket Agent Central Ohio B. B.
. - . I. A. HTJtOHINSON,
Oen. Ticket AgeatBUubeuvllle Bhort Line.
Ohio White Snlphur Springs,
DELAWARE CO. OHIO.
This Favorite Resort will be open
;for Visitors,
Juno XO, 1861
raKlUIl DISIKDia BOAtDIKO SDKIXO TBg BKAOR,tCAJt Bl
ACcoMUonaTgo at aanocan katis. i.
; FOR E00M3 0E INFORMATION,
ADDRESS
.'. ir.: t, A. SWATNIE,
Lewli Center P. Q.,BelWAr 0oM Ohio,
may28;dlmo. . -.;.-
OHIO UNION LOAN.
Orrtcs or thi Commisiiomrs or tbi Bimtaa f om, -Ooldbiui,
Ohio, June 10, 1661. )
rpHI Oommliiloner of the Sinking fund of th Butt
J. of Ohio invite eubicriptloni bv the people of th
Bute to tno Loan or two muiione or Dollars, authoris
ed by the act of the General Assembly " To provide
more ineetuauy tor tn deenee or tne bum agalnet ln
vaaion, paaeed April St, leJfll. -. -
- Certificate will be liaued In lami of tlOO, and op-
warn, payaoie vuiy i, jeoo, at tno eiat Treasury, sear
ing interest at in rata of eut pir cant, per annum, pa
able semi-annually, and by the act authorizing th lo
free from taxation. i ,
Dubmriptiona will be received at th office f th Com
mlaiioser ia tha City of Oolumbua, at each of tb sol
vent banking institutions In the Bute, and atthaaeveial
County Treaiurie In th Btata, upUl ,th let day of
July, 1801. .. . .... . . .
Interest will be computed and paid from the data of
uie oepoui oi ine money at either pi to place aoov
oainva. . . ,
" B. W. TAVUR, Auditor of Btata.
: A. P. HD8HBLL, teereraryof State,
t . JAMES MURRAT, Attorney fleneral
Joll-dtd : . .:- ... ,
n ENTLEHIENtS
VA UUOD)
FVRKIISHIIfe
Novelties In NarkTtManil rfb .
. "Bjroo and Oarrot Collars. r ; . vl'
" Embroidered Poekot Handkerchief, i
, Pari Kid Glovea, eoparlor make. - ;i
1 Golden Bill Shirt, various itylei.
;:-Boji' Golden Ulll Bhlrta, do . .... s
' Driving and Street Gloves, do -
.. Hemmed Pocket Haadkvrahtefa, various style.
'. Half Hon and Under Garment. "
, .' -o BAIN as BON, '
aprilS No. tS Beuth High itiwat
SPECIALuNOTICES,
MANHOOD. 7 -
HOW LOST,1 HOW EK8T0HK0.
JTT8T PTJBLIIirED: ON TUB NATtlttH.' TREA
MEMT ADD RADICAL OOBE Of BPBRUATOBBBBA
or Seminal Weakness. Bexual Debllitv. Nervoumex.In
voluntary E minions and Impotency, reinltlng from
seir-abuse, aco. By Bont. J. Uulverwll,-M. D. Bent
under seal, In a" plain envelope, to any addred.poit
aui. on receipt ot two stamp, ny at. (JUAa.J.u .
iLINE. 1S7 Bowerv. New Tork.' Poit Office Box. No
4.588. ! ' marSl:3md
MOFFAT'S LlfB PILLS.
Ia all eant of ettvDat, dyrpepeU, Wllloue and Qvtv
affeotlona, pile, rheumatlsaa, fever and. atuat, ebU
sate head ache, and all general derangement of boaltb
the PIlli hav Invariably proved a eertaln and speedy
remedy.; A tingle trial will plan th Life B1U bajoad
th reacl o foompetltlon In th wtlmatloa of rvary pa-
Br. Meffat'i Pbanix Bitter will be found iquajly'if
loacloui In all case of nervous debility, dyspepsia, bead
ch,thiicknes Incident to female tndelioat boaltb,
aad every kind of weakness of the difsstlvt Organ,
for sal by Dr. W. B. MOP? AT, 333, Broadway, N. T.
aad by all Druggist. - mayxdawly -
v tm wiiowiBg ii an extract from
letter written by the Kv. J. B. Holma, patter ot tbs
Plorrepolnt-Btreet Baptist Church, Brooklja, N. T.,t
the "Journal and Menenger," Cincinnati, 0., tod epcejrj
volume In favor of that world-renowned medlclae, Mat.
