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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, October 07, 1868, Image 2

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io Statesman.
PRINTED AM) PUBLISHED BT
RICHARD NEVINS.
E. B. BSHl!fcTAW Edltora.
C.B.HMB) . I
COLUMBUS, , OHIO t
KOBrtlTU - OCT. T.
FOB PRESIDENT,
I.ORATIO SEYMOUR,
OrNIVT9HK.
, S FOR TICK PRESIDENT,
GEN. FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.,
OF IBISSOCBI.I
',BtCHJ.JE ETI, of Muskingum
BtgTK'CT Et.BOTOBS.
irt n(st.-OOHN , JECP.of ' Hm11os
IV - i M. NOBbB. t nami son.
3d
4t.h
.1th
6 th
nh
Sth
tit
loth
llth
GEOTW. flOUPK. of Montgomery.
W. J AC K " , f
-ISAAC S. PILLARS, of Allen.
M H. DA I, of Clerwont
WM. J. ALVXANDKR. of Omni.
R. V. VOPPLKTON, of DHwm,
JOHN A. ORAM KB. of Ottawa.
ANORKW ROACH, of Wood,
i EZRA V. PB AN, ot l-awrenoe.
Hth
-J. J GREEN E. of rike.
0. FOLI.FTT. of Uekin
Mth " 0'. FOLI.FTT.of Lioking. .
JlS - Zh , H ; POPPLVTO cf Lorain.
'.? r"Jif
JBro,
ISA S.V SI "".?1'."'.'""" . ,
lth '
ITth 2
icth
lth
W PATRICK.. ot tito.
VMUEL WILLIAMS, of Carroll.
HoRrt. WKIMRR. of Summit.
MATT. BIROBARD. of TrumbuU.
Democratic State Ticket.
"' FOB BWnHTiBT OF STATBJ
THO.T1AS HCBBABD.el lmmm
' fob sufbbub judgi
UPIL.L.I A T E. FINCKt ! Perry.
to mbhbbb boabb o fcbuo wobis
A K rrlUR HUOHKS. of Cnyahogra.
' FOB MHOOt oomnBttoirBit, .
AMDEL JT. KIBKWWO, of Seneca.
FOB OXBBK OF SUFBEXB OOUBT.
JOHN B. WEBB. at Malsaalae;.
FOB RKPRBSBSTATIVB IN CONGRESS.
: (Seventh Congressional UUtrieO
JOHN F. TnonA. of Clarke.
Goi,b closed in New Toils yesterday at
The Black Test.
"7 do -solemnly swear that I accept the civil
and political equality of all men.' and aaree
no to attempt to deprive any person or persons,
on account of race, color or previous condition,
of anypoli'ical or civil right, privilege, or im
munity enjoyed frj y other etat f men- S 0
help me God." Southern Radical Carpet Bag
Constitution.'
The Black Test. Trying to Shield Gen. Grant Under
the Mantle of Jackson.
' The New York Tribune, in a reply to tbe
objection raised to Gen. Obabt, of being in
the Military Service of the United State,
ays :
'Thlj abjection comes from c party pro-:
iessiugto be the identical party which
nominated Gen. Jackson for the Presiden
cy, and, by the sheer force of his military
popularity, elected him."
General Jackson was not electod by the
sheer force f military popularity. The
attempt of certain persona in Washington
to disgrace blm, in consequonce of his In
vasion of Florida, while a Spanish Terri
tory, the Governor of which incited the
Indians to 'acta of hostility against the
United States, and then, when Jackson
defeated them, allowed them to take shel
ter in the Spanish forts, prompted the Leg
islature of Tennessee to present him as a
candidate lor President. At the election in
18U, General Jackson received ninety
nine electoral votes to . eighty-four for
JoHsiQoiscT Adams. Congress, although
he was a minority candidate,elected Adams
many States, where Jackson was the
second choice, and Mr. Adams scarce had
. 1,. A innnnrfar, vnMnff
a corporal a. jjuaiu v oupw.v.-,
for Adams,' while others, it we mistake not,
whose electoral vote was for Jackson, cast
the Congressional vote for his leading op-,
ponent. -
The beller that General Jackson was de
frauded out ol the Presidency caused him
to be nominated as a candidate, by the peo
ple wlthoutthe formality of a Conven
tion, and he was elected by an overwhelm
ing majority.
The fitness of Gen. Jackson for the
place the many civil offices, Judge of the
Supreme Conrt, member of the Constitu
tional Convention of Tennessee, Senator in
Congress, showed that he had civil as well
as military qualification for the office, and
b la eight year career as President, made
his Administration famous as one of the
purest, wisest, and best that the country
ever had. . ... ,-.
Gen. Jackson, when nominated, held no
commission in the Army and bad no sol
dier under bl command. He was not
educated as a General, but as a civilian ;
and the objeotlon to Gen. Grant is not
that he fought for the country, but that be
is a mere military man, without knowledge
or experience as a statesman, and above all
it is, that at the time be aspires to the
first office la the gift of the people, be
commands the Army, with greater power
given blm than ever an American Genera,
including Washington, was trusted with,
and that this Army, instead of being em- '
ployed to defend the white frontier .set
tlers against the tomahawk and scalping
knife of the savages, is engaged in the
South to aid the Radicals in enforcing ne
gro suffrage and Itadlcal measures upon an
unwilling people whose misfortune it is to
ha v4 been born white..; J--.'1' . !
t
to
a
The Tribune and the Chances in
Ohio.
