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Cincinnati daily press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1860-1862, March 24, 1860, Image 4

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mirn T A TT "Vr 11 1) I.1 LIU. 1
KATIKDAY
M AH II '.it
THE FATE OF LOVE.
He atne.1 behind cottage Imf, ,
And listened to ii hilts
On' summer eve. when the breene was gone,
And the nightingale was mute.
Tlie moon wo Hatching on the Mil:
The aire Ml staid, aud til mar-le still,
To hoar a lover's suit,
Tloit, hjilf n vow and half ft pmyiir
Proku less of hope than of despair,
And rose Into the calm, toft ail
An swijet and low
,s he had heard O, w.ie! o. wne'
1'Im flute, ol angels, rung ago!
" Br erery hepe that rartbwnrti cling.
By fntth that mounts on aiwelr wings,
By dream, thru make nlght-shado. bright,
And tru.'tti thut turn our day to night,
And childhood's mm lie niul instilii"! .tear;
By plc-unire'l day mid sorrow's tear,
lly all the (trains tlmt func! alnan..
And pang thut llmr a nP'lr brings -Vorjov
or grief, for hope or fear,
Kor all hereafter a a- hen-.
In peace or strife. In storm or "hliic,
My onl la wedded unto thine !
And for It. fort and sole reply.
iniirniiir. anil a sweet, low igh,
put mil a spoke n word
Ami yet thuy made the water, atari
Into hi. rye. who In-aril:
For thev toM f a nt loving heart,
III a voire like Hint of a bird -Ufa
heart that loved, thongh It loved In lain
- A grieving, ami yet not pain.
A We tlmt took nil eni'ly root
And hail an early iIihiiii.
Like treee that never grow to fruit.
And enrly .lied tlieir Moom ;
Of vanished hope" and happy .nillca.
All lost forever mure.
J.Ike ships Hint .nihil tor sunny l-le.
But never dime to shore 1
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[From Le Follet.]
Ladies Fashions for Spring.
Throughout tlie season Rolil
fr..iio hu riaen verv tii.iliirinnble fur Will l
lremc?. Tarlatane, with flounreo einl.roi- !
dered with colored sputum retvuioroigoiu
spotted all orer with gtilil, silver white rente,
Ac are all in f ivor. We have remarked an
vrqandi. with white stripes, which makes a
litnple but very chunninjr dress, with two
kirtj or a tunic; body, round, with u lonff
s:ihor a Moldavian bnnd. Tulle, worked
with gold, and plain w hita tulle, with Imuil
lunntt skirts, are always suitable und elegant
tor evening dress. Moire antique and moire
francaiie, trimmed with hlonde, lure, tulle,
'tarlatune, and velvet are nil used for quite
full-dress. Velvet will always lie fashionable.
Plain velvet of all shades black, mame.
lemon, tsuxonr blue, corullower, blue pink,
und even white also I'ekin velvet, black and
I.:.- A 1.1... .1- .-....'rr
.ro, and white stripes, &c.' It is true !
.'. ..i. '. :. :... i... i 4I..I. 4i. i
and Ural),
material itself is so rich aud elegant that it
does not require any trimming. One of these
dresses, which we will describe, was of black
Pekin velvet, with narrow white stripes.
This intermingling of black and white gives
a kind of lead-colored hue. The tkirt was
plain; the body high, without waist; the
sleeves tight, with a cull' of embroidered
cambric, without luce.
White velvet has hitherto been but little
used, either for dresses or bonnets, but it is
now getting into favor. For wedding
dre-ises, it is becomm? fashionable.
AVe observe that the dinner dress, rfirmi
ncijlige is preferred to low laidy, unless, in
deed, for a dinner of grcat ceremony.
Velvet and satin arc the favorite materials
for dinner dress; the colors most worn arc
violet, greoa and grey. They are trimmed
with lace, jiatecmeiiterie, and plaits of beads;
but moire and silk are still worn, and
clogantly trinimcd with ruchimn of lace and
Uk. . .
iionncts are gradually Increasing in size,
and are worn over the forehead, and wide at
the 6ides. The materials arc the same ns
were worn last month crape for visits of
ceremonv; silk, or velvet and silk. Casoar
feathers, and even tho ends of peacocks'
feathers, ore very fashionable for trimmings. I
e have seen an elegant terry vuiei
bonnet, a shade between lilac and violet, j
trimmed across the front with a scarf of the i
same colored velvet, with an aigrette high !
up; the upper half white aud tho lower the '
same shade as the bonnet. The curtain half
velvet and half terry. No blonde inside. A
plaiting of velvel and terry all round, with u
small bunch of violets on one side. Strings
of terry velvet. ,
A verv simple but charming head-dress is
e a " i.i. -I..:. r .-..1.1 M.tn.l tin.
lormeu wim a pmu ui yuiu 1.1 m.. m... i..v
hair, and tied in two long bows at the top,
the ends trimmed with tassels or gold balls,
fulling behind the bamleau, or tied at the
nape of the neck. Plaits of gold and silver,
mixed with velvet or luce, form u very pretty
head dress for demi-toilettc; and nets or che-
mllt or gold are still in great favor.
