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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, July 31, 1861, Image 1

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VOL. VIII. NO. 41
NEW. SERIES.
COLUMBUS. OHIO,, WEDNESDAY
MOBNIM. JULY 31, 1861.
" i ' I - i ,, ,
lit 20IIAB1 FEB YXAB,
Inrariftbly la Adraaef.
Statesman
D 4.ILY, TBI-WEIKLT AND WEEKLY
MANYPENNY & MILLER,
PTJEXISHIRS AKS PEOPBIKTOES,
' 13 Office Sol. 88, 88 and 40, Xortn High 8t
'"' TIHUB INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE.
""ally : .ft . ., . ' . $8 00 par year.
" By lb Curler, per week, 18)6 eents. .
trl-Weakly . . . 8 00 per year.
Weakly! . - ;r. , 1 00 ' "
erum of Advertlalng by the Square.
n satiate I yeal . , . 890 00
One square 3 week.. 14 00
One " V week!.. 3 00
One . M I week... 1 75
One " 3 days.. .1 00
One " 3 days... 7S
One " 1 insertion 50
One " V months IH 00
3n
")ue
6 month! IS CO
3 month! It) DO
1 It month! 8 00
I month, 5 00
One
One
Displayed sdvertlMioenta half more tliau the abov
rates. . '
Advertisements leaded and placed la the column of
8.-cial Notices," double the ordinary rate.
All uotloesrequlrea to be published by law, legal rate.
II ordered on the Inside exclusively after the first week
per can:, more titan the above rates; bat ell such wil
ipiMJiir in the Tri-Weekly without charge.
Business Cards, not exceeding five Hues, per year, ln
si le, i 50 per line; ouUide
Notlcesof meelings.charitablci ocletles, fire companies,
fcc, half price.
All transient advertisement must be paid for in
atnWHM The rule will not be varied f rem. -
W eekly, same price aa the Dally, where the advertiser
s .-sthe Weekly alone. Where 'he Dally and Weekly
re both used, then the charge lerthe Weekly will be
Half the rules of the Dally. '.
No advertisement taken except fori definite period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
F. A. B. SmXINS, -t
i3k.ttorxi.oy at Xiet-w
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
0 (Doe Ambos Building, opposite Capitol Bquare.
' ' ' COLUMBUS, OHIOJ
Attorney, & Counsellor at Law,
MARION, OHIO.
OOliITMBUS
Machine Manufacturing Company
MANUrAOrORIM 0 " -
STEAM ENGINES & BOILERS,
Casting, Xlll-Qevlng, JTaehlniry.
metllxroAcL "77"eoilx:
or KTr DESoiimoH.
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
0OA8. AJtfBOB, Bup't. P. AMBOB, TreM.
deoll. lHM-tf
1861. 1861.
Summer Arrangements.—Time.
Changed.
GREAT NORTHERN AND EASTERN ROUTE
CLEVELAND, COLUMBUS, & CINCIN'I
RAILROAD.
Connectlnf at Crestline with the PITTHBUHQH,
WAYNE k. CDIOAQO RAILROAD
FT.
For Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and Baltlmor
Alto
i for Sort Waynt and Chicago. "
Connecting at Cleveland with the LAKE 8H0KI RAIL
ROAD For Dunkirk, Buffalo, Albany, Uos
tou, and New York. ,
THREE TRAINS DAILY,
EXCEPT SUNDAY,
From Columbus, in connection with Trains on the
LITTLE mi A (Til AND COLUMBUS
AND X ION I A HAILRUAD.
FIRST TRAIN.
NIQBT EXPRESS. Leaves Columbus at 3.40 A.M ;
will leave passengers at all stations south of Gallon,
stop at Delaware, Ashley, Cardington and Qllead, and
at all stations north of Gallon, arriving at Cleveland
at 9:00 A. M., Dunkirk 3:00 P. M., Buffalo 4:83 P. M.
Albany 3.20 A. M., New York 8:35 A. M.. Boston 2:30
P. M., Pittsburgh via Crestline 3:20 P. M , Philadel
phia 5:10 A. H. Chicago via Crestline at 7-00 P, M.
SECOND TRAIN.
NEW YORK EXPRESS Leaves Columbus at 11:10
a. m. Will stop at Lewis Centre, (for White Sulphur
Hprings), Delaware, Cardington, Gallon. Crestline, Shel
by, New London. Wellington and Grafton, arrive at
Cleveland at 3:35 p. m.; Dunkirk, 8:5U p. m.; Buf
falo, 10:25 p. m ; Albany, (t:45 a. m.; New York, 1:45
p.m.; Boston, 4:40 p. m. This Train oonneeta at Shel
by for Sanduiky, and at GJafton for Toledo, arriving at
Toledo at 0:40 p. m.
THIRD TRAIN.
HAIL AND ACCOMMODATION Leaves Columbus
atS.30 p. m. Will stop at all stations South of
Shelby, and at New London, Wellington, Grafton,
and Berra; arriving at Cleveland at P:30 p. m.; Dun
kirk, 2:00a. m. ; Buffalo, 3:20 a.m.; Albany, 8:20 p. m.;
NewYork, 7:80 p. m.; Boston, 11:45 p. m.; Pittsburgh,
via Crestline, at 11:55 p. m.; Philadelphia, 1:00 p. m.,
Chicago, ria Crestline, 0:45 a. m. This Train connects
at ehelby for Sandusky and Toledo, arriving at Toledo
at 8:55 p. m. ,
Patent Sleeping Can are ran on all
. ' Night Trains to Chicago, New
York and Boston. . v
Saggagt Chtcled Through to Nw York and Boston
via Clmland; alio, to Philadelphia and
Jeu York via OrttUine.
. RETURNING."
Night Express arrives at Columbus at. .. 11: 15 P. M.
Cincinnati Express arrives at Columbut at 10:50 A.M.
Accommodation Express arrives at Columbus at7:3U
P. M.
Fare aa Low an by any oilier Houte.
Atk for TiektUvia CrtttliMvr Cleveland.
' " H. 8. FLINT.
, , Superintendent, Cleveland, Ohio.
JAMES PATTERSON, Agent, .
Columbus, Ohio.
Columbus, June 17, 1801.
1AA ,,F CI CREE1V and II LACK
IvU lliAe JW bags prime Rio, Conea.
1 AO pockets okl Datoh Government Java Cofee.
18 bags Ceylon Coffee. , .
SOObWs. standard Whit Sugars, eonshtlng of Pow
, dred, Ohruahcd, Granulated A and B Coffee. ,
BO quintals George Bank Codfish. '
. liObbla. ktess and No. 1 Mackerol.
5 tea. Pick Bslmon.
100 bx. Layer Baislni.
50 hf. box do do
100 qr. box do de
100 H Cigars, different brands and grades
I
noviff
wh. Mcdonald.