The New York Tribune says that the Re
publican expect to carry Ohio, but by a
mailer majority than that ol 1866, "and
that we, (the Radicals) are likely to lose
two to four Representatives in Congress."
- We incline to the opinion that the Re
publican majority in Ohio will be less than
that of 186380 much leu that the majori
ty will be sunk so low as to leave a balance
to the Democracy, and that the Radicals
will lose two to five members of Congress,
with at least ten members added to the
larger number.
Immense Democratic Meeting at
Ravenna.
There was an immense Democratic meet
ing at Ravenna on Monday. Even the
' Special ot the Cincinnati Gazette I con
strained to say that it was a success. Hon.
R. P. Rannet and Hon.' Robbkt II ctc bi
son and Dr. - Cbabxes . Allen were the
speakers," and ' they all made " most able,.
speeches. :' '
The Town Elections in Connecticut.
Elections were held lor Town officers
throughout Connecticut on Monday. The
Hartford Tiroa, say shLtjhe scattering re
turns from the various counties the Demo
crats gain largely, showing that bad there
been a general ticket they would have given
5,000 majority
The Radical Pretence of Love for
the Soldier.
The Radicals pretend to be the peculiar
friends of the soldier. Gen. Fbank Blair
. was a soldier schuylek uoltax a stay-ar-home
patriot. Colfax is bespattered with
praise' by the Radical sheets, while Gen.
Blaik is the object of the vilest obloquy
the most incessant abuse.
Gov. Ctjbtin, of Pennsylvania, is re
ported . as a supporter ol Sktmouk and
Blaib. . .
General Frank Blair in Columbus
—The Journal and its Caricature.
The Journal has a wretched wood cut,
Intended to represent General Fbank P.
Blair, as he appeared in this city. The cut
represents him io his chamber, endeavor
ing to dress himself, with his pantaloons
front side behind, with drunken efforts to
speak, and swearing "by God" at the "in
fernal tailor" that male them. A bottle of
whisky Is on the table with a glass by its
side. 'This picture appears in the Horning
Journal of yesterday (Tuesday) morning,
and occupies lully one-third ot one ol the
pages of that paper.
In all seriousness we ask General Comlt,
why it is that he so far sinks the gentle,
man as to allow the miserable abortion as.
soclated with him, to thus, outrage decen
cy, in publishing a picture so outrageously
false and villainous. If it were not thai
the fellow who got it up was- a conceited
fool of the first water, who makes him
self a
subject fit
' For (port of eoji avd rabble wit."
the offense of thus slandering a gentleman
high on the rolls of fame, merely because
he visited the Capital of the State, would
resolve itself into one of graver magni
tude. -
. A large portion ot our citizens called on
Gen. Blair during bis recent visit to this
city, and among them were recognized
many of the supporters of Gen. Grant
and Mr. Colfax, and none, we venture to
say, left his presence without respecting
the gallant soldier and accomplished gen
tlemen, whom they found in the person
of Francis P. Blair. The feeling of dls
gust, at the conduct of the Journal, in its
abuse and villainous carricuture, felt by all
who saw Gen. Blair on Monday last,
must, in the very nature of things, be in.
tensifled with those who called to pay their
respects, and who saw and conversed with
blm. We do not hold Gen. Comlt respon
sible for this carricature, for it might have
crept into the Journal without his knowl
edge or consent. It bears the impress ol
the low cunning of the dandyfied ass, as.
sociated with him. who, like all others of
a low grade of intellect, make the common
mistake of believing blackguardism to be
wit. But we hold Gen. Comlt and Dr.
Smith responsible for. the retention of the
sweet scented, lisping, contemptible puppy.
(we beg pardon of the -younger dogs for
drawing on them for a fitting term) who,
at times, seems to have command of the col
umns of the Journal, and this responsibili
ty, willing or unwilling, they must, bear,
unless they promptly give security lor the
future by his dismissal.
General Blair has been the object of con
tinued and of false attacks since bis nom
ination for Vice President by the" Demo
cratic National Convention at New York,
The charge made upon General Blair by
his enemies, is the snme charge made on
General Grant by bis supporters It Is the
same charge that 'General Grant's po
litical friends. In a leading Radical sheet,
made, on the head of the political organiza
tion In this State opposed to the Democra
cy. The Statesman has never named the
charges against General Grant except in
defending the Democratic party from orig.
inating them.' And, except in one instance,
we cannot now recall a Democratic Daily in
Ohio that made it. That instance was this:
The Cleveland Herald charged General
Blair, on the authority of a lying tele
gram, with -drunkenness, and that sheet
made an editorial on it, knowing it to be
false. The Plain Dealer, of the same city,
in commenting upon the falsity of the
charge, dared the Herald to go Into an
investigation of the charge that General
Grant,' when heswnng round the circle"
with President Johnson, at Cleveland, two
years ago, landed in that city in a state of
such beastly intoxication that he bad to be
tken to the Detroit boat, and put to bed,
sleep off the effects of his debauch. The
Herald did not dare to investigate,
for t,he proof of the truth of the charge
was at hand. . Wendell Phillips charged
General Grant with being so infatuated
with the love of liquor that he coujd not
stand up before a bottle, and has since, In
communication signed with his name,
and in which be gives in his adhesion to
Grant and Colfax, charged that he, Gen.
Grant, has been seen drunk in the public
streets within the last nine months.
We mention these facts to show . that
while the Democratic press has ample evi
dence to charge and to prove that the can
didate of the' Radicals is so much cf a
whisky drinker, that be ought not to be
trusted, yet they have not made the charge
part of the canvass, for Democrats be
lieve, that if Radicalism is to be carried
out, the country disrupted and its people
impoverished, it matters but little, when
all we have is lost, whether it is done by
the Radical President drunk, or the Radi-
cal President sober.
