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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, December 18, 1861, Image 2

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(9lji0 Statesman
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06liUMBX7S.' pit JCO.
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WEDNESDAY MORNING, DEC, 18, 1661.
The Constitution and Wholesale
The Constitution and Wholesale Confiscation.
Among tbe radical and .extreme measures
now before Congress, The' general confiscation
bill bold, perbeps, lie IgremWrankLThere
are many welgtatj,saao e my aTAconclueJve
objection! to these neaenree oa the score of pol
io; and expedieocr, bat ii may bt wall to In
qalre whether the Federal Constitution' does not
interpose 4 barrier to their enactment, at least,
la the form la which they have teed brought
forward. That Instrument prerldee that
No pereoa ah all be convicted of treasonon
leee on the testimony of two witnesses to the
aame overt act, or on confession la open court.. u
No atuioder et treason shall work ccr
ruplloa of blood, or forfeiture axon? daWnj the
lift of the ferun attainted Art. 3, So. 3., '
The trial of all erlmee', except In ciee of Im
peachment, shall bo by jury; and such trial shall
be held in the State where the taid crime ikall
Asm been wiMaV-Art. 3,8ec. 8 .f :.
No person shall be deprived of life,
liberty er property without doe process ol law.
Art. 5 of amendments. - ' .
At has been well seiS, the phrase ''iue'pr'o
cms of law," his a judicially settled meaning,
and the summary "procecs'' provided for in
meet, IT not in all the confiscation bilbj, U not
the "doe process of lew" jsqntred by the Co
CraflRttfoo, according to tie, Conatiiutioa
loilowa npon an attainder pi treason.'' The bills
provide for the cpajiioation f the property of
"rebels, bat do lot specify who are to be con
sidered and treated as rebels. We are left In
the dark as to whether the foreitura is te . take
place upon conviction for treason or some other
undefined crime,. . ..
Tbeta bills provide for the confiscation of
the real and personal property of rebels; and
for the sale of their estates to loyal purchasers,
Bat under the Constitution forfeiture does not
take plaoe until the persesi has been tried by a
jury in the Bute where the crime " wai euualt-
ted, and has been found guilty. , It fs also pro
vide loat tbe forfeiture of estate shall be
limited to the life of the person attainted.
Senator Taomou in bis bill, attempted to
meet this last requirement, bat tried to ' excuse
the omisiion of the one as to a trial In the State
where the crime waa committed, because, ai be
alleged, it was Impracticable. " ;
That tbe sweeping confiscation bills now be
fore Congress do, in many of their" proTisiwit,
violate tbe Constitntiooeannot but be 'readily
conceded by every candid and well-informed
mao. In fact, their authors do not attempt to
justify them in their full extent npon strict con
stitutional grounds, but upon their allege, ne
cessity j 7Tbs .logic is they are . necessary,
therefor) fhey are constitutional. By' such
reasoning anything may be proved to be consti
tutional. ts-itii'viV'li wC'OUi
Wt cloaa with patting to the patriotic reader
a question which we find in the New York Eve
ning Feet "Shall we ourselves, ia passionate
revenge; trample that vary Constitution tinder
foot, for violating whloh we are waging war
agaiubt the rebels!" --
The Abolition Programme.
The Baltimore correspondent of the New
York Herald states that the "abolition wing of
the Republican party Is completely organized
as a party io opposition to the President, and to
the policy enunciated in his message." , He
enumerates tbe following measures aa their
programme: x. . i - -1.
The cassette of Thad. Stevens's resola
lions, declaring free and offering freedom to all
slaves who will leave their masters. -
2. Tbe pssiage of Lyman Trumbull's bill con
fiscating all the property ot the rebels, including
their slaves. . .,- . .-, .
3. The pssiage of a bill abolishing slsvery in
the District ot Colombia.
4. The total, immediate and unconditional re
peal of the Fugitive Slave law of 1850 (one of
tbe compromise measures of that year).
5. The pottage of joint resolution requesting
tie President le remove Generti MeCleUan from
the lupreme esmwwntf f the nny, mni te -
net General Banks in nit tteai, and to rettort
Qenernl Fremont to the command of the Depart
ment of Mutonri. .c:-. - v ,.
6. The passage of an act obliterating the
boundary between the States of North Caro
lina and Soath Carolina, throwing tbe two States
into one, and calling die State thus formed sim
ply "Carolina."
7. The pas lags of a joint resolution declaring
that alavary ia tit oause of the war, and that
the war cannot be brought to a aaocessial ter
mination until the eanse ia removed. ' , ,";'
Tbe aame writer farther states that he has
seen oopiea of all the foregoing bills and reso
lutions, that tbe Abolition party In Congress
coast seventy votes, and that they not only
eount npon a majority for these measures, but,
if the President should veto them, as the cor
respondent thinks ha undoubtedly will, expect a
two-thirds vote, by which they will Carry them
with a high hand over hie head.' -
It would appear from the tenor of an article
in the New York rTorW, which wo copy -elsewhere,
that these expectations, if such are n
Urtalned by tbe radical! In Congrees.'may be
doomed to disappointment; bat tbe World has
set Itself op aa mora month-piece of tne Presi
dent, and will follow where it oaeMes he Intends
to lead. The President with a amall body
gutrd of Republican now stands hi iteming
opposition to the more radical Republic na.