M. C. LILLEY
And Blank-Book , Manu&nturer ,
KOBTH EIQH RKXXT. COLtntBUS, OHIO
xaarll-dly ' i V U ' -'
Red, fhite and Blue
tnnnwB
NECKTIES.,,, .,, ' ..'
Joat opened by
'-" ';'' Ji !"'. BAIN ft SOU,
prW , . . . , No. 89 South HlgU street.
A
NEW nvOP BKlBT. . ? ,( l( v
. No! si, sotrin man strut.
Have Inst received a' new make of HOOP SKIRTS
anlatied In a manner fat superior to any yet Introduced
for
DURABILITT AND GRACEFULNESS.
WORCESTER'S
ROYAL QUARTO DICTIONARY.
The lateit The largeiWThe" Best.
The Cheapest Becsaie the Best,
TU moat If Uab) Standard An
tborltr of tbe Ena;UsbLaiisTtiasTe.
Sia Hundred gminent Educatort of Ohio,
"TIUS BKBT XNOUSQ DICTIONARY RXTANT."
. . r , IAttrary Hen SvtryviKer.
"Heie are upwards of a Hundred Thousand Words,
whose multifarious meanings and derivations, together
with their eorreot spelling, and pronunciation are olearly
set before the eje.'1
... ,, ' i . L'.' Cincinnati Commercial.
Bead the JDeolttoni of tha Member! of the Ohio State
Teacher's) Association. .
: The undersigned, member! of the Ohio Stale Teachers'
Association, adopt and aim to use in teaching, writing
and speaking, the orthography and pronunciation of
Worcester's Royal Quarto Dtotionary, and we most cor
dially recommend It as the most reliable standard au
thority of the English language, as it is now written and
spoken.
Loam Awnaxws, President Eenyon College.
M. D. Lcesrrr, Superintendent Zanesvllle Schools.
Titos. W. lUavrr, Bup't Masai Ion Union Schools.
M. V. OowDiar, Bup't Publio Schools, Sandusky.
John Ltch, Bup't Public Schools, Circleville.
8. N. Banforo, Principal Cleveland female Semina
ry. wis . HrrcnaiL, Bup't Public Schools, Mt. Union.
John Oodih, Principal State Normal School, Minne
sota. Crmos Nasox, Prlnolpal Fourth InUmedlale School,
Olnclnnatl.
H. 8. Martin, Sup't Canton Union Schools.
Rowm RtoAi Principal McNeely Normal School.
En T. Taitan, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio University.
Wk. W. Edwards, Sup't Troy Union School.
A. O. Horatm, Principal West High School, Cleve
land 8. A. Norton, Associate Principal High School, Cleve
land. Thiodori SnRLora, Principal High School, Cleve
land.
R. f . HtmisTON, Principal Cleveland Institute.
J. A. Giarixu), President of IlecUc Institute, Hi
ram. W. L. Harris, Prof, of Chemistry, Ohio Waaleyan
University.
H. H. Barnrt, Kx-Gemmlssloner of Common Schools,
Ohio.
Jamb Monroe, Prof. Rhetoric, Oberlin College.
Thos. Hill, President Antioch College.
0. W. II. Oatboaxt, Prof. Mathematics, High
School, Dayton.
8. 0. CRDHBACen, Prof. Language, High Bchool.
Dayton. ....
8. M. BARiam, Sup't Union Schools, Ashland.
More than Sim Hundred other Presidents of Con
gee. Professors, Author and Distinguished Xduca-
ore, note endorsed tM above eentitnmt.
PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES IN OHIO
Maiiwtta OoLLtsi "It Is truly a magnificent work.
an honor to the author, tha publishers, and the whole
country." y resident Anarews. .
Onto Wuiitan UmvRHsrrr Vlt exceeds my expecta
tions. It will be my culde In orthocraohy and pronun
ciation, and will often be consulted by uie for its neat
ana accurate definitions." President Thompson
W. R. Rdxcno OoLLsea. "Heretofore we have used
Webster's orthoerenhv. At a recent meettoK of our
Vacuity, it was decided to change it to conform to that
of Worcester's Royal Quarto Dictionary." President
uaraeia. - -
Wasmw Rmmva Ooinoa. "I Sod it worthy of
cordial approbation." president ttueucock. .-.
Obkrlin Collioi. "It more than meets my expecta-
tlom. I recommend it as the standard authority In
orthoepy to my children and my pupils." President
morgan. . j
Antiocs Coixsaa. "I adopt and aim to nse In teach
ing, writing and speaking, uie ortnograpny ana pronun
ciation of WnimWi Hoval Quarto Dictionary. ''
President Hill.
"II all my writing;, speaklnr, and teaching, I have en
deavored to conform to the ntlet for orthography and
pronunciation aa contained tn Worcester! Dictionary.
Horace Mann, late President.
Kenton Oolumb. Q am bur. ''I most cordially reoom-
mond It as the meet reliable standard authority of ths
Kngiish language as It is now written and spoken."
president Andrews.
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS OF OHIO.
Prom Rev. Anson Smyth, Commissioner of Common
tUMom tn vmo. .
"The Dictionary la an impertokable monument to the
learning and Industry of its author, and an honor to the
world of letters. Th aaeahanteal. execution Is far supe
rior to that of any other Lexicon with which 1 am ac
quainted."
Prom Bon. U. B. Barney. Kn-CommUrioner of
acnoou m umo.
"The most reliable standard authority of the Un
gnage.'' t
WHAT TBI '
Xjeadins Newspaper of Ohio Say.
Irom the Cleveland Herald of March 28.
The orthography of the Worcester Dictionary Is that
nsed by most, if not all. authors of distinction In this
country and Ingland, and conforms to the general usage
or ordinary writers ana speakers.
Whatever nrelndlces ma have existed previously
careful study of this volume will Invariably be followed
by a warm appreciation of its great merits, and a desire
lo add it to the won selected library, oe large or amau,
Ittaellbrarv in itself, and will remain an imperisha
ble record of the learning of ita compiler. ,.
Irom the Cincinnati Commercial of April SO.
Here are nnwarda of a hundred thousand words good.
bad and indifferent whose multifarious meanings and
derivations, together with their eorreot spelling and pro
nunciation, are set clearly oerore me eye. ine wore
unquestionably tbe greatest Thesaurus of Rnglish Words
ever published. - ' .
irom the Cleveland Plaindealer of Sept. tO, 1860,
Evidently WoRcnrsa's Rotal Quarto Diotionart it
not only the last, but the atnwork of the kind ever if
tied, andean by no possibility suffer by comparison or
controversy.
Prom the Toledo Blade of May 80.
AS tO FRONUNCIATION. WOROtSTXR IS TBI BtaHOABD
followed by our best authors; in definitions ha leaves
nothing to be desired, and In ORTnoonAmr It Is sufficient
to say that WoRoxeram can be safely louowea.
' IMCHAITI Sc. BHAGG,
Pnbllebera, Baofcaellera Sc 8tatienera
NO. 191 SUPERIOR ST., CLEVELAND, OHIO.
maiO
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT
LIEE INSURANCE COMPANY,
OP .
