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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, October 06, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1868-10-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 6, 1868.
NUMBER30:
151
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lvoeplssoeyar.-.......... ............ 900
Ten oopiea one year.:.-.. .....4.... 17 60
Twehty cbpiee one year .. ,........80
er. copies oasr-swar .i.i j . . . .V6 W
uVERTisjrja- rates fordAiIV Statesman
(ZArn.jroftjigrftfitas a Square.)
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. Locat, Notices, 15 cants per line each insertion,
Adtkrtisiko Ratebtob tri-Wbeklt Statiwi
M an 75 centa per square each insertion: for -ihrM
months or longer, a discount of one-hal from
rates.
iamratm ron Wbslt Sttfmam-$i.60
Jer square ror nrsi insertion., 76 eenta tor eaen d
itional ioaertioo,
Buanosa otiCBa, eenta eaok iertion.i
Notices or Deaths, 50 cents. " 1
NoTicis of Mihriages,75 cents.
' BET.fOTorg Notiofs, klf price' tr-T-i-i ','
. AU. traimtmt aHleerMaetaeiits wawaf if paid for at
&Hmtluy-ar4 ontowl....... 1..
Business dieectory
ARCHITECT.
iR.
TT. BKOOKKS, , , .
, Architect. XMvil Kneineesv ka." 'J
' Office ever the National Exchange Bank
ATTORNEYS.
.1-4
a ri our 1
DBASEK & NH
F.VS AT I.AW, ... '
OfBoc. Ko, 6S hontik High street. Am boa Bnild
,fag : ..... , :
JAKIKK O. BULL,
ATTORN KY-AT-lAW A MAYOR, -;
- Mayo Office.
EWHIIT.DeLi!(, i' j O !""
ATTKRNE V-AT-LA W A Notary PobHo. ;
-f 1 .; n- , v Office in Parson's Building. ;
K"P. WOODKl'FF, ' "i - ' ,
ATTORN B lf-A T LAW A Notary PobHs. ; i
i ::. t.:ij".-.ijiw .Office 151 Booth Uih street, i
AUCTION AND-COMMISSION;
.. T- . BEAU f - 'I " -V, - - . I
, (J Auctioneer and Dealer in Real Est&te House-
..hold Uoods, Clothing and Notions, " 1
lr No. T West Broad street. 1
.BATH ROOMS:
vT Harber and Hair Dresner. Hot and Colu
f 'Baths.' Basemen FostotBoe U jiitTin. -
JB00ICBINDERS.
O Book Bindars. Blank Boor Manufacturers.
if Printers ami Publishers.
Opera KniHing.
BOOTS & SHOES.
W.'
144 Soilth Hiirh fl treat. Jnt rnrxiivsMl sin
cane assorttoenv Aew atylea, low prices, la
dies, please call. .
'. I lv ft' WAS. s 4t V.'S
J-' Is the noted house for good Boots and Shoes
;Jtlow prices. .New Stock jnstreoeived. . ;
1 .' '." ' . . 276 South High street.'
COAL DEALERS.
ROBIKKON dc CO ,
Dealers in Pittsburgh and Ohio Coal.
Also.
uoue, irain xiie ana oione Bower ripe.
No. 261 iVotth Biah street.'
I" COMMISSION MERC HANTS.'
HUTCH & SUN,
m Commission, Forwarding and ProduceMer.
cbanta, dealers in Urain, Flour, ao., S7 W. Broad
street. -.1 ... . . . ,
CORSETS: -V ;
"pv ' K. SAONlEMt'Ai CO., ' '
JL Manufacturers and Dealers in French. Ger
man and American corsets.
Also. Hood fkirts.
191 Opera Huustx
CROCKERY, &c.
-TT7m.kEa.x0N,-
P(. f U , Wholesale and Retail Dealer in China,
. . . . Queensware, Ulus, Plated Uooda, Lamps and Lamp
Hntures. ' 46 Norih Hiett street.
Ct ., 'A'. 1-rAH',
' Importer and Wholesale and Retail Dea'er
in Crockery, China, Glass, Cutlery, Plated Uoods,
Coal Oil lAinps. Ao. ...
r,-. . . . ooatn tuts street.
DENTISTRY.
, . V7AUNCtt dc EMMINOKK,
J:V '-- b o. 18 Kast Broad street
G.
W. DVreti, DKNTIST. The best atvlen
of Dantifltrv. i rial nHinir Unnn'i ImnrAtai
Mineral Plate. Office. 10 and 11 Opera Block. ,
DRY GOODS.
r EBttttaVY Ac CO..
V7. Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions,
Cameta. Oi
Cloths, Alattings. fehades. Uats,
, corner Hign aud Friend streets..
Caps and Furs.
" T .' D, OSBUKN 4 i O., ' '
' Je ' 142 South Hieh street.
;r ' . Carpets, Mattings. Oil Cloths.CurUuns, Bta. le and
. .. jancy ury Mooas.
"". 1 I ec W . at. l ull u
' XI ; Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Staple and
r rancy urf vrooas, ana Atanuiaotorers or ladies
Cloaks. ' ' 123 8. High street. .
'-'' T?OPBTH ST. DRV GOODS STOKE.
,t r jf Krutn A (Jo., cash dealers in Dry Goods and
xiouons, iso bobui rounu street. i
rAltKS NAfJUHSON.
O Wholesaler and- Retail Dealer in Dry Goods.
Nanebton Building. Noa. 118 and 132 South Uisi,
street..
1 ESlOli As Vt ItiGIN,' '' ' ' J !
AV Dealers in btapt and Fancy Dry Goods and
menta; jjirnisqing ttouOsJN o. 6 J eilHong.
GILCHRIST, Git AIT Ac CO., I .
