OCR Interpretation


Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, November 28, 1861, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1861-11-28/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

&)t (DIjio Statesman
kU, W. BXANVa-KNlVlf. fcUIr.
mOOLVMBUB. pmo.
.THURSDAY MORNING, NOV. 83, 1861
No Paper To-Morrow.
To-daj being Tnanksgtylng, bo paper will be
, Issued from thU cffics to-morrow (Friday) uorn
"In Every Thing Give Thanks."
Bach tu tha exhortation of a great Christian
teacher, and mob the pxaotloe of srer true
Christian; . ' ' . ,.
Whether Id health or to aickaees, la prospsr
Ity or adrerslt, whether friends inrroand or
4esrt niln joy aod iorrow alika !a every
. (Meg give thanks. And wherefore! .
Because, under all elrcumataooee, however
t adrerse, the great laot of an lamortal sxlst
. aoce atlll ramaloa for at; we hare atlU a com
man Fatbar and are tba children of bia ova.
Bcoaoae, tboagb men may be bent on the
dcetrootloa of the fatreat fabrloa ever reared by
human hands, there are things mora andorlog
than moantaloa of granite, whloh they cannot
shake.
There la tba oeaaeleea round of fruitful sea
sons, which will oome and go, area though men
are atnful and ungrateful.
There la implanted in human nature, which
was originally moulded in the Divine Image, an
Innate lore of society, of order, government
and law. Tba aplrlt of anarchy and destrne-
Boa cannot always -bear sway. Nations and
eemaunitlee, Ilka Individuals, shrink with hor
rar bom the Idea of self-annihilation. Passion
ana prejudice may rule for a seasons but He
who brings "light out of darkness" and makea
"the wrath or man to praise Him," will restore
rder in the midst of confusion, and re estab
lish on firmer foundations than ever three Initi
. tutiois eoaaerratlra of good government and
thai general welfare, which madmen vainly
imagined they could overthrow.
Jeff. Davis's Message.
The reader will And thla document published
at length In thla paper. Wo print it because of
a general deaire to see what the rebel President
baa to aay. We forbear comment upon partic
ular portiona of tba message; these the reader
aaa examine, and form his own opinions.
one thing wa may notice in passing. Ditis
regards the separation of tha so-called Coofed
rata States from the rest of the Union as final
and saia in effect that tbey will accept no alter
native but aa acknowledgment of their Inde
pendence.
Thla may be the feeling now prevailing among
a great portion of the people In the seceded
States. But we believe it to arise, in a great
easme, boa a misunderstanding of the in
teauone of tba majority of tba people in the
loyal States. This misunderstanding may be
aieupstea U time, and a reaction take place.
But there mast also be a reaction in the North
a reaction which shall convince tha Southern
people that there is a determination that the
Government shall be so administered that there
shall be no infringem At of,r Interference with
aay of their Constitutional rights.
A reaction In one aeotion will insure, we
doubt not, a corresponding reaction in the other,
and wlU progress in both at the same time. It
may coma soon, or it may bo long delayed'.
But eTery true patriot and genuine Union-loving
mea will exert himself to tha utmost to hasten
Us advent; for upon tbis must rest our. main
hope for the ultimate restoration of the old
union of the State.
The Doom of South Carolina.
The Journal dispose of South Carolina in a
summary manner. Its "insurgent people" are
to "be exterminated thrust out driven away."
Then when the State is "depopulated," it la to
be "repopulated" by a new race.
Such ia tha fate to which the Journal dooms
South Carolina as aa example and a warning to
other slav States. It is the utterance of such
sentiments by Northera men and in Northern
Journals, that feeds and strengthens the rebel
lion, by uniting the Southern people against
the Government. It backs up and substantiates
the secession argument tbat the object of the
Yankees ia to drive Southern men from their
homes to exterminate them and possess them
selves of their dwellings and fruitful fields
that tba war oa our part Is sot for a restoration
of tha Union, but for subjugation, conquest, ex
termination and plunder.
Tha spirit that would ittminat(kruU oaf
aaa! dries away a whole people, because of an
organised rebellion on their territory, is con
demned by every writer on the reciprocal duties
of government and people. It ia abhorrent to
tha feelings of a common humanity. It cannot
be countenanced for a moment by any on who
sincerely desires, not tba annihilation or final
separation of the seceded States, but tbelr
speedy restoration to the Union.
Conviction of Gordon.
ia the case of tha United States t Geo. Gor
don, convicted ot obstructing process, motion
for arrest of Judgment and a new trial was made
and argued yesterday afternoon. ThU morning
tha motion waa overruled, and Gordon sentenced
to ooalnemeot In tha county jail for alx months
and to pay a fine of $300 and costs. Cktxlaad
PUi Dealer.
Thla Mr. Goidob, who wa understand, pro
f eased to b a minister of the Gospel, is one of
tha persons engaged in tha rescue of several
fugitive) slaves, at Iberia, In Morrow county,
about on year sine, in which several of Mar
shal Sirrois'a deputies ware taken by a mob
and most ahamefolly abused. Wa understand
the prisoner read along Abolition speech to the
ooutl and jury In bia defense.
ST Tha Cincinnati "Turns comments a long
attic as follows:
Tha country can safely congratulate Itself
apoa the situation of affairs at thla moment.