The Value of a Moderate Drinker.
In Pennsylvania, a clergyman on a late
sermon,
which produced unusual effect on the audi-
encc. Among other things, he asserted, as a
result of his own observation, that a confess-
"moderate drinker was sure to become
a confirmed inebriate within five .years alter
reached that slate of indulgence.
He was interrupted here by a man in the
audience, "who started up in greatexcitement,
proclaiming himsell a moderate drinker often
years' standing, aud one ou whom the habit
made no progress.
The clergyman stopped short, leaned over
the pulpit, and when the mau had ceased
speaking, called out:
'I sav, friend, stand up here, and let me
have a look at you.
The man made an effort to brave the host
cf eyes turned upon him, and stood his
ground. . . . , . . . ,
"Nearer, man!" cried the minister, beckon-
ingrrith his long finger. "Hold a light up to
the brothers race, some 01 you. ciiep up 10
the bench and give us a good look.
The moderate drinker was not to be looked
down or talk down; he not ouly mounted the
liench, but allowed a lump to be held close to
his face. , . . . ,
The minister bent over his cushion, and
gave the face a long survey.
"That will do," said he, drawing back,
"that will do, my friend; and now I say, if I
owed the devil a debt of a hundred drunk-
ards, and had paid him ninety-nine, and he
wouldn't take you in full payment at the end
I would never pay him."
of years,
Scene Buroiti a Guard Jcby Smepiku
vs. DiusKiiio. (Enter a disconsolate looking
female, without hoops.) ...
Foreman. Madam, what complaint have
von to make? .
" Complainant. I come to enter complaint
agiu' my companion. ...
Fore. Your husband. I suppose? Well,
what is his name, and what has he done?
Com. His name is Mr. , and he
struck me, and beat me, and threw me out
door," .and threatened to kill me if I come in
the house agin 1
Fore. What provocation did you give
him, madam, for such treutment?
Com. I don't like to tell, sir
Fnre. But madam, you mustl. The Grand
Jury must know all the circumstances.
Com. Well, if I must, I must. Ho done
It iirat 'cause I wouldn't sleep with iui
' Fore. Ah I that's the nature of the case
U? Very well, why did you refuse to sleep
with him?
Com. Cause he was drunk, and I didn
want to. , , .
Fore. Well, how is it when he's sober?
Do dou refuse to sleep with him then?
. Coin No,sir!butwUnb'soberhewon't
er.p with me!
Tb Mann" w which Womn Kcokomim.
A. fair dennen or iMmonaoie ran.,
extrMaac 6ore ruer nnra on
bnsbaoa't parte, was one day taken to
by him lor ner warn oi ckuuuuit.
"I know what you gay is true," replied
repentant belle, '"but what shall 1 do to
our expenses?" . ... . .
"Why, ma chere," replied the husband,
with her submission, "you ride a
deal why not take an omnibus occasiouully,
instead ofa carriage? Tbat will sav eouie
thlng, surely." ... , . ,
The wife agreed, and as soon as her husband
was gone, she rang for her maid.
"iuirietta, call u coach that I may
to tbe omnibus, to go to tne Madeleine.
most economise."
.: The merchants ofTforfolk, Va, recent'y
held large meeting to protest , ajcalnst
aropoeed ooe-per-oentum tax bl 1 on
chitTielet, now before tbe VlrgHiaU Legi.
laturt J ' " " .: '
Scene in a Kansas Court Room—A Card-
Scene in a Kansas Court Room—A Card-Loving Judge.
Some two Tears rro, a quite amnjinft
and novel scene transpired in the presence of
it Probate Jndge of Kansas, while he was
holding court.
The court room was atlittle lojr hut ten by
twelve, with a dirt chimney and floor. Chairs
were very si-an, and His Honor hud several
chunks of wood rolled In, -for seats. Upon
one of the said chunks, His Honor sat, with
all of his judicial dignity. Before him was
arraigned some poor fellow, for borrowing his
neighbor's chickens without permission, cou
l fronted by his accuser. Upon the tvpposito
side of the lirc-place, sat the sheriff and one
of his friends, engaged in a pleasant game of
"old sledge." We will call them Brown and
Smith,
The Judge, after ailjusting his quill, pushed
hack his hair, that his legal butnps might lie
thorottghlv exhibited, and looking the priso
ner full in" the face, pronounced an Inter
I rogntorv like ibis:
3udg fir, what have you to say for
vourscll?