We say teeming opposition, because he haa in
nopublio way taken a decided stand against
radicalism aad in favor of conservatism. He
occupies before the people neutral ground, and
maybe, and Is, claimed by both wings of tbe
Republican party. Perhaps he wishes to keep
himself In that position as long as possible, so
that he can act as a eeapromier aad reconcile or
re-unite the two factions.
All w have to aay in regard to I uch a eourje
on the part of President Limcolw, "or any oth
er man," fs that It subordinates tbe good of tbe
country to tbe Interests of party. Nothing so
much shakes our confidence la the anility of
the Federal Government to sustain, itself maj
fully la the trying exigencies now npon us and'
shortly to come, as the indecisive and nasi tat.
lng coarse of the President and the consequent
bickerings and divisions in the Cabinet- and In
the Administration party in Congress." There
U a great deal ai noise and bluster At Washing
ton; bat it all teems likely to ultimate la streo
loot afforta to aave tbe negro aad, "let " the
Union slide."' If the Abolitionists could dis
place McCLiixarand pot Baku at the bead of
the army, tte real of their programme ' might
be easily carried ont. i They might then play a
mora decided and successful seoesslon .game
than the myrmidons of Jxrr. Davis.
Lt On th on s a n d" two"h undred and'fty -ne
eeople died in London during he first week in
November; one thousand two hundred ! cod
eighty-eight ia the second aad ece thousand
fourhanf tad thirty-font ia ho third.
The Abolition Programme. Radicalism--The New York World.
1 1 this paper will be .found ad article from
the New York: World, n Republican paper, full
afgood.wnse.'.V ' '""'S
' We would luggest to the' World that among
the say, is which h aayvMm prominent oonser
vatlve ia found," it will find nou other than
Republicans, while all the Democrat ere In the
affirmative. Right here, we would ask what
chanoa would the President have In being sus
tained in a oonetrvative coarse, were he to rely
Is the party that elected himl It li as clear
i noonday, that In, all .sensiblY measures the
President must rely upon the Democracy.
l',Mr. STEViaaMr-LoviJOT, and every mem
ber conspicuous for radicalism, voting in the
negative," arc Republicans. "
Every Democrat and coneervativa man oin
eehow important It Is M preserve the old
Democritio organization al the bulwark of the
Constitution and the Union.
If' i . i O .
The Government Financial Scheme.
Secretary Chase's plan lor relief to the treas
ury by a government issue of paper money, be
ginning with $150,000,000, designed to take
tbe place of all other paper money, does not
meet universal favor, If the publio press is an
index of popular sentiment. The apprehension
la felt in financial circles in this olty, and such
must be the feeling in those circles everywhere,
that the proposition cannot be oarrlod into effect
without setioua derangement of the monetary
aad commercial relations of the oountrv. The
mntamniated revolution ia a neat one, and rev
olutions in anything never fail to disturb all tbe
elements related to them. It Is questionable
whether a redemption by the banks of all their
issue within the next six months Is not impossi
ble. There are few of them which have not
their resources a good deal tied up In conse
quence of the financial troubles of the past few
years, ana to compel tnese to ice .nne oi cun
duct croncsed will be to wind them up or break
them op altogether, the Immediate consequences
o wbioa to tbe communities In wblcb tney are
situated are anmrent to every one. As we re
marked TMterdav. It seems to US that the Sec
retary'e scheme should be the last financial re
sort of tbe government to sustain itself aad ex
tinguish the rebellion. : Adopt it now, and, if
the rebellion should not be extinguished by J uly,
at which time tbe relief afforded to tne treas
ure bv the scheme will be exhausted, what will
be the next resort of the government It can
not Issue paper-money Indefinitely. ', An Is
su "beyond $160,000,000 will operate as Infla
tion, ant the inevitable final event would be I
commercial crash such as haa never been known
before. The scheme is, Indeed, surrounded by a
thousand difficulties, and Congress must not be
la hasto to adopt it.-GMejo Time.
! The bankers of the country complain that.
after they have rallied to the relief of the coun
try and loaned their money to Secretary Cbasi,
he turns about and proposes a scheme to blow
tnemnp: ,- , (1 .....
I No fact waa better understood, than that
Secretary Cbasi waa a "well defined" rail-bank,
bird-money man, and that while be had no com
punctions to using banks when in a pinch, be
nevertheless, was at heart opposed to their ex
istence. Hit position is as well understood on
this question, as was John TrLia'aon tbe Bank
of the United Butts, and it may be, that those
who- - warmed him into power may get tbeir nn-
gers burned, as did those who voted for Tip and
Ty without a why or a wherefore. Some good
may yet come of these things. 1
Hold Him.
ITbe Cincinnati Timet goes off as follows: ;
Let Mr. Lincoln face the music, and the peo
ple will sustain him; but let bim "apologize"
to the Brltisn lion, and aieenng oi indignation
without a parallel in the world will be the re
sult. Wa are in the midst of a great war, and
have thousands of cowardly politicians in the
North that will embrace this opportunity to in
timidate tbe Government of Mr. Lincoln.
' If these men, who figured so conspicuously
last spring, shall again appear above the waves
and tare to oppose the Federal flag in this dark
and awful hour, let them be seized aa traitors,
tried aa traitors, ttnteneed as traitors, and shot
as traitors! Wo have ever been the advocates
of law and order: bnt there is a point where
forbearance ceases to be a virtue, and that point
is nearly reached.
Will some kind friend in Cincinnati please
grasp the editor of the Times firmly by the
coat tail, before be injures somebody t .