Dealers iu-Staple and Fanoy Dry Goals. '
. " - . . . '". fe. 29 Sunth biau street-
-' .! ta.T (i. HaAIIIilSIl A (III.. . '
? i Jt.mr Foreign and Domestio lry Goods,' Cloths,
. : i ars. uai xaa souin mgn street. i
-4 DRUGGISTS.!
1 ttrOT llllllli STOaaE.
,XJ- . joaN.s-kouiiRTa...,
1 Xuugaist and Apothecary.
254 North High street.
MAHFLtS dc aalA'90, '
WHOLESALE A REl'AlL DRUGGISTS.
'. i:.-. i. lwtjoutk-High St., Columbus, O.
DKAII9I. BBiCK A CU ;
AJ, W holesale and Retail Druggists, end Dealer
in rrupnetary Medicines. - ' - - -
-".. IH North High street.
-ENGRAVERS.
KiCMti.s jnoottE,
DesisDers, Engravers and Publishers,
rial and other seals enifmvnH m . .
Nota-
' - - Nos. 1U7 and 109 South High street.'-
FURNITURE, &c.
COLUratHJSCAKllMETCO.,
Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail Deal
ersin Fuiuilure, Cnairs, Mattrasses, eto.
. No. Jiul South Higu St. (Opera House).
hio FiiaArniBBtu..
1 1 u.nutiuiLiirarsol nrstclass Furniture. Whole
sale and Retail Wareroouis, 6, 7 and 8 Gwynue
Biook. -
HOUSE FURNISHING.
at a u HEM ulllli Ac CO., I
JCi. Dialer-in Mantles. Stoves and House Fur
: mining Goods. Also, Tin. Copper and oneeclrou
, W are. 47 fcast lowii ftreei..
:t A House Furnishing Go ids. Mantles. Grates,
a m an at sriiiu r.
Copper, Xu and. Sbeet Iron, Stoves and ManUes
A lljutl.ra in HnrflwitrA. dmua fc'nrniflhing Goods,
. k-riiv. tivimu a- ssriFF.
Marble and Slats ManUes, Grates, Su.yes. Hot Air
F urnaces. Ac. . n : - HO JNorin mgn street.
HOOP SKIRTS.
i
-1 ? HEED.
"JjJi Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in Hoop
Skirts aid OOHets. Also, dealer in Berlin Zttpher
atuj jam y UojOs, 103 ooutntiin street. ;
BTJSINESS : DIRECTCHY
HOWE SEWING MACHINE.
T
C P. AXtELL.
Oe1 Dealer in Musical - Merchandise. Boot s. Sta-i -
tionery.and Fancy Goods aeoerally. Special Aaent
fur the celebrated Klias Howe Gold Medal Sewing"
Machine. I. iH . " No.6. South Hiattftreeti. s
HATS & CAPS.
J.' '
l)
xifvts-in 'n'-tjAUfm'
iVA , (Suocessor to J5. lnf.) Dealer in Bats, Caps.
Furs and Straw Goods .229 South Bien street,
j . '. tl b : ... T (Sisn Golden Hat)
3
HOTELS.
XTATIO.IAL HOTEL,
Opposite Depof. '.' ...
J. H. DAVIDSON. Proprietor.
riKlftlr SI ATKS HOTEL,
J Vorner Uign and 10n streets..
E. J. BLO0NT. Proprietor!
ZfcTTLEH HOUSE,. '..,.,,
Corner Fourth A Friend sts. Commodious
house and extensive stables . . . t ' .
. L. A. BOWERS. Pro-rietor.
MEH CHANTS' HOTEL,
240 Kouth High street Good stabling attach
ed to premises. '"'" - '
v ... . YV r. l ll A. l c rxr-n. rropnetor.
insurance:;
CONN EC rrCCT , MUTUAL LIFE i,
: surance Company. Assets. $18 '.00.000. .
' WM. JAMISON. Arant. dnVnmbna. O.
NEWKIKK Ac VIII.TEXBEBGBB,
GENERAL AGENTS Seouritr Life Insurance
CompaBy,.(!.i:T v .-'; r.-i file. OpeiAMouse.,,,
HeirlB INSURANCE cojirnvw
Columbus, O. apital and Assets, (466,514.27,
W. C. M. BAKEK, Seo'y.
ii ' 1 1 i Omoe, Kos. A T Opera Hons. -
MILLINERY GOODS.;
W . Mdnoas, ' :
Wholesale and Retail Millinery Goods.
191 S. High street. Opera House Block.
M
Ka. A. UOWKINIi,
Deiler in Millinery; Straw Goods and Trim
i. No- 67 North Hieh street , .
r H. WILKIC,
J w-
Dealer in-Millinery, Oreea and- Cloak Trim
mings nd raooy Goods. 130 ptoutn nian street.
" MERCHANT; AIL0RS.
SCHArHAIlUF.N A SOBLLEBEN; :
Merchant Tailors .and J)ealen in Gouts' Fur
nishing Goods,
i:i ft T
i i ! i No. 63 North High street:
CW. H1SWAKDER, ...
Merchant Tailor and Dealer in Gents Fur
nishing Goods-i AisoaganLfor the Diamond Shirts,
... , ,'rt ooucn aign street.
THE OHIO MERCHANT TAILORING
A CLOTHING CO.. 18S S. High at. Gents'!
suits made to order. L Brady-made Clothing al-:
TOHIt II. KICKEN BACKER.
tl Merchant Tailor and Dealer in Clothing and
uenta' r urannuni ioons -
'No. 6T North High street
JOHN MCIMTF.K, . ,7
MERCHANT TAILOR. 220 South High st.
Choice stock of Clothing constant!, on hand.
NEWSDEALERS.
ANDREWS dc HULL, i y; , v '
News Dealers, Booksellers and Stationers
No. 55 South High street next door to Postofhce.
JMtED. .UAILIUANN, .
. News Dealer, Bookseller. Stationer and Bind"
r. Publications in both German and English.