This is consoling, to My tha leaat of It. It
reminds as of tha fellow who had hia leg brofc
aa. . Ha congratulated himself that it was not
bis a.
Gen. Bonham.
Tha Cincinnati Oauttt, alluding to the as
ape of eo. Floyd, sava:
Tha Impression Is becoming general tbat
f lard's laet escape iroa uenerai Koaeerans's
eirategy at New river was owing entirely to the
aaMeouotable neglect of Gen. Benhsm to move
forward aa h waa ordered, and carry out bia
fart of the combined attack.
Tha Timet faults Gen. Schmck. The Cin
cinnati 7ac(U, Commercial and Timtt are great
oa finding fault with officers tor mistakes or
blunders, but they scarcely ever agree aa to the
nersoa to blame.
fmrjioMT is about tha only officer tbey have
sanctioned, i&d ha baa been removed by the
President. '.V ': v "' :
The Third Regiment at Cincinnati.
The Enquirer of yesterday, tha 27ih, has the
following!
Th Tmao Ohio Ccm and Gohi. Tha
steamers Clara Dean and Cricket No. 3 arrived
at our landing yesterday morning about nine
o'clock, having on board tha Third Ohio Regi
ment, in command of Colonel Marrow, whicn
they had taken up at Parkersburg. Upon land
ing the bojs wore soon put on shore, Jwineo in
lm, and then, under the eyes of their oflleers,
.k.nnk nf tha nrlnciDal streets
in. the city, making not only a fine, but a noble
appearance. Koturniog to the landing In a few
hours, they commenced shipping for Louisville.
While here they made no complaints, treated
everybody respectfully, purchased a supply ol
shoes, boots and socks, cleared the fruit stands
In the vloinlty of the river, paying for all they
reoeived, and appearing as happy as dame.--They
left in the afiarnoou upon the Isetta and
Clara Dean ior their destination amid the cheera
nf tholr friends udod. the wharf and the citl-
xsna attracted there to bid adieu to the brave
volunteers. ... .
Many of our cltissna Intended to go to On
olnnatl to aee the Third Regiment, but no one
oould tell when it would be there.
A correspondent of tha Cincinnati Commtr
elal, writing from Elkwatcr, Va., notices their
departure from that place as follows:
Tba eallant Third Ohio passed by our camp
this morning, tn tout for Ohio. Many a "Good
bye" and "God bless you" was interchanged
between our men and them. The Third is
laved bv averv man in onr reetmeot. Their
brave and ooorteoua Colonel Is surrounded by aa
gallant a set of officers aa ever drew sword, ana
tbelr men are an honor to tne state.
Wo leave Virginia without a single regret.
We have seen but few Union men tbat we con
aidered worth Behiinff for. slmolv because but
few will fight for themselves, me cone ana
firms of the State it tectition This Is evident to
everr sensible man. 1 bave met many aeiuaeo
Virainia cenuemen aavootunst secession, out
few Union gentlemen.
Of the overcoats for the Third Regiment, the
Commercial says:
The Third Ohio Regiment received and ac
cepted, when at Parkersburg, coat similar to
those rejected by the Seventh, and marched
throush this citv yesterday, with the brown
frowsv thhies on their backs! When the offl
cere were fully enlightened as to the Imposition
practiced upon them, they were as indignant as
oosaible. but it waa too late to help themselves.
Who furnished the coats for tha Third? Were
tbev issued from the Clothing Depository of
this oitjt If so, who purchssed the goods and
who Inspected the coats, and who proposes to
stand Jortu aa tne emDooimeni oi virtuous m
donation at tne exposure ot the swindle i
O We see from exchanges that Col. Wood
ruff, of the Second Kentucky regiment, is one
of those who have been selected b? the South
ern Confederacy to be sacrificed if the law is
carried out In the case ot the pirates or priva
teers taken from the Confederates. While
there is a broad distinction between the soldier
who wara only upon the enemy, but is compelled
by the laws or war to treat the lives ana private
property of non-combatants with care, and is
forbidden to kill the one or seize the other, and
the mere privateer, whose business is not to war
upon the armed vessels of the enemy but upon
commerce, yet we must recognise the fact that
the innocent will suller if this law is carried
Into effeot. No douht the life of one of these
mercenary men. aa compared with that of our
frieid Woodruff, la valueless, but we bave the
fact before us that his life will be the conse
quence, it is not a question oi ngni ana wrong
id the Confederates to do tbis, but whether we
shall sacrifice the livea of those gentlemen,
We cannot consider it a question to debate
utwn. - Woodrorrs lite is wortn mat oi an tee
pirates yet taken, and the mere technical diffl
cullies should be disregarded.
The Government is fully aware of this, and
will not take the lives of these pirates In the
present oonditlon of affairs; but we can see no
benefit, to be derived from delsy. There is no
common sense in keeping these men in prison
when it brings retaliation. It ia a silly picoe of
absurdity. Let them go. bxebange them If
possible, and, if we can, let as have an exchange
by which Woodruff ana others can oe restored
to usefulness for the Union. -fcoutset'fls Vino
crat The suggestions of the Democrat are sound.
It would be a burning die grace, should retalia
tory murder be carried out. It is too barbarous
to think or talk about. By all means let these
men be exchanged.
Some Good Ideas from the Cincinnati
Times.