NowarlL, 3M. T.
Dlvldead January 118G145 Far Cent.
ASSETS 1,8US6 SO,
Statement January it 186 Is '
Balance, per statement Jan. 1st, I860.. ...$3,406,5(12 39
neceivea tor rremtumi dar
ing the year ltftiO 7C3.0S3 55
Received for Interest during
the year I860 814,014 10
Total reeelDti for 1W0.... 1077.067 74
PaldOlalmibyDeath,807,050 00
rata rouciet lurren-
dertd 41,111 89
Paid Salaries, Poit- . ,
age, Taxes, JSx- ' '
change, etc....... 31,620 M'
Paid Commissions to
Agents .....51,395 30
Paid Physicians' fees. 5,066 75
Paid Annuities 1,617 00
P.lri THvlri.nfl. itiir-
lng the er J. ... 166,500 75 605,091 (3 411,076 14
j Net Balance January 1st. 186J.
.13,813,558 50
I a.-. -t AS JKX11.
Cash on hand.'..'.;.... ..... 16,6884 IS
Bonds and Mortgages on Real
, Batata, worth double the
amount loaned...... 3,3374109
Premium Notes, on Policies' . . .
in force, only drawing 6 per
' cent. Interests. , 1,J79,84 17
Real Bstaie.' 80,893 87
Loans on Scrip 5,93144
Premiums, Notes end Oish, in "
course of transmission. .. . 45,343 75
Total AsseU
3,812,S5fl
T575 Policies m fores, lMortog......Bt580838
1 1,435 new Policies have keen teamed Inrhag the year,
i After a careful calculation ot tha present value of Uie
outstanding Folwleeof the Company, and having the
necessary amount In reserve therefor, the Directors
hare deolared a DivtoaKB of 45 per oent. est the Promt
am s paid at tha table rates, to all policies for life In force,
Issued prior to January 1, 1860, payable aeeardlng to tha
present rale of the Company.
Bates for 111 kinds of Life Ooetiegenciea, Prorpeet
oees, statements, and Applications, will be famished
without CBiaaa, at the Office or Agenclee ot tbe Com
pany. '
i BOBT. L. PATTKRSON, President...
I f h. 0,BOVta, Vic President.!
i BIN2 0. MILLER, Becretary.
! , rti iHU,lt. 3KE80J1, Agent, , ,
I M ,rtl Iff jjo, a .hnson Block,
MarchSS, 1801. "'' m Columbus, 0.
TlLAlK'AFrii FIGURED BLACK
LAIN
DRRSS I
X DRRSS SILKS, of every grade Th most select
aasertment la th city, and at saott reasonable rate.
BAIN St BON."
Ayer'sSarsiioarilla
A compound remedy, designed to be the most
ettectuai Alterative tnat ran be made. Jt is
concentrated extract of Pava Sarsapnrilln,
so combined with other substances of still
greater alterative power as to afford an cfl'ec
tive antidote) for the diseases Barsaparilla is
reputed to cure. It in believed that such a
remedy w wanted by those who suller from
Strumous complaints, and that one which will
accomplish their cure must prove of immense
service to this largo class of our alllictcd fellotv
cltizcns. How completely this compound will
do it has been proven by experiment on many
of the worst cases to be found of the following
complaints: ;
OCUOFUIA AND ScrtOPuLOUS COMPLAINTS,
EltUPTlONS AND EllUPTIVE DISEASES, Ut-CERS,
Pimples, Blotches, Tumoiis, Salt lunait,
Scald Head, Syphilis and Syphilitic Ap-
pections, Mercurial Disease, Dropsy, Nkl'
raloia or Tic Douloureux, Debility, Dys
pepsia and Indigestion, Erysipelas, Rose
or St. Anthony's Fire, and indeed the whole
class of complaints arisintxrvm Impurity op
the Blood. JLi
This compound will DC-tmnd a great pro-
moter of health, when taken in the spring, to
expel the foul, humors which fester in the
blood at that season of the year. By the time
ly expulsion of them many rankling disorders
aro nipped in tho bud. Multitudes can, by
the aid of this remedy, spare themselves trom
the endurance of foul eruptions and ulcerous
sores, through which the system will strive to
rid itselt ol corruptions, it not assisted to uo
this through the natural channels of the body
by nn alterative medicine. Cleanse out the
. l , , , i fl..., i.:
vmuieu uioou wiiuuever yuu iinu us impuriuea
bursting through the skin in pimples, eruptions,
or sores; cleanse it when you find it is ob
structed and sluggish in the veins ; cleanse it
whenever it is foul, and your feelings will tell
you when. Even where no particular disorder
is felt, people enjoy better health, and live
longer, for cleansing the blood. Keep the
blood healthy, and all is well ; but with this
pabulum of lifo disordered,, tlicro can be no
lasting health. Sooner or later something
must go wrong, and the gTeot machinery 01
lilo is disordered or overthrown.
Sarsaparilla has, and deserves much, the
reputation of accomplishing these ends. But
the world has been cgregiously deceived by
M.nn.Mtlinn. ft f f no.tlff liafinilMfl .ll'lli.
alone has not all the virtue that is claimed
for it, but more because many preparations,
pretending to be concentrated extracts of it,
contain but little ot the virtue 01 barsapariiia,
or any thing else.
During late years the public have been mis
led by large bottles, pretending to give a quart
of Extract of Sarsnparilla for onu dollar. Most
of these have been frauds upon tho sick, for
they not only contain httlc, if any, barsapa-
rilltt, hut often no curative properties whatev
er. Hence, bitter and painful disappointment
has followed tho use of the various extracts of
Sarsapuiilla which flood the market, until the
name itself is justly despised, and has become
synonymous with imposition and cheat. Still
wc call this compound Sarsaparilla, and intend
to supply such n remedy as shall rescue the
name from the load of obloquy which rests
upon it. And we think, wo have ground lor
believing it has virtues which ore irresistible
by the ordinary run of the diseases it is intend
ed to cure. In order to sccuro their complete
eradication from the system, the remedy should
be judiciously taken according to directions on
tho bottle.
mEPARCD DV
DR. J. C. A YE It & CO.
LOWELL, MASS.
Price, $lperUottlot Six Botiles for $3.
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral
bas won for itself such n renown fur tho euro of
every vnriely of Throat nnd Lung Complaint, that
It Is entirely unnecessary for u to recount the
evidence of its virtues, wherever it has been em
ployed. As it has long been in constant use
throughout this section, wo need not do more thnn
assure tha people its quality is kept up to tljo best
it ever has been, and that it may be relied on to
do for their relief all it has ever been found to do.
