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Daily Ohio statesman. (Columbus, Ohio) 1855-1870, January 11, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028645/1869-01-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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COLUMBUSj OHIO, MONDAY MORNINGj JANUARY !! i860.
NUMBKE111.
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THE OHIO STATESMAN
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Ten eopie od ;mt v 17 10
Twenty eopie one yu. ................. .. .. ..M M
y oopieOD Ter.................. r ...70
uVERTISING rates for daily statesman
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18 00
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27 00
39 00
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: Local Notices, IS cents per line each insertion.
ADTESTI8I1.Q KATierOBTltI-WEKKi.THTATE-
l ah 76eentt per iquara eeok ineertion: mi three
moptbe or longer. dinnoant of one-hlf fromlMUy
tes.''
- ATfmimi mi WiniT STirmiK-ll.H
rreqaero tor first inaertion?fteettta for eeok op
tional insertion, .
BcotKK88 OTicss, 50 cents eaohinsertioa. '
' Notices of Latb8, So cents.
ftJoTl0ii0PMABRiAii8,76eentf. .. i
. fiEuoiors Notio8. half price. . ' !
-' MltntniaUudvrUttKmt mti t paid for at
tJketim tkey art ordered. ' j
BUSIHESi3 DIRECTORY
ARCHITECT.
E: X. BBOOKKS) -
Architect. Civil Knifineer, to.
' Office orer the National Exchange BankJ
ATTORNEYS.:.
TlRASErJ tc NASH,
w..X..i - ATTOKNJSY8 A LAW i: !
OffioevS. 09 ttontii igh ttnet, Ambos Baili-
TAJ. lit Hllt.lif , .y.
eVMATOB, -ilaorOSoe.:
TBWIBHT. DeUlii
Alcaic. X
r Xil- AiroiiMi k'-tAT-LA W A Notary Public
. .. Olkoe in Farson's Buiidiwr.
. VV i - ATTORNE 1 S-AT-LAW.
i i .: Offioe SB heath Hiith stteet, Aiuboe Building.
- AUCTION AND COMMISSION.
T e.BEAU
Ve An
notiooeer and Dealer in Raal Estate HnnM
hol4 Uouaa. UloUung and Notious, ;
No. 7 W eU Broad street.
BATH ROOMS-
GEOH6E 1II1TEK,
Barber and Hair Dresser. Hot and Cold
' baths. Basement Fostoffioe Baildin. .
BOOK BINDERS. ;; !
4 l.fc.U l A 4.11lvt.V.
, O. Book Binders. Blanss j Booc Manufaotxu-ers,
printers an4 fabiishers..
Opera fluiHinr-
BOOTS & SHOES. -
r."W - T WIIXIAIW St VO.t . . .
I TT. 144 South Uiffh street. . Jut remind., an
" elegant assortment, Aew JWies, lawwioaa. La-
r I xunruKi a .' .- i
'" MJ Is the noted house for good Boots mad Shoes
at low prices. New Stock jubtrei?a.
'I-',- - ....... . 7S JiouLh High street.
. I x: COAL DEALERS,
f'UTjejftlsaSeMI Ac J4 .n-.js.-v-- i
Xli Dealers in Fittsbargh and Ohio Coal; 'Also.
Cos:, Araui Til aDd um rwer r'lp. -
- . . .v . No.4-l Morth Mih streot.1
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
x u
(3 06 8 00 ia "oo'tM 00 "$50-
eOK 00 3SOU60 00 100
100S4 00 60 00 90 00 150
IS 00 30 P0 15 00 1 10 00 190
17 00 40 01) H 00)440 00 SS0
26 00 65 00 110 0W190 00 315
36 00 69 00 1 Hi 00 225 00 375
40 00 65 00 136 00 S50 U0 S
4- 00 ill M IN CD44 (II MO
50 00 75 (Kl 165 0C 3S!i 00 650
56 CO 0000 175 0034000 660
60 00 0 Oil 1C0 OolSfiO 001 600
Hf TlTCHASOU, ; ..
' Uentmiesion, Forwarding and Produce Mer
euants, dealers in Uraia flour, to., in W. Broad
' ' treet. -
':;b-V;:C0BSETS:::.::
D. MAVlf OKaaft de CO., .
HasraJaoturen and leaters ia French, Ger
: man apq Amencaa Ceneta.' Also, hue ekirts.
a- . 1M Upera House,
GR0CKERY,-&c. a V-a-!
WhatesalB and Retail Dealer In-China.
Qaeeaswaca. talada. A'lalAl 4iucids. IjaiDoaaad LaiiiD
j cutures. . 4B norui iiign street.
lmDOrter and Wholewle and Retail Dealer
I in Crockery. AJniu, Ulaaa, CuUexy , s'lated Uuods,
uwi taiu ps. ays - - ' -
268 South High street.
DENTISTRY ,
'W AittlliH. at felUiMIMUfcilt.,
no. ia )ast Broad street.
. We os to be the ies.. . . ,
G W. attNNDENTIST.-Tbe best styles
e of Dentistry, including Dunn's linproveu
aiinerai rial, umoe, iw and ii upera mock.
DRY GOODS.
f ABKUlrV A (JU..
Ve Dealers in Dry tioods. Notions. C u-pets. Oil
viotns, Aiatungs, onaaes, nets. Laps ana urs,
etorner Uiga auu J'riena streets. - -
J . .11. OsBUHN ; ., .
e ' 14S South Hieh street.
carpets Battings, Oil Cloths,;urUkina. Sta-le and
f aocy UTJ booos.
- 1 I A'.IA M . U. At.
XX Wholesale and Ketail Dealers in Staple and
fancy xitr uuoas, ana aianutactarers ot Uulies'
' Cloaks. 133 el. Bign street.
. lOllK'l'lt ''. 1IU1 kOUUI ft E'UIEE..
- X? r'. Brum A Co., cash dealers in Dry Uoods and
- jtouuus, ua Boutn rourtn street.
UIufcdNAIIUHtttNi
O Wholesale and KeUil Dealer in Dry Goods,
- NaughtunBuildin. No. liH and last bouth UigA
: treeu
AN HUM A l!slN,
r A.