But the charge against Gen. Blair being
false the thousanus of our citizens who
saw him on Monday last being witness to
the fact that it is basely so, we have no pa
tience with the "low-browed baseness"
that repeats it In the Journal, that its dis
tant readers may believe It to be true.
Three Monster Democratic Meetings.
ings.
The greatest Democratic meetlug ever
held In New York City was held Monday
night. A half million people were out,
and it is estimated that there were ninety
thousand people in Torchlight, procession.
The meeting the . same day and the
Torchlight procession at night in Pitts
burgh, was the largest and most imposing
demonstration ever seen in Western Penn
sylvania.
On the same night the greatest meeting
ever held in Cincinnati was held by the
Democrats.
All over the country in New York, In
Pennsylvania, In Ohio and in Indiana the
Democratic meetings for a few' days past
have exceeded anything ever known in the
meeting line. The ground swell is with
the Democracy.
Wants the Government Driven
into Insolvency.
The Journal says that the Democrats
want to Tax farms, so that the Tax can be
taken off of Whisky, which is druuk by
Democrats, and from which a large por
tion of the Revenue lor the Federal Gov
ernment is realized. In another editorial,
the Journal calls upon the people not to
drink Whisky or chew Tobacco, and not to
use the articles off of which the Federal
Government obtains its revenue. .
If they shall follow the Journats advice,
how is the Government to be carried on f
It is now falling behind at the rate ot over
one hundred and fifty million dollars a
year. .
Giveing it Up.
The Plain Dealer learns that the informa
tion received by the Republican State
Committee at Columbus, in reference to tbe
result in Ohio, Is of such a character as to
produce consternation In the ranks of the
Radicals. It la virtually admitted that
Ohio is certainly going Democratic, and
that all that can be done now is to keep the
maiorlty down as low as possible, in order
to make tbe fight lively lor the November
election.
Democratic Meeting at Pleasant
Valley.
There was a large meeting at
Pleasant Valley last evening. It was ad
dressed by E. B. Eshklman. Everything
looks highly encouraging in that quarter
for the Democracy,
DEMOCRACY.
The Greatest Political Meeting
Ever Held.
An Army With Torches.
IO MILES OF PROCESSION.
90000 MEN IN LINE
And Half a Million People Around
the Speakers' Stands.
NEW YORK, October 5.
The greatest mass meeting ever held in
New York took place this eveniue. In Tarn'
many Hail, Fourteenth street and Union
Square. The Democratic torchlight pro
cession, now in progress, has in its ranks.
according to tbe estimate ot an experienced
police captain, over ninety thousand per
sons. Alter a junction bad been effected
with the deleeations from the adjoining
counties, tbe lenetli ot tne procession ex
ceeded ten miles. Every ward was largely
represented, and banners and transparen
cleB were numerous. Several bands of mu
ale accompanied each delegation, and nlav
d thfi "Star Spangled Banner." and other
.National airs, ine scene in union square
was grand. From the main stand the
Temple of Liberty which was splendidlv
Illuminated, strings of lights stretched to
Tammany rJ all. and the streets in the vl
cinity seemed literally on tire with calcium
lights, rockets, nre paintings, and Are bal
loons. The main stand on Broad wav was
the center of attraction outside of Tamma
ny Hall.though there were six other stands
at whicn speecnes were made to tne im
mense throng, roughly estimated at half i
million persons, men, women and children
The crowd stretched compactly down
Broadway to Eleventh, and even as far as
Spring street. The spacious thoroughfare
was well filled, while scores of cross streets
were alive with citizens.
The meeting at Tammany Hall was held
in the spacious ball in which the delibera
tions ot the Democratic Convention were
conducted, which was filled to repletion.
The front seats were occupied by ladle?,
and the ball was splendidly decorated
Gen. Baldy Smith presided, and said that.
speaking as tbe representative ot hundreds
or thousands or soldiers wbo bad risked
their lives In the war, he declared it to be
his opinion that the results ot the war
wonld be lost without there was an entire
change in the policy of the Government
Hon. santord is. cnurcn was tne next
speaker, and argued that tbe centralizing
policy of the tfadictis would, unless
checked, inevitably result in depriving
the larger State, such as New York, Ohio,
and Pennsylvania, of tbe preponderance in
the a Hairs of the government that properlv
belonged to them in consideration ot their
numbers, resources and amount contribu
ted by them to tbe support of tbe Govern
ment.'
An eloq'ient address was also delivered
Dv Air. A. Uafcev Hall, Utstrict Attorney
Tne toiiowing letter irom weneral mc-
Clellan was read ; bis emphatic indorse
ment of tbe Democratic candidates being
received with enthusiastic demonstrations
ot applause :
NEW YORK, October 5, 1868.
To Douzlas Taylor, Esq., Chairman, &c
Mr Dear Sis: I have the pleasure to ac
knowledge the receipt of your invitation
to preside over the Democratic meeting of
Alondav next. 1 nave long since deter
mined to abstain from further participa
tion in political life. and. therefore, find
myaeir compelled to decline tne Honor you
prefer me. I should, however, be glad to
attend the meeting as a private citizen did
not engagements ot a domestic nature,
rendered imperative by my long absence
from tbe city, upon the day in question,
prevent. .
