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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, June 28, 1861, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1861-06-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL: Till: NO. !7.
' .-I - . . , J, .
NEW SERIES.
COLUMBUS.
OHIO, FRIDAY MORNING. JUNE 28,
1861.
SIX D0LIAES PM TEAB.
Inrariably in Ad?aneii'
0 A.ILY, TEI-WEKLY AND WEEKLY
MANYPENNY & MILLER,
PUBLISH BB AND FB0PBIZT0S8.
O Office Hot. 86, 88 and 40, north High St.
TIRMS INVARIABLY IN ADVAK01.
Oaily - $6 00 per year.
" By the Carrier, per week, M cents.
rrl-Wejlrl? . t 00 per yew.
Weekly. - . . I 00 . "
crinn nt Advertising by the Square.
utquarelyeai...t20 00 One square 3 weeks.. $4 00
One " V luoLthf 18 00 One " i weeks. . 3 00
ine 0 month! 15 00 One ' " 1 week... 1 75
Dne " 3 months 10 00 One " .3 days... 100
3ne " month! 8 01) One " tdays...' 75
One ' I month. S OU One " 1 Insertion W
Displayed advertisements half more than the above
rales.
Advertisements leaded and placed In the eolnmnof
Rnxlal Noticei," double th ordinary rait.
A II uoticea requlrea to be pnbllihed by law, legal rate!.
It ordered on the inside exclusively tf ter the flntweek
per cent, more than the abort ratei; bat ell such wll
appear in the Tri-Weekly without charge. -
Buiineiii Cards, not exceeding five lines, per year, In
de, $i 50 per line; outaide 9
Notice of meeting!, charitable! ootetlei, Are oompanles,
Ac, half price.
Alltrannltnt advertttemeni mtut 04 paid or in
ainanc lie rule will not be railed from.
Weekly, same price at the Dally, where the advertiser
lesthe Weekly alone. Where 'he Dally and Weekly
an both uied, then the charge lerthe Weekly will be
oa f the ratea of the Dally
No advertisement taken except for a definite period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
F. A. B. 8IMXIN3,
Attornoy txt X&rxr
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Office Auibui Building, opposite Capitol Square.
OOLUMBUS. OHIO)
OOHjTJIVXJ-S U 13
Machine Mannfactnring Company
HANUFACTURXkl 01
STEAM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Casting, lflll-flearlng, Machinery.
ALIO,
Zl.Allxoeicl.
or iriar Dcscairrioif.
OOIiVmBVS, OHIO. '
0HA8. AMB0B, Bup't.' P. AH BOB, Treae.
deoll. W5H-tf
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton ft Indianapoliil
Through to Indianaoolie without Change of Cars
and bat One Change of Cars between .
Columbus and St. Louis.
THREE TRAINS DAILY FROM COLUM
BUS. FIRST TRAIN.
(Dally, Monday! excepted.)
NK111T EXl'RKSS. via Dayton, at 8:45 a
'...L
ln at London. Aema. union, eiiauinowa uu smir
ndon. Xenia, Dayton, i
ton. arrlrlnz at Cincinnati at 8:20 a.
m.; Dayton ats.s
a. m.. Indianopolli at 10:48 a
8t. Louiiat 11:50
SECOND TRAIN. '
ACCOMMODATION, at 8:10 a. m., itopping at alt Bu
tton i between Columbui and Cincinnati and Dayton, ar
ising at Cincinnati 11:02 a. m., Dayton at ft 15 a. m.,
indianopolia af :'P- . . ., ',
THIRD TRAIN.
' DAT KXPBK88,at 8:30 p. m., Hopping at Alton,
Jefferaon, London, Charleaton, Cedamlle, Xenia,
Spring Valley, Corwln, Morrow, Deerfleld, Voitar'a,
Loreland, Uiliford and Plainrille, arriring at Oinoio
uaU at 7.-30 p.m.; Bt. Louil at 13 m; Daytoo at 5 35 p,
Indianopolli at 10:3d p. m. . . , ,
Sleeping Oar on all Night Train le
Cincinnati and Indianapolii.
BAOGAUE CIIKCKF.D THHOUGH.
for further Information and Through Ticket apply to
M. L. DOUBKTV,
ticket Agent, Union Depot, Oolumbua, Ohio.
E. W. WOODWARD,
Superintendent, Cincinnati.:
JNO. W. DOHKBTI
: jnia Agent, Oolumbua,
Just Reeelf edt
I A II F, CH CHEEN and BLACK
1UU TKA9 100 bag! prime Bio Conee. ,
' I AO pockets old Dutch Qorernment Jar a Coffee,
7 5 bags Ceylon Coffee. ' '
eonbbls. standard White Sugars, consisting of row
died, Obrushed, Granulated A and B Ooffee. . .
00 quintals George Bank Codfish. '
xObbls- Heis and No, 1 Mackerel.' , , ;
A tea. Pick Salmon. ., ( ' - . ,
tOO hx. Layer Baisina.
SO hf. box do do - ,'.,..
lOOqr.box do de
100 H Oigirs, different brands and grades.
otZ7 WM. McDOSAtD.
M. C. LILLEY
And Blank-Book MannfantuiW '.
HOBTH HIGH STBJtET, COLUKBUS, OHIO
aarll-dly 7 ; '. - '.:
Red, White and Bine
TMGLAINEN.
U CALICOES
allDBONSa
8ILK9,
RECK HES.
Just opened by
apr29
B AIM SON,, ...
No. SO South High street.!
A NEW HOOP SKIRT. 'tr.i - Vm
No.89,sonin man STBiET.c .i.j ;:r
v Hare Juit recelred a new make of HOOP SKIBTI
flnlahed in a manner far supsrlor to any yet Introduced
Dlfrt ABILITY AND GRACEFULNESS '!
' j Ul.i.'
mh93. .. -.- :
.. FAITIILY FLOUU. ;
vrrniTE AVIIUATf UBAHDED U
"SNOWB-'lAKB.' "'.X
from "Barnett Mills," Springfield, e. the best brand of
Flour brought to our market, saturation guaranteed.
Tor sale only at .. , WM. MoDONAUt'a,
noriff " , , 10eSonthnijlgirtt.
Irish: Linen Goods;;'.',
WAIIBANTED aTABRIO '
Linen Shirt Bosoms Plain and Taney. ,: .?.
Shirting and Besosa lilnens. . s
Linen Bbeetings and Pillow Casings. .. i
( j Linen Cambrics and Long Lawns. '.
Linen Pocket-hsndk'fs, all sises.
' i Linen Towellings and Diapers
Linen Napkins and D'Oylles.
Linen Table Cloths and Satin DamaakK i", r.
Linen Towels with colored borders. , , .
Linen Btalr Oorerlngiand Crash, " '
v . JTorsaleatlowpilcee. ,
BAIH at SON,
HM j ,- - .! Ko.S9SoUiHiakstreeb
TtoNNETIi HIBnona.TABSf AND
XJ BU0UE8, Bwstfles,jaslopeniaDT
, jjan wm bwh (
Ne.M Soalh High street.