Ayer's Cathartic Pills,
FOIt THE CTJEE OP
Costivcness, JaumVice, Dyspepsia, Indigestion,
Dysentery, Foul Stomach, Erysipelas, Headache,
Piles, Rheumatism, Eruptions and Sfan J licenses,
Liver Complaint, Dropsy, Tetter, Tumors and
Salt Rheum,' Worms, Gout, Neuralgia, ui a
Dinner Pill, and for Purifying the Wood.
They arc sugar-coated, so that the most sensi.
tire can take them pleasantly, and they arc the
best aperient in the world for all tho purposes of a
family physic.
Frioe 25 coats por Box ; Fivo boxes for 1.00.
Great numbers of nprgyincn.riivsicians.Rlatet
men. and eminent personages, have lent their
names to certify the unparalleled usefulness of these
remedies, but our space Mere will- not permit the
insertion of them. The Agents below named fur
nish gratis our Am krioan Almanac in which they
are given ; with ulso full descriptions of the Imivc
complaints, and the treatment that should be fol
lowed for their cure.
t)o not be put off by unprincipled dealers with
other preparations they make more profit on.
Demand Ayeh'h, and take no others. 1'lic siclj
want the best aid there is fur tlieni, and they shoiili
have it.
All our remedies-are for sale by ,
HOBIRTB at BAHTJKX. Colinbus.
And by Dragfrtnta and Dealers every whe ra.
nowiya,ifftw
CANADIAN ft UNITED STATES MAIL
STEAMERS
to and mora .ju
LONDONDERRY, GLASGOW.
Liverpool, Montreal, Quebec,
" and '
The Montreal Ooean Bteamship Company's flrst-elass
full-powered Clyde-built Steamers sail every Mat
nrdajr from PORTLAND, carrying th Oanadianand
United States Mall and passengers,
NORWEGIAN. NORTH AMKRIOAN,
BOHBMIAN, ANULO-SAXON,
NORTH BRITON, HIBERNIAN,
CANADIAN, N0VA8001IAN.
Sborteet, Cbeapeet and Qnlckcet Con
veyance from
AKXRia TO ALL TiS.lt 01 KUEOPK.
Rates pt Paaeaoe to X3uTXpe,
. S3o. mo, so.
Will sail from LIVERPOOL erery Wedneiday,
and from QCSBBO erery Saturday, calling
LONDONDBRRY, to receive on board and land Malls and
Pasatnnra, to and from Ireland and Scotland. '
Ujthee Steamers an built of Iron, In water-tight
compartments, carry each an experienced Snrgeon, and
very attention is paw to we eomiort ana accommoa
tlon of caasena-eri. A they proceed direct to LONDON-
DERY, tha gieet risk sod delay of calling at St. John's
Is avoided.
Glasgow passengers are furnlihed with ran passage
Berets to ana trom iionaonaerry.
Return tickets granted at reduced rate.
OertiSoatee lamed for carrying to and bringing oat pas
sengers from all the principal towns of Great Britain and
Ireland, at rednoed rates, by this line of steamers, and
by the WASHINGTON LINN Of BAILING PAOKITB,
leaving uverpooi every wesa. .
Sight Draf te far xl and apwarde ar
able In England. Ireland. Beet- ,
' land or Walee.
i Vnr suun. anctv at th Offlo. S3 RltOlDi
WAV, New ork, and 19 WaTKR 8X.,
liiverpaais
IA8IL niiSLX, eeaaral ipats,
Or to- J. R. ARMSTRONG,
. nolO lydtw Post Offloa, Columbus, Ohio.
; Co-Fartnership. , r
I HATE TI1IS DAT ADMl'ITED NIY
son JAMES AD91R BAIN as partner In my busi
ness, which will oof after be eondocted ender th Bra
of Bam a Bon. f. bus,iw seats uiga nw
Columbus, reb IS. 1901. . feblS
HElfHT KtXHLEHs
(L f Phalon'a establishment, N. T..1 Pioprlstoro
the New York fashionable Snavtnf. Hair Catting
, Bhampeoniog, Curling and Dressing Saloon, last Bute
street, aver th Poet Offloa, where satisfaction
h gtasn tn all th various branches. Ladies
oniMrea't Bali brewing dons ths Mrt Itjlai
Summer Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cincinnati, Dayton & Indianapolii!
Through to Indianapolis withont Change of Can
and bnt Oua Change of Can between
' Columbus and St. Louis.
Four TrainB Daily from Columbus.
FIRST TRAIN.
ACCOMMODATION at 5 a. m.. stonnlnir at all sta
tions batween Oolnmtns and Olnclnnatl and D.jton, ar
riving at Olneinnati at 10 US a. m., and at Daiton at
8.10 a. n., conaeotisg at Davton for Indianapolis acd
tae West. ,
" SECOND TRAIN. ,
No. 1 EXPRESS at 11.40a.m.. stonnloiat Jefferson.
London, Charleston, Oedarville, Xenia, Spring Valley,
Oorwln, Freeport, tort Aucient. Morrow St., Lebanon,
roiwr's, liovelnna and Hiirord, arriving at Cineinnau
t4.30 d. m.. Dayton at 3. 43 d. m..connwtinrwlth tha
Ohio and Mississippi Railroad for Loalsvillt), K., Via.
ceanes. Oairo, 81. Louis, Ntw Orleans, ate.: at Dayton
or inuianapous, Laisyeltt, xerre Haute, uaicago and
all Western points.
THIRD TRAIN.
HAIL at 9.10 p. m ., stopping at all stations batween
Columlms and Xenia, and at Spring Valley, Corwin,
morrow ana uoveianu, arriving at Cincinnati at a. m.
FOURTH TRAIN.
NIGHT KXPRES8. vis Davton. at 13 00 midnlniu.
stopping at London, Xenia, Dayton, Middle town and
Uamuton, arriving at Cincinnati at s.'.'S a. m.; at Day
ton at 2. 55 a. m.: oonneotin at Clnrlnnatt with the
Ohio and Uississlppl Usilroad lor Louisville, Eransvllla,
Vincennes, Oairo, 8t. Louis, Memphis, Near Orleans,
and all points South and Sonth-west; also, at Dayton
lor Indianapolis, Lafayette, Terra Haute, Chicago, etc.
IL f lot further Information and Through Tickets.
apply to M. L. DOHKRTV, TicketAgent, Union Depot,
Columbus,
P. W. 8TRADER,
General Ticket Agent, Cincinnati.
JNO. W. DOHERTT,
Agent, Columbus,
E. W. WOODWARD,
Superintendent, Cincinnati.
Columbus, July M, 1801.
EAST!
CENTRAL OHIO
AND
AND Steubenville Short Line.
RAILROADS.
COMBINED!
C0KNE0T1NQ AT BELLAIRE WITH TUB
BALTIMORE & OHIO,
AND AT PITTSBURGH WITII THE
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL
.RAJLXROAD:
fORMlNO TnE
Shortest, Quickest & Most Reliable
Route to all Eastern Cities !
