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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, November 28, 1861, Image 1

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VOL. -VIIL NO. 14G
' NEW SERIES,
COLUMBUS, OHIO, TUDBSSDAY'HOENING. iW. 28. ISfil'
ljf &l)io Statesman
DAILY, TBl-WEIvTT. ABD WEEilY
, .MANYPENNY MILLER, ' '
I OgllSBISS :AHD:fSOPBIXXOBV
' i
s UT Office Hot. 86, 18 and 40, Sorth High It
TERMS IHVABIABLY IN ADVANCE, r
flail . t, . '. . . a 00
" By the Carrier, per week law mti.
trl-WesHy . . 100 per mr.
Weekly,
1 00
Jatmk ( AcVVertl.Inf by the aqarj.
naiquarc iin .io in
Od squar 3 WMki. .) 00
On WMki.. 3 00
On 11 lwtok... 1 71
On " 8 months 18 00
da
3d
On
3a
0 months
3 rnonthi
V months
1 month.
IS 00
10 00
8 00
5 00
On ""'I days... 1 00
On " idiji... 75
On " 1 Insertion 80
yplya advri!,ment half more than tht above
TJiUMCenl.1i1M f He4 t An iolumnof
ISoeelal Notices," ioullt tht ordinary rat4.
AU notices required to be published by ltw, legalrate.
If ordered on the Inslaoeaoluslvely titer the first week
per cent, more than the above rate; bat ell laoh wll
PPM in the Trt.WElwlLhoutehrg. , i
BiialncMOaril, not exceeding flve'llnes, per year. In
siJe, tii 50 per line; outside 2. ...
Notlocs of meeting, chart tables oetetli,n re eompant,
fee, half prlc. "
All trantitnt advtrtittmtntt mil bt paid for in
Iwjny fie rule will not b varied fro.: 7-.
t.kl,'i,Bm foaaath Pally, where the advertiser
seethe Weakly aloue. Where n Dally and Weekly
tie both aaed, then the charge forth Weekly Mill JU
No advertisement taken exoept for a deflnlt period.
BUSINESS CARDS.
CHKitTornra rut. itxrrr cHirrniotR.. .
FINE & CHITTENDEN,
. COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
29 : "VUYtll ; Otroot,
(Offle of Oily Judg,) :
NEW YORK.
Bm to
Hon. James Moncilef, N. T. Superior Ourt.'
Bon. II. B. Payne, Cleveland, 6. v
Hon. H. H. Hunter, Lancaster, O. i-
DOYV-Om
eT. VV YJLbITJJ. .
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
NOTARY PUBLIC, '
O'JS1 !,' 57 HI8n 8TRIKT, ODEON BTJILD
INft, oppoeltetheHuteUouse.
OollaoUona and other matter promptly attended to.
Beferenoe giren when required.
noTft-ly
JETonry BloeliLlor,
(Lat of Phalon'tEitabllihmsnt, M. X.,) .
PROPKIETOR OF THE NEW TOHK
anMV H" Cnttlng , Bhampoonlng
Oarllng and breaiing 8loont, -.
Bontfc High St., over Beua'a Store,
wher atUfctlon will ba given In all the raaioaf
branch..- . . .. -
til1' " ChU('S1' HaIr rlDf don lo th. best
Q A LT H O US E,
No. 178 North High Street, '
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
TWIS IIOTEI IS BUT ONE AND A
!.8CrA.K!!a. bom lbt to " Panon.ar
2S?l So".?.'?1" ? oa "e tralnl,
ping plac " dw'd,11' nTnlnt stop-
ofPrrin7-ted "P ' " bmn ot "'gni'or any
Term moderatt, to tult the time. ' -
0Uo
NATIONAL HOTEL,
NKAB UNION DEPOT,
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
TIR1I3...
octS3-4m
ONE DOLLAR PER DAT.
F. A. B. BWKJE3,
Attorney at Iiaw
.,. .AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Offloe Ambo Bnllding, opposite Capitol Square.
. , , 00LTJMBU8. OHIO,
Attorney & Counsellor at Law,
" MABION,OniO.
M. C. LILLEY.
BOOK
And Blank-Book ttana&ntarer, '
W0BTH HlflH ITM3T, OOIUMBUI, OHIO
nrll-dly . y ' ,
EAGLE BRASS WORKS,
Corner Spring A; Water 8U.,
poluiaatoUB, Ohio.
W. B. JP0TT3 & CO.,
MAOHXKTISTO,
And Manufacturer of Vrasa and Composition Oaatlnn
rtnished Bnws Work of all Description.
Electro PlatingTiid "Gilding !
STENCIL CUTTING, AC.
feel Hl-dly,fc .I' .-.: -...t
Colnmbns Wholesale Liquor Store
LACELLE ROSS & CO.,
QOni&SlOt pRCHANTS,
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS BT
Foreign and Domestic Wines; Brandies,
OLD RYE, MONONGAHELA & BOURBON
: "'-WHISKY. . 7
WAREHOUSE ANDbm0E, SS4 BOUIH HWH ST.,
COIUMBUS, OHIO. :'."-"
VM. II. RESTIEAUX,
(BUOOESBOR.TO McKEH t RESTIEAUJTJ ;
No. 106, South ; 'Higb;; Street,
"OoljXTlSalXlTJEe, :
j, i J DIALER IN "
C R O C E ft I E S, PRODUCE
PROVISIONS"- '
Foreign and Domestic ruits,
FLOUR, SALT, LIQU0R8. ETC
ij i ii i.. i j i n it 1 "it n',,''jK, i'
STORAGE & COMMlisiciM
WORCESTER'S
KOYAL QUARTO DICTIONARY.
The latent The EargeitTh Best,
The Cheapest Beoaaie the Best,
Tli idoct UellabJ atanaard Au
thority ml tbe Enf Uebtiansjaaffw.tt
8im ffimdmt Xmirnni Sdwatort of Ohio,
"in BEST ENGLISH DI0TI0NABX EXTANT."
irary Mm JPvmywHtrt, !
"'He i a ar upward of Hundred Thousand Werds,
who mulllfarlou meanings ud derlrattou, to rather
with the! i comet spelling, aud pronuxlaUoa ar dearly
tb(or th .' , , m
Otnotnnatt Cbmtrnreiat. '
Btad tit DeoUlont of tha iTmbtrt of tU Ohio Salt
. i ; .: . - HkkK' Auooiation.