- 231 South High street. .
PAPER 'WAREHOUSES.
ANDREWS, PKKHir ic CO.,
Manufacturers and Dealers in Writing. Frint-
ing and Wrapping Papers, S3 A 95 North High St.
NrVINS & HI VERS. '
Dealers in Printing, Boole, Writing and Fins
Papers 36, 38 A 40 Norih High street.
PHOTOGRAPHERS.
BALDWIN dc M'EVENS.
- PHOTOGRAPHERSr:
... r 81 Bonih High street.
J.H. ElLIOTTi
PHOTOGRAPHER. 107 South Hikh street
Piotnres made in every style and size.
J. ARCHER,
nJt Photographs, Ambrotypes, Gems, etc., etc
.. : No. 236 South High si root.
PHYSICIAN.
E.
RI.
DOWNS, 11.
D.,
No.
3 Opera House.
Treats Diseases of the
bye. Ear. Heart Ttiruat and LuDgs. Also, Diseases
oi w
Women and Children
PIANOS.
JF. HARRIS Ac CO.,
. Wholesale and Retail dealers for Lights k
Uo.'sand Maine. A Bro.'s Piauos. Also, Organs,
Melodeons and other musical instruments.
36 ttortn Uigb ftreet.
J.
J. WOODS,
Agent for Chichering's and Emmerson's Pi
anos. Also, Organs, Melodeons and Sbeet Music.
. - 21 South Higd street.
RESTAURAN-T.
BANK EXCHANGE RESTAURANT,
- Corner State and High streets.
CHARLEY MYER, Proprietor.
. .SEWING MACHINES.
A ETItA SGWINU MACHINES, '
(a. ine nest in the world.
Nea. 1 and 2 Opera
House.
W. P1MMEL. General Agent.
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
R A. UVB4K:0.,
Dealers in Fine Watches. Clocks. Jewelry.
Platedwars,' Spectacles, Ac., No. 11 Eat Town
street. '.
GATES dc HARRINGTON. ftl
- (Suecessors to Wm. Blynn) dealers in Dia
mohda. Watch s, Jewelry, Silvei Ware and Spec
tacles. No. 2 Neil House.
FA L l,EQIIKHBra,
' Wholesale and Retail dealers in Watches.
Clocks and Jewelrr. N. 71 South High street. ''
STRICTLY WHOLESALE.
BANCROFT BROS, dc CO., -W
holesale Dealers in Dry Good and Notions.
,-, t- 3 and 4 Gwynoe Block. Town street.
DI EBi JONES dc CO.,
AkPM;
Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers In Boots
and Shoes. . No. 9 Gwynne Block, Town St.
BANKERS.
P. W. HUNTINGTON & CO..
1 B A U KE R S , I
Corner Broad & High Sts.
, COLUMBUS,
feb-dly i - - - r.
OHIO.
F. H AYDB . JOS. BUTCHESON. " W. B. B ATntN.
:: HAYDEN, HUTCHESON & Cfc, i
IV p. 13 8. Hlfcill S1BEET, i
ian2n-dly-r ' '. Columbus, O,
V
NOTICES.
NOTICE.
. . , BANK OF COMMERCE,
, Cleveland, May 22, 1868. J
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE
holders of the nutstandiBg Botes of the late
Bank of Commerce, and all other parties interested,
that after the expiration of aix months from this
date, application will oe made to the Auditor, Sea
reiary and Treasurer of State to surrender to said
Bonk the st' cks deposited to secure tbe outstanding
ctrcirlatioa ol said Bank in pursuance of tbe furt
Srst (41 seotinn of the act to authorize Free Bank
ing, passed March 21st. 1851.
-n it JSEPH PERKINS. President
H. R. HOELBCT. Cashier. tmav25 d6in
The Sisters of St. MarjV,
OF THE SPRINGS, RECENTLY OF
Somerset, Perry county, will open their large
and spacious building for the reception of pup'ls on
tbe first Monday in September, 18B8. For Board and
Tuition. 75, 80, 85 and 90, according to tbe de
partment of the pupil. feR. ROSE, Sup't.
Address Box S51. i aut3-dtf
FOB HALE. I
A PAIR OF "JOE GODWIN" COLTS. FIVE
and six years' old. very handsome, kind and
rS&SF. batM 'BICHABD KEVIN 8.
. f$ V v'- fiat 4-4 A ri VVVtvW'
Interesting Correspondence.
Letter from the Hon. T. C. Jones,
of Delaware, Ohio. to the Hon.
Thos. Ewing, and Mr. Ewing's
Thos. Ewing, and Mr. Ewing's Reply.
MR. JONES TO MR. EWING.
FAIRHOLME, NEAR DELAWARE,
September 9, 1868.
1 My Dear Sir: I cannot subscribe to
your last " deliverance," though for a
period of more than thirty years I have
had so much faith in. your honesty and
capacity that I had come to regard your
judgment in regard to public affairs as
almost infallible. 1 "
Admitting all you claim in regard to
the - Republicans, U seems to me very
clear that it is still safer to trust the
party1 that wag in authority and earned
the couutry safe through the war, than
to put those., iu power who fought
against the country, or who refused to
co-operate1 with the party ot the; Union.