' Brown.--Smith 1 beg.
Smith. I'll fee you d d, Hint.
Judge. .Sheriff, keep silence in the court,
Well, sir, what have you to say about those
chickens? , , , ...
Hrown (aside). Run thekurds. Smith.
Prisoner. I intended to pay .Mr. Wiggins
for them chickens.
Judge. Why didn't
Brown. Smith don't you come that new
kick over me; follow suit; none of your re
; niging.
Jinlire. The court finds it impossible to
proceed, unless you have order in the court
house. . ,
Smith. In a moment, Judge. Count your
game Brown.
Juuge. Uia you eai or sen inuev tun.-
ens.
Prlsnner. I sold them.
Judge. How much did you muke on
Smith. High-low-jack-gifl-aud-game.
Brown. Who give you one?
Smith. I beg your pardon. 'Twas you
that begged
Judge. Silence in the court.
Evervthing was quiet again for a few mo
ments; the "ktirUs"' were sliutlied and dealt,
and, in the meantime, his Honor proceeded
with the examination.
In the bight of some other question being
propounded by the Judge, Smith begged, and
Brown gave one, hullowing out:
".Tow, rip uhead, old hoss; five and five."
The Judge, indignant und angry, arose
from the court-bench, and crossed to the
phiyers Before ho could , speak, he i spied
Smii i liimil. holdinir the lack and ten of
trumps; at the same time, glancing at a big
stone between the two, he saw two half dol
lars. "Hrown, says the Judge, "1 U bet you five
dollars Smitli ljeats the game.,'
"Done," savs Browu, up went the ore.
Smith led on, and won the trick; led again,
and won; led a third time, and won; but no
game yet; commenced whistling and scratch
ing his head.
Judge (Leaning on Smith, with one eye
thut.) 'Smith, plav cm judiciously.''
Smith led a little heart, and lost the trick.
Browu played the queen at him, and won the
ten.
"Hold, said the Judge, "let me see.
Brown. "What's the matter, Judge?''
Smith (imiiatient.y "Lead on, Brown."
Brown. "Play to the ace.''
Judge raring) "This was a made up
tliintr vou have defrauded me I tine you
both twenty-five dollars, for contempt of
court.
Brown pocketed the money; tho prisoner
sloped, and so the court adjourned, without
any form of process.
Scene in a Kansas Court Room—A Card-Loving Judge. The Misery of Marrying a Fortune.
.
g0i m mui couuiuon ui which cmuu on ncn
: knows how to avail himself; and he tempted
pan with this suggestion, 4-what a fool to
i w,iste vour life in drudgery! you, so young
Bnrj dashing, and altogeter so proper a Wlow,
and likely withal to marry a lbrtune! Murry
a fortune, Dan, and cut physic!" The sug-
i pt.tion took, and Dan waited impatiently
i for the season to open at Saratoga, and
h(j wen, whcn' -t did opeUi ,vit, his
woridlv wealth in his pocket-book, detcr
cccasion,wnspieachingateuiperencc j mined"0n matrimony. 1 need not say how
i he reMv , jn love witn 01le fa;r V0Ung
,1 u fortune, nor how he managed
,ow.ur(1 tiie cool davs of September, to se
edly . vun ln ola git 1(.i(A a fortune. It is
true in Inarrving her he married her three sis
he u eiK.h ol(fer au(1 uiier tnan tile ot,eri anci
widowed mother also, elder and uglier than
M uut tien tncy owned a thousand negroes
. 1)etweeu ,hem somewhere down in Alabama,
. and had .iiuntutions to match. The wedding
, wag prundl can't say gay and Dan was
, ..pi,,,,, but I can't say happy. And off
he wnt t0 jook H(leT tllt. ngra ad the
'plantation. That was. ten vcars ago. Last
.ear j met hlm in Pur;s. ne was 110 longer
dashing Dan, but cn old man, quite nervous
, Rnd t was gid to see him, neverthe-
mfd urgcd nim t0 dine with me at
Felipe's. But he excused himself on some
fpivftou, re.ext. which I wouldn't accent.
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No youug man of thirtv, well educated, prc-
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posessing, with already a fair literary and sci-
entific reputation, ever Had a orignter promise
; life than my old college friend Dan ? .
jut )an vai poor, and he had found out
tnat brain work was not over profitable. He
na(j worked hard in his profession for three
vears, and lived economically, yet he had not
u,.,.eeed in cettinir that one thousand dol-
),rg ahead, which Astor found it so difficult
. cuuire. and which he culled "the nest-egg
of fortune." Dan grew gloomy over his pros-
nects. and solitary in his habits.andaltogether
r . .i . ...i;.! e ..11
; Finailv thre truth came out he couldn't. The
WIIC, 1UC lllirc oiu luaiuo, mil. mumii,
were all in Paris; none of them spoke a word
of French, and he was obliged to be with
them constantly. They couldn't get their
dinner without his aid. And he had been
with them three years on the continent; they
had dragged him to Egypt and Jerusalem and
Dan drew a profound sigh.