Th undersigned, member of th Ohio Stat Teachers'
Association, adopt and aim to use In teaching, writing
and speaking, the orthography and pronunciation of
Worcester' Boral Qnarto Dictionary, snd we most cor
dially recommend It a th moat relUbl atandard au
thority of th English language, a it la now written and
spoken.
. Loam Ajrntawa, Preildent Kenyon College, i
U. D. LcoasTT, Superintendent Zsnesrll Schools.
Taos. W. Haktiy, oop't lla.il Ion Union Bcboois.
' M. t. Oowraur, Sup't Public Schools, Sandusky.
Jon Lrnoa, Sup't Publlo Schools, Clrelerllle.
8. N. Sutroao, Principal Olereland female Bemlna-
Wm. Unoantt, BnpH Public Schools, lit. Union.
Joan Oootx, Principal Htata Normal School, Minne
sota. .
Ones ITaeosr, Principal fourth Intermediate School,
Cincinnati.
H. B. ktaaToi, Bnp't Canton Union Schools.
Bowm Hntt, Principal klcNeely Normal School,
tu T. TarrAH, Prof. Mathematics, Ohio University.
Wat. W. Edwards. Sup't Troy Union School.
A. a. Hokum, Principal West High Bchool, Cleve
land. B. A. Nostoh, Associate Principal High School, Olere
land. '
Toiobori Btiuliko, Principal High Bchool, Olen
land.
B. I. HoauTOH, Principal Olereland Institute.
J. A. OiartiLD, President of Electlc Institute, Hi
ram. W. L HaMtis, Prof, of Ohemlstry, Ohio Wesleyan
UnlTerslty.
H. H. BAB.MIT, Ez-0mmlsstoner of Common Schools,
Ohio.
Jasus Momoa, Prof. Bbetorlc, Oberlln Oollege.
Tao. Hill, President Antloch College.
0. W. II. Oathcart, I'rof. Mathematics, High
School, Dayton. .
8. 0. CRDHMcea, Prof. Language, High School.
Dayton.
6. 11. BaMaH, Bup't Union Schools, Ashland.
Hot Vim mm Bundrtd otlur PrtHimt of OolU
at; froftttori, AutKort and DUtinaitittod Educa
tor, tae mdorud tht abovt ttntimmt. .
'presidents of colleges IN OHIO.
afaJtiBTTA CoLLwa "It Is truly a magnificent work,
an honor to th author, th publisher i, and the whole
ountry," President Andrew.
Ohio WeslbYar Uritirsitt It tzceed my expecta
tions. It wll be my guide in orthography and pronun
ciation, and will often ba consulted by me for Its neat
and accural definitions." President Thompson.
W. B. EcLRCTto Oolusb- "Heretofore wa hareused
Webster's orthography. At recent meeting of our
faculty, It was decided to ahanae it to conform to that
of Worcester's Boyal Qoarto Dictionary." Presldeat
Garfield. ..
WaartRR Bnaavx Coixcai. "I find It worthy of
cordial approbation." President Hitchcock.
' OatRUR Colmos. "It mora than meets my expecta
tion.. I recommend It as tho standard authority In
orthoepy to my children and my pupils." President
Morgan.
Aimoca Oollmi. "I adopt and aim to us In teach
isg, wrltlngand speaking, the orthography and pronun
ciation ot Worcester' Moyal Quarto Dictionary.''
President Hill,
' ''in all my writing, speaking, and teaching, I hare en
dearored to conform to th rules for orthography and
pronunciation a contained In Worcester's Dictionary."
Horace Mann, late PreeidenU
Krrtom Oollhr, Qambiis. 'I most cordially recom
mood It aa th moat reliable standard authority of tbe
English language aa It Is now written and spoken."
President Andrews.
SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS OF OHIO.
From Rvo. Anton Smyth, Oommittiontr of Common
Sohooit in Ohu.
"Th Dictionary la an Imperishable monument to the
learning and industry of Its author, and an honor to th
world of letters. Th mechanical execution Is fr supe
rior to that of any other Lexicon with which I am ac
quainted,"
From Bon. B. B. Barmy, Xas-OommUtUmtr ot
Bchoolt in Ohio.
"Th most reliable atandard authority of th lan
guage." ,
WHAT TBB
Ijeadins Newspaper of Ohio Say.
Irom tht Clttttani Etrald of March SIS.
Th orthography of th Worcester Dictionary I that
DJ BWj II BUI ll. uwiwi vi uinvuivuvu u w.i
country and England, and conforms to the general usage
- . 1 . . -1 1 .( ..I In Ih .
nf nnlinan, writer, and sneakers.
Whatever prejudices may bar existed preriously, a
careful study of this rolume will Inrarlably be followed
by a warm appreciation or us greai menu, ana a unire
to add It to Ih well selected library, be It large or email,
It la a library in Itself, and will remain an Imperisha
ble record of the learning of Its oompller.
Irom tht Cincinnati Commtrcial of April SO.
Hera ar uowardsof a hundred thousand words good.
bad and indifferent whose multifarious meanings and
derivations, together with their correct spelling and pro
nunciation, are set clearly before the eye. The work is
unquestionably tbe greatest Thesaurus of English Words
Tr published.
Irom tht CUmland PlaindeaUr of Sept. 80, 16C0.
tTUantlv WoRcxmm's BotIl Odarto Dictiorart U
not only tht latt, but tht aaar wort of tht kind rvtr it
ewd.sndcan by no possibility sutler by oomparlson or
ooctroT.ny.
TromihtTMtioBlaitof May).
to ntoKDRCiATioK, WoRcrsraa is tb BtardaRd
followed by our best authors; In definition he leaves
nothing to be desired, and In ORinosRArar it it sufficient
to say that Woacarraa oan be safely followed. . ,
: . INOIIAirX it BUAGC, -
PnbUeUera, Bookeellera ft Statlonvra,
NO. 101 SUPERIOR ST., CLEVELAND, OHIO,
mat . p
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT '
LIEE INSURANCE COMPANY,
3NTo-WvrlS.f Nm a7.
Dividend January l 180 1 45 Pr Cent.