Woaavow't Boothum Bvaor roa Oanmta TxmuMi .,
"We see an advertlwnent In your eohuant of Va
WrMiAw'i Boomis Bvaor. Now w never said a wort
in favor of a patent medletne before tn . oar Hfo. bat we
real eonpeilea to aay to year rsaaar that thi I no- a are
uug-Mwg avi Tturo rr, ana aaow it to si all tt
etaar.1 At u probably on or tno moat in coe awful bm
el ties of the day, bscauas II is eae e( the best. And thoe
or your reader wbo navo caciae eaa'tao tetter than
lay In a supply.' : ) -. ? . . . . : ods7ilrdexw A
I ft. Tm OeatamfttpUTee. " "
Th Adverttoer, aaviag bn restored It heallh M aaiw
treeU by vwrysiarpl remedy, aftst having sffered irr
ral yearIth a trrer lufig affection, and that dsaad
disease, OoaiumpUom I aaxion t avak knows tobli
To all who dealr It, he will sand a copy of (he prewrlf -
Hon ased (free of cbargo)i with the cHreotton for prepar
ing and aatai the tarn, which they will Ind a trmt Ota
for Ooxioarnoil, Ajraau, BaoMoarrlt, a;o. ' the only
objoot of tie advrtlerin sadlog- tb PrasorrpUea I tt
benefit the afflicted, and arraad laforma tlon trhlch he eon
elves to be Invaluable, and ha aopea avery, lufarer will
try bit remedy, aa U will eott them, aothlng, and may
prove ablesoirjf . ,r,i, .1 .
Partis wlabiBf tb proscription will plea aMraaa
' ' 1 1, f 4 Bav,JHtWAB A.-WILSON- t 1
4m - - - . , , Wllltsawbargb-' I
ex.-ucs-e i "v" "
Hjrnt AHIKIOAH WATCH OOHPANTi of Walt-
htm, Viae., beft to call ths attention of th pnblleto
fh foIlowlDf emphetlo reconunndatiea ot Walthaa
Watchet, by th leading practical Watohaaken and Jew
elera throughout th United State. Th tnur lurt of
rignatat to It 1 qalt to loaf for pakUeaUoji o . f
adyertiMoenti but tb name pre ten ted will b noog- t
nlted by those acquainted with th Trade a being la th
hlgheet degree reipert?Me and and loflatnttal. At their
eitabllehiLt: say always b found th gennln Watch-' . .
ee of tbe Company's manufacture, in gnat variety. , ; 'i
Blgnaturei from ban? cities and town! not folly ' 1 '
reaented In this Hit will appear In a future adver, '
Stent. .......
v XO I EX miuQ. ' '
n andenljned, practical Watchmaker and dealert In
Watchei, berlng bought and old Amtrlcaa Watchts ft r
a Dumber of years tut, and having dealt fat all klndiof
foreign Watche for a mach loegr period of time, beg to
Ut that they have nvr dealt ia Watohet which, at a '
olat,orln Indlfldnal lnilAoce, have been monnlU- "
nwtory to IhemMlveiar cuitomera, whether In reepectef . ,
durability, beauty of flnleh, mathematically correct pre-
portlona, acearat oompenntloa and adjuetownt, er ,
jffia UmteeplnQ rawK, than thot mannfactuitd ly 1
the Waltham Company.
N. OBITTINDEN,
WM. BLTNN,
JAMF.B J- BOBS,
H. JENKINS t 00.,
BEGG8 tt SMITH,
WH. WILSON McOBEW,
DUHMBtcOO.,
O.OSOAMP,
0 PLATT. '
KINO Sr. BROTHER
J. T. JtB. M. KDWABDB,
r. j. albaAndbr,
JOHN H. MOUSE,
A. HEPPLER.
W. H. BIOHMONO,
H. D. KAYS,
A. B. 6ILLBTT,
S. D. LILLE8TON,
J. B. OUBRAN,
J. W. BROWN, , . .. v . ,
B. B. TOBlN,
BA88B ti HCLf MAN, .
A. P. BOYNTON, .
WM. M. MAYO,
B. NORTH BY,
A. W. VORD,
WM. 80HKBZEB,
J. M. POX,
WILLABU fcUAWLEY, ,
N. HAIGUT,
H. At D. ROBENBBBO,
0. A. BURBA. CO.
B. 8. BTTENHEIMER Ac CO.
WM. 8. TAYLOR,
w. w. Hannah,
H. B. Ac H. 0. CARPENTER,
HOBK1N8 At BTANS, . .
HAIGHT fcLIAOU,
JAMES HYD,
JOHN H. IVES,
WILLIAMS A CO.,
J. N. BENNBT,
A. 8. STORMS.
WM. B. MOROAN.