Dealers ia Staple and Fancy Dry Goods and
kneatu t lunisning twous. xe. e atu iiouae.
'- d ULCnltlsr, OttA V A tju.t
UT . Dealers ia Btapie and Faney Dry Goods.
- . . . . . . Ao. xv Douth Bigh street.
tJ. Hr.AIJlfk ACO..
x-m Foreign and Domestio llry Goods Cloths,
t urg.-eio. uoAiai ouuui rtign street.
DRUGGISTS.
1. laskrHHtlTi
- O People's Drug bUire, 180 South High SU Pre
"seripiioua carei uily compouuded at all hours.
DKA-OX l)HlU ITOttK.
JOHN 8. BU1JBBTS.
Aruggutand Apotbeoary.
154 North High street.
MAtAt-LH or islisoji,
WBULbSALK KEI'aIL DRUGGISTS.
' lou Bouth Hian St., Culuuibus.O.
I BCAtr, BUlH A S;u .
; X Wholesale and Kii Druggists, and Dealer
1 n rroprieiavy AguwiuH.
. Korth High street,
ENGRAVERS.
KICMfeA 4L MOOKfc,
Designers, fcngrarers and Publishers. Note
rial aad atber seals enarared to order.
No. 107 and lu Soutb High street.
FURNITURE, &o.
, iftl.llRIHIlllll!SkiniKTI!ll .
, KJ llaaufaotarers and Wholesale and Retail Deal
ers u t aim lure, vnatrs, siaurasses, ew.
' No. 301 South Higb St. (upon House),
. kH10 FIIUNITIiHSj. fJU..
J Alasalaotuxers ot first elass Furniture. Whole
' sale and Be tail W arareouis, C, 2 and 1 Gwyiue
BlOCK;
f.'
1 HOUSE FURNISHING.
B Aklk!lkki!,, -,J2j
Dealer, in Uanties. Stores and House) fu
Biding faioous. Aiao, Via, Copper and Sheet Ink
yysr. s svast 1'own ttreet.
i: A A iTUABT, i
iV House Furnishing, Goads, Mantles. Grates,
Copper, lia and Bbeet Iron, Stores and Mantles.
sou Boutn High street.
a 8T!, TAtl OH A HCfr,
Dealersinrlardware,riouseFurntohuicGood,
Marble and Mate AtaaUes, Urates, Butm, Hot Air
Fttxnaoee.Ao: " Soorth High sueot,
' 1
BUSIITESS DIRECTORY
HOOP SKIRTS.
Fl J EED, , , .
i r t 3 nrv t t t, . ti
wiuiwiiim m i , uuivfvio veaier lu noop
Skirts and Corsets. Also, dealer in Berlin Zepher
aod Faner Goods, 103 Sooth High strf Jt.
HOWE SEWING MACHINE.
SP. AXTELL, I
tioaery and Fanny Goods tenerally. Special Agent
for the eeUbratad Elias Howe Gold Medal Sewing
Machine. No. 810 South High street, cor. men.
HATS & CAPS.
IIRS. M. M. IACF,
11 (Successor to B. LanO Dealer in Bats. Caps,
Furs and Straw Goods 329 South High street. .
--r. - (Sin Golden -Hat.) :
HOTELS.
TAT10NAL HOTEL.
Xl Opposite Depot.
J. H. UAV ID
DAVIDSON. Proprieto
UKU'KU MATES HOTEL,
Corner High and Town streets. I
B. J. H1AJ US T, Propneton .
ZfcTTLEK HOUSE, j
Corner Fourth A Friend sts. Commodious!
house and eztensire stables .
L. A. BOWEKS, Proprietor. -
INSURANCE.
CONNECTICUT JIBTCAL LIFE
suranoe Company. Assets, $18,000,000.
W M. JAMISON, Agent. UOIUinDU. u.
N1
EWKIKK 3c HIILTE4BEBGER,
MEN KttAL AGENTS Security Life Insurance
Company, ,., No. 6 Opera House.
HOME INSDKANCE CUIOPAir Of ,
Columbus. O. spilal and Assets, 1486.514.37.
W. C. M. BAKEK, Seo'y.
MmejmseuperaHoufle
MILLINERY GOODS.
c
e Wholesale and Retail M iliinery Goods.
191 S. Hieh street, upera House Blook.
MRS, A. DOWSI8IG,
it i : i, : , i : it 1- 1 T:
mings. No. 67 North High street.
JH. WlLKIE.r . . -,.,.-,
Dealer in Millinery, Dress nd Cloak Trim
mings nd rancy Uoods. 130 south Hih street.
MERCHANT TAILORS.
SCHAFHADsEN A ffOHLLEBEN,
Merchant Tailors and Dealers in Gents' Fur
nishing Goods,
no. oo norm tiign street.
CW. N IS WANDER,
Merchant Tailor and Dealer in Gents Fur
nishing Goods. Also asent lor the Diamond Shirts.
ixi bouth High street. :
THEOHIO IHEBCHAnT TAILOKINO
A CLOTHING CO.. 185 8. High st. Genu'
suits made to order. Ready-made Clothing al-.
ways on nana.
JOHN V. BICKEXBAGHEB,
Merchant Tailor and Dealer in Clothing and
uents- Jt urmsning uqoas.
v No. 61 North Hieh street.
JOHN HUNTER,
MERCHANT TAILOR. 120 South High st.
Choice stock of Clothing constantly on hand.
NEWS DEALERS.
ANDREWS A; HULL,
News Dealers, Booksellers and Stationers
No. 66 South High street, nex' door tp PostoBice. ;.
ITtttlCAS UHA.1TIANN,
A? News Dealer. Bookseller. Sratinnar anrl Rinil-:
or. Publications m both German and Kngdsh. ,
i sou'.n men street.
PAPER WAREHOUSES.
ANDKEWl, CEHKY A CO., -'
Mannfactnrers and Dealers in Writing, Print
ing and Wrappina Papers. 93 A 95 North High st.
N V1NS A IHIEBs.