1 gladly avail myseii oi tnis .opportunity
to express my continued hearty sympathy with
the Democratic cause, and my wishes ardent
wtsbes lor tbe success or tnose constitu
tional principles for which the recent war
was undertaken by tbe North. Separated
as I thus am lrom the distinguished soldier
wbo bas been cnosen as tbe leader of our
opponents, I know that you agree with me
in tbe blgnest respect lor tbe services be
has rendered our country, but It is my con
viction that measures of tbe party which
has placed him In nomination are but com
binations of strife,;and can never restore
peace or.. constitutional supremacy, and
thereby complete the work which he and
the .other brave soldiers so ably com
menced.' The war was only the first epoch
in the history of the struggle In which we
have been long engaged.,, The work of the
soldier Is, I trust forever ended, and It re
mains for. the people to fulfill the great
objects for which tbey or their
sons and brothers were called to the
field. A RESTORED UNION OF STATES AND
HEARTS. AN INVIGORATED CONSTITUTION, TO
BS FIRMLY AND FAITBFULLT SUPPORTED,
THE MAINTENANCE OF THE NATIONAL CRED
it inviolate, and the establishment of j
National and State Rights in all their
INTEGRITY; AND THUS TRUE HARMONY AND
LASTING PEACE. THESE ARB THE OBJECTS
FOR WHICH AVERY CITIZEN SHOULD NOW
STRIVE, AND BELIEVING THKY REST IN THE
SUCCKSS OF THE DkMOCKATIC CAUSE, BY
THE ELECTION OF THE EMINENT STATESMAN
SELECTED TO REPRESENT THE PARTY, IT IS
MY INTENTION TO SUSTAIN THAT CAUSE A3 A
private citizen. With the requeBt that
you will convey to tbe gentlemen, of tbe
committee, and my other friends for whom
you act, my sincere thanks for the compli
ment they bave paid me, I am most truly
GEORGE B. McCLELLAN.
Letters were also read from Hon. Hora
tio Seymour and Hon. Frank P.Blair.
Speecnes were also made by Mayor Hoff
man, Hon. Henry u. Murphy, a. j . Kogers,
Green Clay Smith, Isaiah Ryndere, John
Mullaiy, Captain McClellan, Colonel Da
vis, and others:
The meeting was still in progress, and
tbe procession yet marching through the
streets, at midnight.
Guess Not.
[From the Springfield Transcript.]
We are informed that a certain High-
8treet-would-be-polltlcian, invited one ot
our city painters to bis house to see what
tbe cost or graining a door would be, when
tbe following dialogue occurred :
Politician" What will tbe graining of
this door cost?"
Painter " Well, it is considerably blis
tered, and will have to be worked down a
good deal to make a good job, and I should
say It will be worth at least six dollars."
Politician " Cheap enough ; when can
you do it?"
i-ainter - in a aay or iwo."
Politician " All right ; but say. (the
painter starting away) how do you vote ?"
Painter " I vote as I shot."
Politician " But who are you going to
support for Congress?"
fainter -vuage wiuaus. .
Politician"! guess I don't want my
door grained just now."
. If there Is much love displayed in this
dialogue for the working man we can't ex
actly see it." oprtngfleta .averaser, skua
ult.
A CARD.
The following card has been handed ns
for publication, bearing directly upon the
above:
To the editor of the Springfield Advertiser:
. Sir: I am the painter referred to in
your paper of the 28th ult as having had
a conversation with John H. Thomas. Tbe
statement made by you that Mr. Thomas
refused to employ me because I was a Re
publican, 1b false and without any founda
tion whatever. Although I am a Republi
can, I am unwilling that you should lie
about a gentleman on my account. You
will oblige me, it you are determined to
lies to do it on your own account.
J. A. STITCHBERRY.
Caught at Their Rascality.
The Philadelphia .Pa.) Age of the 2d Inst,
saya: - :- 5 - s .-'.'
Just as we predicted, no sooner did the
bells "Boys in Blue" arrive in the city,
than they at once proceeded to have their
names put upon the voting lists. But the
Democrats were wide awake,and in a short
time three ballot box stufleTs were arrested
in the 8ith Legislative District, and are
now in Moy amensing, where many more of
their comrades win do uuhuk to-aay, as
thev are known and cannot escape detec
tion. In other parts of the city, the "Boys'
in Blue" were caugntin lueaameuiHuonest
acts, and the whole movement gotten up
by the Radicals to carry the city by fraud
has proved a miserable failure, and will
lose them thousands of votes. Democrats,
look out for bogus " Boys in Blue."
[From the Cleveland Plain Dealer.]
TURN OF THE TIDE.
Bail the glad tidinia.
Triumphantly lini.
And forth to the breezes
Our bright banner fling I
Mora Conversions to Democracy!
THE POPULAR UPRISING!
iiivui riviiuva,..,,,, in in, u.wii ui iub u,i .
When the darkneu of misrule shall vanish awj.
ado Amaicai tyranny nee in aismay.
Hon. Joseph Means, of Stenbenvllle,
who presided et the Kadlcal Convention
which nominated Ambler, .Radical enndi
date for Ongres, has come out for Sey.
moor and Blair, and was President of the
Democratic mass meeting at Steubenville
on tbe ad. -
A. A. Woodward, Esq.. a Republican
lawyer of Bucyrus. has renounced that
party, and made a Democratic speech' at
Jiucyrus. on Saturday night last. .
Hon. Daniel S. Norton, ar. present Unl
ted States Senator . from Minnesota, has
joined the Democracy, and makes a speech
t A-rliy at St. Paul, In favor of Seymour and
Blair.