ASSETS e3,812,Ho 50,
Statement January It 1861
Balance, per statement Jan. 1st, 18G0....t3, 406,561 S9
Received for Premium dur
ing the year Utu gtij.ioa 33
Received for Interest during
the year IcoO 8M.DM 18
Total reoelnta for 18G0.... 977,(W7 74
Paid 0 lalms by Death,i7,O50 00
Paid Policies surren
dered 41.H1 xv
Paid Salaries, Poit-
ag, Taxea, Ez-
chamre. Mo 81.020 54
Paid Commissions to
Aaenta Sl,3!3 3u
Paid Pbysiotana' fees. 5,000 75
Paid Annuities. 1,517 00
Paid Dividend, dur
ing the year , 190,500 75 565,091 03 411,978 14
Vet Balance .January 1st, 1861. . ,
.13,818,558 50
ASSETS.
Cash on hand i6,(B84 19
Bonds and Mortgagee on Beal (
Estate, worth doubl th
amount loaned 8,327,84188
Premium Mote, on Policies
In fore, only drawing Spar " " ' ' '
oent. Interest. 1,979.884 17
Real Estate 90.893 87
Loans on Scrip 5,83144
Premluma,NotesandOash, In
course of transmission..., ' 45,S43 73
Total Atete......Ai
3,81258
T,ST5 Policies in force, Insuring.. ....8a,486838
1,433 new Policies hay been Issued during the year.
. After a careful calculation of th present value of th
outstanding Policies of th Company, and having th
ntetttary amount In reserve therefor, the Directors
bar declared a dividbk. oi per cent, on tn rreml
am natd at tha tabl rate, to all policies for lite In force.
iMued prior to January 1, 1800, payable according to th
present rate ot tbe Company.
Bateefbr all kind of Lite Contingencies, Prospect
uses, Statements, and Applications, will ba furnished
without CHARea,. at th Office or Agencies of the Con
pany. ; . .
ROBT. I.. PATTBRBON, President.
L. 0. GR0VBR,Vlo President.
BENJ. 0. MILLER, Secretary,
i .. g. H. Bii"OI, Agmi,
No. 4 Johnson Block,
March 88, 1881. v . Columbus, 0.
TJ I A1II;A h d figured black
X DRUBS BILKS, of aver? wrad. The moat .elect
teeertaent to the city, and at noat reasonabl rate.
i BAIN At BON,
PlUB V.ntoLhHlghitrai
1861. 1862.
Winter Arrangement—Time
Changed.
GREAT NORTHERN AND EASTERN ROUTE.
CLEVELAND, COLUMBUS
CLEVELAND, COLUMBUS AND
CINCINNATI
RAILROAD.
OonoecUcg at Oreslllne with th PITTSBURGH, f T.
WAYNE at. OHI0A0O RAILROAD
For Pitt&uroh, PMladtlplUa and BalUmort. Mto
for Fort Waynt and Chicago.
Connecting at Olereland with the LAKE SHORE RAIL
. ... t . .. ... BOAD . ' - 4 -
For Dunkirk:, Buffalo, Albany, Boa
ton, ana New fork.
TWO TRAINS DAILY,
EXCEPT SUNDAY,
from Columbus, In connection with Tralnl on tha
tlTTliB TIIAini AND COLTJiriBl'S
AND XliWIA KAIa.BtAIS.
PIRBT TRAIN.
NIOHI EXPRESS Leaves Columbus at 1:50 A. M.;
will lasr passengers at all station, atoo at Delaware
Cardlngton, Ollead, Gallon, and at alUtetlons North of
Gallon, and at all other stations upon slgual, arrirlog at
u leveiana at v.u a. si., imnnirk t:vu r. eunalo
8:05 P. M., Albany 6:13 A. M., New Yoik IS M., Boston
3:30 P. M.
S800ND TRAIN. .
. NEW YORK EXPRESS-Leaves Oolumlmsat 11 J P,
M.; will leave passengers at all stations. Greenwich,
Rochester, Columbia and Olmsted being Flag stations,
this train will not stop for passengers except upon sig
nal. Arrive at Oifvaland 6:30 P. M., Dunkirk S A. M.,
Buffalo 4:35 A. M , Albany 4:15 P. M., New York 9:50
P. M., Bos ion 18:80 A. M.
CONNECTIONS.
At Crestline with Pittsburgh, ft. Wayne end Oblcago
Railroad for Pltuburgh, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Also for Chicago.
At Shelby, with Sandusky, Mansfield and Newark Rail
road, for all points on that road. Alto for Toledo.
At Grafton, with Olereland and Toledo Ballroad for
Toledo and Chicago.
At Cleveland, with Lake Shore Railroad for Bite.
Dunkirk, Buffalo, New York and Boston.
Patent Sleeping Cars are ran on all
Mgnt Trams to Chicago, Sew
York and Boston.
Baggagt ditched Through to Nu York and Boston
via atntland; alto, to Philadelphia and
Hv Yorkvla CretUint.
RETURNING.
Night Express arrives stOolumbus at... 1:30 A. M
Cincinnati lixpress arrives at Columbus at 1:30P.M.
Faro aa Low aa by anyotner Route.
Atk for Tickets via Crettlintor Cleveland.
E. 8. FLINT,
fupertntendent, Cleveland, Ohio.
JAMES PATTERSON, Agent.
Columbus, Ohio,
Columbus, Not 16, 1601.
30
CANADIAN & U2HTED STATES MAIL
STEAMERS
TU AND t'MOJTl
LONDONDERRY, GLASGOW.
Liverpool, Montreal, Quebec,
and
'JXTJJW, YORK. .
The Montreal Ocean Steamship Company's flrst-olas
ill-powered Olyde-built Steamers sail every Nata
nrday from PORTLAND, carrying tba Canadian and
United States Mall and passengers,
NORWEGIAN, NORTH AHXRI0AN,
BOHEMIAN, ' . ANGLO-SAXON,
NORTH BRITON,' HIBKRNIAN,
CANADIAN, NOTABCOTIAN.
Snorteats Cneapeat andQulcltcat Cou
veyanco iront
AXERICi TO ALL PASTS 07 XTO0FX.
Ratea ot Famtaxgfi to Europe,
830, $63. $80.
Will sail from LIVERPOOL everr Wednesday.
and from QUEBEC every Saturday, calling at
LONDONDERRY, to receive on board and land Malls and
Passengers, to and from Ireland and Scotland.
inpTheae Bteamera are built of iron, tn watertight
compartments, carry eaoh an axperienotd Burgeon, and
every attention la paid to tha comfort and accommoda
tion or rMenger. A loey proceed direct to LONDON
DERY, tBOjieat risk and delay of calling at St. Joan's
I avoided.