I know it may be said that now many
of those who were for tbe Union are
not now with -the Republicans, and have
united themselves with the Dem
ocrats,.' This is true,buV the .' num
ber is "so smal asnot mater
ially' to change the character of that par
ty. The old loeofocos and the old reb
els, with all. their States' rights heresies,
will have full control of the; party, and
the Southern men, called by the low
bred sycophants of the Democratic party
in the North "high;toned Southern gen
tlemen," will in the future as in the past,
be in the lead. I think Seymour will
be as pliant a tool in their hands as your
poor old friend Buchanan was. I re
member you told. me it was his want of
courage that induced Jiim to allow Floyd
and Jiis gang to control him. Let these
desperate men once have a national in
dorsement of their present attitude,
with' the declaration in the platform that
the reconstruction acts are "revolution
ary,, illegal; and void,"' and who can
predict the anarchy, confusion and vio
lence that will follow in the Southern
States I ' , What Northern jnan, or otber
Union man can remain there in safety 1
I regret exceedingly the sweeping terms
;tri which' you speak of the men 'who
bare V.j gone; South from the
I Northern . States. I know : very
1 many ot them that; are eqnal
in charac'trr to any men in the country,
North or South, and they all tell the
same story that is, that before the
enactment lf the reconstruction meas
ures, as' now, ' though treated ' with
civility, they, are givea'to understand
that they were not wanted there. There
were, they said, exceptions, but this was
the general rule. You know that in this
respect the Southern people have always
been extremely sectional. . .iiut they are
as hostile and even more eo to native
born citizens, who were opposed to them
during the war or are opposed to them
now. ,'llieir classiucation is this those
who came there during or since the war,
'carpet-baggers, those who were there
from the North before the war, "scala
wags" and those who were born there
and act with the Republicans, like Judge
Hill or governor Brown, ot Georgia, are
called white niggers.
xour argument that we should sup
port the Democrats this fall, because the
Senate will hold them in check, is the
samejput forth by . Seymour in his beg
ging fetter ; but you know that his, as
to the situation of matters in the South,
would be no check at all. The verdict
being in their favor at the election, there
would be a reign of terror down there,
as in 1861, which drove even such men
as old John Bell to declare for the Con
federate cause, or be assassinated. Gen
eral Lee says they want peace and will
behave themselves. And he will pledge
himself that they will, if restored not
only to civil and political rights, but to
office, State and national. If they have
everything their own way they probably
will, and so they would in 1861. They
did not want war then, for they had seen
enough, at least such men as Lee had, to
see that they would be whipped. But
Lee is not a good judge of Southern
opinion; he did not believe there would
be secession in 1S61, and was opposed
to it, still he went " with his section.
as he will again, whenever it decides
upon violence. . .
lou say that at the end ot two years,
if the Democrats don't prove themselves
worthy, we can put them out; Oh ! my
dear sir, if the elections were all sub
ject to be controlled by you, or such
men as you, this might do; but unfor
tunately we know that they are not, aud
that in fact good men have no more in
fluence than bad ones. Ine rebels,
and their old allies, the Loeofocos of the
North, once in power, they may retain
it until all we . gained by the war is
thrown away.: . The Republican majori
ty in Congress has been too large, and
in consequence of this, and the folly : of
the Jr resident, extreme and unwise meas
ures have been adopted. - But in any
event there will not be such a majority
in the next Congress; and with a man
of the firmness and will of General
Grant, and his well-known generosity,
we may expect with great conhdence a
wise and judicious administration of af
fairs. After all, what great evil can re
sult from the reconstruction acts 7 They
constitute an awkward and dangerous
method of recovery from the disorganiz
ation of civil government caused by the
rebellion. The evil will be but tempo
rary. Look at Georgia, where the white
people have acted like men ot sense.
Have we not here, even under these
acts, a substantial and lair government
established The negroes are to vote.
Well, suppose they are 1 Is it right
that so large a part of the population
should be counted in representation and
vet have no actual representation?
Neither voting tliemselves nor others lor
them, as iu the case of women and chil
dren ? -
There ought to be a restoration to civil
and political rights; but I am not willing
to say, as the rebel Generals claimed,
and as seemed to be conceded at the New
York Convention, that they were "as
good as any of the men they fought
against !" I am not willing thus to for
get the glory of the cause our men fought
for, to say nothing of their treasonable
rebellion ! Nor, my dear sir, will it do
to say that this is an unwise prejudice.
Justice, alike to the living and the dead,
requires that at least this distinction
should be kept fresh in our memories
By the way, did you notice the peculiar
and carefully selected rhetoric in which
Vallandigham spoke of the military
fame of General Grant 1 After speak
ing of him as the candidate of the Re
publicans, and, therefore, as the repre
sentative of their doctrine, &c., be adds:
"Beyond this, he represents nothing to
me but the: cold lava of the burnt-out
volcano of the late civil war." There
is a great deal of cold impudence in this,
but I think it correctly represents : the
fielingl if the leaders of the Locofoco
party - in 'regard to the . record of our
brave men in the war against the rebels
1their desire that instead of being for
ever remembered with gratitude . by- the
country, they should, as soon as possible,
be. forgotten, as representing the most
appalling evil, instead - of the glorious
deeds of a patriot fighting for his coun
try. ' - ! i
! I do not know that I fully understand
your idea in regard to the payment of
the national debt. If in a moral point
of view the nation, as a debtor, in pay.
ing borrowed money, is bound only to
pay the real value of the ' money bor
rowed, instead of the number of dollars
called fori the same rule ought to be ob
served in settling loans between individ
uals that is, it ought to be regarded as
inequitable 'to demand more than the
actual value of the thing borrowed. But
how is this to be ascertained ? I believe
that in 1864 gold was as high as 280.
Shall we, therefore, say that for every
$2.80 loaned to the Government only $1
in gold should be paid I ; The fact is
that, at that 'very time, a paper dollar
was, tor many purposes, worth more than
a paper dollar is tiow. ' The price of la
bor and the price of land are much high
er now than in 1864, in paper; and if
the creditor had,' at that time, invested
his money in land instead of public se
curities, the investment would have been
equal, probably, to the five-twenties pay
able in gold. But your statement leaves
undisposed -of the real and all-absorbing
question involved in this matter. What
is the Government to do with the cur
rency I Are we to have a currency that
shall be a standard of values, or are we,
for an indefinite period, to have an irre
deemable and depreciated currrencyf
T. C. JONES.
MR. EWING'S REPLY.