Mr. Vaiaakhohaji has introduced a reeola
tioo es follows! . "
Resolved. As the sense oi this House, that, it
ia the dutv of the President to now firmly main-
tain the stand that taken, approving and adopt'
log the act of Captain Wilkes in spite of any
menace or demand of the British Government;
that this House pledges its full support to bim
In upholding now the honor and indicating the
course of the Government and people of tbe
United States against a foreign power.
Mr. V. endeavored to get a vote on the reso
lution, but the Republicans sent it to a- oom
mittee. There was no nigger in it, and it was
thoorht best not to aeeravate John Bull. ': Who
are "the cowardly politicians in the North?'
Very Sensible.
We copy the following sensible remarks from
the Louisville Journal Why any rational man
desires to have oar army Worn ont aad broken
down by a' herd of vagabond negroes hanging
en its rear, is mora than we can imagine. . Oar
soldier have trouble and labor enough to pro
ride for their own subsistence, without being
ladened with them? ' " J v
Manv nerso as seem to think that tbe question
aa to tbe treatment of slaves and alavery by onr
armies aa thev penetrate the Southern Lonfed
eracv presents weat difficulty. To onr minds
it nresenta none whatever. We regard the poll
cy to be puisued perfectly obvions. Wc don't
tee how, with intelligent patriots, there can be
any doubt about it.
Sorely the proper course fcr our armies is to
btve nothing to do witn slaves or slavery, i ne
nailer of Gen. Halieck't proclamation Is tbe
wise policy. It Is tbe true one.' Let no slaves
be reduced bv onr armies at all. Let them be
exoladed from our lines. ' Let our military have
nothing to do with tbem. Let slaves and own
ers of slaves take care of their own relations.
Certainly thia is right and expedient. If we
send an army of ten thousand men into tbe
Southern Confederacy, with provisions for tbeir
support, what good reason is mere, wnat good
reason can there be, for our allowing ten thous
and or five thousand slaves to come in and share
the provisions? Why should (key be quartered
on us? Are we to own them? Assuredly not.
Arc we to employ tbem ss servants and pay
tbem? Surely not. - Oar gallant soldiers un
derjtand that they are to take care of them
selves. They are not in want of nigger ser
vants. ' " - - " k
These arc onr views, and they have been thus
far practically sanctioned by tbe Government.
Wc arc more and more encouraged to believe
that tbey will continue to be. Let the Govern
ment accept the plain and effeotual sjluUon of
this question made ty Dlx end Sherman and
Halleck, and let Congress abstain from Inter
fering, and tbe difficulty in the esse will be hap
pily settled.'1" ' ' ' ' " 1 ' -
BisRor Hoohxs's Mission. The Dublin Free
man' Journal of the 20th of November reports
the object of Archbishop Hughes's visit to Eu
rope thus: The Moat Rev. Dr. Hughes, Arch
bishop of New York, waa among the paisen
gere on beatd the Afrioa, which arrived at
Qaeenstownea Monday. . His Grace will stay
a short while in thia country, in order W obtain
a sufficient Dumber of Catholic Clergymen tc
afford a Chaplain te each of tbe Union regi
ments requiring one. He will then proceed tc
Rome to obtain the necessary power to grant
faculties to sack Chaplains, so that they caojoffl
clete io whatever diocese the regiments to
wblcb they may be attached may happen to be.
The Detroit Free Press.
, WVhaTe not received $ copy of this excellent
paper foe two weeks. What ia the matter t
Haronf ootemporary , because It haa pot on a
new dress, cut its old acquaintance!? "
[Correspondence Ohio Statesman.]
FROM WESTERN VIRGINIA.
HUTTONSVILLE, VA., Dec. 9, 1861.
. 5oito.Ohio STATUMAHlnoe nly. last the
95th haa reached this mud-bedabbled and 'blue
devil -inspiring Tillage if you Call a school-
bouse; s'.yled by the sovereigns of the vaUey
"The Seminary," one old, dilapidated lavarq-
stand, one grocery that was, but Is, alas! no
more, three dwelling-houses,' one blacksmith
shop, and a stable, a village and have settled
down for a stay, of how long duration the most
knowing among na la nnablc to coojeotarc.
At present, wc arc in tentr, or rather what
onoc were tents i and if I mistake not the tern
per of the regiment, in tenia wc will remain, no
matter how much suffering may be occasioned,
rather than aoain build winter quarters.- The
foundation for quarters for one regiment hd
been laid by the 14th Indiana, daring the two
months of their stay in this place, but their
completion was left to ; the 25th, while they
went on to Phillip!, a snug little villsge, within
twelve miles of the railroad, and let up on
their own account, without labor of building or
rent paying. Wo nave one advantage, how
ever, over the summit, and that la the ell
mate. Down here in the valley,) the winters,
as a general thing, are , open, seldom more
than from one-and-a-half to two feet of enow
falling, and that remaining not longer than
from one to two months; while on tbe summit,
the snow lies from three to four feet, and con
tinuea from three to four months without a
"thaw," and accompanied by ; cold eastern
winds. At the pr'jent writing, (he valley is
clear of scow, and the sun shines forth as bright
and beautiful and warm as on a May day
In old Ohio. How long this ''smile ol heaven"
will linger with us, is ss uncertain as betting on
a thoroughbred at a jockey quarter race, and the
boya are making the most of it.