Glasgow passenger ar furnlscsd with ran ramus
tickets to and from Londonderry.
Kelurn tickets granted at reduced rates.
Oertlllcatea Issued for carrying to and bringing out pas-
tengers from all the principal towns of Great Britain and
Ireland, at reduced rates, by this line of steamers, and
by tha WASHINGTON LINE Of BAILING PACKETS,
leaving Liverpool every week.
I if ht Draf ta for and upward pay-
acie in t,ngiano. ireinna, scov-
land or Wale
for pasture. enr
ly at th Offloe. 83 Bit OA HI.
WAY. New York,
t and 18 W A Hi II S I M
Liverpool,
BABEL 4 8XASLZ, General A genu,
Or to- J. R. ARMSTRONG,
nolO-lyJtw Post Office, Columbus, Ohio,
GUERNSEY'S BALMI
GUERNSEY'S BALM
REtUOVES AND PBE VENTS 1N
nammatlon and. pain, and heals th worst burn.
scald, bruise, cut .or fresh wound of any kind, prevents
swelling and pain from be stings, mosquito bites, sad
poisonous plants, neuralgia, rneumattam, agu in the
breast, salt rheum, etc. When taken Internally, It will
positively cure croup tn children, and gives Immediate
relief In th worst oas of this terribl oomplalnti also,
removes hoarseness and sore throat. Price, 85 center
bottle. Should be In eve house, for sale by Drug
gist and Storekeeper. IRV1H STONE,
boi rropnetoi, n npruce it .new York
oottdawlyla.
No real Justice can be done the above preparation
but by procuring and reading descriptive pamphlets A
be found with all dealer, or will be sent by Proprietor
on demand. Formula, and Trial Bottles sent to Physi
clans, who will find development In both worthy tnilr
acceptance and approval.
Oorrespondane solicited from all Whose necessities oi
ourloslty prompt to a trial of tha above reliable Rem
dies.
for sale by the usual wholesale and retell doaler
veiywhtr. , .,,....,.
JOHN 1 UTJNNEWELL, Froprieto
OHEMIBT AMD rHARJUCItmBT.? , ,
No. 9 Commerel&l Wharf, Boeton, Mai
Robert a Bamuel. V. B, Marple. J. R. Cook. J. M
Denlg, Q. Denlg fc Sons, A. J. Schueller A Bon. Agent
tor Columbus, Ohio. . myl-dly
Baltimore. Clothing House.
HESS , cS3 HIaTJIVI
IfARGfAOTUREal ARB WBOUOUJJI BSALBRS IR
READY-MADE CLOTHING.
No. 308 W, Baltimore-street,
(avrvrtx uaxttTf am nowau,)
' ' BAliTlnORE Bid.
A large Auortment ol Fleet and rnrniahln,
Good Conitastly on Hand '
OctSOMly ... .
ladies' linen Pocket-Handk'fi. -V
HERimED STITCHED UREA HAND
kerchiefs, very wide hem.
Embroidered Linen Handk's all price.
Hemmed Btltched and plain do, do. -
do ' do colored border. ;
Mourning do black border
d0. . ?' alytecroas stitched. -
Pin Apple do new patterns.
MisaerPlaln and Hemmed KH.-h- .n -m.
Oomprtslng th moat eelect assortment In th city and
V , 1 BAIN BON,
tebW " ' w, "oath High Stmt.
T) O K It F, T S , RIBQONS TABS, Alta
BAIST At BMf
apriU - 5-tt Beats BlaAatn.il
Winter Arrangement.
Little Miami Columbus & Xenia
RAILROADS.
For Cinolnnati, Dayton & Indianapolis!
Through to IndWtoolia wllhoat Change of Cmi,
aad bat One Change of Cart between ,
Colnmboa anil Bt. LonU; : . ! .
On and After Monday, November
Four Trains Daily irom Columbus.
FIRST TRAIN.
NIGHT EXPRESS, vm Dayton, all a. m.. stocolni
at London, X.nla, Dayton, Ulddletywn and Hamilton,
arriving at Cinolnnati at 7:40 a. m. ; and at Dayton at
5:05 a. m. oonbeotlng at Olodanatl for Louisville, Yin-
eennes, Jt. Louis, and all points Southwest; arriving
at Bl. Cools at II JO p. m. oonneoilng at Dayton for
Indianapolis, Lafayette, Terra Haute, Chicago, and all
polnta West; arriving at Indianapolis at 10:40 a. m
SECOND TRAIN. . ,
A000MMODATIQM at 8:80a. atopptna at all Sta
tions between Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton, ar
riving at Cincinnati at 10:83 a. m., and at Dayton at
8i3B a. m l conneoUrg at Cincinnati with Mall Lin
Steamboats for Louisville, and at Dayton for Indianap
olis and the West.
THIRD TRAIN.
EXPRESS at 1:55 p. m., stopping at Jefferson, Lon
don, Charleston, Xenla, Corwlo, Morrow, Bo. Lebanon,
fester's, Loveland and Mllford, arriving at Cincinnati
at 6:45 p. m., at Dayton at 3 p. m. eouoeettcg at CIn
with th Ohio and Uisslislppl Train for Louisvlll, Yin.
oeone,, St. Louis, (to., etc., arriving at Bt. Louis at
10:43 a. m.; onncting at Dayton for Indianapolis, La
fayette, Terr Haute, Chicago and all points West.
FOURTH TRAIN.
MAIL at 4 p. m , stopping at all stations between
Columbus and Ginotnnstl; arriving at Cincinnati at 9:Si4
p. m.
Ip9 for further Information and Through Tickets,
apply to M. L. DOHEUTY, Ticket Agent. Union Depot,
Columbus.
P. W. BTRADER,
General Ticket Agent, Cincinnati.
JN0. W. D0HBSTY,
Agent, Columbus.
E.W.WOODWARD,
Superintendent, Cincinnati. '
Columbus. Nor, 10, 1801.
COLTJMBUS
OPTICAL INSTITUTE.
Tbe Beat Artificial Ilelp to tbe
Unman Mlajbt ever Invented. .
JOSEPH S. PESIEY,
PRACTICAL & SCIENTIFIC OPTICIAN,
REEFS THE I.AKGEST ASSORT,
meot of th most Improved kind of Spectacles.
All his Chutes, whether for near or far-sighted, are
ground In eoneavo convex form with the greatest care,
so aa to suit th Eye of all case, curing Weakness
Dlsslness or Inflammation of the Eyes, and Imparting
strength for long reading or fine sewing.