There are bat two or three thousand Confed
erate troops at Nashville, Tennessee probably
not more at Memphis about forty thousand in
the vicinity of Columbus, Kentucky; but we
bave information which we deem reliable to the
effect tbat there will be, immediately npon our
advance beyond the Kentucky lines, general
tiring of the Tttnitirt mattet. This crisis bat
not been antioipateo, ana a reaerai army less
then seventy five thousand strong may easily
go Into the heart of Tennessee, but will bt in
danger of annihilation terry moment.
If Beauregard shall tail oacx irons, tne roto
mao, be wilt only placo himself In a stronger
position than that which he occupies to-day, and
leave to us a country Eastern Virginia long
ago exhausted of every element which will sus
tain military life.
But the retreat of Beauregard may be a
dreadful affair to us. Step by step, aa be shall
retire, he will increase the nnmber of bis
iriends, and, as we shall follow him, we shall
increase the boat of our enemies. Nearly all
our resources must come from tha North; and,
when we shall arrive at Kichmond the Capital
of the Southern Confederacy we shall find not
a barrel of flour, not a pound of pork, not a
sheep, not a hoof of cattle in one word, only a
dilapidated urban memory of ancient chivalry.
Two hundred years of Anglo-Saxon trespass
upon the dominions of Powhattan haa imparted
something oi the " mellow sweetness " of the
Tiber to Jsmcs River; the fire, tha life, the
wealth, and the glory of " Old Virginia," bave
departed.
Let ns not, however, lay the "flattering unc
tion to our hearts" tbat the dwellers upon the
banks of tne James will not neat. We mast
remember that the men whom we are now fight
ing are our lata brethren, speaking the same
language, professing tha same religion, boast
ing the aame glorious past, and hitherto rejoie
log in the same brilliant hopes. We must
remember that there are thousands of mea in
the two great armies now in tha field to whom
this world is no longer pleasant, who are sepa
rated forever from all tbey ever loved, and to
whom the path of the demon of civil war is an
unbroken chapter Of especial horrors. I be out
side, careless, laughing world knows little of
the hearts that are wrung, the gloom tbat comes
over the secret spirit, the partings which bear
the stamp of eternity! We. must remember
tbat men who enter armies under such circum
stances aa these are not prompted by the ordi
nary motives that drive men to battle. There
is something underljiog all the frivolities of or
dinary life something deep in the human soul
a principle which filled the graves of the first
martyrs.
We must consider these awful facts, or we
shall form but a pedant's idea of our Doaitlon.
and of the fearful tragedy whose first act we
bave Just begun. Beauregard may retreat from
Manassas; be oan well afiord to abandon East
ern Virginia; ha can well afford to leave Rich-
mood to its late; ana, in laot, preparations are
already made lor removing the paraphernalia
of treason to the capital of Tennessee; but
those dreadful passions which summoned half a
million Southern men to the field will onlv grow
fiercer sod more ungovernable aa we shall ap
proach tha Mexican Gulf. The contest, now
formidable, will assume awful proportions ss
the presence of the Federal armies In Tennes
see, Mississippi, Louisiana, etc., shall call forth,
as it certainly vttl call forth, those irregular
bodies of men which ordinarily II in reserve,
but wblcb, alter all, constitute) the'spinal mar
row of belligerent nations.
, It Is one tbing to conquer an army; It is an
other thing to conquer a people; and wa should
impress the world with the idea that this war is
designed to suppress treason, not to enslave
eight millions of tba descendants of Europeans.
Our cause is right; the greatest and beat men
that live are with as in sentiment; the shades of
distant and almost nnremembered centuries are
looking down npon as with envy; but let us not
forget that the loftiest deeds oi men or angels
can ba tuniahed by tha slightest ling ot tr
ior. '
The Murder of Judge Richardson.
Th nmrder of Judps Richardson Is one
those peculiarly foul deeds, whioh add a deeper
shade to the ordinary horrors of civil war. A
man In close custody, who haa saie pieagcn irow
the head ot tbo oommand which held him In
hnt down like soma beast rthloh
has been first trapped, so tbat escape oraeisoa
are alike impossible! Further words are'eeod
less to announoe a crime of tba deepest dje
Happily, roused aa are the violent and evil pas
sions of our people, there Is no dissent from this
udgment.
Not Ions- since, noon tha information or a
gentleman who, wa thought, not mistaken, wa
... . . . . .1 . f.ri . 1.. nn ana
published a report inai judge suooaiuauu
at the head of a band ot secessionists in or near
Randolph county. Oar statement falling un
der the eye of Judge Richardson, he, In a card,
whioh we published shortly aiter, pomci; u
ni.rt th nh&rff. ana aaseriea mas uc uu tu
raitied no crime which could render him liable
to arrest. We suppose that his sympathies
and nerhana onlnlona on Dubllo matters, aa ex
Dressed bv blm. bad made him obnoxious to
soma of hia neighbors: and it is a faot, we be
lleve, tbat he left hia home. Thla oircumstanoe
is, wa understand, explained by his fear that he
might be troubled (though, aa ha oonoelved),
without Just cause. He returned as wa know,
however, upon the representations of Colonel
Mnnre. nommandinff a body of Federal troops
at the place of his residence, that he should be
protected. For better securing his personal
salety against threats whioh had been uttered,
Colonel Moore took toe J uage to ms quarters
at the Court House and assigned him lodgings
in an upper rcom. Aa he was standlng.at a
window of that room, looking over the papers,
an aaaaaaln from without, taking deliberate aim
shot blm instantly dead. Col. Moore shows his
instinotive horror of suoh h crime, not only by
brandies-It aa such, but by offering oca thou
sand dollars reward lor the apprehension of the
assassin.