"But Dan, I exclaimed, "after all, you are
a lucky dog; it isn't every one who marries
fortune!"
"Marry a fortune!" he interrupted, bitterly;
"do you know what it is to marry a fortune.
Of course you don't! But I'll tell you what
amounts to: head butler in doort, and real et
tate agent out! Marry a fortune! Murry the
dogs!''
And Dan buttoned up his coat and strode
off to his hotel fire women aud a fortune.
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Skrvoxb OrrKKiD rou Salk Cheap in
Exoland. The following singular adver
tisement appeared in a recent number of the
Clerical (English) Journal: A beneficed
clergyman, who preaches to a respectable
congregation, will lend his sermons to any
brother whose occupation precludes leisure
for composition. The discourses are origi
nal in the strictest sense, earnest and striking,
and will be furnished at the rate of 10s. each.
An order for a month s sermons, accompa
nied by a post-office order for 'i, will meet
with prompt attention, and the utmost con-
noence. extracts iroui corresponuence
" The Marchioness of seemed delighted
with vour sermon on . r.. nt.
fills. My people have found out that you
a good preacher. G. H. J." Address
Smith, under cover to M. Walker, bookseller,
189 Strand, London, W. C.
A New Cubical Celebritt. The London
Star of late date says: The Rev. H. D. North
rop, of the United State preached last Sun
day evening in the Pavilion Theater, White-
, J , .i i i.:..i. : :j .A lai.i..i.
w ,.waLa ia CTerv Dart. Mr.
cnapei; me piaco, wuicu ibmiu iu uuiuniiuig
r - three
twenty, and baa come to England on a
expectingto return shortly to America, being
engaged to take charge of the Park Congre
gational Chapel, Brooklyn, New York.
ityle of preaching seems adapted to all
get, but Is especuUljr attractive to the working
nannle. His voice is remarkably clear
well modulated, and it is the general opinion
of those who have beard him that if be
preaching here, his popularity
equal that of Mr. Bpurgeon. His sentiments
are evangelical end anti-slavery.
Justiiubli Homioidi i Missocki.
Scotland County. Mo, one day last
one John W. Bebee made an attack
James 0. Spencer with a knife, when
i- ,U tha former. kilHnor niin
Bpencer wa legally examined and acoultted,
on tbe greund of baying acted in Mlf-dslsni.
A Parisian Litterateur in an Amorous Embarrassment
—Falling in Love with a
"Company."
A
fascinated recently by an unknown lady at
one of the opera balls. She would not re
move her domino, but, at parting, invited
him to visit her, and gave him her name and
address. The next day found h m at the
door of the large, fine house Indicated by
ihc street and number upon the card.
Madame was at home, the concierge in
formed him.
"In what story shall I find her suite of
apartments?'' , ...
"Madame occupies the entire house.
By no means less enamored at finding the
ladv so magnificently lodged, the visitor as
cended the staircase, at the head or which
he was met by a servant In full livery, much
embroidered aud belated, who threw open
the door of a large apirtment, suspended
around the walls of wlrch, or carelessly
thrown across articles of furniture, were a
number of brilliant toilettet.
"So thh handsome boudoir Is used merely
as a wardrobe," said our young hero, men
tally; "no wonder Madame requires a whole
house to herself."
Before he had time for further comment, a
ludv, finely formed and very elegantly dressed,
entered the boudoir, and advanced to meet
him. The palpitations of his heart did not
permit him to doubt that this was his domino
of the masked 111. He stepped forward, and
was about to take her hand, when a formal,
' What do you wish, sir?'' chilled and embar
rassed him. The voice, too, was strange; but
then voices are sometimes disguised.
"Do you not recognise me?' he stammered,
at length, "Are you not Madame ?'
"No, sir, I am not; but it Is just the same.
We ar partners; and any order which Mon
sieur may wish to give I can take charge of
as well as Madame.
The word orrfer opened the eyes oi me vis
itor, and revealed to him what the sound of
many scissors in active exercise In thcatboiu
,,,1 tha numerous tnirmcnts dis
played about the boudoir might have shown
mm ueiore, h nt imu uioimuv." .... -(..
the traditional bandage of Love. His domino
was "Madame and Company, dress
makers. Madame was out or engaged; the
"Commny" had received him.
This revelation placed our hero in great
perplexity. It was evident that Madame did
not confide her affairet du carur to the "Com
pany." How could he get away without
either compromising her, or compromising
his nurse by a ruinous "order."