III Ikf i. xlMaT
sprtIS
Canton X.Iattinga.
s.a. k.a. A-A.'Wblte) n Had euad
4 WhIU Cheeked of supeilor quality. , Tor sals by
xahM c. 4m, 88. Mtk Highlit
au n em rnH,
'
WORCESTER'S
ROYAL QUAKTO DICTIONARY.
The IatetTlio Largest The Beit.
The Cheapest Because the Best.
Tue) Moat Heliab ktandard iu
taorltr of the Englleh Lang-Mate."
Btm Hundred EtMneni Mutator of Ohto,
"IHB BEST INOHSn DICTIONABT IXTAST."
, ; LUtrary Men Xoerywhtr.
"Heie are upward! of a Hundred Thouiand Wordi,
whoae muitifarioui meaning! and derlratlooa, together
with their oorrect 10011101, and pronunciation are clearly
let before the eye.''
. ' . (Xnctnnatt Ommtrolal.
Bead the DecUUm of the Member of th Ohio Stat
. ZeaoAer'i Aitociatton. -
The underrlgned, membere of the Oble SUte Teaehan'
Aaaoclatlon, adopt and aim tonaeln teaching, writing
and peaking, the orthography anfl pronunciation or
Worceiter'i Koyal Quarto Dictionary, and we moit cor
dially recommend it ai the moat reliable standard au
thority of the InglUh language, ai It Is now written and
spoken.
loam Akdxiws, Preildent Kenyon College. '
M. D. Liaorrr, Boperlntendenl Zanesrille Scbools.
Tnoe. W. Haavrr, Hup't Maul Ion Union Beheeli.
M. V. CowDiar, Snp't Pnblla Schoels, Banduiky.
' 3ob Ltrch, iup't Publle Bchoola, Olrelerille. ,
' S. M. gaiiroKO, Principal O lore land female Bemlna-
17 V. Mrrcaait, Sup't Publle Sch'ooli, Mt. Cnlon.
Jona OeDEH, Prlnolpal Blate Hormal Bcnool, Minne
sota, -i - r "
Oraos Hasor, Principal fourth Intermediate School,
Cincinnati. . .
H. 8. MaaTM, Bup't Canton tTnlon School!.
' Enwm KawaL, Principal McNeely Normal School.
Ku T. Taita, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio Unlrenlty.
Wat. W. SawaJtDs, Sup't Troy Union School.
A. a. Herein, Prlnolpal West High School, Olere-
hS A. Sobtok, Associate Principal High Bcnool, Olsre-
TatosoKi STiauna, Principal High School, Clere
land. .:'!-,:.: t-
B. V. HoMirroH, Principal Olereland Institute.
J. A. OAariiLD, President of Hectic Institute, III
ram. W. Ii. HARgts.Prof. of Chemistry, Ohio Wssleyan
0nlrenlty. ' ' . ,
H. H. Barret, Ix-Oemmlsiloneref Common School!,
Ohio.
Jakss MomtOB, Prof. Rhetoric, Oberlln College.
- Taoe.Hitx.President Antioch College. -
0.-W. H. Oathoat, Prof. Mathematics, High
School, Dayton. ' ' '
8. O. CKCMSAiJoa, Prof. Language, High School.
Dayton.
S. M. Baaaxm, Bup't Unloa Schools, Ashland.
Mor than 81m Eundred other Pretidentt of OMc
on, Profettori, Author and JHttinguUhed Juca-
tori, hat mdorted th abotn tenUment,
PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES IN OHIO.
Marietta Ooluos "It Is truly a magnificent work,
an honor to the author, the publishers, and the whole
eountry." President Andrews. ..... .
Onto Wear, rr ah Uxithuitt ..-"It exceeds my expecta
Uone. It will be my guide In orthography and pronun
ciation, and will oiftnbe eonsultedbymeforlts seat
and accurate deflnltlons." President Thompson.
W. B. IciiCTto Colusa. "Heretofore we bare used
Webster's orthography. At a recent meeting of our
faculty, It was decided to change It to conform to that
of Worcester's Boyal Quarto Dictionary." President
Garfield.
' Wsstrrn Rrtxmrs Coiurof . "I find It worthy of
cordial approbation." Preildent Hltohoock.
OintLra Coiisoa. "It more than meets my expecta
tions. I recommend It as the standard authority in
orthoepy to my children and my pupils." President
Morgan. . .... .
Amoco. Comes. "I adopt and aim to use In tcioh
Ing, writing and speaking, the orthography and pronun
ciation of Worcester's Boyal Quarto Dictionary."
President Hill. , ...; .: - - r - ,
"In all my writing, speaking, and teaching, I hare en
deavored to conform to the rules for orthography and
pronunciation as contained In Worcester's Dictionary."
Horace Mann, late President.
Kotor Coliroi, Omeira. "I most cordially reoom
mood it aa the bmI iim standard authority of the
ngllih language as It Is now written and spoken."
President Andrews. .mi..,.:
' SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS OF . OHIO.
from Sep. Anton Smyth, Commiionr of Common
Sohool in Ohio.
"The Dictionary Is sn Imperishable monument to the
learning and Industry of its author, and an honor to the
an.M nf inun. The mechanical execution Is far supe
rior to that of any ether lexicon with which I am ao.
lqualnted.'
From Eon. ' B. B. ' Barney. J6e- Qmmiettoner
, achoot in umo. .
"The most reliable standard authority of the lan
guage-' ( -f .. -
. was. TUB - -, ; ..
Le?vclin Kewsrpapem of Ohio Say.
Irom th Cleveland Herald of JfarchU.
rhm .rthnirranh af the Worcester Dictionary Is that
ased by moat, if not all, authors of distinction In this
eountry and Ingland, and conforms to the general usage
of ordinary writers and speakers.
Whaterer prejudices may bare existed prerlouily, a
careful itudy of this rolume will Inrariably be followed
by a warm appreciation of its great merits, and a desire
to add It to the well selected library, be It large or small,
It Is a library In itself, and will remain an Imperisha
ble reoord of the learning of Its compiler. '
rem Me Cincinnati Commercial of April 20.
TfrM ara anwarda of a hundred thousand words good.
bad and indifferent whose multifarious meanings and
derlrattous, togetherwlth their correct spelling end pro
nunciation, are set cieariy oeior mw
unquestionably the greatest Thsssurusof InglUh Words
erer published.
1 rromthtCleveUtndriaindealer of Sept. SO, 18C0.
Mni wnicKra', RnriL Odixto Dictionary is
mM mlu lL laet. but th bcst VMrt of the kind ever is-
ttrf.andcan by no possibility suffer by comparison or
eontrorersy. , . r
from thiTbUdo Blade May 29.
Aa In nomiHClATIOIt. WoRCtma ts THS StaNOARO
followed by our beat authors; in deflnltlons he leases
nothing to be desired, and In OaTtioeRArui it Is sufficient
to say that WoucxsTsa eaa be saitiy loitowsa. .
INOIIAIH & BRAGG, t
Pit bllehere, Book.eller. tt Statloner.f
NO. 101 BUPEBIOR ST., CLEVELAND, ODIO.
mai . ' ' ;!'.!( ' :
THE MUTUAL' BENEFIT, 7
LIEE INSURANCE 'COMPANY.