It Is argued, with extreme probability, tbat
the murderer belonged to Colonel Moore's com-
msnd. in fact, hardly any otner supposition is
admissible, for nobody else can be permitted to
have been able to act wlttin nis lines so aa to
hiv hid tha orjnortunltv needed.
Of course, in ordinary times, it would be Idle
and unnecessary to ssy that such a crime Is a
murder, committed under the instigations ot pn
vate malice and revenge, and wa trust tbat, ex
cited aa the tlmea now are, such it will be
deemed to be by all. The Unlen cause requires
no such deeds tor its support. 1 hey would pol
lute any cause. They are at war not only with
that cause, but with every sentiment and pnn
cinla which civilised men deem vital to tha pre
serration of civilized society. Nor does tba
cause require the support of any man who
would defend, or approve the act, or sympathize
with itj foul and cowardly perpetrator. All
Union men, who deserve that name, would rep
robate it. Therefore, any feeling of exsspera
tion, or retaliatory wish or thought, on account
of this horrible, crime, would he upjustinaDie.
One barbarity of this Sort is enough. Let not
its infamy be emulated by counter barbarities
St. Louis Rep., Nov. 25.
The Rebel Case Stated to the Fishmongers.
snoagera.
The London Globe of Nov. 12, notices the
fact that Messrs. DooLir Mann and W. L. Yan
ccr, two of the sontctrn commissioners, now
in Englsnd, on the Saturday previous, sttended
the dinner of the Fishmonger's Company. The
Olobt reports Mr. Yanciv's speech on the occa
. .. . . ,
sion. Alter some preliminary rcmarxs, mr
YaHccrsaid:
I feci bow unbecoming it would bs in me
to intrude upon such an occasion as tae pres
ent any merely partisan viewe oi tne causes
which have broken up the late Federal Union
No matter what they may bave been, one tbing
Is clear, and tbat is tbst tbe contest now going
on is upon the part of tbe people of tbe CoDfed
erate States for tbe right to govern themselves,
and to resist subjugation by the North. Hear,
hear. I They occupy a territory as large as Cog'
land. France, Spain and Austria together tbey
are ten minion in numoer tney are cmeny pro
ducers of important raw materials, and bums
of all kinds of goods. I heir pursuits, soil, cli
mate and productions are totally different from
those of the North. They think It their inter
est to buy where tbey can buy cheapest, and to
sell where tbey can aeil dearest, in all this
tba North differa rote corf from them, and bow
makes war upon us to enforce tbe supremacy of
their mistaksn ideas and seinsh interests-
Hear, hear, and cheers.
In defense of tbelr liberties and sovereign
independence, tbe Conf ederate States and peo
ple are united and resolute. Tbey are invaded
by a power numbering 80,000,000; yet ior eight
months Das tne tooieaerate uovernment suc
cessfully resisted aye, repelled tbat invasion,
along a military frontier! one thousand miles.
Though cut off by blockade from all foreign
trade, their internal resouroes bave been ade
quate to the equipment and maintenance in the
held ot an army oi over two hundred and City
thousand troops. Can all this be, and yet these
six millions of whites be divided! The idea ia
preposterous. 8o much baa been said abont our
efforts to obtain foreign Intervention, tbat I
may be allowed to declare emphatically that
tbe Confederate States bava neither sought nor
desired it. Tbey can maintain their independ
ence intact by their own strength. As to thsir
recognition by the Powers of the world, that of
course they desire. Tbey are a people, a na
tion, exhibiting element of power which few
States of the world possess. But they bave no
reason to complain, nor do they feel aggrieved,
because these great Powers see fit for a season
to defer tbelr formal recognition and reception
into tbe family of nations. However tbey may
differ from them aa to the period when their re
cognition shall take place, they fully understand
that auch action ia purely a question to be de
termined by those countries eaob for Itself, and
with reference to its own Interests and views of
public policy.
utber nations having trading relations with
us have quite as much interest to send ministers
snd consuls to us aa we have to aend such rep
resentatives to thsm. Hear, hear. Why, then,
shall there not be peace 1 Simply because the
North in its pride will not admit that to be a
fact a ail aecmpli which old England, fol
lowed by tbe first powers of Europe, has recog
nised, and which the Confederate government
and armies have repeatedly demonstrated to be
atern and bloody fact tbe fact that we are a
belligerent power. There can be no basis ior
negotiations, or for peace proposals or consul
tations so long as the Confederates are deemed
to be and are treated as rebels. Hear But
hen onr adversary shall become sufficiently
calm to treat us as a belligerent power, tbe
morning of peaee will dawn ia tbe horizon.
When tbat bour etull arrive, I think I may
say tbe lonfedtrate Uovernment will be In
flexible upon one point only its honor and
Independence. For the great interests of
peace and humanity it will yield much that
is merely material or of secondary Impor
tance. Mr. Yancey sat down amid loud and contin
ued cheering.
Gov. Morton's Overcoats Again.