Trains Leave Columbus as follows :
MORNING EXPRESS
Leaves Columbus 3.30 A. M. from Union Depot via
Bellairs or Btenbenvlile t arrives at Bellaire, 10.30 A.
M ; Steubenville. 12. SO P. M. ; PItUhnrgh, 3 40 P.M.;
Harrlsburg, 1.10 A. M.t via Allentovm, arrives at New
York 8.00 A. M.; via Philadelphia, arrives at Phila
delphia, 5.10 A. M-; New York. 10.30 A. M. Connects
also at Ilarrisbarg for Baltimore, arriving at 7.45 A. M.
Sleeping Can attached to this Train
in Columbus, ran directly throuih to Bellairs or
Pittsburgh without change; and Paaiengers via Allen-
town arrive in new lorkatoA.Al.,
1T7TW0 HOURS IN ADVANCE OF NORTHERN
LINES.
This Train also connects at Bellaire with the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
PITTSBURGH EXPRESS.
Leaves Columbus 11 25 A. II , from Union Depot, via
gteuiwnville; arrives at Newark, 12.50 P. M.; Coshoc
ton,!!. 15 P. M.; Bteubenville, 6 P. M.; Pittsburg, 9.40
P- V- lLrThls Is the only route by which Passengers
can leave Cincinnati at 7 A. M., go through to Pitts
busjh in daylight, withont change of cars or delay.
FAST LINN.
Lawes Columbus S.15 P. II., from Union Depot, via
B.llaire:' arrivea at Newark, 3.S3 P. M.; Zanesvllle,
483 P. M ; Bellalre.7 .55 P. M.J Pittsburgh, 11.25 P.
it; Ilarrisbarg, 0.00 A. M.; via AUentown, arrives
ai New York, 4 P. M.; via Philadelphia, arrives
Ihiladelphia, 1.10 P. at.; New York, 0 P. M, This
Irain also connects at Harrlsburg for Baltimore, ar
riving atl P.M.
This Train runs throuch to Bellaire or Plttibnrt with
out change of Cars; and from Pittsbnrg there is no
change ot Cars to Philadelphia, or via Allentowa to
New York thos offering
The only Route from Columbus to Baltimore,
Philadelphia, or New York, with only
one change of Cars. ,
By this Train Fassensera arrive In New Yolk five
hours In advance of the Northern lines.
This Train also oonnocts at Bellaire with the Baltlmor
and Ohio R. R.
UTTbis Route is 30 miles shorter to Pittsburg,
ana more tnan iuu miles snorter to
New York, than Northern Lines.
Baggage Checked Through to all im
portant romta Jiast.
ASK FOB TICKBT8 TIA
BELLAIRE OR STEUBENVILLE.
Ticket Oaod arer cither Konte.
JNO. W.BROWN,
' Gen. Ticket Agent Central Ohio R. K.
I. A. HUTCHINSON,
, Gen, Ticket Agent Steubenville Short Line.
JelG
,
will
and
7111IvrjOL l. O-lll
coLtiniius, omo)
AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSE
A.nd Seed Store,
' '" DIALIS IN
GENERAL HARDWARE,
' NAILS, GLASS, BASH, PDTTT, C0RDAQ1, ' '
Onna, Plate!. WaodJc Willow Ware,
Htherand Kubbsr Belting, laee Leather,
Bos and
king.
eal-dl
GENTLEIIIEN'S ,. rVKNISIIING
GOODS.
Novelties In Neck Ties and Bcarfs.
, i. Byrea and Garrot Collar. 1 ' '
" KmhroHered Pocket llaBdksrshisfs. :
' Paris Kid Gloves, superior make. ,
" Golden Hill Shirts, various styles.
Boys' Golden Hill Shirts, do '.,
. Driving and Street Gloves, do ': . . .- .-.
,. Hemmed Pocket Handkerehlefa, various style.'
' Half Hose and Under Garments, .
BAIN fc BON,
aprllS " ' No. 19 Booth High street.
SOMETHING: NEW;;
HOWARD & GO'S.
'AMERICAN 'TVATCIIES.
piAlit, AT FfO. 83. BOtfTU niOII st
V- ua cxaniiija our ucw aUKevc vi (
AMERICAN WATCHES,
manafaetarsd by I. HOWARD et 00 .' Boston. Ifaas
Taes Watohee are far superior to aaythmg srtr etTered
to tbe public, heretofore. Having Uie uclesiv ageacy,
I can sell Ihsm at prions to suit the times. I have just
ijoi.vq m hub" ..w ' l
: ', !, .:,, AMERICAN
maaafaotttnd by APPLBTON, TRACT, at 00 I alio,
In assortsMntof v . i O :., It . ":;9 J. .-.vr
JKHG1.INU AND MWI89 WATCHES,
... U toU and lUwCa, at fasilo prices. '
to Statesman
TIB KB.
Dally, par year.. f s 00
TriWeokly, psr rear..... sou
Weekly, per yeat ion
Gen. Scott and the Adailuielratlen.
We copy tbe following from the New York
Time of the 2flih:.. .-,.
GEN. SCOTT AND THE CABINET—THE DUTY OF
THE PRESIDENT.
1
1
a
The following; oararrraDh aoDears (a the
Washington oorrcipondence to the Tribune;
"Mr. Moses a. urinnell does Hecretarv
Cameron jrreat lojostloe when he places upon
mm tne responsiDiuty or reiusing regiments 01
monnted men. We have pretty good reason
for knowing that Secretary Cameron has ac
oepted regiments that have been refused bv
Gen. Scott, who, with hit peculiar iteration of
manner repnea, ! aon't want any cavalry, Kir;
I don't want any cavalry, Sir. My plan of
campaign doesn't require cavalry, Sir.' It is
but justice to the President and Cabinet that the
country should know that Oen. Scott hat had
full control of all the tear mowmenle and alto
organized the eolumnt, appointed the eflietri, and
tflutrd the time and points of attack at Bull'
Run."
So far as the Dreoarationofthe armv for the
special service assigned it is concerned, it is
undoubtedly true that Gen. Scbtt did have fall
control. He probably did "organize the col
umns, and appoint the officers j" and be may
have "selected tbe time and points of attack at
Bull's Run," after that attack bad been per
emptorily ordered by his superiors, though we
are inclined to believe that these details were
confided to Brig.-Gen. McDowell, who was on
the spot, ana who could form, from a personal
examination of the approaches, a much better
opinion as to the points of attack than Gen
Scott. The fact that both the time and point
of attack were cbaosed by Gen. McDowell
proves, indeed, that in this respect, be was left
to the exercise of bis own judgment. The orig
inal purpose was to attack tbe enemy's posi
tion on Thursday afternoon or Friday morning,
by turning it on the south side: and Gen. Mc
Dowell went personally with Col. Hclntzelman's
colnmn to superintend the attack. But ht
found the roads on that side impracticable for
neavy artillery, ana on mat account abandon
ed the plan. Friday was devoted to a survey
on tbe other flank, and there be found tbe roads
in such a condition as to justify the attempt to
turn tne enemy's position on that Bide. Tbe
fact that Gen. DcDowell thus chanced the time
of attack from Friday to Snnday, and the point
of attack- irom tne southern to tbe Northern
flank, shows that tbe control of theae details
waa confided wholly to him by Gen. Scott, and
we presume every one will concede that this
discretion was wisely exercised, and the change
judicious.