Dividend January 1 186 1 48 Per Cent.
..i a i . . .v r i ,l ,t t ' i i:
ASSETS . VfiUfiX W
i ; gtaManent Jannary is 186 is"
Balance, per statement Jan. 1st, 18C0,.... 13,400,581 39
Recelred for Premiums dur- . v ,
Irg the jear 10 763,05S IS
Becelred for. Interest, daring . .
the year. IfcWi xw.m. n . i,;
Total' reeelDls' for iiO.T..l!)77,0C7 747 ' v
TldOlalmsbyDeathtSG7,090 00 ' ' '
Paid Policies snrren- r " .
.deiea 41.111 29 ' ' " V :
Van IiIiiIm. Pint- ' '
age, Taxes,
Mmm. ml. j. . . 3I.GQ0 S4
i rr
fald Commissions to
Agents " tl,395 39 -
Paid physicians' fees, B.WMJ W
Paid Aonultiee..... 1,417 OU,
T.(A ntvltAnrla dura
lag the seal ,.,ac,swi 73 ks.wi 63 411,stb is
; Nei Beiaaoa January 1st, 18flWv.,M..3,8tf,S58 09
I.-, ' '-ASBITS.
Cash en band i - 16.0384 18 f J
Bonds and Mortgagee on Real
elate, worm uouoio w - -
mount loaned. 3.387.841 SB ,
rmnlum notes, on ronciea ,.
4. force, only drawing o per "
sent. Interest..... 1,278.804 17
t-i : i
,r- ii. :
Seal Bstate. ... . 90. 8W S7
LeensonScrip 5,03144
Premiums, Motes ana uasnt in
course of transskisslon....: ' 45,343 75
' total Assets
3,81S,55 SO
It IT B PolWes In fbrea, Insurinf. 96i20,63t
, X,at BewTellcles hat besa Isaaed durtof the jear.
. After a earefnl eaiealatleal er tbe preeeat valae of the
oautandlng i-ellotcs o the Oempan, and harlof the
Meeeteary amount la reserve tberafor, the Directors
hare declared a lnvinMBof 45 peroent. on the Priml
nsae paid at toe Ubia ntM to all polletee for life la foroe,
tsaaad prior to 1 anaarj i, ibSO, pajaele aeeordiaf to the
pretsnt rule of lh Oommnw, , ,..-r-.- .
Bates for alf kinds of Liia AnnUnnMra: Presbeet-
aset.ttstemecitt, and AppUoatiw- will be tarnished
wiTJioo-r, cJies, at tbe OUloe r Ajanjias ot the Oem-
rT ' ' J 6l . t. f ATTUfcsoit, President.
'BUM. 0.Ull"Vj'eoreaiT ,. ., 7
1 1 ,1 . t Jenneoa'iloeey '
' archS, WSL ' . ;? ,; '. Oolombna, 0.
PLAIN AND JTIiJIJUED. BLACK
DBJtsS (ILK8p 5 eriv arada., vlhe motl aalsct
assenaaeM ta we eiv, taw at bm rawoiuiw rai..i, ,
' .... ...... . . JaAlMiiOK
prtBwi,; '..I .,', ' He.S loathHlihttrasU,
Scrofula, or King's Evil,
is a coiistttutioiml (I'ihwihc, a corruption of the
blood, by which thin fluid becomes Vitiated,
weak, mid poor, Wm in the circulation, it
pervades the whole body, find may burst out
in disease on nny part of it. No organ is froo
from iU attacks, nor is there one which it may
not destroy. The. scrofulous taint is variously
caused by mercurial disease, low living, dis
ordered or unhealthy food, impure nir, filth
and filthy lmliits, the tlcprossuip; vices, and,
above all, by the venereal infection. What
ever bo ltd origin, it is hereditary in the con
stitution, descending 41 from parent to children
unto the thu d and fourth generation ; " indeed,
it seems to be the rod of Him who says, "I
will visit the iniquities of the fathers upon
their children."
- Its effects commence by deposition from the
blood of corrupt or uloerous matte?, which, in
the lungs, liver, and internal organs, is termed
tubercles; in the glands, swellings) and on
the surface, eruptions or sores. This foul cor
ruption, which genders in the blood, depresses
the energies of life, so that scrofulous constitu
tions pot only suffer from scrofulous com
plaints, but they have far less power to with
stand the attacks of other diseases; conse
quently vast numbers, perish by disorders
which, although not scrofulous in their nature,
arc still rendered fatal by this tnint in the
BVstcni. Host of the consumption which de
cimates the human family has its origin directly
in tins Rcrotulous contamination; ana many
destructive diseases of tho liver, kidneys, brain,
and, indeed, of all tho organs, arise from or
nre aggravated by the snmo cause.
One quarter of all our people are scrofulous ;
their persons are invaded by this lurking in
fection, find their health is undermined by it.
To cleanse it from tho system we must renovate
the blood by an alterative medicine, and in
vigorate it by healthy food and exercise.
Such a medicine wo supply in
AYER'S
'oiiipoitml Extract of nrsaparilla,
the most effectual remedy which the medical
skill of our times can devise for this every
where prevailing and fatal malady. It is com
bined from the most active rcmcdials that have
been discovered for the expurgation of this foul
disorder from the blood, and the rescue of the
svstem from its destructive consequences.
Hence it should be employed for the cure of
not only Scrofula, but nlso those other atiec-
tions winch arise irom it, such as .LnvrTirE
and Skin Diseases, Sr. Anthony's Fiue,
IIosh, or Erysipelas, Pimi't.es, Pustules,
Blotches, Hlains and Boim, 1 umoiis, 1 ettep.
and Salt IIiieum, Scald IIkad, Kinowoum,
Kiikcmatihm, Syphilitic and MEitcuitiAT.Drs
fasi:, DnorsY, Dyspepsia, Dkmlity, and,
indued, all Complaints ahisixo ritoM Vitia-
teii nit Imi'UUR Blooi. The popular belief
Impurity ofth blood is founded in truth,
for scrofula is a degeneration of the blood. The
particular purpose and virtue of this Sarsnpa
rilla U to purity and regenerate this vital fluid,
without which sound health is impossible in
con turn inatfd constitutions.
Ague Cure,
FOIt THE SPEEDY CUKE Or
Intermittent Fever, or Fever 1 Ague,
Knilttteut fever, thill fever, nil mil
Arut, Periodical Headache, or Bilious
ltcDrtarlio, oia autlsua I'cvrri. Indeed
for the whole class of dim-axes original-
ins; in Hillary arrangement, caauii uy
the Plnlorlu or aiiaainattc countries.