Some of Governor Morton's overcoats have
been received. Tbe boxes were marked "iron
grey overcoats" (or some of them), but on open
log them, they turned out to be like Joseph's
coat, of many colors, and of many different qual
ities ana mate, i nose sens to- one regiment
were of four colors, and ranged from very good
quality to very Inferior. By unanimous vote of
tba regiment, tbey were returned, reserving
enough only ior guard doty. Another reg'ment
fare worse than tbis. There were In tbe latter
seven different colors, and in quality good, In-
merent and Dad. Xbese were likewise re
turned. Tbe Governor may possese rara and
varied accomplishments, but it is evident be Is
ho judgs of army clo sing. Tha regulation
overcoaic are cheaper at $10. than Governor
Morton's at balf that sum. Indiana State Sentinel.
ET Horace Greeley, of the New York Tri
bune, ia exultant over theprogreseof Abolition-'
ism . He claims on his side all tha rebel slave
holders, and shows how they bave effectually
aided the canse. Hs sneers at Sherman 'a proc
lamation, and bis efforts to get white -people to
read it. Ha advises Sherman to Issue bis
proclamation to tba negroes. Tbey are the
people of South Carolina that will listen. Why
don't Greeley do what be desires to do attack
the administration aud its policy at once, root
tbe Cabinet and President, and put somebody
else in its piece unneoiue frrwcroi, .
Gsiilit will oppose tba Administration so
soon as he ia satisfied that the Administration
will not wage tbis war for the extermination of
slavery. , .'. ." .
Headquarters Ohio Militia.
Headquarters Ohio Militia. ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
COLUMBUS, Nov. 27, 1861.
COLUMBUS, Nov. 27, 1861. GENERAL ORDER NO. 64.
p,l.lon bavins been made byaot of Con
gress, approved July 223. 1861, by which such
r it, .ninntftu forotts as may desire It, can as
sign portions of tbelr pay for tba benefit of their
families, an order baa peen uuu j
tant-General oi the arm providing for such a
.t-nmn m h made on allotment tolls.
hn nrenared. and will-be
..i.i,.,i .t thla office. on proper application
nmn rum uii. .- r i
Officers commanding companies are expeoted
to use their Influence with tbelr men lo make
provision for tbelr famillea by asugning re.
.m. .nnn of their oay for this purpose.
fUUHMIV jrwtwv- - . .
Aa tba Pavmaiter-uenerai win siu..
. .n one narty a less amount, tnan
.h. .,t anm assigned by on company
it i. .norMitd that each company select from
amon. their friends in the neighborhood of their
hnm.. one trustworthy, patriotlo man, wno
will be willing to receive, distribute and account
for the amount paid over to mm ior tua. v,.
nnaa
""" : lAUn. f
In most cases the Treasurer ur uU.,. .
tbe county; or the Cashier or a neignooring
bank, would be a very proper person to perform
thla rlllt.
Care should be taken to have the names of
the assignees plainly written and accurately
.nailed, with the first name in full. The ad
dress should give the name of the town or town
ship and county. '-',"
Much trouble, and perhaps muob suffering,
mw h saved by a carofut attention of the offl
ami nf fVtm nanles ts tbe proper execution ol
VQI wa v r- -
these allotment rolls. . .i - '
By order.
C. P. BUCKINGHAM,
Adjutant-General of Ohio.
Headquarters Ohio Militia.
-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Columbus, Nov. 25, 1861.
All unpaid bills lor subsistence furnished' to
the three months' Volunteer Militia ot unio
when authenticated, will be paid on presenta
tion at this office.
Similar bills, for subsistence furnished to
three years' volunteers, will be paid on pre
sentation to Captain Fred. Myers, ol the Uni
ted Stites Army, who will be lound at this
office.
C. DELANO,
Commissary-General.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
1861.
1861. EAST.
UNITED ARRANGEMENTS.
TIME CHANGED.
CENTRAL OHIO
CENTRAL OHIO AND
STEUBENVILLE SHORT LINE
RAILROAD,
UNITED.
CONKEOmO AT FIITSBUBGH WITH TBE
Pennsylvania Central Railroad
Cm TBI
Shortest, Quickest and Most Dnslra
ni iteuie so an n at tern line.
Trains Leave Columbus as follows:
VU BIUAIKS.
VU mcBIKVILLt.
laornin&j
4:00 A, M. 3:10 P. U.
Express.
FAST LtNI,
4:00 A. II: 12 33 P.M.
A UMTS AT BILLAIRI
8:40P.M. -
ASRITI AT rXTTSBUROH
2:45 A.M. 4:10 P. M. 10 00 P. M.
ARRIVS AT HARKlfBURO)
1:00P.M. 3: 10 A M. 8:15 A.-M.
AXRIVt AT BALTMORS
6:20 A.M. 1;40P.M.
10:40 A. U.
4.10 P. H.
3:10 A.M.
6:30 A. M.
ARRTVR AT PBIt-ADSLMIIA.
5:S0P. M. 7:40 A. M. 13:50 P.
7:40 A. M.
M.
Ktn YORK VIA AUtHTOWH, It. T.
1:00 A.M. V:50P, M. 11:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
via rHiLABarau
10:13 P. M. 1:45 P.M.
1:45 P.M.
613 P. M-
VIA ALLDtTOWX.
PasEenrers by this Us reach New York in advance of
any Northern route.