Hut all this leaves tbe main point untouched
The question in, Who dteided that the attack
should ht made? Who determined that the
road to Richmond should be by Manassas Junc
tion 7 Who is responsible for the plan of oper
ations by which a battle at this point, selected
by the rebels themselves,' admirably adapted for
defense, fortified through three long months of
incessant laoor, accessible to their relntorce
ments from both directions, and in all respects
precisely such a position as they might wish to
make it, became a matter or necesaityT I be
paragraph quoted above, for tbe purpose of re
lieving the President and Cabinet, throw tbe
responsibility npon Gen. Scott We have not
the slightest desire to involve the President and
Cabinet in any responsibility that does sot be
long to them; but, on the other hand, we do
not intend that Gen. Scott shall be loaded with
blame for acts whiah were done by others.
We knout that Gen. Scott was opposed to this
plan of the campaign from the beginning; he
deemed it unwise to make Richmond the main
point of tbe movement; but alter that bad been
decided against bim, he was opposed to march
ing against it by the longest and most difficult
route, through a country every foot of which
would be obstinately defended, and which must
be held by a strong force after it had ance been
taken. This we know to be true and in spite
of the delicacy of such disclosures, we shall not
hesitate to state the authority for it. It is that
of Gen. Scott himself.
On tbe Tuesday preceding the battle, Gen
Scott, at bis own table, in presence of bis aids
and a single guest, discussed tbe whole subject
of this war, In all its parts, and with tbe utmost
clearness and accuracy, lie bad a distinct,
and well defined opinion on every point connect
ed with it, and stated what his plan would be
for bringing it to a close, if the management of
it bad been left in his bands. The main object
of tbe war, be said, was to bring tbe people of
the rebellious 8tates to feel tbe pressure of the
Government; to compel them to return to their
obedience and loyalty. And this must be done
with tbe least possible expenditure ot lire, com
patible with the attainment ol the object. No
Christian nation can be justified, he said, in
waging war in such a way as shall destroy 501
lives, when tbe object of the war oan be attain
ed at a cost of 50U, Every man killed beyond
the number absolutely required, is murdered.
Hence, he looked upon all shooting of pickets,
all scouting forays not required In order to ad
vance the general object of the war, all, destruc
tion 01 lire, on either side, wnicn did not con
tribute to the general result, as so many acts
01 nojusunable homicide.
' If the matter had been left to bim, be said,
he would have commenced by a perfect block
ade or every southern port on tbe Atlantic and
the Gulf. Then be would bave collected a large
force at the Capital for defensive purposes,
ana another large one on the Mississippi lor
offensive operations. The summer months,
during which it is madness to taks troops South
of St. Louis, should have been devoted to tacti
cal instruction; and with the first frosts of au
tumn he would have taken a column of BO.UOu
well disciplined troops down the Mississippi,
and taken every important point on that river,
new urieans included, it could have been
done, be said, with greater ease, with lees loss
of Hie, and with far more important results than
wonld attend tbe marching of an army to Rich
mond. At eight points tbe river would proba
bly have been defended, and eight battles would
have been neoessary ; but in every one of them
success could have been mado certain for ua
The Mississippi and tha Atlantio ones ours, the
southern States would have been compelled,
by the natural and inevitable pressure
events, to seek, by a return to the Union, es
cape from tha ruin that would speedily over
whelm them out of it. "This," said he, "was
my plan. But I am only a subordinate. It is
my business to give advloe when it is asked,
and to obey ordeit when they are given.
shall do it. There are gentlemen in tbe Cabi
net who know much more about war than I do,
and who have much greater Influence tban
have in determining the plan of tha campaign.
There never was a more just and upright man
tban the President never oae who desired more
sincerely to promote tbe best Interest of the
country. But there are men among his advisers
who consult their own resentment lar more
tban the dictates of wisdom and experience
and these men Will probably decide the plan
tha campaign, i snau ao, or attempt, what
ever 1 am ordered to ao. uat tney must not
bold me responsible. If I am ordered to go
Riohmohd, I shall, endeavor to do it. But
know perfectly well that they have no concep
tion ot tbe aiiiionities we snau encounter.
know the oouotry how admirably adapted It
to defense, and bow resolutely and obitlnetely
It will be defended. ' I wonld Ilka nothing bet
ter that to take Richmond now that it baa
been disgraced by becoming the Capital of the
rebel Confederacy, I feel a resentment toward
It, and should like nothing better than to scatter
Its Conereea to tbe winds. But I have livsd
long enough to know that human resentment
a very Dad foundation ora puono policy; ana
these gentlemen will live long enough to learn
It also. I shall do what I am Ordered. ' I shall
fis-ht whan and where I era commanded. But
I am compelled to fight before I am ready, they
shall not hold me responsible. . These gentle
men must take the responsibility of their aota,
I take that of mint. But
mti.t , l. . . L . - ., ....
k.nl1.M ' -
uv. iuiv. siieir reanonairiintw nn mm
llils U the lubgUnoe and very nearly tha
language of a portion of Gen. Scott's eooveraa
iloo o i tho occasion referred to. It nrnvc. m..
cluslyely that he was opposed to tbe advance
upon Kicbmond by way of Manassas at that
time, and also that the Administration waa al
most certain to overrule bis objections and com
mand a battle. Taken In connection with what
was said la the House of Representatives on
Wednesday, It leaves no doubt on the subject :
Mr. Ricbardion I repeat that Gen. Scott
bad been forced to fight tbia battle. , I will tell
him what occurred yesterday morning. My
colleague (Logan and Washburne) and myself
" prawns witn trie President, becretary of
War, and Gen. Scott. In tbeoourae of our oon
rersation, Gen. 8cott remarked, ' I am the ble-
gest coward in the world . T PreeaA favtm ma Saaaat-
Buy said Gen. Scott: I will nrove It. i
t It Tfr oe t?ttle ia mJ iudgnieat, and
MmiWA ww B wn
day lor doing it. As God is mv iud ' h
added, alter an interval of silence, X did all In
my power to make tbe armv efficient. nrt I
serve removal because I did not stand np when
I could, and did not.' I stand here to vindioata
uen. con. i am indebted to the gentleman
from Missouri for the compliment he gave me.
I desire to sav for myself that I am hr th.
last of a feneration, mv father and pranrif.ll...
barlug lalien beneath the flag of their country.
I, too, bare foueht under ita iolda at
aoroaa, ana, uoa willing, there I will stand to
the end of my life, defending It sgahut all
a was
. "Mr. Washburne As my colleague has re-
ierrea to uen. Ncott'i remarka. h minht .im
anuae to wnac tne President said.