"Excuse me, madame, he said, altera mo
ment's reflection; "I am about to speak
frankly to you. I am an author by profes
sion, and am at present engaged upon a fash
ionable novel. I was about describing a ball
in high life, when I found myself not suf
ficiently familiar with the nunutias of the
latest styles of costume. Fearful of commit
ting some solecism in the attire of my hero
ines, 1 have come hither, as painters go to the
art galleries, to copy the great masters. Will
you be so kind, in the spirit of artistic
temity the pen and the needle arc sisters,
they both embroider as to permit me to cast
a glance upon vour gallery of masterpieces ?
und, taking out his eye-glass, he began to
examine attentively the suspended toilette).
A note from Madame , that evening,
apologized for her absence, thanked him lor
his ingenious device, and appointed a time to
receive him; but we are notiuforuied whether
he cared to risk another interview with the
"Company."
Vigorous Influence of Bravery.
The example of the brave is an inspiration
to the timid, their presence thrilling through
every fibre. Hence the miracles of valor so
often performed by ordinary men under the
leadership of the heroic. The very recollec
tion of the deeds of the valiant stirs man s
blood like the sound of a trumpet. Ziska
bequeathed his skin to be used as a drum to
inspire the valor of the Bohemians. When
Scandcrberg, Prince of Epinis, was dead, the
Turks wished to possess his bones, that each
might wear a piece next his heart, hoping
thus to secure some portion of the courage he
had displayed while livingj and which they
had so often experienced m battle. W hen
the gallant Douglas, bearing the heart of
Bruce to the Holy Land, saw one of his
knights surrounded and sorely pressed by
the Saracens in battle, he took from his neck
i l,o aiw-er ruse. i-nntnininc the hero s bequest.
and throwing it amid the thickest press of
his foes, cried, rass nrsv in 1114111, us muu
wert wont to do. and Douglas will follow
thee, or die," and so saying, he rushed for
ward to the place where it tell, and was there
slain. Smilei Self-Help.
Italy, the Birthplace of Nkwupapkhs
The First Journal Published in Vekice.
We are indebted to the Italians for the idea
of newspapers. The title of the Uazctttu was
derived from Oatzera, a magpie or chatterer;
or more probably from a farthing coin,
peculiar to tho city of Venice, called Oazetta,
which was the common price of a newspaper.
Another etymologist is lor deriving it from
the Latin Oaia, which would colloqinlly
lengthen it into Oazetta, signifying a little
treasury of news. The Spanish derive it from
the Latin Gaza, and likewise their Oazatero
and our Gazateer for the writer of a Gazette,
and what is peculiar to themselves, Gazetiita,
for a lover of the Gazette.
Newspapers then took their birth in that
principal land of modern politicians, Italy,
and under the government of that aristocrat
ical republic, Venice. The first paper was a
Venetian one, and one monthly; but it was
merely tho newspaper of the Government
fhr rrnvemments afterward adopted the
Venetian plan of a "newspaper, with the Ve-
1 . a anlitorv flAr.ninilinl
neuau imiuc, hum. w --
Gazette, an inundation ol newspapers has
burst upon us.
a
it
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are
J.
and
visit,
Hm
clas-
and
con
tinues will
Iu
week,
upon
the
dead.
Tut Phkim im Bbitain. There were, in
1830, printed in Loudon, daily or weekly, 65
and in England and
Wales 154 others. The whole number of pa
pers which they sell in a year is twenty-hve
millions. These consume one hnndred thou
sand reams of paper annually.
The number of newspapers now published
in the United Kingdom, (1830) is three hun
dred and eight, of which eighty-nine appear
in Scotland and Ireland.
The salary of an editor upon a respectable
morning paper in England, is from U007. to
0001. per annum.
There are besides "Penny-a-liners re
noriora. frimi the circumstance of their tur-
nishing articles of intelligence at a fixed price
perline, viz: VAd. to VAd. They are not
attached to any iwrticulur newspaper.
H.alfVKHll I'ni EPINO THgl'LiCKOF OplCM.
The New Vork correspondent of the Chicago
7Ve HUtes that Indian nemp is useu
large quantities in tbe former city, and
rupidly tuking the place of opium among
those who have given themselves up to
slavery of nervines and stimulant. The
lump or haiheesh, without the astringent
properties of opium, hits a far more subtle
in,! ii.t.nsA nnwer of elevatius the mental
faculties, aud is proportionally more danger
ous. Its unhappy uevotee receives no warn
ing until completely enslaved by iu mystic
influence. The writer says that there
hundreds of persons in New York who
constantly under its Influence, and tho
mand lor it is increasing overj uj.