12:35 P. M. train is the only on from Columbus at
this bour, and the only train by which piaeengcr can
reach Baltimore or Waiblngton the following- day, and
arrive In Philadelphia or New York before dark.
11781eeplng cars on all night trains.
Tba Only Bonte from Colnmbns to
Baltimore, rnlladeipiiiii or
Now York -
WITH ONLY ONE CHANGE OF CARS.
This train also connect. at Bellalra with the Baltimore
and Ohio Railroad. .
TTTThl. routs la 30 MILES 8H0KTE& to Pltttburrb
andoor than 100 MILKS SHORTER to New fork,
than Northern Uses. -
ETBai-eaee Checked Through to all Jro
portant poUits EiBt, ....
HT Ask for Tickots via Bollaire or 6tcu-
benville. '
ST Tickets Good over either Route.
JOHS W. BROWN,
Oentral Ticket Agent Centra'. Ohio R. R.
IRA A. HUTCHINSON,
(leneral Ticket AientStenbenTill Uhort Lin.
Columbus, Nov. 88, ml.
Sheriff's Sale.
PeUrA. Prea.ler ) Doo. j, p. S59.
Thomi'Banlel. $ Superior Court,
T VIRTUE OF AN ORDER OF SALE
I to ai directed, from the Superior Oourt of Franklin
County, Ohio, I will offer for sal, at the door of the
Court House, In the city of Columbus, Ohio, on
Saturday, tbe 4:h day of January, A. D. 1862,
between the hour of 10 o'clock A. M. and 4 o'clock
Bt., the following- land, and tenements, situat in
the eount of franklin. Stat of Ohio, and In the town
of Wortnlngton, and known and described as follows, to
win
The north equal third part of In-lot nnmber ninety
two (OS), a. di.tlogoi.bed ou tie original and recorded
nlat of tba town of Worthinston. in eald franklin ooon-
r, umo, Ming tn tun premifn conT.jm 117 win
haodore B. Taller and Bohrln his wife, to .aid Thomas
Dantel, by deed dated August Silb, A. V. VX.
Appraiaea at vouu w.
O. W. ntJPfMAN, Sheriff.
Printer', fee. 5 00.
no?38-dltwWl
Sheriff's Sale.
R. and James Melon.
By Jordan Melon, Gaardlao,4t,
Union Oonnty Com
v..
EteklelMalone
mon fleas.
TT TIRTTIB Ol A WRIT Of TIlfDI TO MI
I J dlractal from the Court of Gammon Plea. Of UoiOB
eouoty, Oblo, I will offer for eale in front of the Court
Hon, in the City of Columbus, Oblo, on
Monday, tha 9th day of December, A. D. 1861,
Between the hours of IS o'olock M. and 8 o'clock P. M
tbe following property, to wltl
On mar and oolt. ' .,
0. W. HUFFMAN,
Eherll! of Franklin oousty, 0.
Printer's frss 6 50..
nr27-dtd. ' .
Shooting Gallery,
rrH underrtiroed begs leave to Inform His friend
X that he ha. fitted op a
8nooTEsa gallery;
. "'' . "" AT TBS ' ' . ' ''" '
- VERANDAH, ON STATE STREET. ,;
Cood flans, Alt (Jan., pistols sad Bafmbmeats.
Mv.rn.aeaU. . 0qNBA
NEW ADYERTISELlENTS'a
To Ooutraotoro.
BIDS Wilt Ba BIOIITKO TTNTIL TBI 10th
aar or lo. ihai. at 19 ciook its...
- ....... I l .. ,, 1 1 i . . a . . . . .. . ilnn rili.u
Ohio, wits oomplet ration.. Th ration to oooslat of
uira-fourins or a pound of pork or bacon, or one and
a fourth pounds of frab or .alt boot; twenty-two ounees
or bread or nour, or ono pound of hard sraaa, er on and
a fourth pounds of oorn meal; and at tha rats to avory
on bundroa rations oi oiaut quarts or beans or ptas. or ten
pounds of riot or homto jr; ton pounds of groe. eoflM, or
tight pounds of saaat.dor ground ooffoo, or ont and a
half pounds of teal filtton pounds of sugar; four quarts
of vlnogart on pound of intra candl.., or on and a
fourth pound, of adamaatln candles, or on and a half
pounds oi tauov cuoaiv.) lour pouna. or up two
quarts of salt; and thrlc por wk potato at tk rat
of on pound per man.
All of whloh ar to b of a good quality, and to b dc
llvcnd at the oommlmry departmwt at Camp Ohase,
at auch tlmtt as ma b required .
Thla ooatraot to oommnc on lh 15th day of Decern,
ber. JftCl. and (nlint on the lSih day of June, 1809, or
at such earlier day, a the Oommlsslry-anral may
direct.
lb bids most b for so nncn per ration, anu auarenea
to me, Indorsed "Proposals," box 420, Oolumbat, Oblo.
Oapt. B. P. WAIKXH, O. B.,
novSOtd : U. B. Army.
117
'." CALL :k , . ,
J L GILL & SON'S
jsrmxw Biiooix,
a
NORTH HIGH STREET,
AND SEE IDS LAUQEBT STOCK,
THE (GREATEST VAIUETY,
iUD
TBS
MOST
BBATJTIPTJL PATIXBHS
or
STO V B S
Xrer offered to
the citizens of Columbus.
a
THIT EAT!