We arc enabled here to offer the coinninnltv a
reinedy which, while it cures the nliove complaints
Willi certainty, is still perfectly harmless in any
quantity. Such a remedy is invaluable in districts
whore these (illlicting disorders prevail. This
CiitE expels thd miasmatic poison of Fkveh
and AutB from the system, and prevents the de-
velomicnt or the disease, it taken on tnc nrst an
nronoh of its nrcmonitorv symptoms. It is not only
the best remedy ever vet discovered fur this class
e( complaints, but also the cheapest. The lnrpe
qiinniuv we supply lor a auunr Diinpu wunin tne
rcich of every body ; and in bilious districts, where
I'EVtit and Auue prevails, every body should
have it and use it freely both for cure ana protec
tion. A great superiority of this remedy over any
other1 over discovered fur the speedy and ccrtnin
cure of Intcrmittents is that it contains no Quinine
or mineral, consequently it produces no quinism or
other injurious elk-cts whatever upon the constitu
tion.' Ihose cured by It are left as healthy as if
they had never h;yl the disease.
i ' i . - . -1 . i - . . r
the tniiini!ttio poison. A great variety of disor
ders inri-ie from its irritation, amnn winch are
A'sii'ir.tym, Itlictmmtiim, Gutit, lleatlarhe. Blind
ncsni Tiiiilli'iche, Karachr, Catarrh, Asthiiin, Vnl
pitattoii, Painful AJIWiion of the Spleen, lli',trr
ii'S, Pain in the lloweh. Colic, Paralysit and lie
ranionent of the Stomaclt, all of which, when
originatinii In this cause, put on the inhrmittmt
type, or become pfriodiral. This " Ct'iiE " expels
the poison from the blood, and consequently cures
tlicni all nliko. it is an invnnuioic pioicciion ki
immigrants and persons travelling or temporarily
resiilinu in the malarious districts. Jf taken occa
sionally or daily while exposed to tho iiifeciinu,
that will be excreted from the system, and cannot
accumulate in sufficicnrqiuntit)' to ripen into dis
ease. Hence it is even more valuable for protec
tion than cure, and few will ever suffer from Inter
mittents if they avail themselves of the protection
this remedy affords, . ( . v , ,
Prepared by Dr. J. a AYEE & CO., Lowell, Hail.
R0BIRT8 It 8AMCIL, Columbus,
And ev DrofnrUts and Sealers everywhere.
novtciya.twatw . . , . , ;
CANADIAS ft UNITED STATES MAIL
STEA3CERS
1 - TO AND FKOftI
LONDONDERRY,,, GLASGOW,
Liverpool, 'Montreal, Quebec,
I .; tuad -. , ... ,
Th lfontnal 6eau Itaamahin Oomnanv't flrst clars
fnll-poweredOlyde-bnllt Bteamare sail every Malta
ttrdar froa PORTLAND, carrying toe venauiaa ana
United states uau aoa paaaragan,
i i NORWEGIAN, .f. ; NORTH AMERIOAN,
: BOHEMIAN, ANOLO 8AX0N,
NORTH BRITON, HIBERNIAN,
- CANADIAN, : N0VA800TIAN.
Sbartaat, Cheatpeet andqalckcatceu
TSjaum iiv in
AHEWCA TO ALL FASTS OF ZTISOFX
RatM ot Pnawege to Xitirope,
, . v- . 1 830, 800. ao. .. k
Will sail from LIVERPOOL ere it Wfldneaelayt
and from QUEBBO ewery Batafday tailing at
LONDONUatUli, toraoeiveon noeraana lane naiisaaa
p.iwur.ri. to and from Ireland and Bootland. '
lTrTheaa Steamers are built of Iron, In watar-tltht
compartments, carry each an experienced Bergeoo, and
ajary attention w yaia V9 iu euauvrt aau nmnuiMv
t nn nr BiHunn, ai inerannm ainw w luiivr.
DEBT, the great risk and delay of calling at Bt. John's
lstvoided.. - " ' , . .
Oltsgow psatsngera are furnished with ran nattage
tickets to ana irom trfmaoaaarry i , .
Rinna tkikt s srantea at reaucea raise. . , .
AertlBoaiaa issued for oamlnt to and brinslDiout pas-
sengsre frota all the principal towns of Oroal Britain and
Inland, at reduced ratee. by this line of steamers, and
by the WASHINGTON JUNB Of BAIUNO PA0K.IIB,
leaving iitverpooi erny w. , , .
Bivbt Drafta for i avnd upward pay
able) lat Knclandt Irelmndi vcog-, ,
I . , laaei r wattes
Tor passage, apply at the Ofllo 88 BROAD.
WAY, Netw Verlt, and 19 ATKtt 8X.,
I4lwerpi' !'(!!.. iii i..-r.-.
, ' - BABEL ft B1AS1I, Ertneral AganU,
or to- J. R. ARMSTRONC.
'' aolO-lydfcw . ..i , Post Office, Columbut. Ohlp..
i Co-Fartnership. r v
T flATfi Tltl PAT' ADMITTED MY
J. sea JAMI8 ADGaR BAIN as partner hi my husi
ass. which will hereafter be eendnetsd enaer the Arm
ofBain At Bon. - P. BAIN, W Booth High Bt.
Oolnmbas. f tb 11 HBlr- ' - ' ' ' feblO
, : DENRY KEIILR,
(Late of Marten's stabllshment, H. T,,) Pieprletore
' .!, Naw Turk fashionable lhavlni. Hair Oatttna
11 Bh..nMHin. Ourllna' and Draaatna Saloon. last Slate
r" -.ZJL... "a.. Di nffln mtft slUfuttlmt Bill
'bo atven to all the various branches. Lad lot and
, Oblldrenl Bali Brstslng dona la the bestttfle.
Jgvl-41f .vUt.V 'iW.'UWr-. '
4
BEAXTTIFUTL, .:
AN D CHEAPER THAN' EVER !
v wt r Bvniwo lai-fiiiK is vn unu ja-
VJ Ivlarro and well asaorted. The very latest patterns
from AMEIUOAN, KNQLIBH and IllESUll raotories.
GOLD PAPERS AND BORDERS.
Gold and Velvet Borders,
SPLENDID DECORATIONS
SIDELIGHT
AND!
FIRE BOARD PAPERS,
Gold and Painted Shades,
GOLD
WINDOW CORNICES
BUFF, BLUE,
"and '
GREEN HOLLANDS,
WINDOW FIXTUBES, all kinda,
CORD AND TASSELS,
BEAUTIFUL PICTURES
AND FRAMES.
RANDALL & ASTON,
lOOSoutn HigllSt
COLUMBUS, O.
N. B landlords and persons wishing quantities of
Paper will make money by buying el ns, country
Merchants and persons from abroad will do well to call
and see ns. aprll l d3meodl - R. at A.
EAST.
CENTRAL OHIO
AND
AND Steubenville Short Line
RAILROADS
RAILROADS COMBINED !
IIW-B.JLU'W.
COKNBCriNO At BELIATHI WITH THK
BALTIMORE & OHIO,
; AND AT PITTgBURQIl WITH TDK
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL
HAILEOAD:
. ; FORMING! THK
Shortest, Quickest & Most Reliable
Routa to all Eastern Uities I
Trains Leare Colnmbua aa follows :
- MORNINO IXPRKB8
Leaves Colomhna 3.30 A. M. from Union Depot
yia
BelUire or gleubenvlile : arrives st Bellaire, lU.'.H) A
il.; BtenbenTille, 12.20P.M.; Pituburgh, 3.40 P.M.;
Harrlibnrg, 1.10 A. VL.t via Attentovn, arrives at New
York 8.00 A.M.; via Philadelphia, arrives st Pbila-
delphlS. 5.10 A. M.; New York, 10.30 A. M. Connects
alio tt Harrltburg for Btltloiore, arriving at 7.45 A. M.