PROPKa PROKCHOIAT10 OP "FabLOW."
young gentleman in an office at Sonieniet
tfi.v .. hiohlv rleliirhted bv reading,
the letter of the Alexandria correspondent
the Morning Pott, the statement tnut tne
ms.i aa enntniDlated bv its projectors,
would have to be excavated "by tbe labor
the fellahs of Egypt." "By Jove!'' he
claimed, "that fellah in the Morning run is
deuced cleva fellah! Knows how to
fellah. Those other fellahs, deuced cieya
too those phonetic fellahs spell
..m. wv Khali alwavs soell it so
...ir i i-ehw W'lsli all the wawk a have
do to-dav bad to be executed Dy tne laoaw
those Egytian felUhs." I'uneh.
A V.,.niBi. Noam's Kmr. The
Arts says: Tbe priestess's knife used by
Hcheilel, wnon sne penunueu m
Norma, has been deposited by her sou In
National Museum at Pesth. It is in
frilt and enriched with u9 precious
Iromtlie mines of Huniary, and was
to the celebrated singer by her admir
ers In 110.
Origin of hte Famous Story of Cinderella.
The origin of this nursery tale Is thus
given by a French journalist. We toll the
tale ns told to ns, but It is probably of much
imwlrr antlimltv: A I milt the year 1730. an
rrnr of annal talent and wealth, named
Thevenard, in passing through the streets of
J'nris, oiwervea upon a coooier ssiau ineomro
of a female, which struck him by the remark
able smallness of its size. After admiring It
for some time he returned to his house; bnt
his thoughts reverted to the shoe with such
Intensity that he reappeared at the stall next
dav, but tho cobbler could give hira no other
chie to the owner than that It bad been left
in his absence, for the purpose or being re-
naiearl Dav nflnr daV did Thevenard fetlim
to his post to watch the reintegration of the
slipper, which proceeded slowly; nor did the
proprietor claim it. Although he had com
pleted the sixtieth year ot his age, so ex
trHvncrAtit liemmB nis uassion for the un
known fMir oie, that he became (were it
possible for a Frenchman ot that oay w oe
so) melancholy and miserable. His pain,
however, was somewhat apiensed by the
avatar of tho little foot itself, appertain
ing to a pretty and youthful girl of the vory
humblest classof lite. All distinctions were
leveled at once by love: the actor sought tho
parents of the female, procured the consent
to tlie luatcn, unu bcihbuv uiuuo uci mo
wife.
marital Sufferers by Woman's Rights.
All the while the preacher
Mrs. Black Brown) was talking 1 could not
neiptuinEiiig wnu pity 01 ner uuouaiiu, u
how lonely and dreary he must find his home
after being hard at work all day among his
patients, while she Is always away on those
missionary excursions, spreading the gospel
..I-j 1 fl.m'f f liinlf anostlpji nf I
either sex ought to be marled, and that, I
presume, Is the reason why 1 listened with
so much more pleasure 10 me lovciy l auiine
raul, and even to me naru-iuceu mrKiiv
St. Anthnnv. than to the fervent Mrs. Black
Brown. 1 was not disturbed In their case by
any compassionate thoughts of pining babies
and forlorn husbands. But, then, Dr. Black
Brown has no reason to complain; lor nis
wife I ought rather to say his partner told
me she made it a condition ol entering the
liartnerhin. that he should stay at home and
take care of the children, leaving her at lib
erty to go whenever and wherever she
pleased, in the fulfillment of her great mis
sion. JJr, uianam.
Schamyl's Reception of his Family.
The Kalouga Gazette announces ar
rival in that town of Schamyl's family, con
sisting of fifteen persons, including his two
Wives, IWO Sons, ana live uuiiKUiera, euu
their husbands and children, bchamyl was
reading when the approach of the party
was announced, and he appeared greatly
moved by the intelligence, but soon recov
ered his composure, and knelt down to offer
up thanks to Heaven. He then sat down to
tho table, and had just begun dinner when
his youngest son, who had ridden on first,
entered tho room. The reception was very
ceremonious, though both w-erc evidently
mncn nnecieu. jvuer &1.1.1111K ma miuci a
hand, the young man retired to some dis-
tnnce, and slandiiig 111 a respectful attitude,
answered SchamvVs inquiries. The rest of
the family were received in the same manner,
tho men first and then the women. When
all were in the room. Schiiuiyl directed them
to join him iu returning thanks to God for
their prosperous journey
ExTBAonnmARV Infatdatioxok Passion
The Most Impi dkst Lovkb on Rkcoro. A
wealthy and beautiful girl in Memphis, Tenn.,
was recently married to a rich Mississippian,
and on tho same day eloped with a former
..;a nrl,A nwnvoumn line unentilpO if linnnr
by the ardor of his addresses. After passing
tlie night with the virgin bride, he deserted
her. and she returned retientunt to her hus
band and was pardoned; whereujion the in
dignant lover sent three challenges to the
husband for daring to receive his (tlie lover's)
mistress to his connubial arms. 1 nis is tlie
coolest piece of villainy we remember to
have heard of in the lust lustrum of our jour
nalistic career.