LANCASTER, September 30, 1868.
!
.. My Dear Sir Your favorif the 9th
has been some time on hand, but a press,
partly of business, mainly of indolence,
has delayed my answer. ,
. I am not at all surprised at the views
you express on the subject of my
address of the 2d. You talk, and read
and live on one - Bide of . the question
only, and whatever strongly contravenes
it must, I am well aware, impress you
unfavorably: while I, on the other hand,
not engaged in political or professional
life, mixing freely with men of all par
ties and having all the reliable sources
of information open and present before
me, have formed an opinion quite dif
ferent from yours, and probably differ
ent from that which I would have formed
in your situation. You have read the
brief on one side. I have examined and
we:ghed the case carefully on. both,
with a most earnest desire to sustain, if
possible, the party to which very many
of my old friends and political associ
ates belonged; that I would not do it
was their fault, not mine, for I warned
them repeatedly of the gulf which they
were opening between us, which it were
impossible for me to pass without an
abandonment of all my life-long cher
ished principles; and while these events
were passing, I stood on ground which
precluded all possible supposition that
I had an nndue bias on the side on
which you think I err, that is, towards
secession, its consequent revolt, er iu
favor of those who committed it. I have
during all my political life spoken and
written against the right of nullification
and secession. And at the opening of the
late contest, from the very first, and as
long as my physical strength endured, I
publicly addressed the people, calling
upon the young men to volunteer, and
the aged and rich to contribute funds to
support the families of the patriotic sol
diers who volunteered to fight in defense
of the Constitution and the Union.
In this, Judge Ranney, Allen, and
other old school Democrats, took the
stand with me. It was not a party, but
a National, a . Union movement, and 1
did not propose then, nor do I intend
nowi to slide into a party which by its
reckless violence is destroying both the
Union and the Republican government
under which alone it exists. 1 have
tour sons and two sons in law. six in
all. When an armed force became nec
essary, five of the six volunteered of
these all but one, who was disabled by
a wound, served during the war, and
fought in more than twenty battles, be
ginning at Bull Run and ending at the
grand review in Washington; and of
these four, no one was lees than twice
promoted for good conduct on the field
of battle. . It is cool for gentlemen to
talk to me of their achievements and ar
rogate the right to govern the nation
because they saved it, when few of them
rendered more efficient service- in the
hour of trial than I, and the millions
who think: and act with me. And the
most that many of those did who claim
most merit, and are most clamorous and
exacting, was to manufacture shoddy,
and, with it, to cheat the Government
in clothing furnished our troops.
In the beginning of the contest it was
of paramount importance to secure the
co operation of the border states, es
pecially Kentucky; and to this end I
held consultation with Mr. Crittenden,
and at his request, he being iu feeble
health but strong in the ruling passion
devotion to the union 1 drew up
the resolutions which bear his name,
which, without the change of a word,
passed the two houses with but three
dissenting voices. 1 intended them in
good faith, and so they were received
by the border States; but that faith was
violated by Congress at its first session
after the surrender ot the rebel army,
and the dissolution ot the Confederate
government, and this breach of faith
has produced all the anarchy and most
of the evils which have since distracted
the nation. I have washed my hands
of it, and of the party who committed,
and still persist in asserting aud sustain
ing it. The old Whig party, to which
you and I belonged, was a sincere and
r i o :.v. i, tt:..
trUtUIUl pally. OU wim mo umuu pai-
tv of 1861: they violated no obliga
tions, leaal or constitutional; they broke
no faith, but held due on to the execu
tion of their iust and lawful purpose
and I am too long taught in their school
to now join in, or knowingly give coun
tenance to. a lawless or faithless politi
cal combination, however powerful or
imposing, or however largely composed
of those who once acted with me and
were mv friends.
Whether justly or not, I am proud of
the part which my tamuy Dore in tne
late conflict.and am not at all afraid that
their laurels will be tarnished by the ob
servance of strict good faith with the
vanquished, who have yielded the prin
ciple fought for an laid down their arms.
No, nor even' by . extending to their
wounded, feelings, their prejudices and
opinions a liberal, and even a generous
indulgence.; Indeed, I think the just
and liberal is the wiser as well as the
more honorable policy. We are more
likely to restore our erring brethren. in
heart and feeling to the Union, and to
heal the wounds caused by the late ter
rible conflict, by the observance of strict
good faith, and a conscientious observ
ance of our constitutional obligations
toward them, than by assuming superior
ity over them, , heaping on them con
tumely and reproach, and sending spies
among them to slander and misrepre
sent them. . You express Jean that if
Seymour and Blair are elected, they will
reinitiate secession, and that we shall lose
all we have gained by the war.. A a
reasoning man', do you think sol Do
you ..think the intelligent men of the
South are in love with secession and its
consequences,, under which they have
endured such terrible calamities, or that
because they are treated with justice and
mercy, they will immediately rush into
another destructive war ? for myself 1
think that the only danger of another re
volt lies in the continuance of, the present
party in power, and of their lawless poll
cy made up of mingled insult ana oppres
sion such as men of ordinary spijit, who
have once been, freemen, would, die sooner
than endure. ' Men who have been free
will not submit 'to ' permanent degrada
tion ... aud ' political servitude or even
inferiority.' When this is known to be
the fixed, stern and relentless policy,