Dealers in Printing, BooV. Writing and Fine
Papers 86, 38 A 40 North High street.
PHOTOGRAPHERS.
DALBW1N A STEVENS
AJ PHOTOGRAPH
PHOTOGRAPHERS.
. 81 South High street.
J.TT. ELLIOTT,
e PHOTOGRAPHER, 107 South High street.
Pictures made in oyer style and siar.
D
J. ARCHER. - ' . .
' Photographs, Amhrotypes, Gems, eto, etc.,
no. ai soutn mgn street.
PHYSICIAN.
Ii' ra. DOWNS, JH. x.,
No. 1 Opera House. Treat Diseases of the
Bye, Ear. Heart. Throat and Uiw. Aln. llinaaR
of Women and (Children. x "
PIANOS.
JF. HARRIS A CO.,
Wholesale and Retail dealers for Lighte A
Co.'s and Haines A Bro.'s Piauos. Also, Organs,
Melodeoa and other musical instruments.
38 North High ttreet.
J. C. WOODS,
e Agent for Chickerings and Emmerson's Pi
anos. Also, Organs, Alelodeons and Sheet Music
31 soutn High street.
RESTAURANT.
BANK EXCHANGE RESTAURANT,
Corner State aud Hich streets.
CHARLEY MYER, Proprietor.
SEWING MACHINES.
A ETNA SEWINQ 17IACHINES,
fa- The best in the world. Nos. 1 and 1 Ooera
House.
W. PIMMEL, General Agent.
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
RD. DUNHAM A CO..
Dealers in Fine Watches. Clocks, Jewelry,
Piatedware, Spectacles, Ac.. No. 11 Eatt Town
street.
CI AT ES A HAMRINU'ION,
I (SureessoTS to Wm. Blynn) dealers in Dia
monds, Watch s. Jewelry. Silver Ware aud Spec
tacles. No. 1 Neil Hoore.
FA. A L LEMgCEREUX,
Wholesale and Retail dealers iu Watches.
Clocks aod Jewelrtr. N o. 71 South High street.
STRICTLY WHOLESALE.
ANCttOFl' UKOS. A CO.,
W nolesale Dealers in Dry Uoods and Notions.
3 and 4 Uwynne Block. Town street.
REED. JONES A CO.,
Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in Boots
and Shoes. No. Gwynne Block. Town St.
NOTICES.
Bank Notice.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO
all whom it may eonoern. that the City Bank
of Cleveland, an Independent Banking Company,
organised and carrying on business as an Indepen
dent Banking ximpany at the city ol Cleveland,
Ohio, under an act of the General Assembly of the
said State of Ohio, entitled "An Act to incorporate
ihe State Bank of Ohio and other Banking Com
panies," passed February 34th, 1845. being desirous
of relinquishing and closing its Banking business,
to that end has, in pursuance of the statutes of the
said rotate of obio in such case made, paid and re
deemed more than ninety per cent, of the maximum
amount of its circulating notes, and delivered the
same to the Treasurer ot State of the said State of
Ohio to be destroyed, and have provided means and
given security to the satisfaction of the Treasurer,
Secretary and Audit r of Slate of said State of
Obio lor the redemption of its outstanding notes of
circulation at tbe office of the National City Bank
of Cleveland, at the raid city of Cleveland, where
said City Bank is located.
Done by order of the Board of Directors of the
Citv Bank of Cleveland, J uly 9th. 1868,
LEMUEL W lCK. President.
jjll-dltawflm
Notice to Bridge Builders.
SEALED PROPOSALS WILL RE RE
eeived bythe undersigned, at the office of the
rA1!,Koblio Works in the eity of Columbus,
?nli! THURSDAY. Slst January. 11-69. at 1
lor building the superstructure of a 3-trusa Bridge
oro8f ?? V'l Walnut oieek. on the line of tLe Na
tional Boad. in ranklin ouunty. ol two spans, each
spantobe aeout li i,t iODg. and 3oH feet wide,
troin out to out; to be eovered. by the oest of oak
shingles, and weather boarded with good first com
mon boards.
Bidders to furnish their own plans, with specifica
tions in detail. All of said work to be done to tbe
satisfaction of the Board of Publio Works aod the
resident engineer ot tbe National road.
The right to reject aoj or all bids, plans or speci
fications is reserved. JOHN A. BLAIK,
Resident Engineer National Road.
decg4-dtd r
The Sisters of St. Marj's,
OF THE SPRINGS, RECENTLY: OF
Somerset, Perry county, will open their large
and spacious building for the reception of pupils on
the first Monday in September, 180s. For Board and
Tuition. 176, ceo, a4 and 0, according to tbe de
partment f the popU. bR. ROa, Snp'k
Address Box 361. aus3-dt
FOB tHA JL.E.
A PAIR OF "JOB GOD VIN" COLTS, FIVE
and six years' old. very handsome, kind and
ouod- W ill be sold low.
augas-dtf B1CUARD NEV1NS,
DRY GOODS.
. . ! .. , I - 1 ' ' ! - . .' '
ATTRACTION!
ON AND AFTER TUESDAY, THE
11th day of Jaauarj. 1869,
i -- 5 i
FOR 35 DAYS,
GILCHRIST, CRAY & Ct),
Nos. 23, 25, 27 & 29 S. High Street,
WUl sell
CXo.Tk 1 Tl Cs, :
. . . -. i- .-: .-- i ,
Wool 'acsocjjai,:.';.; i '
1' '. . t(l. .4 . " . : : "i i
Pur, JbO. - i-I
. - ' Also Great Redaction in the price of ' j
tlc.3aJbE.o-tsiy :u ; : ' " 1 - '.
TJ&rleiTwear,
G-loves, . . s
Cooiery.
3111x.rsf dbo. .
We are sole Agents for the sale of the HARRIS
SSia.SlLili.i3S AID UlAJVES. - -
From this date our 'tore will be closed
at 6 o'clock P. M. until further notice. .
; GtLCHRIST. GRAY ft CO..;
janl-ly . Nos. 33,x6, 37 A 19 South High st
NAUGHIOS' S
FALL AND WINTER
DRY GOODS.