Gen. Richardson, late Republican At
torney General of Ohio; Col. John M. Con
nell, one of the Lincoln electors in 1864;
Hon. inomas it. wing, oi Lancaster, urilo,
always a Republican ; General A. S. Piatt
and a score ot others in Southern Ohio, are
' at work for Seymour and Blair.
Dr. Sampskl. of Ashland, Ohio, has re
pudiated Radicalism, and joined the Dem
ocracy. Over two hundred Germans in the city
. of Toledo will go the Democratic ticket this
fall, who have never before voted it.
Fletcher Dickson, the Radical nominee
for Treasurer ot Wyoming county. Penn
sylvania. has declined the nomination, and
declares his intention to act with tbe Dem
ocracy. Bully for Fletcher.
Captain M. R. Butts, heretofore a strong
Kauical. mane a speech in vlnincy. 111., on
the Cth of August, in which he said he
would support Seymour and Blair.
The St- Joe (Missouri) Patriot has hauled
down the Grant and Colfax flag, and hoisted
that of Seymour and Blair. So we go,
Col. C. C Gardner, of Elmlra. New
York, a gallant officer in the war, and
heretofore a Republican, comes out square
ly for the Democratic ticket.
Dr. Morgan, of Evansville. Indiana, an
Influential citizen, and a Republican who
helped to organize tnat party, has an
nou ced that he can go no further in that
direction, nut that be shall support Sey
mnur and Blair.
Lieut. D. W. Clark, of Tlonesta, Penn
sylvania, late Quartermaster of the 83d
Pennsylvania Volunteers, and since the
war an active member of the Republican
party, has divested himself of "the last
drop of Radical blood," and wheeled into
line witn tnose wno are marcning ior- rree
government, equal taxation and constltn
tional liberty. . , ,
Judge Ira Mead, a prominent Republi
can of Wisconsin, presided over a late
Seymour and Blair meeting in that State,
and declared that every honest man should
abandon the Kadlcals. .
The commander of the famous Sixth
Regiment from the State of Wisconsin, In
.the war, Col. D. 8. Curtis,' has boldly
spoken out for Seymour and uiair.
William Styles, late president or a
Union League in Georgia, publishes a card
of withdrawal, in which he says the league
is "dangerous to the peace and good order
of any town or neighborhood," and says
that he shall support Seymour and Blair.
Hon. H. G. Webb, a Republican State
Senator of Wisconsin, nas published bis
reasons why be cannot longer support
Radical rule.
Col. J. F. Gaul, of Tlonesta, Pa, who
commanded one of the Pennsylvania Re
serve Corps regiments during the rebel
lion, had renounced Radicalism and come
out in . support oi democratic men and
measures. He says he fought for a resto
ration not a division ot union.
' The editor of the Green Bay (Wis.) Ad
vocate, Col. Robinson, who acted a conspic
uous part as a Union soldier iu the late
war, Breaks out for Seymour and Blair.
John Mannings, hitherto a prominent
Radical ot Clinton, New Jersey, abandons
that party "because it has shown itself
incompetent to restore peace and secure
tbe fruits of victory since the close of. the
war." ,
There are over one hundred thousand
soldiers who voted tor Lincoln, now going
for Seymour and Blair.
The Hon. John A. Matson, heretofore a
prominent' and influential Republican at
Greencastle, Ind has, in a public speech,
announced his intention of supporting Sey
mour and Blair, as the only way ol restor
ing peace to the country.
[We have some 800 other changes which we
will give hereafter.]
This is an evidence of the wav the tide
is running in the United States. Tbe Dem
ocracy every where are united, and pulling
together, will win the grandest popular
victory of modern times this fall. On with
the column. Tbe people must be freed
from Jacobin rule and robber practices.
Look out for thunder in October, and for
still louder peals In November. The Re
publican party is without a single states
man of the many who originally embarked
with it. ::r .
[From the Cincinnati Enquirer.]
Immense Outporing of the Democracy
—Greatest Demonstration
—Greatest Demonstration Ever Known in Cincinnati--
Speeches of Gen. F. P. Blair,
Gov. Bramlette and Others.
Never before, in the history of the poli
tics of Hamilton county, was there such
an outpouring of the Democracy as was
witnessed at the mass meeting in Fifth
street Market space last night. One would
have thought from appearances that the
whole city had come out on the side ot De
mocracy. Old men and young men alike
swelled the dimension of the crowd, and
pressed eagerly forward to catch even a
glimpse ot the distinguished orator; while
the booming of camion, tbe hissing ol
rockets, the lurid light of Roman candles,
the 8trains.ot martial music, the playing
of the bands, the blaze of the bonfires, the
jets of light about the speakers' stand,
and the shouts of applause, all combined
to make it tbe grandest display of earnest
devotion to principle, to the cause of the
Constitution, Constitutional liberty, and
the rights ot tbe people protected by law,
that could be Imagined.
During the speeches of Governor Bram
lette, and others, the enthusiasm seemed
irrepressible and unbounded, and the thou
sands wbo were packed into the dense
mass that filled to overflowing the great!
square auu were uui ui uearuijc oi tne
speakers, seemed to catch tbe inspiration
of the orators, and intuitively felt the force
of their convincing logic and fiery elo
quence. But the grandest scene of the
whole evening was reserved for General
Blair.