HENDERSON BKO'8
J. A. CLARK,
BLOOD As PUTMAN.
JENNINGB BRO'S
JOHN J. JENKINS,
W. H. WILLIAMS,
A. WARDEN.
L. O. DUNNINO.
CHA8.B. WILLARD,
W. P. BINGHAM fc CO.,
0HA8. O. PBENCH.
J. NcLANE,
0. A. DIOKENSEN.
0. H. BASCOMm CO.,
J. M. BTANHII.
ADOLPH MYEBB,
THBO. I. PICKERING,
OBO. DOTT.
M. 8. SMITH
A. B. VAN OOTT,
JOHN ELKIN8,
n.N. BUERMAN.
S. O.SPAULDINO,
W. A. OILBB,
BEINEMAN ft MEYBAN,
SAM'L BROWN, Jr.,
W. T. KOPLIN, .
010. W. STEIN, '
OBO. B. TITC8,
HEOKMAN As TOHB.
GEO. SIBIN,
B. J.LA80ELLB,
SAMXOARMAN,
JOSEPH LADOMCB,
J. J. BLAIR,
OEO. W. McOALLA,
IRAN01BO. POLACK,
0. M.'ZAHN,
GEOBQH HBLLBB,
P. P.HBLLEB,
B. ACGUINBATJGH,
8. X. HOPrMAN,
J. 0. BANNA. V
0. T. ROBERTS,
J. 0. DOLON,
OHAS. L. FISHER,
B.U. St. OLAIa,
B. dr. A. PITERSON,
DATID LAYEBAOK.
W. T. BAB, :,
BNOOH I. BILLS, .
HBNBY B. JAMES, ' ' ."
T. B. LITTLE, 1 ' ' "
CARBON Jr. BRANNON,
THOS. OOWDKY,
A. W. riLB,
SIMPSON t PBICB,
V. W. 6KIPF,
J.Ac A GABDNEB
W.O.DEPRIEZ,
MAURICE at HENRY
JEHU BYLVEBTBB,
J T. SCOTT CO.,
T. B. HUMPHREYS,
B. A. VOGLER,
V. W.LBINBBOK, .
J. W. MONTGOMERY,
BENJ. B. COOK,
B. OHILDS,
DEXTER At HA8KIN8,
B.D. TISDALE,
ALBERT PITTS,
ELLIS GirrORD,
T. W.MAOOMBER, ,
i.J BURNS,
JESBBSMIIH,
T.H.LAMB. '
8. N. STORY, '
LEYI JOHNSON,
ANDREW WABBBN
0. W. 1000.
AMOS BANBOBN.
JOHN BARTON,
JOHN MoGREOOB,
W. Ii. BOOT,
JOHN B. SOOTT
N. MOODY, "
WM. KIRK HAM, Jr.,
L.D.ANTHONY CO
THOMAS STEELE As CO.,
HEMINGWAY tt BTBVENB,
WM. ROGERS k. BON.
0. i. MUNBON,
B. HENJAslIN.
J. B. KIRBY.
GEO BUI BROWN, ' ' '
E, I. HUNTINGTON tt CO.,
B. A. WOODFORD. .
H. D. HALL. . . '
JOHN L. BMITB, .
JOHN GORDON, .
J. 0. BLAOKMAN,
JA8.B. AYRES,
BHBBBURNI SHAW,
L. B.HANDER80N,
B. KNIGHT.
N. 0. OARB, ' . -
OBO. W. DREW It OOi,:
8. J. HELLISH, - '
W. O. 0. WOODBUBT,
BBUBBN BPENOBB,
WM. B. MORRILL, ,
RICHARD GOVE, ' ' ' '
JONATHAN HOBM1B,
. W. OODDARD,
OBAS. B. BACON,
P. M. HABDIBON. '-.
TWOMBLT St BMITB,-
MOSES M. SWAN,
J.A MB BRILL
JAMBS EMERY,
SIMEON BLOOD,
HENRI H.HAM,
ROBERT N. BODGE,"
HENKT McKENNBk, " :
Oleveland,
Oolumbua,
Zaaetvtll,
Cincinnati,
Delawar, .
Warm, :
Chlosgo,
La Sail,
Peoria,
Bloomlngton,-
14
Decatur, ;.
Springfield,
ttuincy,
14
Oalena,
Jackaonvlll,
0 berry Grove
Breeport,
Peru,
Canto
Symeuee,
New burgh,
Atocneeler,
tltlca,
Hudson -Troy,
Oswego,
Auburn,
Pairport,
Oanandalgua,
tt
Poughkeepile,
BaUvIa,
Amiterdam,
Saratoga,
Albany,
Ooahin,
Penn-Yan,
Cataklll,
Indlanapolli,
t.