Portrait ok Giiidinhs by a Woman. The
Sew York Ertnina l'ott savs, that on an
easel in Huntincrtou's studio is a nearly fin
ished likeness of the Hon. Joshua K. Gid-
dinirs. It is the work of Miss Kansom, a
nuiiil of Mr. Huntington, and was com-
menccd nearly a year ago at the tity of
Washington. It is a strong likeness ot tne
veteran, and in an urtistic jioint of view; is
highly complimentary to me lauy uiuoi.
Mi9 'Ransom is a native of Ohio, and, we
believe, from the same county with Mr.
Giddiugs.
A Savauk Horse. A hackmau in Mon
treal, while attempting to release his horse
from the harness, the animal having slipped
and fallen, was savagely seized by the pros-
a ..:.-...l I I.!.. ! .. ., lUIn mut.nn-
imie Ulllllini UllU Iiiicu 111 wnium
While hnldiTirr the man s lez the horse shook
it as fiereelv as a terrier dog does a rat, and
it required repeated strokes on the animal's
forehead from a loaded whip-handle before
the man could be released. Perhaps the poor
horse was trying to avenge ins many wrongs.
Profaue language is to conversation what
ten inch spikes would be to veneering split;
ting, shivering auu uciccuiig 11.
MISCELLANEOUS.
iu
is
the
are
are
de
A
iu
of
ouez
of
ex
a
spell
a i
lahs, fel
i.h my.
to
oi
Enti
Mme.
tlie
silrer,
sUines
pre
senUd HARRISON & COLLINS S
CtKNTRAI, BEE-HIVE OAIHHY,
j n.rni'rol Fifth and Western-row. I'hutoKralihM,
Mclninot) pes aud Amtmt pen taken clioaptT than
elsewhere in tlia city. Oil Colored Photograph.
...iA ..r ,,ll .Was. rini life to the smallest miniature.
l'icluri'S iiiMitly set iu Loi kots, Briiastpins, t'luxcr-
rlnirs auu nracoiois. a '';
noi6-ay A. B. DLOOM, Artist.
H.1IOK.E-CONSUMING
COAL COOKING STOVE
11ANBEEN PRONOIINrKO BYCO.MPK.
m. TT. NT jiidgcs to bo the BEST COAL COOK
INOrlTOVK EVBIl INTVBKrTJJ -L
SIX SIZES: PATENTED DECEMBER!, 1858.
For sale by the Inventor, and Manufacturer,
ADAMS & PEOKOVER,
I.OVELTY 1B0N FOUNDEBY.
No. 333 Fourth-Street, Cln.
IdelS
" ' S PA t D I NG'S
PREPARED GLUE!
A STITCH IN TIME SAVES NINE.
Economy ! Dispatch !
tfivo tliQ Pieces
WTHWVl. IN ETEUr HOCrJB FDK
U liuiuiuug urummi AU.. (.ruvaexiri uuMawara,
Wholesale ueaoi. no. w i mi.i , .via.
AdtlraM HKSIKT C. KPAI.DI NU Ul.,
Put t for Dealere In casos ruutainlnx four, ejKht,
and tarlvD dir7.su a beaiilllul liliuugrapn nnuw
cord accuuiiii)irigeacli paoiago. ""-ar
I MONEY
LOAN OFFICE
KEM0V8D KnoM SO WEST HIXTH BTKIKT.
mm uiiii.Tiiin
niij HJiiiwiiuu.i&ro
mWONEV LOANED ON WATIHF.M, JEW.
"l.ll aud. II kinds of Slerchauiliwi. at
inti.re.t. at No. 17S V iua-s treat, between
Fourth ai d Filth.
TH hi PATH OB1 UUTYI
Ta Ulve Preference to
ar. ar. ntTTijBiVS
m.rsmR writins and cdrmine fluids
. . .. uu WIIIKIHs. THRItKHV
W Cteplng your nioucy at houie. and, at the
lime. ving W per cant, by the operallon.
Call at etatlouan, or Vlnetraet fur suppliM.
iulaSO-aw
INSURANCE.
CHOJCM
FIRST-CLASS INSURANCE.
DT TIIE
laearaaratea lSlB.-Caariar PeraetaaU
Cash Capital Enlarged Half Million
or uoiiarti
AKCY FWTABMKH BT If flllVCIN
N ATI In IrVi-l, aiiUi-iUtiim all niwrnt Incal
lii.nratic compHHii'
l...nM In tl,l. rl
tr
duty hore, tonililnrd wltb weal
uth. axDorlencai enti-r-
rn anil llhanilliy, anpeciaiiy commend ma jr,ina
timiranra t'unipany in tlia fWrnrahla patronnjra of
till, imnmnnlly taiKllna aiilltary and ahiua, tlia
anln survivor ana living puiuMT 01 v;mciunaii unuer
wrltm "f IM. . , . .