Office, 13 East State street, at Beltser Webster's
Musie Btor.
augS-dly
AKIN & EMERY,
168 SOUTH HIGH STREET,
Hav a full and Complete Auortment of
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,
StOVCS C& Ga-2Vte3,
TIN AND C0PPEE WAKE,
JAPAN'D GOODS
Of almost every kind,
Elegant Chamber Sets,
SPICE AND SEED BOXES,
Tin Toys, and Articles in that Lino,
For Little People.
XXnivea and ITorka, Spoons, Tube),
Buckets, Shovels and Tonga,
Goal Hods, to..
Yor the Larger Ones.
We wonld call your further attention to the fact that w
are SOLI AGENTS for tha sal of th
STEWART COOK STOVE,
Which Is. In all respect., clearly th "AUTOCRAT Of
THE KITOHKN." having no equal In th completeness
of Its performance and economy of fuel. Th clean.!
testimony ei us superiority I tn rsot tnat manufac
turer and dealers arc constantly Imitating it. coming aa
near ltaa possible in EXTERNAL APPEARANCE.
Call and examine our stock. It I no trouble to show
oar goods.
cotej-dlm
REMOVAL.
WttUAM H BESTtEAtlX,
DEALER IN
Groceries,
. Produce,
Provisions,
Foreign and Domestio Liquors,
Fruits, etc. etc.,
HAS REMOVED BIS STORE PROM
NO. 34, NORTH HIGH STREET,
TO
No. 106, South High Street,
Th old stand recently occupied byWM. McDONALD
He Is In dally reeelpt of
NEW AND FRESH GOODS
Which be wIU tell . .
Cbeap for Caan or Country Prodnce.
J7 Ooods delivered lo City trad free ef charge ffj
Wis
"Wiiliarra a3l ca-iii
coLunnrjs, oiiio - ;
AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSE
, And Seed Store,-
DlaLn IM
GENERAL HARDWARE,
; RAILS, GLASS, SASH, PUTTY, 00BDAQB,
Onns, Platola, Wood Willow Ware,
ether and Rubber Belting, Io Leather, Ho and
Ring. . ebldly
Gents Linen Shirt Collars,
OF STJPEKIOB QflAMTT, IN 3AH.
BOTE, Standing, Byron, Persignay, Renfrew and
other new shape.. Hemmed Pocket Handkerchiefs, Neck
Tie. Btooks, Street and Evening Gloves, Half Hose
every ama, under uarment ana an kind of ttente' tat
ntafitng uoods In (rant Wiety ana at moderate price..
BAIN 4k 80N,
febS, r; Ho. 89 South High street.
t b a v a
Dally, per year.
Tn-Wekly, per ; car.
Voakly, per yaai ;.., .,.......,
f G ua
. 3 oo
. -1 oo
Message of Jeff. Davis.
To tht Conarti, tf th, Canf.
The few weeks which have elapsed aioco jour
adjournment hare brought ui go near the close
ol tbe year that we are now able to iota up It
tetter! ranlta T,.
:iJ.M iiiVi.T w irwiMjioct l. buco . as
ebould fill the hearta nt n. aLj. -i,l
ISfi. k ifrt.ride' !or riiB kiod ntt-;oslaion itr
tflfilP nnhn Ir A Kneu)...! t . t .t a
,1. i.V. ;v. "uu"uu' J'tu nave rewarded
the labor of the) agrl.ultmiit, while! the mano
faoturing IndQbtfj of . the Conftderata States
wa noTereoprosperoueasnow., Tho necesei
liei ot the timet have called into exUenee new
brancheeof manufactures, and given a fresh
impulse to those heretofore lo operation. The
means of the Con federttte States lor manufac
turing tbe nece38ttxlc8 and oomforts of life with
in themselves, Increaso as tbe ootflic. contin
nos, and we are gradually becoming indepcod
eus oi ibb rest or tbe world for tbe supply of
nnl, IH,. ...... . . j ... Tr.
"" omiu, uu inuDiiioriB as are liidiu
pensable lor war. ' , ,
GRATULATIONS OVER ARMY OPERATIONS.
operations of tap armyi soon fb be prt
i,t4""p"i ,b PPTcblnwi Jttrftiuve
afforded a protection to our country and ebed a
glorious luster noon its arms, thrnni'h tha t..
lug vicissitudes of more than one arduous cm
paign, wntcn entitle our brave volunteers lo our
praise aod gratitude. From itj coaimenccmcnt
tip to the present period the war- has been en
larging its proportions and expanding it) boundi
aries eo as to include new fields. Tbe conflict
now extends from the shorci of th f ;h
tp tbe confines of Missouri aud Arlg ma, yet eud-
ij . remotest poiutj lor military
aid have been mot with nrnmntn. tnnn.ii i
only to avert disaster in tbe face of superior num
uc., uu ai.u i rou o&ck tue tide of Invasion
from tbe border. When the war commenced
the enemy were Dossessed of certain stn,te..in
points and strong places within tho Confederate
States. -They ereatlv exceeded 11.4 in nnnh...
in available resources, and in the supplies ne
cessary lor the war. Military establishment!
had long been orgaclied, and were completed'.
The navy, and, lor tbe most rmrt. the armv.
once common to botb, were in their possession.
10 meet an ibis, we had to create, not only an
army in the face of tbe war itself, but aleo mil
itary establiehmenu necessary to equip and
plaoe it in the field. It ought, indeed, to be a
subject of gratulation that tbe spirit oi the vol
unteer, and the patriotism of the people, hive
enabled us, nnder Providence, to grapple sue
ceesfully with thee difficulties;
A suoceseion of glorious victories, at Bethel,
Bull Run, Manassas, Springfield, Lexington,
Letsburg, and Belmont, has checked the wick
ed invasion which greed of gain and the unhal
lowed luet of power brought upon our soil, and
has proved that numbers cease to avail when
directed agahst a people fighting lor theeacrcd
right of ecir-government . nd the privileges of
freemen.
SEVEN MONTHS OF WAR.
After more than seven months of war, the
enemy have not only failed to extend their oc
cupancy Of OUr BOil. but new Statea nrl
ries have been added to our Confederacy. While,
Instead of their threatening march of uncheck
ed conquest, iney nave been driven at more than
one point to assume the defensive; and upon a
wuipar.ouu vetweeu tne two belligerent) it
to men, military means and financial conditiob,
tbe Confederate Statea are relatively muob
stronger now than when the struggle commenc
ed. Since Tour adjournment, iho nnnl. ..r
Missouri have conducted tbe war In tbe lica ot
aimost unparalleled diUlcnltles with a spirit snd
suocees alike worthy of themselves and of the
great cause in which they are struggling.