'
Sleeping Can attached to thU Train
Froln Columbui, run directly through to Bellaire or
Pittsburgh without change; and Pasiengers via Allen
town arrive in New York ate A, M.,
O-TWO HOURS . IN ADVANCE 0? ffORTITERN
. . tanas.
This Train also coon ecu at Bellaire with the
Baltimore and. Ohio Railroad.' - '
PITT8BCRQD EXPRKB8. .
Leaves Columbus 11 S5 A. M., from TTnlon Depot, via
Bteubenvllle; arrives st Newark, r. M. ; Cosnoe
ton, 8. 15 P. M.l Bteubenvllle, 0 P, M.; Pittsburg, a. 40
P,
Ii.' UTThls Is the only route by which Passengers
i leaveClncInnttl at 7 A. M., go through to Pitts
burgh in daylight, without change of cars or delay.
, : I'M PAST LINE. 1 ' ' .. :f ,.
Leaves Columbus 3,1.1 P. M., from Cnlon Depot, via
Bellaire: arrives at Newark, 3.S3 P. M.; Zanesvins,
4 33 P. M ; Bellaire 7 ,51 P. M.; Pittsburgh, 11.23 P.
M-; Harrltburg, 9.00 'A. M.; Ha Allenlown, arrives
at Naw York. 4 P. M.: via Philadelphia, arrives
Pbilsdelphia. 1.10 P. M.; New York, 6 P. M, Thli
Train also connects at Barrishnrg for Baltimore, ar
riving at 1 P.M. t -
This Train runs through to Bellaire or PUttborg with
ont change of Cars; and from Plttsbu'.g there is no
chsnse of Cars to Philadelphia, or v'A Allentown te
New York thus oOeilug
The only Route from Columbus to P till more
Philadelphia, or New York, wltb only
one change of Cars. ' ( .
n this Train Passsnrera arrive In Naw Yoik fire
hours In sdvance of the Northern lines.
This Train also oonnects at ueiiaire witn.tne muimoro
andOhloR.K. . i . -
0Thls Route U 30 miles shorier to Pittsburg,
andTmore than iuu miles snorter to,,
, New York, than Northern Lines,., .,
I..
Baggage Checked Through, to all im-
.I'-: 1 ASK fOR TICKETS VIA1 ' '' " 1
V.: BELLAIRE OR STEUBENVILtE.'
Ticket Good oyer eUlior Koute
' ,; l ' I ' " 1 1 .' ''::
' ' ' , . , . JNO. W. BBOWN. ,
1 .. : '. " ' Oon. Ticket Agent Central Ohio B. R. '
' . I. A. HUTCHINSON, 1
Gen. Ttciet Agent Bteubenvllle Short Line.,
JelO
Wiaiinna -A.;1; ,0-111
AGRICULTUHAL WAREHOUSE
I . Btaui i;7"'7" " .
GENERAL: HARDWARE,
tkUM, OLAB8, BASH, pOTTT, C0B.DA01, , t
Gnna, IMaiala, WeofltWHlow Ware
aiheraad tabber Belting,
lace Leathar, Hate and
king.
tJT OOO . ' ,V .'
MOVeUMB W "" tawana ... , - ; ;
. " . Bjron and Oarrote Collars. i
. m ' -'ii xmbroidered Poeset Handkerchiefs.
Tarls KM Oloves, to parlor nske. ' 1 ' , '
' Oolden Hill Bhlrte, vartons ttf lee. ."v , v. ,1
Bovs' Golden lllll Bliirte, de -Hu.ii n i.i
Driving and Btreet Oloves, do .
- ii Za pk ruitkmhlefi. variont abrlea. '
ucnuini ' w . .
UMI " ' n . .
,p,HS Rb.oaUHIIghetreet.
itlRlli-
Dally, per year.. 0
Tri- Weekly, per far ...... f oo
Weekly, per yeai '
[From the Boston Post.]
Law, the President of the
United States and the Constitution.
"Thi Preildent ha tower, at' the military head
of the eountry, to dtclnr martial law."
This assertion has been made by a gentleman
of distinction as a lawyer, and in its unlimited
form of expression It lurnisnee another of tne
remarkable evidences of the times, that in our
zeal to preserve the Constitution we are la dan
Ker of undermining constitutional Government.
To escape anarchy we are in danger of demand
ing despotism.. , r '
It would be startling to put tne proposition iu
ordinary times, that the President of the United
States is more of a military despot than the
Kino- of Great Britain: and vet he is so if be can
suspend the habeas corpus or declare martial
law for in that Kingdom tbe Bill of PetUiops,
la (he reign of Charles 1 , aboitsnea martial law,
and In the reien of Charles II. tbe power to
suspend the oivU laws was taken from the King
and reserved by Parliament only, as a legislative
power and not a royal prerogative. And Black
stone well says (1, 135): "If It were left in tbe
power of tbe nignest magistrate to imprison
whomever he or hie officers thought proper,
there would soon be an end of all rights and im
munities." Thus, In the mild administration of
Cardinal Fleury, in t rance, &4.UUU persons ware
seized and imprisoned in the Bastile, without
law, under the "leltre de cachet," which was tbe
same despotio power la France as would be tbe
suspension of the habeas corpus or declaring
martial law in England or the United States.
If, therefore, tbe power to declare martial
law is claimed for tbe President of the United
States, it is manifest that it cannot be derived
from the common law of England. If It Is
anywhere, it must be iu the Constitution. But
no such power is given to tbe President of the
United States In the Constitution. Ail his pow
ers are defined therein, and nothing is given to
him which is not there specified by tbe term
"the President shall have Dower," etc Mar
tial law is not named in the Constitution, and
Congress only, and not the President, has power
to suspend tbe writ of habeas corpus, when In
tbe oase of rebellion or Invaaion the publlo safe
ty may require it, of which Congress alone is to
judge. Moreover, the President is required "to
take care Ibat tbe (ami be laitbiuiiy executed,
and tbis la utterly incompatible with his de
claring martial law; for Biackttone, quoting Sir
Matbew Hale, defines martial law to be "tbe
tuppreesion of all fates." How then can the
President take care to faithfully execute tbe
laws by abolishing all civil laws, and all process
of the Judiciary?
The only possible ground for the assertion
that the President has power to declare martial
law, is that by tbe Constitution be is "Com
mander in-Chief of tbe army and navy of the
United States." But tbis is h!a military and
not bis civil capacity, and in tbia capacity as a
military chief, no more power is given to him,
than belongs to Gen. Scott or any other com
mander of tbe army where tbe President is not
actually in the field. How wild a power is it to
claim for the President that from bis library in
tbe White House be can proclaim martial law,
all over the United States and against every
citizen of the United States, and suspend all
the functions of the judicial power. And if be
can do tbis or do any such act farther than any
other commander of an army can do within bis
military camp, then he can abolish all laws, at
hit will and pleasure, throughout the United
Statea. Granting: even that the President, in
suppressing an Insurrection, .may exercise all
tbe powers existing in state of war, which
military commander may exeroise touching
martial law, what is that power, which we are
to look for outside of the Constitution?