EXrRAORDINARY INDUCEMENTS
r TO BUY AT s
NAUCH TON'S!
Puronasers of Dry Goods are cordially invited Ito
caii ana examine tne
T ,1 .... , :' ' I
iE W S T O C K.
DRESS GOODS'...,
FANCT GOODS-
SHAWLS.
DOMESTICS
ETERYTHING .....
CHEAP I
CHEAP .
CBEAPI :
CHEAP
CHEAP
JAMES NAUGHTON,
118 tc 182 Swulb HiKb Street,
deo-dly , . COLUMBUS. OBIO
HOTELS.
FKAiKLIi HOUSE,
. (Recently Merchant's HoteU
Hes 830 M 832 Soutti M Igrb Street,
COLUMBUS. OBIO.
THE UNDERSIGNED, FOR A NUIT1.
ber of years proprietor of the National Hotel
of this city, takes pleasure ia annooicin to the
publio that he has leased tbe above named House
for a term of years, hd it thoroughly renovated,
supplied throughout with entire new furniture. and
is now readr for the retention of snejitji. hntk
transient aad regular boarders. He flatters himself
that his long experience in the hotel business and
his determination to devote his entire personal at
tention thereto will enable him to give perfect sat
isfaction to all who may f ror him wifi their pat
ronage. , H. REYNOLDS.
N. B- A Saloon and Restaurant is attached to
the Hons; also, extaosive Stabling, attended by
wmpneni ana attentive nosuers.- a. a.
deolS-dlm
ST. JAMES HOTEL,
Fourth Street, Bear "Iain,
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
HENRY P. ELLAS, ; - . , - Proprietor
T-HIS POPULAR HOUSE, CENTRALLY L0-
M- eatea ana convenient t i Dnsiness, and to all
points of travel, is the most desiriable stopping
place tor persons visiting tbe eit.. No pains will
b spared u. make the stay ot gnesta pleasant in
ever nnnkl myla-aotn
FURNITURE.
X10QS.KL H ALU. OB 1RLZS O. BSLLOWB,
' 0. P. L. BVTLSB. . .
IIAUTI, IllXLOHN Sc BUTLER,
FURNITURE WARE - ROOMS
Nes. 816 AlilSSaata HisinSt.,
COLUIORUS. OHIO.
(7Ai extmHv Manufactory is at A Foot of
SoutAtttttt, on the Canal.)
Their business tra, tactions, both Wholesale snd
Retail, new extend throughout the States of Ohio,
Pennsylvania and Indiana. They manulacture
PARLOR, BEDROOM, 0ININGR00M, HALL AND
, KITCHEN FURNIltRE
Of all classes and every design of superior work
manship and finish. Also, Cane-Seat Chairs of
every description. Wholesale and Retail,
tebtt-decdlv - .
COMMISSION.
WE MONYPENY,
Forwarding and Commission
MERCHANT,
DIALXB IM
GRAIN OF ALL KINDS,
OUR, WHISKY, Ac.
A- T
Corn, W
st Prices Paid at all times for
Barley, c, etc.
F F 10 Et
Near West End oINat'l H ad Bridges
COLUMBUS, 0MI0.' '
feblS-deodly - :
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
W. B. BBOOX8. ALII. BODBTOM. VI. H. BL B
JT. &rW. J3. BROOKS,
Cer. Rich AHIffkt rUe.,Clnniaa '
Wholesale Grocers,
DBALBB8 IM
SEW 0RXEAH8 8U0AB8 AHD K.LA
" Island Sugars. Coffee. Teas Spices. T aoo
IjIOUOBS, jo.
MEDICAL;.
WHY ENDURE
j i - 1 -.ft i
A LIVING DEATH!
The confirmed dvpeptie may almost say with St.
Pnfcj.. ! Ait. d.ilv ' I'h.nkiiwt of thi. rtil i.
not to remind hint of j bis pangs.but to show
dioiuwiuuhi.uiiiiiu m a twa.n. iu, uiwu.
of immediate and permanent relief are proffered
him in . - -
; H O O Ft A fib'S
GERMAN BITTERS!
And it is for him to say whether he will eontinu
to endure a livinff deafch. or to. not hinulf in
sition to render life enjoyable. . .
LIVING ADVlTISEimvTS
Of theeffieaeT' of this natehlaes veratable .tAtn.
achio are to be found in every eity and town in the
United States healthy men and women, rescued
from torture by its use, and eager to bear
testimony to its vir- tues It differs from
any other Bitters ia existenoe, in this special par-
uauiar it is not aioonoiio.
For such constitutions and systems as require for
their inriguration a diffusive stimulant.
' HOOPLAlfD'S, IU
GERMAN TONIC I
Has bees ororided oreoaratirm Is whleb the sol-
Id extracts of the finest restoratives of the vegeta
ble kingdom are held in solution by a spirituous
agent, purged of all deleterious constituents. Tbe
patient, in choosing between these two great anti
dotes, should be guide! by his own condition. If iu
a very low state from debility, the Tonio should be
uio mjiw ion; uui iu cases wunn to ementancy IS
not so pressing, the Bitters is the specific rea uired.
Thousands find infin- ;,A knAfit fmm tak
ing each in turn. J There is no phase of
inaigestion. ouiousnes, nervous disease or physi
eal prostration to whioh they are not adapted, and
in wnicn.singiy oroomDinsa, tney will notelteoti
eure. ... . .
Exchange Fain for Ease
And Weakness for Strnurth. Get rid of tbe ail
ments which interfere witO eniovment: east fflfmm
ar.d despondency to the winds) take a stronger hold
ol uio ana. in snort, oeoome a
NEW MAJV - -
TKMtlarrl fllsA Insifra rn akk rea 111-- -A AV- ..A ur.l
aod popular of 11 vesetabla iavigoata aad oor-
ITCUIW
IIOOFLAKD'S GERMAN -BITTERS.