Much dissatisfaction Is felt here in conse
quence oi an order positively prohibiting the
recommendation of furloughs, to either sick or
well, by onr officers. , But few of our. regiment
have, as yet, visited tbeir homes since entering
tbe servioe, and npon those having families at
borne with whom they fondly anticipated spend
ing the coming holidays, this blockade falls moat
heavily. The propriety -and wisdom of i this
prohibition, inasmuch as we have to winter here,
Is questionable, and most undoubtedly adds ma
terially to the dissatisfaction every day maul
Zested toward these high io command In this
division of the great "Anaconda."1 , '
Four companies of the .Thirty-second Ohio
passed here on Friday last, on their way to Bev
erly, where they arc assigned winter quarters.
Thia leaves but one regiment on the summit,
the Ninth Indiana, ' . ; ' .; ' ,.- . . '
Yesterday fire deserters from the rebel pamp
Allegheny, arrived ; under a guard from tbe
Ninth Indiana.' "-They deserted three days since,
and gave themselves bp to our pickets. - Their
report of the condition of the rebel forces, four
thousand In number, ut that esmp, is anything
but flattering to the Confederate cause.'; They
state that the troops sre suffering terribly from
want of provisions and clothing, and that the
cold is intense:. The Georgfaregiment bad
been compelled to return to tbeir native State,
being unable to winter In that latitude; and that
hundreds of Virginians and Tenneeeeeans were
deserting. Tbey express great 'surprise at this
intelligence of onr troops aad wonder bow they
come to "know id much," stating that they
were not allowed to hear anything but lies coin
ed by their offloers, and in all other respects
were treated more like dumb boasts than human
beings. ., When I saw them, they were running
at Urge through the camp, and a happier look-'
ing set of fellows, notwithstanding their rags,
it has seldom been my lot to witness. , They
report ten pieces of ordnance in possession of
tbe forces, and also, that, in their opinion, it
would be an easy matter to make them ,"cbed
addle " from their present position. - Much
sicknets prevails in . their camp. To-day they
are sent on to their homes, with an tteori; all
ef them living near Grafton. -i -
The health of our regiment, considering the
exposure we have undergone, is good, and re
ceives the credit of being the finest and hard
iest regiment in the service. .'
.,..,. .Yours, etc.;'
HUTTONSVILLE, VA., Dec. 9, 1861. W. F. B.
The Recruiting Service of Ohio.
' Wc find In the Journal tbe following state
ment of the condition of the recruiting service
of Ohio, which, wc suppose, may be regarded
as at leaat semi-official:' u " ' "
INFANTRY REGIMENTS.
Tbe total number of Infantry regiments in ac
tive service In the field is forty-one. There are
completed and stationed in different camps in
the State, four regiments; nearly completed.
fifteen; organizing, twenty-three making in all
eighty-three regimentt la the field, ready to take
tne nsia, ana organizing., xtiany or tbe regi
ments still organizing have several hundred
men, and but few of them have lew than from
three to five hundred.
CAVALRY.
There are two regiments of cavalry in tbe
field, and there are three fully organized and
ready to taxe tne neia on snort notice, ana one
organising with a fair prospect of Its speedy
completion. - ucsiaes tnese mere are lour de
tached" companies ia the field, and foor compa
nies organizing end neatly completed,' making
in all six regiments ami eight companies ot
unto cavalry in tne service or tne united
Statec '-:
ARTILLERY.
There are tea catteries of artillerv m the
neia in tne service or tne federal Government,
and three' batteries organized and ready for
marcntng orders, ueeide tnese there are four
teen batteries now organizing! making in tbe
aggregate, when completed, twenty-seven bat
teries or Unio artillery in the United States
service.'' ' " . ' '
ESTIMATED NUMBER ENLISTED.
The estimated number of men enlisted, and
connected with tbe above regiments and batte
ties incomplete, inolnding tie four regiments
completed and awaiting marching orders, ia in
tne neignnornooo or - tnirty-nvc thousand
When the various regiments and batteries are
completed, the State of Ohio will have in the
service of tbe f ederal Government - elgbty
three regimeata of infantry, eix regiment and
two battalions of cavalry,' and twenty-seven
batteries of artillery.
ET The abolitionists ol the Reserve are in a
great stew over the negro martyr Gosjwu.
They are worried at the idea oi bis being con
fined In a jail. Several abolition men and
strong minded women (we Suppose in bloomer
costume) are out In a card in his defense. , Poor
defense! The Cleveland Ueraia la filled np
with lamentations over Goinow
Is
,
The Official Vote.
city canvassers completed their work on
Frldav. and declared the iollowioar result: On-
dvke. 25.380; Gunther, 24,766; Wood. 24.567.
This makes upayxe over uuotner ei4; Opdyke
over Wood. 813 ana (runtber over Wood. VJ'X
Tbe Mayoralty vote in 1859, stood: Wood, 30,.
125; Havemeyer, 26,M3, and Opdyke, 21,773.
Jour.tCom, .;;..,. . ,-. ,,. : '. : -.r
. ; : -
' rr If CooffrcM would promptly adjourn, and
send tbe howling gang ol Abolitionist) home,
the conservative mea or tna country coma run
the war and save the Union. The Abolition
and Secession clement are alike offensive to
the country, and must give way before the
.
Of
canst of the Union LonitviUt Dm,
The New Government of North Carolina.