Throughout the history of this country mar
tial law bas never been proclaimed by tbe Presi
dent nor by Congress; nor did any military com
mander ever proclaim it in any part of tbe Uni
ted States except in tbe memorable lostanoe of
General Jackson at New Orleans in 1815. Upon
that act we hare tbe opinion of one of the most
eminent American Jurists that ever lived, Ed
ward LiviDgatoo, the friend of General Jackson.
He gave that opinion at the request of General
Jackson, and in these words:
"On tbe nature and effect of the proclamation
of martial law by Major General Jackson, at
New Orleans, my opinion la, mat sucn procla
mation (a unknown to the Constitution and laws
of the United States. That It is to be justified
only by the necessity of tbecaae, and that there
fore tbe General proclaims It at bis risk, and un
der bis responsibility, both to the Government
and to Individuals. When the necessity is ap
parent he will meet reward Instead of punish
ment from hia Government, and the claims of
Individuals for damages most be determined un
der the discretion or a Jury." ' ' J I'
ll! other word?, all acts done under martial
law are unlawful acts, and punishable by fine
and damages.
General Jackson, nice tne magnanimous patriot
he was, when he had taken this responsibility to
save tbe city of New Orleans, submitted himself
to tbe jurisdiction or a civil conrt, and paid tbe
fine tbe court Imposed upon him for breaking
tbe laws. Subsequently a grAtetul country In-
demniftedhim by restoring tbe fine, and thus
the majesty of tbe law wss vindicated. - But
many wise men and nearly tbe whole ' Federal
and Republican party opposed to Gen-' Jacksoo,
doubted and denied the justice or propriety of
eatoricg tne fine, and condemned bis aot as ty-'
rannlcal." This, then, is the extent of the
power of martial law.' ' The President of tbe
United States, H in command' of the army in
active service, might assume the same reaponsl
billty, and If he did it wisely, tbe like result
would follow, nut ne could not do it in tbe
exercise of any power given btm by the Const!
tutioo, and, therefore, U is not a legal or a Con
stitutional or sound nroposition to lav down as
a rigbt or prerogative ot tbe rresident or tbe
United states, (bar be bit power to deolare
martiallaw. " !.'
Hannilv no such docarlnre from the af-
uards of constitutional law'ls required to put
own the war- which is waged against th Unit'
ed States by the Confederates. The martial
law of the camp always follows tbe ivommand
er In time of war, within the limits of hit camp,
and covert all military offenses and all persons
inarmt against the Government. But oivil
crimes, and offenses, and oititent not in arms,
should alwaya be lelt. to punishment by tbe ju
diclal tribunal. r ..;, ;i4 -.
Lei nt stand by the Union and titetaln the
President in upholding it by ail the lawful means
God and the Constitution and tbt patrioiisa.
the people have put in our power j bat let not
the constituted authorities nor thai people for
get, In any orisist that to preserve free institu
tions, tney must never, unoer ina pica oi ne
cessity or patriotism, subttitutt tbt will of any
man or body of men for the fundamental prin
H.
Tariff Amendments.
-Since the prOKrarame of the proposed amend
menu to tbe Morrill Tariff was quietly prepar
ed by (he gentlemen in tms city wbo nave the
matter In charge, a new and very unexpected
hitch hat occurred in the arrangement."' It
objected on the part of many, that tbe tommer
session of Congress Is too short tod likely
nrove too stormv to tfiora tbe necessary reqnl
sites for a calm consideration of our whole tariff
DolicT. and that it would be far better to
noihine more than simply suapend tbt free Hat,
Imnoslnr a heavy tax on tea and coffee, and ap
point a commission to prepare a thoroughly re
vised tariff for adoption during the winter ses
sion. Tbe force of the opposition to the plan
heretofore announced, however, it directed
an-alnst the tieavT tat whioh Is proposed upon
o , , - . -Iir
raw tugar, unaes idi present lariu mo uutv
raw ausar Is three OUarters of a cent per pound;
It Was proposed to raise It to two tnd t half eentt
per pound, an advance of Over three hundred
per cent, upon the amount now collected." Sine
thlt plan wat announced,' letters -have been
from various parts of the country protest-
tn against It. and an earnest appeal In odpobV-
tion has alio been mtdt by portion of tbe
gar refioere in this city. The production of re
tlued sugar la probably, all things oonsioereo,
the most important manufacturiug inteeeet in
the city of New York, although we question
whether ltt magnitude hat been properly esti-,
mated outside of lbs elrele engaged in it. Tbe
most, intelligent of these refiners contend that
no considerable addition to the revenue can be
secured by advancing the duty before tbe advent
of another erop, and that a change during tbe
summer would damage tbe refining interest, and
only loare to tbe benefit of importers and apeo
ulators. It la well known that the bulk of the
year's importation of foreign sugar arrives dur
ing the first eight months of the year.. If a
change were made in tbe tariff during tbe sum
mer seasicn, It could hardly take effect upon tbe
receipts belor the first of September, and after
that there would nit be a pound upon which to
pay duty until tbe Spring of another year. In
1860, out of 267,538 tons of sugar landed here,
219,837 tons arrived before the close of Augusts
In 1859 only 88,948 tons came after August;
and in 1858 only 34,375 tone in the tame period,
thowing the most of tbe trade is then over. But
If this change in the tariff were to take effect
even br the first of August; the announcement
would hurry forward the receipts; and every ton
which arrived after th date fixed would be en
tered in bond and re shipped to tome foreign'
port, to that no revenue could accrue until af
ter the opening of a new year. It is argued,
therefore, by thoae wbo oppose tbe change at
the extra session, that tbe subject may be just
as well postponed until tbe winter, when more
light day be thrown npon the subject, and tbe
whole tariff can be re adjusted together. ' '
But there it another item In this reckoning
which baa a still greater influence npon many
minds; and this is found in the promising as
peel of tbe Louisiana production for the current
year. Never, in the history of the country, bas
there been anything like the prospeot now open
ing before the tugar planters of the South. The
largest Southern crop ever made wat in 1853,
when it reached 449,324 hhds ; tbe yield subse
quently fell off through the effects of froat and
drought, until in 1856 tbe crop wat only 73,976
hbds.) in 1859 it was 321,840 hhds.; and last
year It reached 228,753 hhds. The promise for
the current year is laid to be nearly tlx, hundred
thousand hogsheads, and we may be almost cer
tain that it will be at any rate the largest crop
ever known. In view of these faots, the ques
tion of duty hat assumed another shape, and
something besides mere revenue from imports
will have to be taken into consideration. , The
total consumption of the United States, besides
maple anear. for tbe year 1860, wat 930,000,000
povods, Including both foreign and domestic, of
which tw.iba.uuu pound were imported irom
abroad. If tbe domestic production for the en
suing year reaches 700,000,000 pounds (600,000
hhds.), there will be little left to be imported
unless tbe Louisiana sugar be exoluded from tbe
market. We give these facta and conclusions,
more with tbe obiect of throwing- lieht npon
the questions at issue, and of spreading before
th public tbe views of those who control the
movement in relation to it, tnan at expressing
our own conviction . If we should add a thought
to those we have made prominent above, it
would be limply to inquire whether tbe adoption
of a nigh rate or duty on sugar, at an early date,
even it it produced no Immediate revenue,
would not be likely to aid materially insnstain'
ing tbe credit of the Government? -But enough
baa been said to show that the difficulties are
not as easy of solution at at first supposed, and
ereat care must be exercised not to make a
movement wbicb will only disturb the course of
trade without adding to tbe resources ot tne
treasury. iV. x.Juur. Vom.