Biliousness, Indigestion, General Debility, and
all the complaints which proceed from a want of
proper action in tne liver, tne stomach and the
Dowels, areeradioated by a oourse of this great ; ,
CONSTITUTIONAL SPECIFIC,
Which not only combats and conquers diseases that
have entrenched themselves rn the system, but
is the best known safeguard against all unhealthy
influences. Persons whose occupations and pur
suits suojeot them to the depressing effeots of a
elose, unwholesome atmosphere, should take itrez
ularlv as a Drotection aaainst the low fnvAra ,nrl
other disorders which malaria engenders. Inva-
uas wno are .t.
; ' WASTING AWAY,
Witnuat anyvpoetat eomplaint, exceot affradaal
will find in the'Bll'- fj" TERS a fountain of
vitality and vigor, as I refreshing- and exil-
eratinias apooiin tne desert to the tand-scorohed
ana taiuung travelers. , -
.. HOOFLAND'S
GERMAN BITTERS
Is com pose 1 of the pure iuioes (or. as they are me
dicinally termed. Uxtrutsl. or KioU. Herbs and
Barks, making a preparation highly concentrated
and entirely free from Alooholio admixture of any
alio- -' ' a
HOOFLAND'S
GERMAN TONIC
Is a combination of all the ingredients of the Bit
ters, with the surest Quality of Santa Cm. Rnm
Orange, etc., making one of the most pleasant and
agreeaoie remeaies ever onerea to tne puDlic
These remedies will effefitu.il. nor l.iv.p r,.,
plaint. Jaundice, Dys- I pepiia. Chronie or
Nervous Debility, mm Chromo Disesses of
the Aidneys, and all diseases aris.ng from a.disor-
uereu nirer or awui.ou,
such ' " - -':
...... t ..- - as Consti- ...... .
patlon. Inward
i Pilos FullnesJ of
Blood to the Head,
Aeidity of the Stomach.
- , - Nausea, Heartburn,-Disgust
for Food, Fullness or W eight in the
: ' Stomach, Sour n, nictations. Sinking ''
or Fluttering at the pit of the Stomach,
'Kwimmina: of the Haarl. HnrHfwl anrl lliffinnlt
Breathing, Flattering at the Heart, Choking or
Suffnoating Sensations when in a Lying Posture,
iimuwi oi v ision I'ois or wens Deiore tne
Sight. Fever and Dull Pain in the Head,
Deficiency of Perspiration. Yellowness
' of tbe Skin and Eyes, Pain in the
Side, Back, Chest, Limbs, ete.
Sudden Flashes of Heat, "
. . Burning in the Flesh,
Constant Imagin
ings of Evil, and ' ;:.
.... Great Depres- - .
sion of
Spirits.
They are the Greatest and Best .
ULOOD PUKIFIEH9
Ever known, and will enre all diseases tesnltln.
trom bad Blood. Beep your Blood pure. Beep
your Liver in older. sa Keep your digestive
organs in a sound. , hetltby condition, by
the use of these remedies, and no disease will ever
assail you.
Weak and Delicate Children
Are made stronsr bv tbe use of eltber nf these rem
edies. They will cure every ease of MARASMUS
wituouttau
Thousands cf certificates haveTacoamuTated In
Ik, h,B I nf llian..nn.t,M V. , . r 11
of the publication ot but a few; Those, it will be
observed, are men of note and of such standing that
iuey must oe oeiievea.
THE WHOLE SUPREME COURT
OF PE-HSSILTASIA
SPEAKS FOR THESE REMEDIES. '
Who would ask lor more dignified or stronger Us
timony T
HON. C. W. WOODWARD,
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsyl
vania, writjs :
PHII.ADBI.rB-T A. Mamh IB. 1887.
I find "Hoofland's German Bitters" isagoodton
. ..r.i : j : . c .1 .
iu. h!diui iu uiawno BtA mv uiKesLive or
gans, and of great ben- IXi efit in eases of debil
ity and wantot nervous action in the system
Yours truly, C.GBO. W. WOODWARD.
HON. JAMES THOMPSON.
Judge of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.
Pbiladblphi a. April 28. 1866.
I consider "Hoofland's Uerman Bitters" a valua
ble medicine in cises of attacks of Indigestion or
l)i spepdia. . I can oe'tity this from my experience
JAMES THOMPSON.
HON. JAS. ROSS SNOWDEN
I'rothonoUry of the Supreme Court of Fennsylva
nia, writes:
Pbii-adblphia, Se-t. M.1867.
' ''Hoofland's German Bitters is a very useful ar
llnl a. a tiknia and as an annetiaer. It 1, not an in.
loxi ating drink, and may be used beneficially by
persons 01 ail age. no peoiiuny yours,
JAMES ROsS SNOWDEN.
OA.TITIOW.
Rnnfland's German Remedies are counterfeited
See thit the signature oi C. M. JACKSON
is on tne wrapper ot a each bottle. All oth
mrm .r Ann nt erf eit.
Principal Office and Manufactory at the German
U.j;A:n- Na A.11 1RI!U KTUITtr.T Pkil..
deiphia,ra.
CHARLES M. EFANS, Proprietor.
formerly C. M. JACKSON A CO.
FZUCBS. '
Heoflsnd's German Bitters, per bottle $1 00
Hoofland's Uerman Bitters, half doien 5 00
Hoofland's German Tonic, put up in qt. bottle 1 60
per bottle, or a half dosen for 17 SO.
Do not forget to examine well the article you buy
a oraer mi get tuo sonmne. ,
FOB SALE jiY ALL DRUGGISTS
And Dealers in Medicines everywhere.
jyU-dwAa geowly . t . ,
Our Indian Complications-No. 5.
Black Kettle.
COLUMBUS, Jan. 4, 1869.