The New York Sun U guilty of a lingular
piece ol Impudence. It aotually "publiehec a
letter from Hatteras Inlet, which audaolously
asserts that the Provisional Government for
North Ceeollne, whloh was recently established
by a convention assembled oq that sand bar,
"1 nothing; but at big farce' fwc, the people
of North .(Jarolina,,' being represented by one
hundred and twenty Ignorant Hatteras fisher
men and voters the rest being women and
children, "The Grand Convention," sayi the
author of this "scandalous obronlole," was ad
dressed by a Tribune reporter, a Mr. Foster,
now an -Hon. M. C, and also by "Governor
Taylor,-- bot recently a Methodist preacher
there. When the resolutions were read by the
Goveruor, "a form of a mao," who "wanted to
do what waa right," but did not know what the
resolutions meant,' consented hesitatingly to
seeond them. The vote was then taken, and
thus i"thc Provisional Government waa established."
BaKimort Aires.
I Gin, PArrxasoN'e Case The Philadelphia
Inquirer aaya that Gen. Patterson has been ear
nest In the matter oi a court of inquiry npon
the conduct of bis summer campaign, for sev
eral months past. The necessary papers were
forwarded to the authorities io Washington In
Ootober; but no response wai received. The
Inquirer thinks there was a reason for this in
tbe probability that Gen. Scott would be affeot
ed by the result.' Subsequently Gen. Scott re
signed and went abroad, and Gen. Patterson Is
still pressing his demands for an Inquiry. It is
denied that he deferred asking an investigation
until after "Scott waa well out of the country,"
as some correspondents would have it appear.
He asked it months ago, asks it yet, and will
ask It till It Is granted. In the delay of the
Government to - near bis prayer, he made the
Philadelphia speech, which has been quoted In
his vindication. His friends claim that he is
one of the best abused men in the country. Let
bim have the court of inquiry.
' O" A gentleman of Hartford, Ct., has' in
vented, a revolving rifled cannon, whioh haa
three separate barrels, made of eteel and ri
fled, tbirty inobes in length and one inch bore,
flrmlv fixed in a triangular iron or steel franc.
These are mounted on a light pair of wheels,
about four feet in diameter. 1 he wnoie does
not weigh more than two hundred and fifty or
three hundred pounds; can be drawn anywhere
and managed by two-men."; ' ' '
' ' '
(, m . '
I BaiDox BunMKO in Kxntucxt. A bridge of a
hundred feet span, on the Louisville and Nash
ville Railroad, which was burned by the rebels
last summer, and the re-building of which waa
almost eomnleted. has attain been burned by a
small number of rebel cavalry, within six miles
oi General McCook's lines, which were illu
mined by the blaze. ,
t . aamyii ' ,,i , , . .
07 The friends of Jesse D. Bright, at In
dianapolis, assert that be' is for a vigorous
prosecution of the war, and will so record bis
votes
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
C. EBERLY& CO,
DRY GOODS: AT, COST,
... .r. -i - i i
Ilt' cdNBEQtrENCK OF tHE HIGff RIOE OF
Cotton i and tbeieetnt advance In Dry Goods, and
tbe expiration ot ou oopartnerthlp-." we will, on and af
ter U 38th diy December, offer onr stock of Dry Goods,
Hat. Gael. Boots and Bhoea at cost, or lees than New
York wholesale prioM, and will continue until the en
tire stook Is cloeed out. ,"-" 7 -.
' The Grocery end Produce Business, will jhe co&Unaed
in oar new building.
The Btore room we now oooudv will be for rent, and
possession siren on tbe first day of April, 18C2,by Cyrui
Cberly.' -V - ' . . - .-' 'A : 1 "
Tbe Store-room it 91 bv St feet: tbe building three
stories high, and el toe ted on tbe sontbeaet corner of
uign ana rnena streets, uoinmone, unio. i
deol8-d3w
i
; PROPOSALS
WILL BE BECIITID AT DEADQU ABTKR8 18th
Infintrr. oorner Town and Hitch etreete, Columtrai,
Ohio, for furniibing COOKED BAT ION 8 for recruit of
IStb Infantry, np to liio'olock n. stiat ineiani. for in
furuutOuu mvyj- bUqmMr.- - r
, , . na. ii. Disnsni,
' FlrjtLieut, lOdilnlanfry.A. A. O, S.
decI7-5t
' ' OmciCrrm Cotmaoi IcXniu B. B. Co.
-r Ooloiiids, Deo. 16, 1801. '
rrH STOCKHOLDERS 01 THB COLUMBUS AND
X Xenia Railroad Company are hereby notlDed that
the Annual Meeting for the election of Director! to eerre
the eniuina- year, and for other pnrpoies.'wlll be held at
the omce or the uompany in uoiumcai, on meiaay, me
7th day of January, 1803, between tbe bonra of 10
os lock A. U. ana o ciocar. oi.
CYRUS IAT, Secretary
'decl7-d3w i.
AUCTION AND COMMISSION
r"pHB SUBSCRIBER HAVING TAKEN
a lease on tne etor jwom
' No.' 11 East State St,.
bas opened it as an " . , r '
; Anetion & Connnission Boom.
He Is bow prepared to reeeWe on Oommleilon every
deaorlptlon of property, such as Dry Oooda, Groceries,
Llaaora. larnitnra. Carrlwes. Bones, eld. He also
Intends to devote fats attention to sales of Beal Kstate
and Personal Property, at any point, within twenty mllei
Auction Sales Every -Evening.
Oenshrnments respectfully solicited.
: i W. B. KENT, Auctioneer.
. ootU -: ' .; , .