they, will resist by force ' of arms,
and in that event their resistance
i will be justified on the univers
ally acknowledged principle of the
right of revolt against intolerable op-
pression. Had the same cause existed in
1861 which now exists, no Northern army
would have crossed the Ohio river to put
down the revolt. ' You express fears that
-t .t -it - i 51
tne XNonn win countenance secession ii
Seymour and Blair are elected. In the
present state of things, and' ther present
party permanently in power,; that were
possible; for, the." fierce 'passions of
conflict having subsided, the mass of
mankind sympathize with the conquered,
especially if insulted an.d oppressed; but
elect an administrtion disposed to re
store them where they were before the
revolt and I see see no rational proba
bility, that the 100,000 majority in Ohio
which recorded their votes -against se
cession, and in favor of subduing it - at
any cost, will at once change sides, with
out the shadow of a reason, and sustain
it, '...;.- ;
I have looked the condition of things
full in the face and write down my deep
convictions.- ' There is danger of another
civil war.-.--1 deplore the threatened
mischief, and have done all I can to
avert it, and still hope the bitter cup
will pass from us. But the party in
power are resolutely fixed in exciting to
the utmost, and keeping up to their
highest intensity, the fiefce and angry
passions of men, and it were vain for
them to expect ferocity on one side, and
calm endurance on the other. Their
policy continued will force on collision,
which let them in prudence avoid. The
moral and physical power of the nation
is against them; they can proscribe vo
ters and manipulate elections, but their
power will fail against men, embodied
and under arms, where each man counts,
whether cheated of; his vote or not ; and
in this arbitrament they would be but as
one to three. The war.if they really force
it on, will not be strictly section against
section tbe South will be united, the
North divided it will be like the
war between the Guelphs and Ghibil
ines, which, for more than two hundred
years, desolated Italy, and in which
Caesare Borgia practiced the lessons in
political morality which Senator Morton
has been taught to adopt and practice,
by our five years of war. If he had re
vised hisreading of Machiavelli's Prince,
it would have deprived his lessons of the
charm of novelty, as he would have
found it in full Dractice many hundred
years ago, and by looking a little further
he would have found fliat it peopled
Dante's hell even to its ninth . circle,
with more than half its tenants. It
were better for the country, better for
the party, that Congress sjiould not re
assemble on the 15th. If they meet,
they can not possibly abstain from in
terfering in the Southern elections, un
less, indeed, they be overawed by a
strong Northern vote; it is the sole bus
iness for which they are to be called
again together, and they will feel bound
to act.
There are some things in yourletter not
quite worthy of you or of the subject we
discuss. You say my suggestion as to the
power of tne Senate to prevent legisla
tion, is the same as contained in Sey
mour's "begging letter" an insinuation
that I borrowed the opinion from him,
whereas you well know that mentally I
never deal in borrowed capital. The
trnth is, I had written down the passage
referred to, iust as it now reads, weeks
before I saw Mr. Seymour's letter, and
the thought does not suffer(do you think
it does i) by occurring to two indepen
dent minds at the same time. ' ' You call
Seymour's a "begging letter."- .You
must be at a loss for something to object
to; it struck me as in decidedly good
taste unexceptionable in matter and
expression. I know little of him,
personally, but, if in all else he fa equal
to this, he will do. You certainly have
no warrant for the opinion that he will
fall nnder the influence of Toombs and
Hampton. He certainly never yet acted
under their influence as General Grant
did under that of Stanton and Wade,
when he gave Stanton a file of United
SUtes troops to enable him to " stick
and bayonet the President if he should
attempt to enter the department. There
is no more reason to suspect Seymour of
subserviency to disloyal councils than
a"nv other, the best man in the nation
On .the whole, I would rather have your
opinion two years hence on the present
political condition, than now.
I remain, very truly yours,
T. EWING.
Hon. T. C. Jones, Delaware, Ohio.
Will speak at Osborn, Green county, on
Friday evening, Oct. Oih, In place of Gen'
Geiger announced lor that place, in the
afternoon ot that day. The meeting at
Xenla announced for the evening ol the 9:h
for General Geiger was made through mis
take and will not be held.
JNO. G. THOMPSON,
Sec'y. Dis. Com.
E. T. UeLany
Will speak at Lithopolls on Saturday, Oct,
10th, at 2 o'clock p. m.
in . Hon. Kuans . Ranney
Will speak at Tiffin, Oct. Sth, and at Carey,
Wyaudot county, Ohio, on the Oth.
DEMOCRATIC
MASS MEETINGS.
Hon. A. ii. Tlinrman'a 1 A
menls.
AT L0SD0N. with John H. Thomas Esq.. and
others. Thursday. October 8th. '
At I1ELAW KE, Wednosday, October 7th.
At LO i DON. Thursday. Oomber 8th.
At WASHING I ON C H.. Saturdar. October loth.
" Hon. Geo. E. Pugh
Wtllspeak ' : -
At HAMILTON. Saturday evening. October 10th.
Gen. Irurbin Ward,'.' r
.t CINCINNATI, Thursday, Ootobtr 8th. 1 -t
PIQUA. October 6ch.
t GRbfcJi V1LLE. October 7th. ' "'"'
Geit. Geo. W. IflcCook Sc Gen.
Joseph II. Gelsrer -
Will, with others, address the neoDle :
.AT WOOD3FIELD-:Minrn nonnl. Tk...l
October 8th.. - . , ,
Hon. Geo. II. Pendleton
Will speak .-"."'
t TDLVRIA. Wednesday. Oet.'7th.
i Mr. VERNON. Thursday, Oct. 8th. -
f OIL Honr.? ty. Friday. Oot. 8th."
1 TRO i, October 10th.
Hon. I. Van Trump i ' -
Will apeak J " ' --p. . .:.'.;;.,
t GROVEPORT. October 10th . .
i COLP JIBOS. October loiti, evening.
. Hon. Chilton A... White
And others will speak '
At
t MILLER3RCRG, Holmes Co.' Thursday!' Oct.
6th.
Gen. George : VP. BIcCook :
With others, will speak ; .. ..';
WARREN. Tuesdav. OatobarSth. .
Hon. S. W. Coll, f I..,., and Hon.
-. (onion a . It bite
Will speak . ; .,....,.
At CHILLICOTHE. Saturday. Ootober 10th.
Hon. A. G. Thurniau and Hon.
Frank If. Hard
Wiil address the people
At MARION. Tuesday, October th.