[From the Cincinnati Gazette]
Moke-tav-a-to, or' Black Kettle, is
slain. . Sheridan's allies, the Osago war
riors who accompanied Custar, have the
' scalp of the. dead Cheyenne; and it, to
. gather with other similar trophies.graced
an Indian scalp" dance in bberidan s
.camp, on the Canadian, on - the. evening
of the 3d of December, . after Custard
return. In this dance the Osage and
Kaw Indians, in the service of Sheri
dan, participated. . The scene is describ
ed as one of, savage effect. ."The dance
lasted until a late hour, and Gens.- Sher
idan and Custar and a large number of
officers witnessed the scene.". On the.
return of Custar after the "battle,"
and .. . his - - ' triumphant v- entry into
"Camp Supply," on the morning of
December 1, 18GS, it is narrated that
the Osage Indians were in the ad
vance, arrayed and decorated in a man
ner becoming the importance of the oc:
utuiuu. a. iieir isctn.werc ittiiifccu iu
the most fantastic and hideous" manner.
About their persons were dangling the
trophies which they had captured in
battle; spears, npon which were fasten
ed the scalps-of their fallen foes,', were
swung upon their shoulders; from their
own painted scalp locks- were suspended
long trails of silver ornaments and feath
ers. Even the animals which the
Osages rode, were decorated with scalps,
&c. At the head of the column rode
Little Beaver (an Osage Chief) with a
countenance as fixed as stone, yet in his
bearing showing indications of a self- glo
rification which was apparently kept stir
ring and swelling higher and higher by
' the gesticulations and wild notes of the
war songs shouted by his warriors,'' in
termingled ' with whoops and the . dis
charge of rifles." 'In a moment of en
thusiasm the chief said "They call us
Americans; we are Osages," which sen
timent met a wild response. Following
the Indians were the scouts, led by Cali
fornia Joe, Who "was a suitable figure
head for the motley band tollowing mm
"Next cameGenerel Cnstar, riding alone,
mounted on a magnificent black stallion,"
dressed in a short blue sack coat, trim
med with the color of his arm' of the
service, and reinforced with fur collar
and cuffs ; on bis head he wore an otter
' cstp. . . 7- ... Next followed
the living evidences of the victory over
.fifty sqnaws and their children, surround
ed by a suitable guard." Following these
. came the sharpshooters, and then the
different -cavalry companies. General
Sheridan took position in the valley, and
this column passed him in review. "When
General Custar came within fifty yards
of the commanding General, he left his
position in the column and dashed up to
his chief, when a warm and hearty ex
change of salutations was made between
the commander and bis distinguished
and successful .Lieutenant.
In his general field : order of Novem
ber, 29, 1863, announcing to his com
mand the "defeat by the Seventh Regi
ment of Cavalry of a large' band of
. Cheyenne Indians, under the celebrated
chief Black Kettle, re enforced by the
Arapahoes, tinder little Raven, and the
Kiowas, under" Satanta." Gen. Sheri
dan gives all the glory to Brevet. Maj.
- Gen. Geo. A. Custar, "the distinguished
commander," for "the efficient aod gal
lant services rendered ia the opening
campaign against hostile 'Indians south
- of the Arkansas," and wholly ignores
the secvices of bis Indian allies, and con
ceals the fact that to the Ooages the
"glory and honor" of killing Black Ket
tle belong a young Osage chief, Tom-la-man-Che,
the Trotter, having, it is
said, taken his scalp, after a most des
perate conflict.
In his official announcement of tbe re
Bult of " the Battle of Washita" to the
Lieutenant. General, it is stated by Gen.
Sheridan that " it was Black Kettle's
band who committed the first depreda
tions on the Saline and Solomon rivers in
Kansas." In giving this report to the
- country Gen. Sherman indorses it, and
thus adds the weight of his name to the
accusation. To slander the living is a
grave offense ; to bear false witness
against the dead, a crime. While Black
Kettle was living, neither Sherman nor
Sheridan ever made any such charge
against him or bis band. I have, I think,
examined all the official papers prepared
and made public by thesa officers, and
in no single instance, while the chief
was living, did either of them utter a
charge against him. -
General Sheridan, on the 26th of Sep
tember, 1868, at the request of General
Sherman, made a report in relation to
the canseBr beginning and ' (then) exist
ing condition of Indian troubles in West
ern Kansas. Attached to this report is
a specific " list of outrages," with day
and date, np to September 17, 1863.
From first to last in all this document
not one charge is made or word uttered
against Black Kettle or bis band. . Had
this chief appeared on the Saline and
Solomon rivers last summer and there
committed the first depredations, the
.fact, in view of its importance by reason
of the position and character of Black
Kettle, could not, and would not, I
think, have been overlooked by General
Sheridan. I regard this story, there
fore, in precisely the same light that I
do a kindred one hatched np by Chiving
ton, Gov. Evans, of Colorado, and oth
ers, against this same chief and his
band, after the Chivington massacre of
1864. It was supposed for eome time
that Chivington . had killed Black
Kettle. In the official report . of
the "battle" it was so stated, and dili
gent use of the interval was made to fix
in the public mind the hostile character
of the Chief and bis baud. Fresh white
scalps were said to have been found in his
village ; also books, papers and letters,
together with the wardrobes of white fe
males said to have been killed on the
plains ; .it was alleged tney Had mur
dered settlers on the frontier, surprised
emigrants in their camps, children were
slain, wives were taken prisoners, and
every species of atrocity and barbarity
committed. In tbe sequel the reader
will observe how these charges were dis
posed of, so far aa Black Kettle's band is
concerned.
For several years preceding the spring
of 1S64, the Cheyenne Indians were at
peace with the whites. They had great
provocation to go to war. The gold
hunters bad rushed into their country,
and but little, in fact no respect was paid
to their personal or property rights. In
April of that year Lieut. Dunn killed a
number of them. In the mouth of May,
Major Downing killed some twenty-six,
wounded thirty more, and burnt their
lodges." These acts started a portion of
the Indians on the. war path. . Jn . the
27th of June, M8.64j Governor Evans
issued , a circular wto the friendly
Cheyennes and Arapahoes, ; directing
them to separate from the unfriendly,
and go to Fort Lyon, where Major Col
ley -would supply them with, provisions
"and show them a. place -of safety,"
Some time after its date, the circular
was placed in the hands of Black Kettle,
who immediately prooeeded to gather his
band with a view of complying with its
directions. His first efforts to commu
nicate with the fort , were unsuccessful,
his ' messengers being '. fired npon and
driven off. At length be succeeded, and
Colonel Wyokoop, then in command,
had a talk with him, whicn-resulted in,a
visit of this chief, and others, to JJenver,
to talk with Governor Evansl' They
were accompanied by- Colonel .Wyn
koop. ' The interview with the Gover
nor took place on the 28th of September,
1864. In that interview Black Kettle
"On sight of your circular of Jane 27.