! INTERESTING
TO EVERY READER,
II Is an indisputable fact, that If any person wants one
of those comfortable ESQUIMAUX BEAVEB OVJSE
OOATB, be will usually find them in large .uantities at
,,. JUAKUUB lytfUiUS'B.
1 I !
18 any pSreon dettrons of owning one of the late Style
of BCAVKB OVKB COATB. with eape attached,
don't break your beads to learn where to find them, but
go to the . . . r
Opposite the State House.
You will And them there In all colore, kept by .
MARCUS CQILDB. t
TVTD tou nerer wear any of the BILK MIXED CAS
J 8IMBRB 8UIT8, which are sold at the Capital City
Arcade? Bum in ana you win una mem in pile, at
, MAK.UU3 CHILDS'S.
YO0 may alio be In want of PANTS and TESTS, and
there la but one establiahment in the West where
Pants, and Teats are to be bad in all stripes, shape,
sty es, quant t ea and qnantiei, ana mat piace tne
TNOS'T foreet the extensive usortment of vURNIBH-
I 3 tna OOODB. narticularlv ill WOOLEN BHIttTB.
which you can end in "ttea, wniw una oiue, mi me
UArl l Ali A11 I AHjAUCi,
Superintended by Marcus Ohilds.
If yon wish to wear garments 11 A DK TO IMt.
DKta. ion can do no better than to BO to tbe Mer
ehaot TllorlD latabllabment. next to the Arcade, and
select your goodt from a stocx comprising an ooiora oi
Heaver Ulotflt. uaseimeres, bus veiyei ana riuin eei
logs, and yon will surely meet with a good Ut by purcbas
lug at .
MILITARY GENTLEMEN, when they come to this
city, a straogers, aad with to get a UNIfOBM, it
to tbeir beet aarantage w oanai
t . r MARCUS CHILDS'S, '
Where a large assortment of BLUE CLOTH and other
articles belonging to in equipigo or an omcer can oe
bad at very BMerata prices. ;i . 1 -
in snort oai I at
Marcus Childs's,
i Proprietor of that extensive business locality, x
NO. tl S3 and 85 HIGH SKEJET,
t -t- Opposite the State House. - " ''
eetz7-dom
NEW 1 0 O AL YARD 1
THE UNDERSIGNED KEEPS CON
BTANTLY on hand and for sale, the best quality of
HOCKING, GRATE COALw :
Which be will sell at the lowest market prices. . .
Call and examine my Coal belor pwrehaitng else
where. ik, ... .-.2' . f-. 'H .-.-
Office at the ltore or Brwrora, Boyoam at vo., bead
Oaamr.'3't - -
t'l-r'j Ot r. RUXSAH.
sepW-Ba
GENTS nOUItIiEBHASTJB0 ME.
BINO Cnde-shlrU, . . ..
. i;, t I ,'BAIsT BON. '
Gr
ENTS RIBB'D BIEBIIIO fJNDER-
OABUENI8.
BAIN it SON.
rjEIfTS 8ILK VKDER-8HIRT9 AND
t DBAWSlta i r v . ,
M
IS8EB'. I.ADIES AND BOI8 OTE-
BINO Drawers.. .,-. . n - . -
BAIN h ION. .
GENTS KID LINED GLOVES. '
BAIN at SON.
HICOT (V BEAVER, Ca.OAK.IN G8,
new sales.
BAIN k SON.
SHAKER FLANNEL SHIRTS AND
Drawers. - - , - .
C Jlli.-'1 '.' BAIN tt SON.
PAN TON FLANNEL DRAWERS FOR
Gents.
BAIN Jc SON.
LADIES', DOTS' ANlf MISSES' MER
INO Under-shirts.
I BAIN 4c SON. ,
ENT8' FANCY FLANNEL SHIRTS.
. j)Ai own.
SHIRTINU FLANNELS, PLAIN 6c
fancy.
I ' ' . . BAIN As SON.
, i i ,, ' '. '
riENTSl AND BOYS' SUPERIOR
SHIRTS and Collars.
BAIN & SON.
rpilE BALMORAL HOOP SKIRT A
JL Novelty.
BAIN k. SON.
TnE IlttlTIOVABLE CLASP HOOP
BKIBT.
. , BAIN SON.
XTEW DELAINES At 12X CENTS,
11
VALUE iftf cents.
BAIN tt BON.
I ELEGANT CLOTH CLOAKS, AT HE.
U DUOED Prices,
i -...- .: ; BAIN c SON.
INK - COLLARS, MUFFS tc CUFFS,
ror iiaaies. ,
' ' . ! " " . , BAIN BON.
B
ED, CRIB 6c CRADLE BLANKETS,
all a.iei,
BAIN kSON.
LADIES' WHITE CASHMERE Sklrta
.J...., .1 BAIN As SON.
decis-ni '
NEW BOARDING HOUSE.