'- it
Richmond,
Terr Haute.
Sullivan,
Plymouth,
Kalamaioo,
Detroit,
Ohio,
n. r
lad.
Mich
Wll.
Milwaukee,
Ruins,
Belolt,
Janesvllle.
Prairie duChlen, '
t.j
Pittsburgh,
Nor rti town,
t.
lartoa,
AHentown,
Westchester,
William rpoit,
. Cbealsr,
- Lebano,
- Harriiburg,
Tork,
Lancaster
Beading
H
Cnambiriburg,
Q reensburg,
MeweaiU.
abenaburg,
Maueh Chunk,
Ash land,
Indiana
Bonn ton,
Patsnon,
Newark.
Borden town,
Trenton,
Cumberland,
Pulaski,
Naihvlll.
Springfield,
Olarkavllle,
Savannah ,
St. Lout
Pa.
N. J.
t
Md
Tenn.
Mo.
ti
Wheeling,
Hiehmond,
Balem,
II
Va.
4
N. 0.
I
t. 0
Hewberry.
Horthimpton, Mas.
New Bedford, . "
"
Teas ton, '
.
fall River, ''
r ,t t,
Oloweeattr.
Balem "
Woroeiter, , "
Waltham,
tt
Lowell,
" Lynn,
Lawrence
Pltumeld,
e
Oronfleld,
e-pnngneM,
ideaoa,
: . i.
Frondeaoe.
. Oreeawiob.
Hartford, , Oosai
II M '
NewBavan, "" '
i ii
n n
- ii ' i,
. Danbury, .
it t,M
. aUddlrtowa, .
NewLondoa
Bridgeport, ,
Waiertary,
Ban bora ton,
Oonoord,
N. Hi
2, "'7'
Hanovtr;
Cmrsmont,
- Bxthrr,
' Laconla,
Nashua,
Dover,
Bo. Berwick,
, Baoo,
. Aaguttai
. Portland,
Buokeport, '
Rockland, .
T Bottamoutb, ,
Vt.
I'
T. HOWLAMD.
TOMPKINS At MORRIS,'
S. 0. WILLIAMS,
. B. Ac 0. L. BOOBBB,
D. LUCY ; -j
v. v. nattu,
BRINBMA1D k HILDRITB.
0- H. HARDINd,
T. O.PHINNEY,
A. a. mau, .,
O, BATES, " -H.
MURDOOK.
0. 0. OHILDS,
0. H. HUNTINQT01T,
POBTBBOBOW,
W- K. WALLAOM, '
LI ANDES AMADON,
0. S. JENNINGS, -
GRaOORAOO.,
S.OOOKRBLL,
A. W. MALli.
ROBBBIWILKIB,
:.i 1
i m it 'fc
Vt, -r-
ITTtfT
: Auburn, ::i
Bath, ,
' feangor: '
M i. . , !
Gardiner,
";' Boa I ton,
lwieton,
JBurltogtoa,'
Bradfefdt -
- Atoatpaliev
Forthneld,
, Weadaeeek, - r- -
nt. jonoebury. . " ...
- 1 Bt. Albaaa, :U,i-it''"' nf-'
Chelsea, Wiw v ' i.
- ' Mewbury, l'w
-1 Bellows tatlt, ' ' J
Mow Orleans, La.
. tf i t tt T
'K.tcbH, HIr:
atllferd,, t:v Mb tJitf
Tonmto,, , , 0. W. if
V
n
J.I Ik'
1 , : I' ... h . r.
Oaotioi. At onr Watch it aow saratvly oountar
felted byforelga manufjetarerf , we bavt to Inform tb
publlt that ao watch U of our produeNvU which Is anao-
eompanUdbya etrtulcatsof genuAaeaamearlsg tb- -1
' . ... , . .-I fi ' f - ' 1
aambrr of th watch, aad ilgaed by ear Tmoaror, B.
1. Bobbin, or by our jr4esoT, ApMoa,'Tracy
CO. i dm- Mr.nl ' '
M tbase' watchet are for tale ay Jetttet generarjy
tbroaghoBt fat Colon, the Ataorkae .Watoh Ooavpanp '. i t A
do' not solicit order! for aingl watoh- t:vi
, t . ! : ROBBIES APPL1-TON
' im..WI.AwaalLBe.r-lW
nWVii, jT i r ' . , . hi ! . r
p!0 d. ., 0,W.V. ...K '
t'"T I

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