X took bold of the matter, and have now
come to talk to you about it. I told Mr.
Bent,' who brought it, that I accepted it,
but it would take some time to get all my
people togetner many pt my young men
being absent, and I- have done. -everything
in my power since to keep the
peace with the whites. . . , . We
have come with our eyes shut following
nis ivrynKoop'sj nanatui ot meu like
coming through the fire. ' .All we ask is
that we may have peace with the whites
We want to hold you by the hand. You
are our father.' 'We have been traveling;
tnrougn a ciond. xne sky Bas been
. 1 V f. 1 Mil m "
dark ever since the .war began. These
braves who are with me are willing to
do what I say. We want to take good
tidings home ' to our' people, that they
may sleep in peace.. I want you to give
an tuese cniets ot tne soldiers here to un-
derstand that we are ' for peace "fColo-
nel Chivington and other military men
were present), and that we have made
peace, that we may not he mistaken by
them for enemies. I have not come here
with a little wolf bark, but have come to
talk plain with you. We must live near
the bffalo or starve.' When we came
here we came free, without any appre
hension, to see you, and when I go borne
and tell my people that I have 'taken
your band and the hands of all the chiefs
here in Denver, they will feel well, and
so will all the different tribes of Indians
on the plains after we haveeaten and
drank with them."
' Governor Evans declined to make any
arrangement with them, said that .war
existed, and he had turned them over to
the military. Colonel Wynkoop, with
the Indians, then .retraced their' steps.
and the latter were placed on Sand
Creek, under, as they supposed, the pro
tection of the military. This they were
promised. About this time Wynkoop
was relieved from command at Fort
Lyon by Major Anthony, who joined
Onivington in tbe attack on the village
at ana ireek, and tne massacre
which followed on the 29th of November
1864. - ,-
This affair was eramined into by the
committee on the conduct of the war, of
which Senator Wade was chairman.
That committee had all the charges and
tne testimony before tnem, and in sum
ming it up say: "all the testimony goes
to show that the Indians under the im
mediate control of Black Kettle and
White Antelope (his brother), of the
Cheyennes, and Left Hand, of the Arap
ahoes (the Indians in the Sand Creek
Tillage), were and had been friendly to
the whites, and had not been guilty of
any acts of hostility or depredation. A
northern' band of Cheyennes, the Dog
Soldiers, had been guilty, but they bad
no connection with Black Kettle's band,
and he and bis band denied all connec
tion with or responsibility for the acts of
the Dog Soldiers. EvenGovernor Evans
and .Major Anthony, though evidently
willing to convey -to your commit
tee a false impression of the character of
these Indians, were forced, in - spite of
their prevarication, to admit ' that they
knew of nothing they had done which
rendered them deserving of punishment.
The investigation and judgment of this
committee should be sufficient to relieve
the character of Black Kettle from all
the misrepresentations of Chivington,
f Ivans and others, and to place him, in
865, before the country as a faithful
friend of the whites. His confidence in
'and friendship for them, through which
.the Indians were placed on Sand Creek
to be slaughered by Crfivington, subject
ed him to the censure of his own people,
and he lost his influence and position. It
is, however, averred by-those who ought
to know, that be still adhered to his pa
cific views, always throwing the weight
ot bis influence, be tbat mnch or
little, in ' .favor . of peace. He was
enabled to bring .' his ' band - to the
meeting of the commissioners who made
the treaty of 1S65 at the mouth of the
Little Arkansas, and join in it; and
again to meet the Peace Commissioners
at .Medicine .Lodge (Jreek in Uctober,
1867, and join in that treaty. In tbe
intervel between November, 1S64 and
his death, no single offense was charged
aerainst him, so far as I know, until af
ter the Osage warrior had taken bis
ecaln. Nov. 27, 1868, and his lifeless
body was left without burial on the
Washita. Then, and not till then, Gen.
Sheridan asserts, that he was guilty of
the first depredations last summer in
Western Kansas'. A - soldier, honored
by his country, should weigh well his
words and tell the truth. This I most
solemnly believe Gen. Sheridan has
failed to do, and that his accusation
against Black Kettle is without founda
tion. In this connection, . I offer a few re
marks on this extraordinary -Indian at
the "Medicine Lodge Creek Council, as
reported for the press. All the Chey
ennes were not present at the first pre
liminary council with the Peace Com
mission, but Black ' Kettle was there.
Time was asked until the Indians could
all come in. Seme were at a distance,
making medicine arrows a religious cer
emony. Eight days' delay was asked
by tbe Indians, and granted by the Com
missioners. At this the Kiowas and
Apaches became dissatisfied, and urged
that the Icouncil be held in four days.
" Black Kettle said, for himself be was
ready and willing to join in a council at
the end ot four days, bnt rebuked the
impatient Indians because they were in
such a hurry. : He said : M Let us, then,
stay, and not get impatient ; those
absent, it. is true, are' in a minority,
compared to all' the Cheyennes; but
still many leading men . were among
them, whose presence at the coun
cil was important and be therefore
wanted sufficient time for thetri to Cofile
1n, as those present did not want toTake
the entire .responsibility, of - making a
treaty without the concurrence of the
whole tribe. When I look to
my left (said lie). I see you, and that you
intend to do right ; and when I look to
my right I see my men, and know that
they intend1 to do right. F 'want ' you
both to touch and shake hands. '
The Cheyennes had been firm friends' of
the whites, but the other tribes, by their
intrigues, bad brought them into trouble.
He felt that a great load would
be removed from his heart, if the Com
missioners would wait arid make a strong
peace. He wanted toBhow' bis people
that he acted in good faith, and" that the
Peace Commission was working fotrfheir
ood, as-be had been "all along telling
lhem."- .'. i) ,t if, nnli .