Tbe White Boys in Blue, commanded by
Colonel Smith, marched from their bead
quarters to tbe Burnet House to receive
and escort our gallant standard-bearer to
the stand. At a few minutes past 9 o'clock,
the column, after moving through several
of the principal streets, filed into the Mar
ket space, escorting the General, who rode
In. the center in an open barouche with
Oe'neral Jos. Geiger, Colonel Dodds and
Dr. J. J. Qulnn, Chairman of the Campaign
Committee, and was greeted by thuuders
of applause, the roar of cannon aud the
display ot fireworks, while the great crowd
swayed back and forth to get a glimpse ol
the great center of attraction. Tbe White
Boys in Blue, who had fo ight under Gen
eral Blair, scarcely knew how to contain
themselves as they marched along the
street with their belo vi d commander, who
bad shared with them the tolls and dangers
of battle in their midst.
As he mounted the stand one universal
shout greeted him from the twelve thou
sand people who had come out to honor
and to listen to, not only the gallant sol
dier, but the tried and trusted statesman.
For nearly a quarter ot an hour the ap
plause and enthusiasm were nnabated, and
tbe General could only bow his acknowl
edgments to his friends. At length quiet
was restored, and he delivered a most bril
liant speech, which will be found this
morning in our columns.
There was no attempt made at a proces
sion on the part of the Democracy, the on
ly organization which attended tbe meet
ing as such being tbe White Boys in Blue,
five hundred strong, who acted as an es
cort to Gen. Blair, as already mentioned.
Their fine appearance and soldierly bear
ing was noticed and favorably remarked
upon wherever they marched. A single
glance would satisfy one that they bad all
seen service. Their steady and even step,
their military evolutions and precision,
were such as only belong to the vete
ran soldier. It la' na 'nf the Aheer.
ing signs of the times to see those gallant
jjjuii wno nsKeo their lives midst the hail
storms of cannlster and shrapnel, and the
storms of musketry, to save the Union and
maintain constitutional liberty, fighting
aualn nobly and gallantly, this bloodless
battle of constitutional right and liberty
against Radical tyranny and wrong, and
evincing that the education they received
in tbe ranks of the army of the Republic
has not unfitted them to perform tbe high
and responsible duties of citizens in peat 6
as nobly as they performed those of sol
diers in war. They will vote as they fough,
ti maintain a white man's free governmei-t
tor all time, and at all hazards. Heaven
Bless the White Boys in Blue! A grate
lul country will ever honor their nobility
and patriotism. They never faltered In
the hour ot danger, and who will never be
found on the side of tbe enemies of the
Constitution.
We noticed a very touching incident,
among others. At an eaily hour in the
evening, an aged lady apparently eighty
took a position near tbe stand, support
ed in the arms of a young woman, to get
one iook at uenerai Blair. Her sou. who
was a member of the Seventeenth Corps,
fell in the celebrated march from Atlanta
to the sea, intelligence of which she re
ceived in a letter lrom the General, telling
her how bravely he fought and how nobly
he fell. When General Blair whs pointed
out to heron the stand, her old eyes run
over with tears, and she declared that she
had realized the dearest hope of her old
age; she had seen the gallant officer under
whose leadership her last born had fought
ano leu.
As we have already said, there was an
immense concourse. of people at the Fifth
street juarKet space.
LOCAL NOTICES.
Meals at all hours, at Gloss and Wilper's
oct7-dtf, .
Grand Millinery Opkning on Thursday
morning, by Miss J. IL Wilkie, at her
rooms, No. 151 South High street, oppo
site the Goodale House. Miss Wilkie has
just returned from the East, where she
made personal selections of goods specially
adapted to the wants of this community,
oct7-lt
Gloss & Wilper's Restaurant open day
The managers of tbe Hannah Neil Mis
sion will be happy to receive donations of
cake for their Ice Cream table at the
County Fair. Send to the Home or tbe
Fair Grounds. . oct6-d2t
Painting and Draw ing. Instruction in
penciling, crayoning, and painting in oil
and water colors, given by Miss Amelia
Wiegand. Classes will, be formed it de
sired. For terms, lnauire between 4 and "i
o'clock P. Mn at No. 291 East Town street
oct3-dlw : :
, Millinery. Mrs. A. Downing is now
receiving ber tall and winter stock of Mil
linery of every description, selected witb
her usual care as to style and novelty.
Ladles are respectfully invited to call and
examine, as prices are low and all can bt
suited. sept30-eodti
Am Enbmy in Your Mocth. Do not put
an enemy in your mouth to steal awaj
your teeth. ' Beware of destructive tooth
washes and tooth powders, many of which
are base imitations of Sozodont. Insure
life lease of sound teeth acd fragrant
breath, by adopting the fragrant Sozodont..,;
"Sbilding's Glue," a handy little thing
about the honse, mends everything.
vnY-junl5-eod6m-cw
HolLoway's Pills. More than two
thirds of the sickness which ocenrs in the
summer proceeds from a disordered condi
tion of the liver. Persons of a bilious
babit suffer most In warm weather. - They
are languid, low spirited, troubled with
pain in the side, head-ache, and a constant
feeling of weariness. Tbe immediate and
certain remedy for these symptoms, and
all others proceeding from biliousness, is
Holloway's Pills. Of all anti-bilious med
icines they are safest, surest and best. Sold
by all Druggists. jy9-dly-cw
DIED.
FRISBTE On the 6th instant. Mint K-. eldest
daughter of O. H. A Mary L. Frisbie. azed 13 years.
o monins ana xiaays.
Her faneral will be attended at their residence,
Nr. 73 hast Friend street, on Thursday next at 3
P. M.
ootT-dt
New Advertisements
3? Xbe Ohlo'Slat'imaii has a
Iitargrer Circulation than any pa
per published In tht City or Cea
tral Ohio. Advertisers will bear
this In mind.
FOR HALE.