Hugh Miller and Mary Duff.
of
Is
to
do
on
Hugh Miller, the geologist, journalist, and
man ot genius, was slain e in bit newspaper ot.
floe late one dreary winter night. . Th oleiks
had all left and he wo nreoarins: to bo. when
a quick rap came to the door. He (aid "Come
in," and, looking toward the entrance, taw a
little ragged girl, all wet with sleet.. "Ar you
Hugh ' Miller?" . "Yes." "Mary Duff wants
ye.' "What does she want?" "She's deein."
Some misty recollection of the name made bim
at once set out, and with bit welt known plaid
and stick; be was toon striding after the child,
wbo (trotted through' the now deserted High
street, into the Canongate. By tbe time he
got to the Old Playhouse cloee, Hugh had re
vived bit memory of Mary Duff, a lively girl
who bad been bred np beside him in Cromarty.
Tbe last time be bad teen her wa at a brother
mason's marriage, where Mary was " best
maid,' and he "best man." He seemed still (o
sea her bright, young, careless face, her tidy
sbortgown, and her dark eyes, and to hear her
bantering, merry tongue,. , j .
Down tbe close went tbe. ragged little wo
man, and up an outside stair, Hugh keeping
near her with difficulty; in the passage the held
out ber hand and touohed him; taking It in
bia great palm, he lelt tbat eh . wanted a
thumb.' Finding ber way like cat through the
darkness, she opened a door, and say in'g,"That't
ber!". vanished, uy tne ngot et a dying nre
be taw lying in the oorner of tbe large, empty
tometning use a woman's ciotnea, and
on drawing nearer, became aware of a thin, pale
lace and two oaric , eyes looting keenly, but
helplessly up to bim. The eyes were plainly
Mary Uuirs, tnougn ne could recognize no other
feature. ' She wept silently, gazing steadily at
him. i "Are yon Mary Duff?" - "It1 a' that's
tne. Hugh.' She then Uied to speak to him.
something plainly of great urgency, but she
couldn't, and seeing tuat one was very ill, and
was making herself worse, he put half a crown
Into ber feveriah hand, and taid he would call
again in tbe morning. He could get no inform'
aiion from the neighbors they were turly or
asleep.' f
' When he returned next morning, the little
ftrl met bim at the etair-head, and said, "She'a
deid.-, ne went in, and lound mat it was true;
there she lay, the fire out, her face placid, and
the likeness to her maiden self restored. Hugh
thought h would have known ber now, even
with tbOBe bright blaok eye doted at they fere,
ta eiernum,
Seeking out a neighbor, be said be would like
to bury Mary uutr, and arranged wltb an under
taker in tne oiose for tne lunerai. Little teen
ed to be known of tbe poor ontcast, except that
the wat a "licht," or, at Solomon would have
eaid, a "strange woman.' 'Did the drink?"
"Whilee."
On tb day of tb funeral, one or two resi
dent1 In tb cloee accompanied bim to tbe
Canongate ohurohyard. ' He observed a decent
looking little old woman watching them; and
fallowing at a distance, though the day wa
wet and bitter. Alter tne grave wa , niied.
and be bad taken off bit bat, at tbe men finish
ed tbeir business by putting on and slapping tbe
sod, he taw this old woman remaining. , She
came up, and courteaylng, eaid, "Ye wad ken
tbat lass.strr" "xes; i anew nerwoensne
wat vouDff." ' The woman then buret intotetrt,
and told Uugb tbat tbe " keeplt a bit ataop at
the Cloaemooth, and Marv dealt wl' me, and
aje paid regular, and I wat feared tbt wat
ceaa. tor sne uaa oeeu a mooia awin me nan-
aorownj" and then with a look and voice af
awe, the told him bow on the nlgbt bt wat lent
fori and Immediately after he had lelt, she bad
beeo awakened by tome one in the room; and
bv her brlsht fire for sht wat a 6ei, well-to-
do hodv she bad seen the waeted dying erea
tare, who came forward) tnd -said, M Wasn't
halwt-crofrnrv " Tet.'-V "There) a ta, i ana
DuUina it under tho bolster, Vanished., if
Alaa for Marv Duff! her career had been
tad one since the day when the had stood side
by tide with Hugh at the -wedding tit tbeir
friends. Her lather died not lone after, and
her mother supplanted bet ia the affections
the men to whom the had given her heart. Tbe
shock i wat overwhelming, and made borne u
tolerable. . Mary led from U bliehttd end est
Uttered, and after a life ots shame and sorrow.
crept int the corner of her wretched garret,
die deserted and alone; tivinc evidence, in
latest aot that bonetty d aurvived mui tb
wrack, of , nearly every other virtue., v at
re
reived tu
nPRlMO f'I.OAKI .ANn BASQlNES
m rtvi.r Matin tk Sett. No. left South
tn.a h. haTa lusteneoed new styles of Cum Oia
- i. . .-J a,Mim mmU Im tha wml
moat, stvllsh -saannar. , AIM, atuperb - flails
- 1 iiantiiie
uiactA iii viy uaiij, Mi tfij
and hstqulDea. - apnia
it
a
of
to
ber
I
nt I
ii
A. jP. STONE & O'HARRA '
ABE NOW RECEIVING THEIR WIN-'
TKR GOODS, and Invite the publlo to Inspect
them. No snch stock of Ooods has ever been brought te
thlt market. The South, in consequence of tbe failure
of ihs grain erop, has not been aids to purchase the ot s
nal quantity of rich goods, snd this fact hat forced the
Importers to sell them at public auction. Our borer
(Mr. Stone) being in New York at Uwte large sales, took J
advantage of them, and we can and will sell our goods
here, at leas than any one who purchased two weeks ainca,
paid for them In New York. Our stock- Is complete lo
every department of , . ... . .
ELEGANT DRESS SILKS, ' " ' '
, OTTOMAN VELOURS, " '
' " ! - BROCHE VALENCIA8, ,
...... PRINTED MEEINOS,- .
. ... PRINTED COBURGS,
I DYED COBUGS;
BLACK ALPACAS, ": ,
ORLEANS,
. t FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
......; .. ALL WOOL DELAINES,
, , , " POPLINS, PRINTS,
f j r: - 7 I r . DELAINES. ...
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS!