THE CASE OF KENTUCKY.
time Kentucky, too, has become
tne meater oi aotive hostilities. The Federal
forces have not only refused to acknowledge ber
right to be neutral, and have insisted upon mak
ing her a party to the war, but have invaded
her for tbe purpose of attacking the Confederate
States. Outrages of the most dejpotio obarao
ter nave Deen perpetrated upon her people.
8omo of her most eminent oitizens have been
seized and borreawayto largui.h in foreign
prisons, without knowing who were their o
cusers, or the specific cbarges made against
them, while others have been forced to aban
don their homes, their families, and property,
and seek a refuge in distant lands.
Finding that the Confederate States were
about ta be invaded through Kentucky, and
that ber people, after being drawn into a mis
taken security, were unarmed and in danger of
being subjugated by tho Federal foroes, our
armies were marohed Into that 8tate to repel the
enemy and prevent their occupation of certain
strtttfgio points, which would have given tbcm
great advantage in the contest Btep which
was not only justified by tbe necessity of gclf
defense on tbe part of tbe Confederate States,
uu biro dj a ueatre to ata the people of Ken
tucky. It wag never intended by the Confeder
ate Government to conquer or coerce the people
of tbat State; but, on the contrary, it wag de
clared by our Generals that they would with
draw their troops if the Federal Government
would do likewise. Froolamation was also
made of onr desire to respeot the neutrality oi
Kentucky, and the Intention to abide by the
wishes of her people as toon as thov were free
to express their opinions. These declarations
were approved bv me: and I ahani.i tmiatA t
one of tbe best effects of the march of our troops
tutu n.cutuua.7, u u snouia am in giving to her
people liberty ot choioe and a frca onnortnnHv
to decide their own destiny according to their
V"U TV M a
THE NAVY.
The army has been chiefly instrument! In
pivscvuuug mo greai contest in wbicn we are
engaged, but the navy has also been effective
m ion proportion to itt means. Tbe naval of
ficers, deprived to a great extent of an oppor
tunity ta make their professional skill available
at sea, nave served with commendable zeal and
gallantry on ehore and upon inland waters, fur-
.1 . . 1 1 r ' T , . - . . .
lucr ueta.ii. ui wuicu win do ioulq in tbe re
ports of the Secretary ef the Navy and the
secretary oi war.
THE "CONFEDERATE" MAILS.
In the transportation of the mall man dlffl.
oulties have arisen, whioh will be found fully
developed in the report of the nostmaatcr een.
. i rri . l .. .. e . . '. .
erai. i ue auaurpuoa oi tne ordinary means of
. . . ; r . i
irau.pvrtauua ior tne movement ot troops and
militiry supplies, the insufficiency of the roll
ing stock; of railroads for tie accumulation of
business, resulting both irom military opera'
lions ana tne oosirucuon ot water communica
tion by the presence of the enemy's fleet, the
i atiure ana even refusal or contractors to cam
ply with the terms of their agreements, the dif
fioultiet inherent in inaugurating so vaet and
complicated a system as tbat which requires
postal facilities for every town and village in a
territory to extended as ours, have all combined
to impede tbe best d. reeled efforts of tho Post
master General, whose seal, industry and abili
ty, have been taxed to the utmost extent.
Some of these difficulties oan only be overcome
by time and so improved condition of the coon
try upon the restoration of peace, but others
may be remedied by legislation, and your atten
tion is iuvited to the recommendation contain
ed in the teport of the head of that
WORKING OF THE REBEL FINANCES.
treasury will, doubtless,
be a subject of anxious Inquiry on your part.
I am happy to sty that the financial system al
ready adopted; hie worked well so far, snl
promise good results lor the future.
To the extent that Treasury notes may be is
sued, tbe government is enabled to borrow mo
ney without interest,'- and thus facilitate the
conduct tf the war.' This extent is measured
by the portion of the field of circulation whioh
these notes-can be made to oooopy. Tbe pro
portion, of the field thus occupied depends again
upon the amount of tbe debt for which they
are receivable, and duet, not only to the Con
federate and State governments, but also to
corporations and Individuals, are payable in this
medium. A Urge amount of it ml, bo eircu
ated at par. There I every reason to believe
that tho CnnfeiW... i. ... l
Coming r a a medium. Th inlalnn it,..!
these not. j shall be convertible into Confederate
stock, bearing eight per cent. Interest, at tbe
KiOMura oi toe Bolder, insures Ibem against a
depreciation below the value of that stock, and
no considerable fall la that value need be fear-
if m 8 " vu" "merest enau be punctually
paid. Tbe punctual payment of-this interest
fias been secured by the act passed by you at the
.-on .cwiuu, imposing; sucn a rata of taxation
ujusv provide sutucieut means for tbat our
pose. r
- !
j
I
TRANSPORT FACILITIES.
For the cneoeasfnV nrn.c,ninn f
is Indispensable tbitt the meant of transporting
troops and military suonliea he furnulmrl. .. tJi
as possible, in such manner as tot to interrupt
the commercial intercourse between one nhnnl.
hor place a check upon their : productive euer
glea. To tLis tai the mean of transportation
iroia ono section of our country to the other
must bo carefully guarded and improved and
this ehould be the objeot of aoxious care on tb
part of the State and Confederate governments,
so for as they may have power over the subject
uave nireauy two nwin eystems of through
transportation from the North to the South. one
from Richmond along the. seaboard, and tbe
other. through Western Virginia to New Or
leans A third might ba Bc-cored by eompletrng
a link of about forty mllee between D.ioville,
in Virginia, aud Gret nborough, North Carolina
1 be cocstructiou if this comparatively short
line would give us a tbrouch route from No.th
to South iii the interior nt tl.n rnnC.rforo-.
Slates, and give us access to a population and
to military reiiources from which we are now in
a great tuoisure debantd. We should Increase
greatly the Siiely and c:ipacily of our means for
transporting men and military eupplies. If the
couetruttion ol too road should, in the ludir-
meut of Con'itreas, as it is in mine, ha lnrli.nn.
sublo for tbe most Bucce.-sful prosecution of tbe
-r, mo auuon oi tne government will not be
rcairained by tho constitutional objection which
would attach to a work for commercial pur
poses; and attention is invited to tbe practica
bility of securing its early completion by giving
tho nccdlul aid to the company organized for
its construction and administration.