COOKING STOVES FOR COAL,
COOKING STOVES FOR WOOD,
and
COOKING STOVES
For either Wood or Coal.
COOKING STOVES
for Large Families or Small FamlHei, and varying lo
rnee irom ,
Three Dollars to One Hundred and
Twenty-Five..
PARLOR STOVES,
Of every Price, Six and Variety, for Coal or Wood.
DINING-ROOM STOVES,
HALL STOVES,
Of many Patterns. .
' SITTING-ROOM STOVES.
STORE-ROOM STOVES.
OFFICE 8TOVES,
Army stoves,
Both Cooking and Beating.
The Lightest and
molt Portable
Tent Stove ever
offered to tb.
Officers of our Great Army.
FURNACES,
For Heating Swellings, Churches, Store-room., or other
Urge Building. '
LAUNDRY STOVES,
For Family Uie or Hotel..
MOTT BOILERS, '
AGRICULTURAL BOILERS,
SUGAR EVAPORATORS,
SUGAR KETTLES,
HOLLOW WARE,
DOGG IRONS,
SAD IRONS,
. . TAILORS' GEESE,
And maor other articles "or any other man."
HP CALL AND 8KB. .O
No. 92 North High Street, '
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
J, L. Gill & Son
nov25-tf
INTERESTING
TO EVERY READER.
IT Is an Indisputable fact, that If any person wants on
of those comfortable ESQUIMAUX BBAVEB OVER
COATS, he will niually And them la large qnantltles at
18 any person desirous of owning on of tb tat style
ot BBAVIR OVXB COATS, wtib tap attached.
don't break your beads to learn where to find them, bnt
go to tbe . . I
1Ani AL AKUAUC, ,
Opposite tb Btat Dome. ;
Yon will find them there In all oolors, kept by
MARCUS CII1LD3.
DTD yon seres wear any of the 8ILE MIXED OAS
8IMEBK SUITS, wblcb er sold at the Capital Clt
Arcade? Kuih In and yon will find them tn piles, at
MARCUS CHILD3'3.
YOU nay alio be lo want of PANTB and TIBTS. and
there Is bat one establishment In tb West where
Pants and Teats an to be had In all stripes, shapes,
styles, quantities and qualities, and tbat place la the
CAflTAL CHI AKCADE.
DON'T foreet tbe extenilye assortment of ItJRNI SH
IN 0 GOODS, particularly In WOOLIN SBIdTS,
which you can Snd In "Bed, whit and blue," at the
CAPITAL CITY ARCADE,
. Superintended by Uareus Ohlldi.
IF yon wUb to wear garments MADE TO OB
I) Kit, you can do no better than to go to the tier
chant Tailoring IslabUsbiMat, next to tb Arcade, and
select your gooda from a etock comprising all oolors of
Bearer Ololbs. Oasaunere, Bilk TlTt and PluahVeet
logs, snd you will sur ly meet with a good fit by p arenas
sing at .
- .MARCUS CHILDS'S.
MILITARY 0ENTLBMES, when they oome to this
city, as strar gera, and wish to get a UIUrOBM, It
la to tbelr best adventag to call at
. MARCUS CHILDS'S,
When s lars assortment of BLUB CLOTH and other
articles belonging to tb equlpig of an officer can t
bad at ry moderate prices. ,
In short call at . . . ; ! ' ;
Blarcus Childs's,
Proprietor of that ezUnilr business' locality, ,.
NO. Sis ss ana 85 JtiGa itbeet,
Opposlt the But Hons.
ocOT-dSca : .
Cranberries I Cranberries 1
OA BBLIf, OHANBEUBIES IN OOOJD
uj uniin, on ceniignment. . , r
Ior sale low by , ,
WM. B. BIBTIXAUX.
ooCM lOvBovUtBliaatmU
t.
TIM
STOVES
STOVES
HSWI M
: AIUTTJAXi 1 2?i:OSPBOTUS
(J H ;4 TBi ...
MS SIMM
' -' . .... .. , ... .
- HOW IS THE mil TO SUBSCRIBE I
PUBLISHED
, piXTT : OP OOXaXJlaHlXJ. OHIO.
; .oi . - -r : ' ''al. : . '
The DAILY, &t - . - - - . Six Dollars per Annum;
The TRI-WEEKLY, at - t ;
The WEEKLY, at the low rate of
Subscriptions to the Datlt and Tri-Wiiut Stateuun will bs reoeived
FOR THREE OR SIX MONTHS
.' - ' , , ..,.: A
.. At tha above rates; and the Daut will be furnished . '
TO CARRIERS IN ANY PART OF THE STATE,
At the usual rates. Aa an established and reliable organ of Jhe Demooratio party,
THE STATESMAN IS WELL KNOWN.
In the future, as in the past, it will nphold and defend the
PRINCIPLES OF THAT GRAND OLp PARTY
. -,
Which haa been so fruitful of good to the PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES; and wii
faithfully urge the re-establishment and supremacyV the
DEMOCRATIC CREED AMD POLICY IN ALL THE STATES.
As essential to the oomplete and perfeot re-eonstruotitfti of tha -
PBDBRAL UNION,;
' - On the basis on which that Union was originally formed,
The Statbm an will support the Administration of tha General Government in all legal and
constitutional efforts to put down rebellion ; and sternly resist tha efforts made in some quarters
to convert the present unhappy war into an Abolition erusade.