T-iHE PROPERTY FORMERLY OWNET1 BY
I Rudolph Riokly. on the National road, east of
Blind Asvlum consisting ot a double DnoH nonse.
stable, slaughter house and outbuildings, and one
acre ana a nail oi ground, inquire oi
jiuuo inn.
ootT-eodlm 168 hst Friend street.
DRY GOODS:
GRAND OPENING
OF
Fall and Winter Goods
AT
GILCHRIST, GRAY &(J0.'S,
Nos, 23, 25, 27 & 29 S. High Street.
DUE 98 GOODS.
Now opening, the most varied and elegant stock of
Jrlain and fanoy Dress Woods, erer
, onered in this market.
BILKS
In all the new styles and colorings. A magnificent
assortment.
LACES AND EHBROIDEBIES!
An alegsjit assortment.
FULL LINE
FURNISHING GOODS.
Full assortment of Harris Brothers' Seamless Kid.
Also, Alexandre s.
OUR PRICES ARE UNIVERSALLY
LOW.
GILCHRIST. GRAY A CO..
Nos. 33. SS. 27 A South High st.
oetT-dsm
THE
NATIONAL TRUST CO.
Ot THB CITT OF MEW TSKX,
No. 33f3 Broadway.
Capital, - One Million Dollars.
CHARTERED THE STATE.
Darius R. M ano ah. Pres't. Jas.Mkkrim.. Seo'y.
Receives Deposits and allows FOUR PERCENT.
INTEREST on all Daily Balanoea, subject to check
at sight. Special Deposits for Six months or more,
may be mule at fire peroent. Tbe Capital of One
Million Dollars is divided among over 600 Share
holders. oomDriftinf many aentlemen of large wealth
and financial experience, who are also personally
liable to depositors for all obligations of the Com-
pany to double the amount of their capital stock
As the National Trust Company receives deposits
in large or small amounts, and permits them to be
ilrnan aa.whnlfl or in D rt by check at aivlif.nj
wiiaoot nouns. Rjiuwius 'uioniw aaliv oaian
ces, parties throughout the country can keep ac
counts in this Ins itution with speo.al advantages
of seourity, convenience and profit,
ri NT-jais-dAwSm
:
!
DRY GOODS.
NEW GOODS!
NEW GOODS!
GREAT EXCITEMENT
-AT-
A.C.HEADLEY& CO.'S
JUST
ttlST HIST G-l
A LARGE STOCK OF
DRESS GOODS !
IN
r .-.,- -. k :v .'...-5
Plainanu Striped Silks,
Yelonrs, Changeable Serge?, ,
Poplins, Chene?, Empress Cloths,
Poplin Plaids, for Children's Wear.
NEW CLOAKINCS !
' t .
IN "...
Lyons Velvets 7 - ' ; '
Seal. Skins, . ,
Astricans, .
Velours,
. Mohairs, &c
CLOTHS AND CASSIMERES.
TRIMMINGS,
Or Ewet-y Style and Tarlely
NEW SHAWLS!
in .
Paisley,
Broche,
Wool, ,
... ... Long and
Sqnare.
CHILDREN'S 8HAWLH
EMBBOIDERIEB
A full line of
ALEXANDRE'S KID GLOVES!
HOSIERY AND CLOVES !
DOMESTIC GOODS
In great Quantity.
250 AND 252
SOUTH HIGH STREET.
A. C. HEAULET efc CO.
febT-eodly
AMUSEMENTS.
OPE It A HOUSE.
HARRY WSSTON...,. .'.......Makaobb.
Fivo IVIfi-lita Onlv ?
Cemasncldi Ta.E,.. .t.a.
Grand Carnival of ils,ir mun, .4 n-.
THB GREAT .' '- , ,
M A R TJ N 6
California Illusionist & Champion Ventriloquist
WILL PRESENT JsACH EVENING AN EN
tire ehne of DrofflMmme raols,.. .iih ...
and beautiful features, including the wonderful
One hundred eleaaut and costly presents will be r
given away every night.
aomitiance. its cents; Keservea aevs, do cents.
Doors open at T o'clock, to commence at S.
6RAHB 43 1 FT MATINEE
Saturday afternoon, Oct. 10th, when every' child in
tbe andienoe will receive a Handsome Presen'.
jiamusion to ftlatinee. 25 cents.
oei3-. 7t-r ARNOLD JONKS, Agent.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
Cristadoro's Hair Dye.
Uld lather Time takes many a year
To torn to white d ark colored hair :
Butinstantly the EXCELSIOR DYK
Briars back the tint that charts the eye;
And Nature owns that conning Art
(!inli...i:ri..U Snrf
Cristadoro's Hair Preservative.
vn, now Deautiruiiy gloss j yoor nairiocgs or late,
Maria. . Yes, Julia, sinee, I have used Cristadoro's
Hair Preservative and Beantifler, ny hair has im
proved wonderfully, and stopped falling oat alto
gather.
Sold by Drmggists. and applied by all Hair Dress
ers. Manufactory No. 69 Uaiiec lane. Principal '.
Depot No. 6 As tor House. , -. ,, ..
PeHT-jul6-dwly-em i.
injtlEMSE INCKBASE OF SALES.
Alicock's Porous Plasters.
Where one was said a tew rears age
a theusaad sire Mid new.
They strengthen, warm and invigorate the part
upon which they are applied, and relieve nervous ,.
affections of the bowels, lumbago, pains of tbe '
side, and usually all local pains. In affections of '
the kidneys they are of great service. - j "T
Lame Back.
Nbw Yobs, Nov. S3. 18B.