SECESSION IRREVOCABLE.
W0 our means and make a In
dioious use of our resources, it would be dif
fioult to fix a limit to the Deriod durinsr which
we could conduct a war against the adver
sary wtom we now encounter. The very
tffjrts wbloh be makes to desolate a,nd in
vade uo muit exhaust his means, whilst tbey
rp.a ,n r,.. m n 1 . . , V. . .! i i r ...
. ..mpcto hjo viruie auu uirersuy ine
productions of cur industrial svstem There-
conetruction which he seeks to effect by arms
Oecomca daily more and more palpably impojei
ble Not only da the causes which ioduced us
to separate, still last in full force, but they have
beca strengthened, and whatever doubt tnav
have lingered in tbe minds of anv must have
been completely dispelled by tue subsequent
events.
If, inetead of beine adisBjlutlori of a leairnp.
it were indeed a rebellion in wbich we were en
gaged, wo might find ample vindication for the
course we havo adopted in tbe eceoes which are
now being enacted in the United States. Our
people now lo.k with contemptuous aetoiiiah-
tnenton those with whom thev have been aa re
cently aiuoclatrd. They shrink with aversion
from the bare idc ol rcuewios tuch ac&nnfo-
tion.
When they h c a Pi widt-ut nuking war with
out the tfbetit ol Cui.greds wbtu luey behold
judges threatened beeiure tbey u,.uold ihe writ
of habeas corpus, eo sacred to freetucu when
iney see justice and Uw trampled under the
armed heel of ui'llury authority, and upright
men and innocent women dragged to distant
dungeons when they find all this tolerated and
applauded by a people who bad been in tho full
eojoyment ot treedoni but a lew months ago.
tbey believe that there must be some radical
incompatibility between such a ueonleaad them
selves. With such a people, we may be oontent
to uve at peace; Dut our separation from tbem
is nuai, ano ior tne independence we have as
snmcd we will accept no alternative.
CHARACTER OF NORTHERN WARFARE.
The nature of tho hostilities which thev have
waeea acmnst us must be characterized as bar-
barorjB whenever it is understood. They have
bontbiidod undefended villages, without giving
notice to women and children to enable tbem to
escape, and in ono instance selected tbe night
aa the pctiod when the? mlebt eurorise them
moat effectually whiltt aleep aud unconscious
of danger. Arson and rapine, the destruction of
private houses and property, and injuries of tbe
most wanton charito-.er, even upon non-combatants,
have marked their forays along their bord
ers and upon our territory, we ouebl to nave
been admonished by these thine tbattbev were
disposed to make war upon us in the moat cruel
ana rcieutiees GLirit, yet we were not prepared
to see tbem fit out a large naval expedition with
the confessed purpose uot only to pillage, but to
incite a servile war in our midst.
If they convert their soldiers into incendiaries
and robbers, and involve us in a species of war
which claims non-combatants, women and child
ren, as its vtotims, they must expect to be treat
ed as outwbtj and enemies of maukind.
There are certain riithts of hunAuitv which
ere entitled to repeo' even in war. and he who
refuses to regard them, forfeits his claim, if
captured, to dj considered a prisoner of war,
and must expect to be dealt with as an effsnder
against all law human and divine.
THE CAPTURE OF SLIDELL AND MASON.
But not content with violating our rights un
der the law of nations at home, they have ex
tended their injuries to us within other juris
dictions. The distinguished gentlemen whom,
witn your approval at tbe last session, I com
missioned to represent the Confederacy at ccr
tain foreign courts, have been recently seized
by the Captain of a United States ship-of-war,
while on board a Britleh mail steamer, oo
their way from the neutral Spanish port of Ha
vana to England. Tbe United States have thus
claimed a general jurisdiction over the high
seas, and entering a British ship, sailing nnder
its country's flag, violating the rights of embas
sy, for the most part held eacred even amone
barbarians, by seizing onr ministers whilst nnder
tbe protection and witbin tbe domains of a nen-
tral nation. These gentlemen were as much
nnder the jurisdiction of the British Government
upon th .t ship, and beneath it flag, as if they
had been on its soil: and a claim on the part of
the United States to seize them in the streets of
London would have been as well founded as to
apprehend them where tbey were taken. Had
they been malefactors and citizens even of the
United States, tbey could not have been ar
rested on a British ship or on British soil
unlcs, under ' the expreES provisions of a treaty
and according to tbe lorms therein provided for
the extradition of criminals. But rights tbe
most eaored item to have lost all respeot In
toeir eyes.
ARREST OF FAULKNER.
When Mr! Faulkner, a former Minister of the
United States to France, commissioned before
the secession of Virginia, his native State, re
turned in good faith to Washington to settle
bis aocounts and fulfill all tho obligations into
whioh be had entered, be was perfidiously ar
rested and Imprisoned In New York, where he
Dow Is. Tbe unsuspecting confidence with
whioh he reported to bis Government was
abused, and bis desire to fulfill bis trust to tbem
was used to his
FOREIGN RECOGNITION.
la conanoting tan war, we nave Gonght no
aid and proffered no alliances, offensive or de
lusive, abroad, we have asked for a recog
nised place In the family of cations: but In do
lag so, we have demanded nothing for which
we did not offer a fair equivalent. Tbe advan
tages of intercourse are mutual among nations,
and in Reeling to establish diplomats relatione,
we were only endeavoring tj place that inter
course under the regulation of public law.
THE SOUTHERN BLOCKADE.
"Perhaps we had tbe right, if we bad chosen
to exeroiee it. to ask to know whether the
principle that blookades, to be binding, muit
Inrariablj in AdraaerJ
be eiitT. .
SSiZ?'
enforced L affi ?
"""""aa or applied on
solemnly announced by the great
ope at Pari, la in ha w.n.ll.
nnlidrf n1. 5v--...
When the tMfiaT E"'"lL.