Five Thaiusand Dollars Worth
" 'Bought in One Day,
LADIES7" FURS,
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT.
Vent, ladies and Children's Under Bhlrte and Drawers; .
Ladles, Misses and Children Hosiery or all kinds, In
Wool and Lamb's Wool: Fleecy Lined tnd Cotton Oloves '
of every make.
' - iLSO ;
A complete assortment of all tbe utnal varie
ties of ; : ' , : -' ; -- ' ' '
LADIES' CLOTHS, . s ,
, , ! j CASSIMERE3, ,
OVERCOATINGS,
!-- TWEEDS,
FLANNELS, '
, - RIBBONS, , .
. DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladiel and Gent' i Linen Cambrio Hand
kerchiefs, 4o,, &c.
To Dersont who call on as, we nlejce- our words to
show them the largest, beat and cheapen atock of floods
ever seen in this market, or pay them one dollar per
hour while looking. ' '
decl-dljztawltw. btunb st v uakra. .
EXTHAOnDWARV BARGAtNS! ,
BAIN fc SON,",
H0. 29 SOUTH HIGB STREET,
ATI -K NOW OFFKRINDI
1,000 yardi Saoer Plain Black Silks at 11 00 vtlce
t5perytrd. .'. ' " " ' ';
ZtSOO yardt Travelitg Pre it and Mantle Goods tt
19 it cents valae 80 cents per yard. .
3iO00 yardt White Brlllitntet at 12 l8 cents .
value 20 eentt per j ard. .... ;
3,000 yardt Fine tnd Dometlla Olsgbamt greatly an
der value.
ALSO: ' '' '
LARGE AND DESIRABLE LOTS OF
MOZiMBIQUES, BALZORIHES, . v
' : CHAUIS, I0BL-BD SILKS,
' '"' ' EHQUSa BAEESES, tlVELLit,
i"77 " L&WBB, CALICOES, fOPUHS, '
, , I AND ALL OTHER . .
New and Fashionable) Dread Good
in the most desirable styles and st very losers prices.
MAXTZIiIiAS!
Of all materials, mide In the meet tlylUh mtnner after
the latett Ptrli Ftthloni-tht most elegant styles In
the city, v
BAIN Ac SON,
Btyao . Nc. 99 South Iligh street.
; NOREADY.
THE REVISED STATUTES ' "
'o? tiic ' '.!
STATE OTP OHIO
lit A GENERAL NATURE, IN FORCE AUG. 1, 1860.
.....I COLLATEDBV '
Hon. Joseph. H. Swan, ,
WITH XO'm OF TBS PSCISI0X3 Of TBS 8U' - -
, ... , .,, PBEMS OOVRT, ; .r .: . .,
(Contained in twenty-nine volumes of the phis and Ohio .
; ...... State Reports.) , ,
( AND REFERENCES TO PRIOR LAWS, ' . '
UVLEANDER J.CBiTCIIIFELD,ESq. .
: AND a FULL AND CONVIN1INT INDIX. '
In Two Rojal 8vo. Volumes. Price $10 0(1. :
.... MMs - .' sJ "...
No care or expense has been spared te make the work. -
nerfeet and reliable in all respects.
.. Ii as now the IiegislatlTe unction having be!? ep- '
proved by nearly thannanlmons vote of both Hooata, .,
and was ordered to ha distributed to the followtni Stale
Sod Gotroty ofllceri: " , 'i ..,..
aovernor. Attorney ueneral, supreme Judges, Seers- .
tary, Oxmptroller, Treasurer and Auditor of Stare, and ' ' '
to the Probate Courts, Courts of Oaaemoa Pleat, Super'
lor and Police Oourtt, Auditors, and the Clerks of the .
various Courts in each county, to the tfembersof the'
Senate and Heats of Representatives of Ihis State, ant
Uie governors ot tne several cities ot tne union.
This nook, eontainieg, aa it does, allot the Statutes i
aow in force, and tbe authoritative construction ot then
tnd of the New Constitution, will he found to be etpectah " ' '
ly useful in tne penemuuwe ot weir quitet, to all; .
OOTJNTT OFFICERS,
. ' ,- JO0TIOU Of TH PsUCaV -
i ; . TOWN8HIPTROBTIE8,I .-, ,..... '.
3! OLSKKS OF TOWNHHIPS, and 1
"-"! '"i OUT OfflOMS.'. . -I ; !. 7-V,
Inasmuch ai very many chaniee have been made ia the I -. ;-. -
Statutea aince the publication of thelait edition!, bv re-
-naal, alterations snd additions, and many Important de-
citions nave neen kvsu uy n vuprcme tiDuri on coir
troverted points, all "
ATTOHnKiB at taw, - - t.i . -. - r r - i'
, BANKERS, MKKC HANTS
I AND BUSINESS UIN OINtKALLT, -'' '
Will fled this an Invaluable Work.''" ;.'!.. I;- ;p-.-.'
3co Boyal See. Volume of ever Btnetetn ffundred , . ,
'J. InStrong taw Blnding.'J ?rtee S10.00. -; ' "
Published by ' 5-- ' --: ' -J I ' '5"rc-'..
.BOBERT CLiARJOB .fc OOt ' v )
Law Publishers, , Booksellers;- Stationers and Importers . ,
i no. oj ric auurm avrevi,
fehtS:dSia:ia 1 . UtneinnsU O.i-riatinrj
In
Avat. -am ear atsa astsst W W w mw tm vaw tsasa www
Bc,o WARD & q p s;-
AMERICAN WATCHES
C A Ll AT NO. 83, SOUTH 11 1 OIF ST.,
and tatmlneooraawmakeof- J "r p.
AMERICAN WATCHES, 31
manufactured by I. HOWARD A CO , Boston, Haas.
These Watches tiw far superior to anything ever eflerat . .''
to the publlo, nerttoiors. tianng ua aaciutive sgenry.
I eaa Sell them at prices is suit Ihe trroat. I btrejuit--'
receWtdralariw stookof . n'J
i.kiiirtmiKWiTrura
Uilit I
1 It
taU'tibytPLitdltJtBACt, st'cO I also! a ''
fltwasvortmentof :,) n.i ,r. t. . . J -;
ENOI.1S1T AND W1S If ATOHEtJ . ...i.,r:
T j tBOaidaodlllrsraaas.atfairicprioes. . ;,, t.
J--.l;s,aiv.-1- .v-n.' V,,F-l.?AT AM.
YLACK STKAW HON NETS AND EL,.
AJ egant Itiobons, la great Variety at
BAIN't. ' t;
i.te
Ma. OO tl .. .
vt
lEPRlXANT
OR
WATEB.PIlOOF '
It, KILO A K CLOTHS. Also, other snakes of Spring
OloakiOloha,'htal desirable saUtaree Blndlnn, Tas
MX aid Buttons to match. BAIN at EON.
..aprtiJ ' '- " K. tt Son Utab sta
-r
vrvv aMTfi itA uruti to ski. i..
VV (packaitei ot STATION BUT and JKWEI.KY, at
trices one-third less than can he purchased eliewhre - .
' v u . u .. "r ' r. Z ai: . '
- iaa vom , .uu.
1

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