M R. F. snATTLEH HAS OPENED A
XX .
i BOARDING HOUSE
!' 'AT NO. SO EAST, TOWN STBEET, '
Whert he can accommodate a number of Boarders by the
day or week.
dec4-tf
HEADLEY,
EBERLY &
I RiCHARDSS
! 2SO axiX 25Q
SOUTH JJCtt STREET,
' " Are now opening a large lot of
j :.. ' ' . L
'Ladies', Misses' and Children's
F U R S,
Ladies' 016th Cloaks,
! BALMORAL SKIRTS,
Shephard's Plaid Shawls,
Ladies' Merino-Vests & Drawers,
Boys' Merino Shirts & Drawers,
' ' zEPHvn wonsTEOs;
Embroidered Repps,
Iiadios' Nubias,
i, OPERA H000Sy
: I
Opera Flannels,
' WOOLEN BLANKETS,
CLOAK CLOTHS;
MISSES SUPERIOR LONG SHAWLS.
this Arm, hating adopted the Cash system In the pur
chats and sale of Goods, are enabled to sell from U to 50
per cent, leas than other bouses under tbe eredlt system
HEADLEY, EBERLY' ft BICHABDS,
250 AND 252 SOUTH EJGE STREET,"
COLUMBUS, O.
i-
otSI
NEW GOODS
P. HOSE'S.
TTAT1NO JUST RETCHNED FROM
JJL New York, I aa now prepared to offer to tbe nubile
a mon excellent aasorimeni oi uwdu run UJENTB
n us, suon as t . 1
cloths,
, . tC A 8 S I M E R E S,
-'r' '. VESTIGNS,
Ani a general assortment of
FURNISHING GOODS.
of the rirheat and neatest styles In the market; all of
wmcn i am selling at the l'UEArESl fUBHlULI
B4IKB IOK CA8B. ..'.,.
TTT SDeclal Attention raid tc Itilll.
tary Uificera C'lotbtnf .
HtTior had lonr exoerlenoe In the Out and Uannru.
ture of Officer' Clothing, I fee) confident I can give en
tire satUfaction to all my patron.
. . nusa,
M erchant Jailor, ,
aoTi9-tf :
' V t J -Ji
Columbus, Ohio.
' Oysters! Oystere!!
HAS JUST RECEIVED, AND VTILL
be in "ally receipt, by Bxpress, of
mESH CAS ft KEO OYSTERS,
from Baltimore and Pair Haven.
OaU at Wagner's Oyster and fruit Depot, No. SI last
gtate street.
' - - . ' '
OAID
NOW IS THE , TpiE ; TO SUBSCRIBE ! '
Mt,.'rai-SEEIL'MD ' UBESLY;
' ,"- 1..- . ; ' ' ' k ' ' Bl.THE ' , ..
C03T OF OOIiTJMBUO, OHIO. -
The. DAILY, at V i
The TRI-WEEKLY, at ' - ,V.
The WEEKLY, at the low rate of
. i Subscriptions to the Dailt and Tbi-Wrklt Btatbuian will be received ,
FOR THREE OR SIX MONTHS
At the above rates; and the Dailt will be furnished
TO CARRIERS ' IN ANY PART OF THE 8TATE,
At the usual ratee. As an established and reliable organ of the Demooratio party,
THE STATESMAN IS WELL KNOWN.
. In the future, as in the past, It will uphold and defend the
PRINCIPLES OF THAT GRAND OLD PARTY
Whioh has been so fruitful of good to the PEOPLE OF TEE tlOTED STATES; and wil
. faithfully urge the re-establiehmenl and aupremacy of the
DEMOCRATIC CREED AND POLICY Iff ALL THS STATES. '
As essential to the complete and perfect re-oonatruetion of the
TP US 3D 13 3EI. Zi XJ 1ST I C INT , "
r , On the basis on whioh thai Union was originally formed.
The BTAnsHAir will support the Administration of the General Government in all legal and
constitutional efforts to put down rebellion ; and sternly resist the efforts made in some quarters
to convert the present unhappy war into an Abolition crusade. '
It will constantly urge economy in the public expenditures, and the most rigid accountability
of all public officers; - I . - . v.
As a medium of general news, the Statesman will endeavor to make itself acceptable to its '
numerous readers, and at all times supply them with
. OMao . Xjevteat xid zxxomt nellable Reports
Of the home and foreign
lllli HUMMUS imu t Aiviurjit, mmwusk iJMi MbUKtlS
Will find their interests consulted and attended to, and no effort will be spared to make it a first
class newspaper, . . . , J -i. .
During the approaching session of Congress we will have a talented and accomplished correal
pondent at Washington, through whom our readers will be furnished with much valuable and
reliable information.
The doings of dur own Btate Legislature will be fully reported, and the local news of the
RiAta anrl nnr own immediate vioinitv. will have a due share of
We urge upon our friends In all porta of Ohio, and the North-Western States, to aid in extend-'-lng
the circulation of the SrATKMAir, since by so doing, they will assist in the promulgation of
sound political doctrines and reliable general intelligence. . . .
. Ti WEEKLY OHIO Sf AMAH IH CLUBS.T
To any person raising a Club of Ten Subscribers to the Wxkxt Ohio States!, and
sending us ths money ten dollars for the same, we will send one copy gratis.
All orders will be promptly attended to. . . . -
Address, MANYPEKNT' 4 MILLER, '
' ; .
November 1, 1861.
i j ;
i
Six Dollars per Annum;
! ; ' -' Three Dollars per Annum
; - , One Dollar per Annum.
markets. In its columns
. , . -, ruDUsners of tbe Ohio Statesman,
OoiUMBUS, ObTO.
SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES.
THE
AND,..
BLANK BOOK MANUPACTORV
SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED WITH
IMPROVED MA CHINERY
'.V .AND . ' '.''-.
' STEAM POWER.
N. W. LEFA V-OS, Supt:
i . . - - y i. - - . - - .
NOB. 3J 34, 38, 38 NORTH HIGH BTRIET,
Stateaman Balldlns;) Mecend Floor,
over K. Nevloa'a State Steam
- Printing; Roome.