Hon. C N. Ejmniiison '
Will speak with Hon.' A. G. Thurniau ;
At MARION, October 6th.
At I1PI.A IVA UW. Ttt.
At LONDON. October 6th. ' ' 1 '
Ar iiAam.iuiua j. u., uotober lotb .
Gea. Thomas ISwins Jr,
Will address the people ! --..i ;
At IRONTOX. Ootober 6,h.- .. f
At GALL'POL.S. Octobei 8th.
At ATHENS. October sth.
At CH1LLIC01HIE. October 10th. .
Hon. Robert Hulcheson
Will speak . ,"
At WARREN, Tuesday. October th. ' ,
At O fTA. A A. Putna u county, Weinesday, Oeto-
At SID E Y. Saturday, Ootober 10th.
Gov. Thomas K. Hrarulette ' '
Will e peak ' 1
At DAYTON. Ootober eth.
Hon. Chilton A. White, with E. B.
Asbelmian,
Will speak -
At CRESTLINE, Tuesday evening, Oct. th.
Hon. Chilton A. White, with Oth-
. . ers,
Will 8 peak
At OTTAWA, Wednesday. Oct. 7th.
Hon. V. Reed Golden
Will speak '
At GALLIPOLIS. ThuMday."Oot.8th.
Gen. Harbin Ward sand Hon.. A.
Mayo,
Will speak at
CAMBRIDGE. Saturday. Oot. 10th;
E. F. BINGHAM, Ch'n.
W. WEBB, Sec'y.
W. WEBB, Sec'y. NEW APPOINTMENTS.
E. II. ESUfXIlAK
Will speak . .
At OTTAWA, Oct 7.
At TIFFIN. Oct. 8. '
UK. CII4S AEEE3T
Will speak '
At WARREN. Oot. .
At MILLERSBURG, Oct. 8.
. HOU. BUL IO.K S4.1XF.R
Will speak . . '
At GERMANTOWN, Montgomery county, Friday
Oct. 9
HOT ARCHIBALD MAYO
Will speak
At OTTAWA. Oct. 7.
At TIFr'lN, Oot. 8.
HOT J AMES R. IIUBBELI.
Will speak ' '
kt IRONTON. Oct. ,
At GALLAPOLIS. Oct. 8.
At ATHENS. Oot. 9.
At CH1LLICOTHIE Oct. 10.
E. F. BINGHAM. Chairman.
W. W. WEBB Sec'y.
RALLY!! RALLY!!!
DEMOCRATIC MEETINGS.
The Franklin County Democratic Exec
utive Committee announce tbe fol'owing
Ward and Township meetings :
BRIGHTON HOUSE. Mth Ward ) Tuesdav even
ing. October 6th. Speakers Hon. Cal. T. Mann
ana jno. . siouuney.
HKTTE-HIMER'S HALL. 7 h Ward) Wednes
day evening. uctoner7tn. speakers Col. J, V.
Groom an I Tom. C. Thurman.
O'BRIEN'S GROCERY -STORE. (9th Wa d).
Wednesdav evening. October 7(h. Speakers
Hon. A. siayo and uapt. j . ot. J. Liarason.
BROADWAY HOTEL, (Wm. Hoar's). Tuesday
evomne, uctooe- am. speakers r. ueLauy
and Jas. G Bull.
JACOB IMS' GROCERY. Thursday evening. Oo
tobrrStu. Speakers Col. L. Baber and J. Rein
hard. DUFFY'S HALL. (8th Ward). Thursdar evenine.
October 8th. Speakers Hon. A. Mayo and A. T.
Del.anv.
CITY HALL. Friday evenine, October Sth. Speak
ersCol Geo. W Manypenny and A. Mayu.
BKOWN'S CORNERS. Friday evening. Ootober
9th. Speakers E. T. DeLany and J L). Barnett.
COL. INN1V SCHOOL HCUSK. Friday -evening,
October Sth. Speakers Cal. T. Mann and
' C. Loewenstein
PLRASANT HILL (Franklin township), Friday
evening, October dlu. epeaners a. r.mngnain
and J. C. Groom.
GEHANNAH, Fi iday evening. Ootober 9th. Speak
er; captain j . ct. J uiarsson ana j nage a. n
Alberv.
HRNKY SCHRElSER'S HALL. Friday eveninsr.
October 9th. Speakers Otto Dressel and Colonel
I.. Ranftr.
LOCK HOURNE, Saturday evenirg, October 10th.
Speakers George L. Converse and Judge H B.
Albery. ;
HARRISBURG. Saturday. Oct. 10th. at SP'M
Speakers Thos. C. Thurmaa and Col. J.! C.
Groom. .. 1
TOWN HOUSE, (Jaclisoi township) Satnrdav
eveninsr, Oot. 10th. Speakers Col. J. C. Groom
and 1 nia. U. '1 burman.
DUBLIN, Monday, 0t 12tS, at 8 P M. Speak
ers Hon. Jas. R. Hubbell, and Geo. L. Con'
verse.
WESTERVILLE. Monday eyenins. Oct. ISth.
Speakers lion. j. it. nuoneu ana ueo. L. Con
verse. PLEASANT RIDGE. (Mintgomery township)
Monday evening, Uot. 1-tn. speakers Jas. G.
Du i ana Vs. Aioewenstem.
GERMAN MEETINGS.
C. Loewenstelu will speak in German as
follows:
WASHINGTON HOUSE (South Pub. Lane), Wed
nesday evening, Uct. 7tn.
LAWRENCE AUMILLER'S, Thursday evening
Out- 8tb.
MIODLETOWN (John Schart's), Friday evenin;
Out. 9th.
LAURENZ SCHNEIDER'S, Saturday evening,
JOHN G. THOMPSON,
Ch'n Co. Dem. Ex. Com.