T. Allcoce A Co.OntUsnun : I lately suffered
severely from a weakness in ny beekv Having
beard your flatten much recommended for sseea
of this kin J1. 1 procured one. and the result was all
I could desire. A single Plaster' cured me in -week.
; f i , ;-.
Yonrs respectfully, - J. G. BR1GGS.
Proprietor of the Brandreth House. V
Principal Agency. Brandreth House. New York. '
Sold by all Druggists.
reNT-julS-d&wly-ora
"To Owners of Horses." "
Thousands of horses die yearly from Colic. Tb
need not be. Dr. .Tobias Venetian Horse lilnt.f
ment, in pint bottles, price one dollar, will post-'"
lively cure every ease, if given aocording to tbe di- .
notions, when first taken. It is warranted snperi-7
or to anything else for Cuts. Galls. Sprains, Old
Sores, Swellings and Sore Throat. It is no new,
remedy, but of zl years' standing, and approved,
by the first hot semen in the ooantry. Cot. Philo
P. Bush, of the Jerome Park Course, hsi used l"
for years, and recommends it to his friends. Of ,
ders are constantly reoeivei for it from the Racing ,
Stables la England. It has stood the tart of time;
no one has ever triad it bnt continues its use. Bee.,
ollect to get Dr. Tobias' Venetian Horse Liniment
in pint bottles, and take no other. Sold by the .
Druggists and Storekeepers throagheut tbe United
Statee. Depot 10 Park Place. New York. '
reNT-juie-dAwiy-em ' ..'.,
PROFESSIONAL.
DR. A. B. WILLIAMS. West Broadway, nee -digh
street. Columbus, Ohio, has devoted himsell
at a series of years to the treatment of oertain pri.
mte diseases. He may bteensultedat hie cfllne
Uroadwat. near theExohange Bank
maySr-tf - - -
MANHOOD AMD THE VIGOR tir
IrOWTH restored In four weeks. Success;
guaranteed. DR. RICORD'S ESSENCE OF L1FK
resteree rnahly powers, from whatever eanse ari
sing; tbe effects of earlv pernicious habits, self- 1
abuse, impotency and climate, give away at onoe to '
this wonderful medicine, if taken regularly aocord- "
iag to the directions (which are very simple and re-.
quire no restraint from business or pleasure.) Fail-
ureis impossible. Seld in bottles at $3, or four ''
quantities in one for $9. To be had only of the sole
appointed agent in America, H. GkbitzBM, SOS
Second Ave.. New York. .
VNY-jy2T-dlyr ' ' ' .'...',
' f AWHOO T Anothf ilfeej Medical
ivf PaaipMt from the pm et Us. CPRTia. 1
The 'Medical limes" says of this work: This -valuable
treatise on the cause and cure of prema
ture destine, shows how health is impaired through
secret abuses of youth and manhood, and bow
easily regained It sires a clear synopsis of the
impedimenta to marriage, the oause and effects of -nervous
debilitv, and' the remedies therefor." A
pocket edition of the above will be forwarded on ' .
receipt of as cents, by addressing Doctor Cubtis.
No. 68 North Charles street, Baltimore, Md. - -
era may2S-dly-r ,. ,
Palm sb's Lotion Thb Gbbat Medicine fob
the SKIN.oures without fail every kind cf an- -sightly
eruption of the faee, or itching, or irritating: '
or distressing cutaneous disease, on anv part ot the ;
person.
septSl-d&wly-cm . . ..
BATCH ELOK'S HAIR D B. This
splendid Hair D.e is the best in the world ;
the only true and perfect Dye; harmless, reliable
instantaneous; no disappointment : no ridiculous
tints; remedies the ill effects of bad dyes; invig
orates and leaves the Hair soft and beautiful. NocA
or brovm. Soi l by all Druggists and Perfumers ;
and properlv applied at Bitchelor's Wig Factory. .
No. 16 Bond street. N. York, fnt aprag dAwly
New Advertisements
MUGHTOFS
.4 T
IV E TV
FALL AND WINTER
DRY GOODS.
EXrRAORDIMRY INDUCEMENTS
TO BUY AT
NAUGHT ON' SI
Purchasers of Dry Goods are cordially invited to
call and examine the
iE W S T O C K
DRESS GOODS CHEAP t
fancy goods ..... cheap
shawls cheap!
domestics cheap
everythisg ....:..-;-..cheap i
JAMES NAUGHTON,
118 & 182 Sea 111 His; a Street
DOTll-dly-aprlT , . COLUMBUS. OBJO. .
CAMP CHASE LAND
THE TRACT OF LAND, CONTAINING FOUR
hundred and sixty-five sores, and occupied as
Came chaw dnrina the war. is now offered for sale
in lots tosuit purchasers. This land is of sup rior
quality. nd lies on the National Road, four miles
west of Columbus. Ohio.
Terms One fourth ot tne purchase money at
time of ssle, the remainder in three equal annual
payments. X. D KODGERS. Agent.
. . Three miles west of Columbus.
Septembers. 1888. . ... sepl0-d4w .
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
THE PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE EXIST-
r l . "nnersiKDea. under the firm
... uu n.aiupmannv nas this day
been fiuolved by mutual consent. 9
... -- iuubuhu iuhib arm win please eall
and settle atonce with Charles Kampmann, whoi"
uw-iiHu i uuiivot outstanding oiaina. and all
persons having claims against the said firm will also
o I ease present them for payment to said Charles
- . W M. YOSWINK'.L.
n i v . CH ARLES KAMPMANN.
Columbus, September 11, 1868. octi-r

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