It will eonstantly urge economy in tha publio expenditures, and the most rigid accountability
of all publio officers. .. . . - .:. -; ; --r
As a medium of general news, the Statisxak will endeavor to make itself acceptable to its
numerous readers, and at all timea supply them with; ... :... ; ?
piio Xsntesst n.cl xkxosat Helltble Reports
Of the home and foreign markets, In its columns . . -
THE BUSINESS MAN, THE FARMER, MECHANIC AND LABORER
Will find their interests consulted and attended to, and no effort will be spared to make it a first
class newspaper. .
During the approaohing session of Congress we will have a talented and accomplishsd corres
pondent at Washington, through whom our readers will ba furnished with ranch valuable and
reliable information.
Tha doings of our own State Legislators will bs fully reported, and the local news of the
Stats and our own immediata vicinity, will hava a due share of attention.
We urge upon our friends in all parts of Ohio, and tha North-Western States, to aid in extend
ing the circulation of the Statesvam, since by so doing, they will assist In the promulgation of
sound political doctrines and reliable general intelligen.ee.. - ,..,.
THE
WEEKLY
OHO
To any person raising a Olnb of Ten Subscribers to tha Wieklt Ohio Statesman, and
sending us the money ten dollars for the same, we will send one copy gratia.
All orders will be promptly attended to. v
Address, . t MABTPEITNY 4 MILLER,
, ' Publishers of the Ohio Statesman,
November 1, 1861. .- Coicmbus, Ohio, s
I!)
Three Dollars per Annum
One Dollar per Annum.
-H-
STATESMAN
CUE
SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES.
HEADLEY,
EBERLY &
RICHARDS S
NEW S T O R E,
2SO and QSQ
SOUTH HIGH STREET,
An now opening ft Urge lot of .
Ltfdies', Misses' and Children's
F U RS,
Ladies' Cloth Cloaks,
BALMORAL SKIRTS,
...... ; , . ;
Shephard's Plaid Shawls,
Ladies' Merino Vests & Drawers,
Boys' Merino Shirts & Drawers,
. ZEPHYR WORSTEDS,
Embroidered Repps,
Zjadles' CTtaJaleua,
OPERA HOOPS, . '
Opera Flannels,
' WOOLEN BLANKETS, ,
CLOAK CLOTHS;
MISSES SUPERIOR LONG SHAWLS. .v
This Una, having adopted tha Oasb sysUra la tb pur
chan and sal ot floods, ars enabled to sell from tt to 80
per sent, less tbaa other houses under therdltiy item.
HEADLEY, EBERLY & EICHAHD3,
250 AND 252 SOOTH HIGH STBEET, '
COLUlNflBUS, O. r
Oysters!
HAH 3UST BECEITBD, AND WIVL
be tn dally receipt, by Jxpreas, of. ,...k
PHESH CAS 4 KEQ OYSTERS,
rna Baltlmor and lair Harea. ..". r s
Call at Wsars Oysttrand fruit Depot, No. 91 last
tat street. -. : '
aufiu
I
POST OFFI0ES.
GOOD SAMARITAN.
IIWWCTatliCO.
B. B. ARMSTRONG
No. 17 East Town Street, -
WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALER IN
STOVES AND TIN WARE.
ir A larrs stock of tb GOOD 8A B
B0Tl3-d3m
J. M. & V. KCERNER.
Corner of Broad & Front Streets,
COLUMBUS,
DXAX.IB8 IN ' J
GROCERIES, PRODUCE AND
PROVISIONS,
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC FRUITS,
FiOTO, SALT, LiaUOESETC.
OVB11B8 BT TBI OAN IH.TBKIB BIA30N.'
NEW COAL YARD
THE ' UNDERSIGNED KEEPS COM
BTANILY ob band and for salt, tb best quality of
! HOCKING GRATE COAL,
Whloh bs will U as tba Iowert market prices ' , 1
Call and XkBlB mj Ooal belor purchasing" si-
where. . M .
Offlc at the store of Bradford, Bay dam si Co., bead
Canal. .ui!'
p. f . Stjidah.
sp9S-9ia
Domestio Cotton Goods.
i '
i BAIIT Ci SON
OFFEH tsa most Extenalra Aaaort
saentof ', ..'. ,Y
'i Brown and Bleached Cotton flannels!
" ktnsllnsi
Bamalaw Ootton Bheetlnn: - - .
Beieet Styles of Calico' and Delaines; '
Tickings, Bblrtlnrrs, Olnghams, ' f
.' And Cotton Battings.
Also, Blanket, flannala, .... u.,'
i OaalmM,01oak Olotbs, ttc,Sts..
atueb below ragularprU-s. t , fc g0N)
OctlB 89 loutb Blgh Btnet
Flannel phirtinga.
PfcAIW,l?l4AID,TBIPEDoVWII.t
SD. Ib most txtenslr stoek In tba elly v 1
Army WooIn Books. ..
; Shektr Bibbed Book. - , t i . J 'J f d
. ; DnderBhlrte and Drawer. .
I Ootton and Merino bookr - - - -ik--t
V Oolo.n Hill Bhlrt. . , ,..-' -V:-'5
Oept'sKidOioT. : " ' ,....
astis - o. Mu High stmt.
rj.

xml | txt