; t .We lutye the assurance of Major Wyp
ioop that after the present?, war j began,
And the columns of Sheridan commenced
moving, that Black.. Kettle sought .a
efuge for , his band in the Indian ter
ritory, where he had been led to belieyo
was the point of safety for1 those Indians
who desired to remain at peace, ;'e-nly
to meet his death at the: hands" of white
Ven, ia whom he had tow often fatally
trusted, And who triumphantly .report the
facjt ot haying bit jscajp. ia .their, posses
sion." ,V,!fl.-,o yjsH Hi:" M x-.--A t
,.. Evidences,. of the friendly character of
this chief, from the time of Jh.4 firt i rush -of
gold hunters toTike's Peak, bis kind
offices to those found on Ihe. plains desti
tute, supplying their wantsj giving them
" shelter when3 sick, and furnishing them
ponies to aid them on their iournev; th
-valuable services' he frequently , ren-
uerea emigrants and tbe military by giy
ing them notice of danger, are ..extant,
and could, be furnished, but . I 'refrain,
believing 'that . what I have "here
presented will rescue J nisJ memory
from ' the 11 'foul : and ' false 11 ' accusa1
tibns made against him nftert buf not' be
fore, his death: '' Let ine,' howeyer,'-giv
one Incident to show the nobility of char
acter of- thjs , most remarkable; mas.
When Chivington had surrounded . his
village, with a, view to commence ' the
: slaughter of the Indians, there was at
Black Kettle's campfire three white is
(itors, one ot whom was a srldier iri: the
United States, army, " The chief said to"
' them, "It looks h as thougb yon bad
come bertf as spies to see how few -'
are, but I have 710 proof of iti-s. go
and join your follow white men; before
they begin the fight.".ivAnd these men
were allowed, to go their way unharmed,
v I think there can be . no doubt that
Black Kettle and his.,, band, remained
.friendly during the summer and fall- of
18GS, and that lie bad in good faith gone
South to reside iu the neighborbopd of
Fort Cobb, in pursuance of what he' sup
" posed to be the desire of the government,
and in accordance with the stipulations
of ths treaty of October,' 1867. : If I am
right in my conclusions then Castar'si at
tack upon his village, and the slaughter
of its inhabitants is more atrocious thum
Chiyington's. j i ; a-.M'.-jA. V;--:iy.ia-
. I think it of public importance? to ex
amine the official documents which. bavt
emanated from the military in relation to
this . affair, but must reserve- this . labor
. tor anotuer nuiuuer.
- Very respectfully, '
GE. W. MANYPENNY.
CLOTHING.
1, : : O-LOTJaUNGti yiiiic.ff.
CUSTOM: AND" REAdV-MADE !
- : k THE OHIO r jt. ,-.-. :t;.,iK
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' ' ' ' - - ' '.-- ;- Colamkaai Ohlewl
A' SCPRRBREW BTOCKsf tLOTHS1,
Cassimereit. Overcoating and Vesta airs." both
Foreign and Domestic for Fall and Winter wear...
... ' . - i :-'
GENTLEMEN OFTASHIOir,
Will always find both our materials aod our work
to be in the height of the mod. We s all spare
no pains ia produeing tbe most elegant aad fast
ionabJe garments to be found anywheie. .
' BEADT-MADlTcW
Of which a great part is manufactured by ourselves,
, in tbe latest and most fashionable styles, will al
ways be found en our shelves, in all the varieties
of the season, at very low price. . .
GENTS' FURNISHING G00D3
In full lines, always kept on hand.
HENRY MKISb, Superintendent. -
i . : - -JOHN RICH Treasurer.- .Y u
W . G, PfcRKS. Foreman. , '
oet23-deod3ia - '" ' l';3
FALL AND WINTER; GOODS,
HUNTER'S
Clothing Emporinm,
No. 220 South High St.;
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
largest and finest stock of Fall and Winter
Goods ever brought to this eity, consisting of . -ITx-endi,
- ' .. ' - : ;
Jblntrllesli and . .... ;,
Domestio Cloths, ' '
For Gentlemen's wear, whioh 1 will sell at the low"
est Cash prices. - . , . . .
Also keep constantly on band a wall selected
Sfock-Of . , , . .-.ji
READY MADE CLOTHING..
. ; JOHN HUNTKB, .
iuU-dly 8S0 South High F '
1 BOOTS - AND. SHOES, vj
"- . - - f f
T. 8. SHCPABD. '- O. fiOBIOI
CHEAP BOOTS AND SHOES.
NEW-''FIBM."'i,l'!'
T S. SHEPARD HAVING FORMED
a partnership with G. H0R1GKB. for the
purpose of carrying on the Boot and Shoe trade at
no. 16 souxu high sTiitE r.
Would respectfully invitewtheir friends and the
public generally to call and examine their tne aad
well selested stock of Ladies', Gents', Hisses' and
Children's Boots aod Shoes, thisMlay received di
rect trom the taut, and which tbey are now offering
lor sale on the most reasonable terms. In ear man
ufacturing department special attention is givaa to
CUSTOM, MADS WOBK. , ,
Repairing of all kinds neatljr and promptly done.
We would respectfully solicit a share of public
pationage. Please give us a call. No trouble to
show goods.
- Bemembec the plaoe : No. ks South High street.
BHKPAKD A HOUIGKK.
- Columbus. O. Sept. 11, IMS. - apl9-dtf
- ; BANKERS.
P. W. HUNTINGTON & CO..
B A r J K E R S , ;r
Corner Broad & Sigh Sts. '
COLUMBUS, OHIO, ' V'
1 .--,' 1 4 . - - ..A,.. Il
- fob-dly, ... .... ,
7. HATDI. . JOS HUT0HX80N. H. 1T.B. HATPIN.
' .lUIDlaN,"HtTCHS(it
v. 9.U 'rt -j.il i:t
ii .ci 4.Muir3
, NO. 1 S. MIII rKEETT,-1
1- Jt
janao-dly-r
Caliuaabns, . t j

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