"Mr. KIcbardson I will do so. 'Your con
versation implies.' Said the PrMtdnnf. tn flan
Scott, 'thai I forced yoo to battle.' To which
Gen. Scott replied, 'I have never served under
a President who has been kinder to me tban
you have been.' But Gen. Scott did not relieve
the President from the fact of tbe latter having
forced him to fight the battle. Gen. Scott thus
paid a compliment to tbe President personally."
We repeat what we said yesterday, that Pres
ident Lincoln is not likely, of his own motion,
to have overruled Gen. Scott and to have forced
bin to fight a battle against bis will. But
President Lincoln is, to a verv ereat extent. In
such a matter as this, in the hands of bis Cabi
net. A portion of that "Cabinet is known to
nave iuu and entire confidence In lbs military
ability of Gen. Soott; while another portion is
equally well known to be areverned bv senti
ments of personal dislike which amount almost
to natrea. it is not necessary to specify indi
viduals. It is a matter of notoriety that some
members of tbe Cabinet have done little else
during the last few weeks, tban to denounce
Gen. Scott, ridicule his plannof the campaign,
and declaim on the necessity of overruling ot
superseding him . Tbey have succeeded in over
ruling bim, with what results the country knows
w well
now, we bave not the slightest wish to see
anything like a break up of this Administration.
Such an event, in tbe p'fesent condition of the
country, could only be fruitful in disaster. But
it is indispensably necessary for the President to
aeciae, peremptorily and finally, between Gen
bcott and those who would overrule him. Tha
great interest of the country now lie in th
army. Its military department is the depart
ment of overwhelming interest and importance.
Its finances and its foreign relations are In good
bands; and there should be not a moment's hesi
tation in placing at the head of the War De
partment some man of larger views, of more ex
periene, and of more commanding personal rep
utation than the present Incumbent Aod, above
all, the country should know at once whether it
may still lean upon tbe great military genius
and experience of the Lieutenant-General of our
armies, or whether we are to be thrown back
upon the new crop of Generals and statesmen
who are striving to grasp the power that rests
in his hacds. Let tbe President make np bis
own mind on this point, and then make bis Cab
inet a unit npon it. If the Blairs and Greeleys,
and the radical contemners of experience and
science in military matters, are to bear sway,
let it be undisputed. Let them have full poi
eeeeion of tbe Government, aod take all tbe re
sponsibility of its ruin, if not let them retire
and give place to men of cooler temper and of
wiser beads. The worst thing the President
can do in this crisis is to hesitate, and allow
things to atrit at random, as they are now doing.
Denouncing the Administration.
I
I
of
to
I
I
is
is
If
we were to speak in strong lan
guage against tne policy or acts ot tbe Admin
istration at Washington, we should feel quite
relieved from tbe obligation reeting npon us, in
virtue of the manner in which the Republican
journals are treating the Preaideut and his oflT
ciai advisers. Among tne numerous Republi
can papers in this city, there are not more tban
one or two, or at most tbree, which do not ha
bitually, and in bard terms and language, de
nounce the Administration; some upon one pre
text ana some npon otners; out all agreeing
substantially in tbe opinion that the manage
ment of tbe war, and the policy of the Govern
ment, are not snob as the exigencies of the coun
try demand. The most notable exception to
this remark, is ta ionrnal started without po
litical professions, and ostensibly to promote
other and better objects than partisan triumphs,
but which at this moment, mote than any of
its eotemporaries, Is tbe organ of the Adminis
tration. '
While we may not differ from the Republican
press npon the leading fact alleged, via : the in
competency of the Administration, we should
unquestionably dissent from some of the points
made by our eotemporaries, and feel called np
on to defend the President from the unjust and
intemperate assaults of its prolessed friends.--
it is no part oi our purpose to mingle in tbe
quarrel going on between the Republican edit
ors, or to assist in determining who among tbem
ail is most responsible tor urging on the move
ment ot the army before it was prepared, In
military point of view, to take the field. Prob
ably the pnblio will have no difficulty In deter
mining tbte point, since tbe din of tbe war cry,
" Forward to Richmond," has not yet ceased to
resound in the ears of tbe public, especially
that portion wno are readers of tne journal in
question. But we do not think it quite fair that
under cover of tbe " atop thief " cry against
the Tribune, the others shall escape their just
share of the responsibility for the disasters
which our army has suffered. ,
It is not quite manly for the press, after urg
ing the Government to begin tbe fight, after
Inflaming the publio mind and holding out the
vain expectation that the Federal army was go
ing to march speedily and triumphantly against
the enemy, now that mislortuoes bava come
upon ue, to step on one side and let the whole
loroe and eneotof tbe blow fall upon tbe Admin'
Istratlon. It would be more dignified, more
manly, more last, to acknowledge their own
error and lack of understanding of tbe true state
ot the oase, and to sustain rather tban abandon
tho f resident, who against bis own judgment
and tbe remonstrances or Lieat.-uensrai bcott,
baa been forced by publio opinion, speaking
through a partisan press, to attack a superior
force, protected by the most scientific and effect
ive defenses known to the art of war. Now that
tha result of their own lack of discernment and
appreciation of tbe real obstacles in our way has
been made manifest, it is unjust and unworthy
of an independent press, to skulk the responsi
bility, by throwing uwnoiiy npon ine Aamiois
tration. Let os not be misunderstood. , Wa do
not approve of all, or of tbe leading aota ol tha
President, la connection . with the war. Wa
have expressed our dissent In temperate and
respectful terms, leaving to his friend the auk
of assailing him, and ot threatening to supersede
him b more supple Instruments..
,IIad. It not been for the Intemperate baste
tha Republican papers, and the ne less euioldai
advice of oertaia membera of Congress, tha
President would doubtless have deferred to tbe
wish of General Soott. and postponed tha move
ment of tha armv until such time aa it could
Ht out with a fair prospect of sucoees, and with
oat tha oertalnty at encountering disaster at the
verr tbreshhold or the campaign, we have
seen no reason to doubt the good intention
President Lincoln. But be bad not ths stamina
to resist the blood-thirsty demands of those to
whom be ia Indebted for official elevation; and
aia Administration, thua early, ha fallen a vic
tim to tbe partisanship which has ruled it and
bim since his entrance npon office. JV. Y.Jour-aelsf
Commerce. ;
of
of
STONE'SJAZAAR.
No. 4 Gwvnne Block.