W. S. HUFFMAN, Sec'y.
DEMOCRATIC BASKET MEETINGS.
INGS. .
The Democratic Executive Committee
announce the following Basket meetings
Ot Saturday. October loth, at Groveport, for
Madison. Hamilton and south part of Truro town
ship.. Speakers Hoo. P. Van Trump, L. B. Lsh
elnian and Thomas Sparrow .
' Let arrangements be made to make these
meetings the largest ever held in the coun
ty. Bring your baskets. Bring your
wives and daughters. Bring your sons.
Bring your Republican neighbors, pre
pared to spend the day and have a good
JOHN G. THOMPSON.
Chairman Co. Ex. Com.
W. S. HUFFMAN, Sec'y.
DEMOCRATIC GERMAN MEETINGS.
' lHllS.H,.if
! John B. Jeup, Esq, Editor of the Cincin
nati ToTksfreiata, will address the ncople-iu .
.tne ucrraan iansTnai?w aw toliow-i
" AT WOODFIELD, Thursday. October 8th."
! All th above meetings will be in the
evening, unless otherwise ordered 'by the
. county committees, f if -. , .4S "
Lion. Emil; Rathe, of , Wisconsin, will
speak? , , , . .., ' ! '
J At sSANDOSKYCITY.Tuesday.Ootober toiSf)
I Other German meetings will be here
after announced. "
E. F. BINGHAM.
Ch'n. Dem. Ex. Com. O
NEW GERMAN MEETINGS.
-' Hon. Emit Roth(".-.-r'i ...
TWiH speak in German at ' ii-'Z !'?
FORT WAYNE, Ind., Oetob r6th. .'"- " ,
CINCINNATI, OotoberTth and 8th. - " .
SANDU SAY CITY. October th. " ,,'
TOLEDO October loth.'. , ' ','- " ' r
Mr. Kotbe's meeting at Sandnskv tltv:
ictober 6th, is changed to October. 9tb, as.
bove;
W. WEBB, E. F. BINGHAM.
Secretary. Chairman.
GEX JOI. M. GEIGER ;
Will address the people of . Franklin:
ifiunty at the following-places i' ." c-hi
R0VEPORT. Tuesday evening. Oetobertth.
OLUMBUS (west front State House), Saturday
evening, Ootober 10th, with Hon. P. Van Ttump
and oihers. ,; j r:.
Let 'menf of .'an-'parties! attend; these
leetings, and hear the -political Issues of
;he present campaign discussed.5 " '
JOHN G. THOMPSON,
JOHN G. THOMPSON, Chairman Dem. Co. Ex. Com.
W. S. HUFFMAN, Sec'y.
Franklin County Democratic Executive
Committee Room.
The Franklin County Democratic Execu
tive Committee Room (Thurman Hall) will
be open duringthe-catnpaigQ froraDo'clock
A. &!.. to 10 oeock PALV&lMdays except
ed ) Democrats are cordially invited to
JOHN G. THOMPSON, Chm'n.
W. S. HUFFMAN, Sec'y.
PAPER .WAREHOUSES.
paper warehouse:
:' '-' - ' '.' .'"-' t - 5- -v-: '-.0
The attention of the Trad. Ik called to the super:.
-.i .. i .;. j orstookof , ., .
'- -'...-'.".)
PAPERS ' OF ALL R I N LS ,
-:A sm !-; It; ..ai.,T?tslw:i
Just received ndf sale by "i ' rr -
mm & MYERsi
30, 38 & 40 NORTH HIGH" ST.,
' " ' ''"" ' ' --i i . i ,-;
C 6 LV MSV 8.V 1
Oar stock comprises a full line f
Book.
Writing, I i
Colored and
Print Papers.
Ws have a full stock of
ENVELOPES,
Of all sises and varieties, which will bs sold at the
. Ilowest market rates.. . .
OPS STOCK OF v,
O A R D
Is unsurpassed in ths eity, including .
: BRISTOL BOARD, ! j
Rt Rs CHECKi , .
COLORED of ail kinds' ;
And BLANK..' : i
... 1 . . . -- . . ... . ..
GIVE ,U ,,A C A. tl t.
KEVINS & MYERS.
novS"
-WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
Fs A.! & , L; ; LESQUEREUX1
! ' - - ' .'-' T I.-.' ' :.-
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS InJ ,
WATCHES ,
JEWELRY. - .
'-CLOCKS,'-'
; SILVER and .
PLATED WARE,
CAXES, SPECTACLES,
CETLERV, .. . t
. GOLD PErs,''";
POCKET-BOOKS nnd
OPERA GLASSES,
" . IN ENDLESS VARIETY.
Keep constantly on hand a large assortment of
Sella Thomas and WaterbuirClocks,
For the Jobbing and Retail Trade. Also,' Agents
for the ,
ITHACA CALENDER CLOCK COMPANY.
Watch Makers' Tools aod Materials. Watch Glass
es (French and Geneva) in full supply at
li-w rates.
Iff All orders promptly filled and satisfaction
guaranteed.
F. A. A L. LESQUEREUX.
febH-eodly No. 71 South High St.. Columbus.
JOHN SCHNEIDER,
DEALER IN
WATCHES, CLOCKS JEWELRY,
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, AC .
173 South H:gh street. Columbus, O. Repairing
carefully done ani warranted. Hi?7-endsm
FLORISTS.
UNDERWOOD CO. ARE HOWPKE
pared to furnish from their extensive Nurse-
tt east of the County Fair Grounds, between
Broad and Friend streets, all "neties of Orna
mental Shrubs; Provence, Damaak. Mosa. China,
Bourbon and Tea Roses : new varieties of Peonies.
Gh?vsantheaiua,s. Dahlias, Verbenas. Ac.. Ao. Tba
MlStion will not be wanting iu any desuabis
novelty. Cut Flowers of great variety in season. A
aprSl-eodtiin ,

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