"T "ecme a ,arty to the deol.tWrf.
whToh. p,lD0,pla ;o' International law,
a?H " recKD,e long by publicist
ii. ""'a'"., we certainly that it '
was to be unlearn II. i-J n,. "
r law nf n..u i , uo customa
ry law of nations is made up of their practice
rather than their dei.,i;. ' ... V0"0"
Uration. are only to t.Vnfor'c d in" a
nsUnCeiAt the pleasure of those who make
them, then the commerce of the-world; to far
from being p aced nnder tha, M.nu. ' i , "
general law, will become subject lo thebaprloe
or those who execute it or sotpebd It at will
it such Is to be the ooune of nation! in regard
to this law. it la nlaln that it .ill
a role fof the weak and not for
WILL APPEAL TO EUROPE AGAINST THE BLOCKADE.
Feeliog that sucbi view.
neutral nation, of the1 earth, I haveV.u.ed It.
i. .t . w """eeteo) wniob proves com p ete
ly the niter ineflinlenn. l th- ..i.i ,7, "J
aae or our coast, ami ih.u i... .
laid before such governments as shall affotd ns
the means of being beard.
COMFORTING ASSURANCES.
ft... .I.V v . .. - : L.t '
th. r ",VUUD6n 8bould be benefited by
edbyth. great powers of Europe, we are cot
GPDdoaiot vh.t enforcement for the suocesT
r.v "un r lb As long aa hoUU
lies continue the Confederate States will ce
the . eitMd,. LD7e"ln "P"ty to furnish
the. .Mv"',111 f0d':l'Alng arms. - If
they should be forced to forego mat,, of tbe Ini'
unes and some of the
at least have the consolation of knowing that
they are thus daily becoming n.,..nii,n
--Uucui ui me reit of ibe wor d. If, in
Ibis process, labor In 0....J a.'.
- 0 wis tuwiv
ahould be gradually diverted 'OTE'ES
much of the oommerce of mankind Into other
fn.tD..d f' ,Lm P'odocere.
Instead of profitable euAtomnr. th.. -m ... v.
f ZlyM' "ie chlef ,0,ef change
In tb direotloo of tbelr Industry.
THE COTTON SUPPLY.
Although it la
from the Southern 8 Kg
cu off b7 lhe gubversloo of our social sysltm,
pl?lth''ong continnance Jf this
blockade ifflwhi, by a diversion of labor and ln
Jf imE ,Sf pU.1 ,D otnef epliments, ao
diminish the supply ,s to bring ruin oppn all
those interests of foreign countries whTh are
dependent on that staple. For ever, laborer
the Snath , . ? l , tQecu"" of cotton a
the South, perhap, four time as many else
where, who have found .nh.i... 7TT
etl?v-,ed.f lso t0 ch.auf?B lteir occupation.
Lin th. 8. . ,dr-w" "an never at
Si" 'V"4' 11 " to be Been how far. it
Vh!- r.re?v0,Utioa ,n ,he lodo'trial system
fan. - .'h Mrr' "Meg to other
lands as well as to our own. . ..,.,
APPEAL TO GOD AND LIBERTY.
mean time. .h.ti .......... .m.
struggle in humble dependence nnon Provi
dence, from wbose searching scrutiny we can
ont conceal the secrets of our heart., and to'
whoso rule we confidently aubml.. For the
rest we shall depend npon ourselves. .t r
Liberty is always won where there extols
tbe unconquerable -will to be free, and we have
reason to know tbe streufth that is elver, b a '
conscious sewe not only of the magnitude, but
ot tue righteousnes of our ctuse.
JEFFERSON DAVIS.
RICHMOND, Nov. 18, 1861.
iSAiiWAtiii STORE
VST RECEIVriD BY .
WM. A. GILL,
No 30 Worth High Street,'
Jce ..I th Largest and Best Beiaeted Aieett ' '
oi - . : :
.... '. r -. .a
KVRH OFfERED 1.1 THIS OITTI .
House BoiIt.er8v FnmishinsJ
a - .;
Of EVSttY STYLE AND QDALITs. .1.
t- rencb American '
vcrixacLow Olaaa
PAINTS GROIISD IN OIL,
icd put up if, half pound can for family us, and Dry j
. Palntelnbalk.
i'-ushes ot every variety & quality.
A Splendid Assortment of ' . .
MACHINISTS TOOLS;
OAKRIAGE MATERIADS.' ' - - ,
' -' "' -
AXES GRINDSTONES, Sue
Jl'NS, PISTOLS, SHOT, o ' v' '
FISHING TACKLE.
ROPE ft CORDAGE,
LEATHER' AND INDIA RUBBER. .' s",
BELTING. '
lV EDGES, MAULS, PUMPS, "
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,;1
SCYTHES, tut., ; ' - '--
SCALES, BELLS CHAINS . Ii
Table and Pocket Cutlery. '
.. 1 Mpeolally Invite the attention of all Interested to my
,iook of Pocket and Table Gallery, and ' -'
' eilLVEIl rCATED rOKKS, ' ,'
Table, Desert, and Tea Spoons,
i Butter Knives, &ci
M ttOOEKBs A BRO'B. Manufaotur, warranted tsbr'
xtra heavy, Electro-Plated, on genuine Alhatte. , Jt'
Country Merchants, Mechanics, and others, as Invited ; J
u call and examine my Stock, a I aa prepared te sell
Wholesale and Retail. WM. A. OIL In .
Colmnhu, Ohio, May B, I860. : " ' ' '
A NEW HOOP RJKIKT.
No. 9, BOTJTD flIOR STREET. .
,
Have just received a new Baa of HOOP SKIRTS'
Bnished I. Banner far superior to any yet latraduoes -
"DURABILITY AND.GRACEa'LNESS
. h 83.,, .). ..,. , )u :- .; i-.:';! ;.r,''''l
"' '.Va
GENTLEnenig , imnisusno
, -, i Novelties in Neck Ties and Scarfs. 1 ' 1 ' ' T
" . Bvroa and Oarrofo Collars. .
, , " Embroidered Pocket llAnrtkprrhiefs. ;".-.
'- Paris Eld Glove, superior make. t-it.,v
.' Oolden Hill Bhlrte, various stj la. . . , v . ;
Boys Oolden Uill Bhlrte, do
Driving and Btreet Ulovee.de-: ; - ' :) ,tf-ki4
Hemmed Pocket llamlkerehiefa. varioo. style.
Half Uoee and Dnder Uarm.nl, " - w.i' ti
i , . i ' BAIM k 80,.,w'
i aprltt " No. Booth High treet
ALEXANDRES) KID ULOVES. --.t.'v.sl
All stees sad oolonjust opened at BAIH8,
dec.il. M. B0 South High ftnel.J
t)d

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