A. P. STONE & WRAMk
ABB NOW KECEITINOTIIKIRWirt
1KB GOODS, and invite th nubile to inspect
them. Me soon stock of Goods has aver been bronsbt to
this market. The South, in consequence of th failure
of the grain crop, has not been able lo purchase the ue
nal quantity of rich goods, and this fact has forced the
Importers to sell them at publio auotioa. Our buyer
(Mr. Stone) beiag tn New Tork at theae large sales, took .
advantage of them, and we oan and will sell our goods
here, at less than any one who purchased two weeks slnoe,
paid for them In Mew York. Our stock is complete In
every department of '
fcLfcUANT DRESS SILKS, X
UriOMAN VELOURS,
I i BROCHE VALENCIA8,
. J PRINTED MEBINOS,
PRINTED COBURGS,
DYED COBUGS;
BLACK ALPACAS,
ORLEANS,
FANCY WOVEN FABRICS,
ALL WOOL DELAINES,
POPLINS, PRINTS,
DELAINES.
SHAWLS AND CLOAKS!
Five Thausand Dollars Worth
' Bought in One Day,
LADIES FURS,
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT.
lien's, Ladies and Children's Under Shirt and Drawers;
Ladles, Hisses and Children's Hosiery of all kinds, in
Wool and Lamb's Wool; fleecy Lined and Cotton 0 loves
of every make.
ALSO
A complete assortment of all tbe usual varie
ties of . ,
LADIES' CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES,
OVERCOATINGS,
TWEEDS,
FLANNELS, '
RIBBONS,
DRESS TRIMMINGS,
Ladies and Gent's Linea Cambrio Hand
kerchiefs, Ac, &c.
To persons who call on as, we pledge onr words to
show them the largest, best and cheapest stock of Ooods
ever seen in this market, or pay them one dallar per
hour while looking.
dccl-dly2taltw. STONS Jt O'HaBKA.
NEW ARRIVALS
OF
Spring & Summer Millinery.
The Stock Replenished
DAILY
mojl LATEST 1JIPOKTAT1WNS OF
NEWYORK
MY STOCK Of
Spring & Summer Millinery
Is now complete, comprising every variety of M nin
ety; also, a large assortment of Embroideries, Hosiery
and Notions, Ito., and In quantities and prices that can
not fail to suit all who may favor us with a call. Th
goods havs been bought at Panic prices, and will be sold
at a small advance on cost.
MILLIHEET
Miss M. E. YOUNG, late of New York City,
will superintend the Millinery Dtpartment. Her long
experience in the most Fashionable Establishment in
Broadway will alone be a warranty that she will be able
to give entire satisfaction in matters of taste to all wbo
may favor her with their orders.
The Ladies ot Columbus and vicinity will please ac
cept my sincere thanks for their liberal patronage, and
I would respectfully solicit a conlinuanee of Ibe same.
R. H. WARE,
68 East Town St., Cslnmlins, O.
TO WHOM IT MAT CONCERN.
The Public Works of Ohio.
Orrica or rat Lessen or tus Peine Works,!
Oolumbfs, June 13, Itttll. j
Till nndrrslsned having become th Lessees or ths
Public Works of Ohio, under the act of May 8. 180 1 .
and having entered Into lb possession of said Works,
hereby give notice tnst in operating unuer sain tesse,
and discharging their dnties under the same, the busi
ness will be transacted with the publio through agent
appointed by the Lessees, under such rules, regulations,
reatricUona and limitations, as shall be prescribed for
their government.
Those A genu for the present, will consist of one Gen
eral Agent, a Treasurer and Secretary, for th Central
Office of the Lessees at Columbus; and ths necessary
number of Superintendents of Repairs and Collectors of
Tolls on the several Works embraced ta the lease.
The General Agent shall be the principal executive
offloerof th Lessees, aod shall have charge of th gen
eral business oftloe at Columbus, lie shall have super
vision over tbe basinets of the Lessees with ths public,
and aa such agent shall execute all contracts, except
those for labor and materials connected with the ordina
ry repair of the several Work, and he shall audit and
aettle all acoounte.
The duties of ths Treasurer and Secretary shall lie
suoh as ar usually discharged by similar officer in other
cases.
Th Superintendents of Bepair shall, on their re
spective divisions, have power to employ and discharge
all subordinates and laborers, and to purchase all tools
and materials neoessary tn the ordinary repair of suck
division, and the same shall be under their special di
rectlon and management.
Tbe Collectors oi lolls, water Bents ana s ines, ar
Invested with all the authority and power, provided in
tha law of the State and the mutations ol the Board
of Publio Works, mad for that purpose, when such Col-
lectors aciea unuer appomiiuau aau amuou. iruw
Bute.
No Individual member or lb Lessee shall nave tne ,
rfaht to transact business In ths name of the Lessees,
with any person or persons, la any othsr manner than :
througn the appointea agents, unites specialty muiin
ed by the Lessees so to do; nor shall any one of th ap- '
pointed agent hare authority to transaot any business ,
in the aunt or tne Lessees, exoem in mo parucuir
branch of th business eonfided to him, and subject to
the restrictions and limitations of his agency.
No authority to borrow money on th credit of th
Lessees, shall ever exist in any Lessee, agent or other
employe of tha loesses, unless tne earn snau o con
ferred by a unanimous vol of the Lessees, st a regalar
meeting, and the amount so authorised to be borrowed
specified in the order and entered on the journal. -
USO-. IV stamraifaT is uia vsbvibi Bgea, vi ui
ass- Bawaisu) J. Bsutu, Treasurer, and . Joan
Jovca, Secretary.
The Superintendents or Repairs are :
On the M. at a Canal and W. B as Road Josam
Coo ran, Thomib Baowa, Wa. I. Jacaaoa and A ex urn L.
Bicxoa.
On the Ohio, Walbondlng and Hocking Canals and the
Muskingnsa Improvement Bsaaa-r 11, Noma, Inoau
niLLau. iisaais joguabtht. PTbvnrn biphki mhi
Bowian Ball.
Tha Collector on the Canals, Muskingum Improve
ment and Maumee Road, ar th same that were in the
service of the Star at th tim of th xceutloa of tn
Leasei but all the aforesaid agents hold their appoint
ments at th pleasur and option of the Leiaees.
asnr tfanviB,
- JOSBPU COOPER,
, WM. J. JACKSON,
.. ARNOLD MBUBSbT,
. THOMAS MOORR, . .
THOMAS BROWN.
sf the Publio Work.
JU-d3law3 - ...',..; i- .
,i Tt-iar, T.iwiAv QiAa , s .
lylRHtSTED FABRIC
V V l.inen rniri rjosoms riain ana raney
' BIliniDKIVl MUll bUWD.i l.-m
,. . . Linea rlheetlngs and Pillow Oastngs. .....
... '. ... , Linea Cambrics and Long Lawn. . .
' ' 1inen Pocket -handk'fe, all else,
f.i.l i'u,y Llneu Towellings and Diaper
Linea Napkins aod D'Oy lies.- - i-'
. LlaeaTaklt Olotbaaod Satla Damask., .-,.,- .:
Linen Towel with colored borders.
Linen Stair Ooverings and Oih.
'Ht.il-!. r lor sal at lowprtoss. . r ,p
t BAIN fc ION,
saves - - - sie.viNuuiuiasuecn

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