EXTRA SUBSTANTIAL
PAGED BLANK BOOKS,
With or wlthont Printed Beadlngs, on gnperlor Paper
; RULED AND BOUND
To any required Pattern.
STATE DEPARTMENTS,
j i RAILROAD O?fI0EB, ' ' . '
' , . . , BANKING O0DMB. - (
:' . ' ; ' ' COUNTY OrilOES, "'
, MEBOHANTg,
Purntihed' at the ' Lewut Prices. ' .
BOOK BINDING,
bj in Eumon oreingis Toiom
MAGAZINES, '
i L' it.i'.:.
I
MONTHLY PUBLICATIONS.
'pamphlets,
papers, ;
Bsund In anj Required Style.
, i . .
BINDING AND BE'BINDINO
' For Publio and Private Libraries, - ' j
Orders from abroad will reetlrs prompt and spsclal
attention. Address, .
J. H. RILEY, or. N. W. LEFAVOR.
Bookseller and Stationer, Superintendent
, vaeouuiiiignBtreet. Franklin Bindery,
noTl4-d3m a
J. M. &, V. KCERNER.
Wo- QO,'.
Corner of Broad & Front Streets,
COLUMBUS,
' ' - . ' DIALERS IN
GROCERIES. PRODUCE AND
. PROVISIONS,
FOREIGN & DOMESTIO FRUITS,
PI0TJB, SILT, IIOTOBS, " ETC.
0TBTERB BT THE OA!, t tffBia SBAS0N. .
ootSS-dly
v. -
Oranberriea I Oranberriea I
iA HRL CBAJIBEKHIES, IN OOOD
OU OBDB, on ooailgnment. .
Jori tvw vj ' '
TO. D. R18TIBAUX, .
oetn lWSgBUiBigt.BtrMt.
FRA19KLIM BOOK BlfiDEBY
I
T
POST OFFICES.
GOOD SAMARITAN.
E. B. ARMSTRONG-.
No. 17 East Town Street,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALER IN
STOVES AND TIN! WARE.
hamC - - ;v - -.
novIt-d3m ' ,
SPECIAL NOTICES.
TO MAHnrn-n rjrp.fi
Or Ttaoae Oantempiatlna; marriage.
THl nndenlined Will ! Inform. tin n an m. mmrmJm.
teretUno and important sahjeet, which will be vain
ed more than a thousand times Its eost by svory married
eoople of any age or oondlilon la life. The Information
will be sent by mall to any address ea the reoeipt of 9i
eents ttiver) and one red stamp.
au letters should be addressed to
i H, B. MORRIS, at. D.
M31-ly8tawdw , Boston, Mass. :
(!!$? MANHOOD.
Ci isa asa HOW LOST,' BOW BXSX0BIO.
I Just Published In a Sealed Inrelopei Frlos t ets.i ,
f "OTUIH ON THl NATURE, TR1ATMMT AND
RADICAL CURB OI BPIRMATORRH1A Or Seminal
WMknM 1 nl . i i. a , n
- -"-V1UUI.I, miMivu., cfjsnai iDiiiiy. ana
ImpedlmenU to Marriage nnerallly, Nervoaaness, Con
sumption, Epilepsy and Pits, Mental aad Phyelea! In.
oapaolty, reaulUng from Belt-abate, fco. By Robert i.
OulverweU, M. ., author of the arson Book, aso. i , ,
A Been t Tbonsandc af offcrcrct
881,1 seal. In a plain envelope, to any address
I X r- ' wu "otjipi oi two vounpa, vj jir. uii AH.
-. -ai""' 187 Bow' N' OfflcJTBoa ,v
NO iMSt. , ,7waik . .
JBVEH8, FEVEK AND AGCB.-BU-j
lions Affections, Colds, Rhsamatlsms, Oosthreaess, Oon
sumptions, Affections of the Spleen, ef the Liver, ot ,
the Heart, Tumors, and all diseases whloh destioy life
have always exhibited upon dissection of the body, a
number of hard or concrete points, either in some of the
organs named or In the Mood vmssIs, sometimes even '
ramifying In the flesh, and again deposited upon the side
of a bone. Now these little hard substances would
savn box If Brandreth's Pills were used; they would
be purged out of the system, and sears of happy Uf. -wquld
be the sufferers' lot Instead of an early grave.
Always purge but mvta suae insloknees. ,i K J
I.T. Carpenter, .Esq., of Gorerneur, St. Lawrence
county, New York, 64 years ef age, says he has ased
Brandreth's Fills for 34 years, administered them first to
his eoaciuaaa, who had fsTer and aftegava eight the
day after tbe chtll; chilli and fevtr leas several gave
eight more he aeztday, and so every ether day antll
the chill and fever did not return, whioh was about sigh
days from the first attack. He (ben gave fonrsrery
other day for another week, when the sua was entirely 3
restored to his asual good health.
He wu himself attacked) took then fa the Same way,
and was cured In less time. Has ased no other medi;
eld. for 34 years; found them always rsllabl. for nhaself
and family when slok; has reoommanded tbeaa to thou- i
suds with the test results, and feels Confident that eve. I
tj family would bava a larger avenge of health If these
Pills were used la the plaoe of oalouwl aad other hurtful
remedies. '-Tc-' i J - Z '
Bold tar loan B. Cook. Dnrrlst. Columbus, and bi
all resneotalii. dealtlt la medlfues.
noTXt-nua .

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