Tha larmmt loan avar an.talant by any Inimrance
coinlMtiy at una Rra to OI1I0 waa I17 the .Aetna, at
Clilllkotha, April, 1S.H, anil amountM o JIU.Wl 7,
finally paid prior to thirty days aflrr the flra.
JjuaBCM palll in 1. incinnaii uunna pa" aia yearv,
, A - A rffi
Cash Capital, - - $1,000,000!
Abmlute and onlmpalrad, with a net lurplm of
$,114,14!) ST.
nU the prestlira of foi
parienoa.
f forty -on ynntV tnecMi ind -
QVCr $100,000 In 0!tlO SCCUrltlCS
rm vn INLAND NAVIGATION.
RitikN accepted at tonne connliitent with solvency
and fair nront. Eepeclal attention given to llinur.
ancc of Dwellings aud content for term of one to
Ave year. . . ...... .
Application mww " "n, moj .iiinviiim ".i
promptly anenooo i. n, .i.'iu , - i,-
ltnnte Iinniraiice niulnena, this Company le enahled
to offer both Indemnity for tha pant and eoctirity for
tho future, l'oliclea Ileum! without delay by
CARTER tV UNDUE Y, A sent a,
Yo. 40 Main-street, and Mo. 171 Vine.itreet.
J. .1. IKiOKKR. Agent, Fulton, 17th Ward.
P. BI'MH, Agent, Covington, Ky.
fell-ay C. P. BI':hanaw, Kewport, Ky.
City Insurance Company
OF CINCINNATI, OHIO.,
XO. 8 Pl;Bl.IC IiAKiDINH, BBTWEKM
MAIN AND hYCAMOllB-KitaUII-hed 1M.
Capital Stock 130,000 00
Fire ftnd la.rino IIImIih
Taken at fair rate. Lome aquitably adjusted and
promptly paid.
Tl,arcTOIUI D
Banning, Joseph C. Bntler, B.
M.
Bishop, T. J. Weaver,
Bishop, !. J. "Tver, " , """'fV'," , "i
E 8 IlailHM, O. W. Trowbrlilge. J. D. Lehmer.
i. 0. name., u. J0S 0 gUTLIBi rlUeDti
w. u.
W. M. flirnARDso. twcreiary.
AVa. P. Htkatton, Biirvoyor. maKm-
Western Insurance Company
OF CINCINNATI,
OJZZVZXW?
1 hlM I oaipaiiy IS laaing r ire, iniauu im m.uii.
ltleks at current rates of premium.
J.OHSCH jairiy aujiisveu anu piuupuj ,u.
DIRECTORS:
T. V. Ei-Vert, r. Bull, n. w . pomeroy,
V m (tleltll, VT. V. r nncuer, ...i.. k.niui,
llulit. Mitchell, W. 11. Comstock, L. O. K. Stoue,
Kobt. nuchanau, !. O. Khaw, Ooo. Stall,
Wni. dlew, Keth Gvalis, J. H. rniilTe,
David ttiueon, 11. uraenmuun, iuaui.
H. Clearwater, Tuoe. It. Elliott,
T. F. ElaEKT, frcmaenr.
BTgpnrH Moan, Secretary lio8
FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.
citizens' Insurance Company,
OF CINCINNATI, OUIO.
OFFICE NO. 3 WEST TH1HB-STKB.ET
V...... ltil.lo,ir 1m nniDared to 1M!U4
Policies ou lire und Marine Itiska on favorable terms.
DIRECTORS:
William Wood, Isaac C. Comletl,
Jos. K. Cnnninghain, Kydney t. ( lark.
A. Erkenorecner, jneepn r-oaaui,
Geo. W. Bishop, W. fisher.
ueorge a. loxun. ...
ISAAC C. COPELEN, President.
Ot.n. W. Copilis, Secretary.
nus-bhu A. M. BOSS, Hurreyor.
National Insurance Company,
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
.FPirR MOI'TH-WEKT (OKNUtt UJf
MAIN AND JPUliNT-litKEETS.
,f , inlnnrl Trnnsnfirffltlon
."i"v, -" -'
and Fire Risks.
TAKEN AT CURRENT RATES.
D1UKCTOBS; . .
.ToliaBiwoyne, K. M. rluiltli, Kolijrt Sloore,
Win. Hipaorth, Chin. L. Moore, M. Kechellrwr,
V. X. Wlnaemor, thus. "W!, ; "il ! "
ObS. 1 1 OS. IV. IMpB", iiciiij ;',in.
' JtlHN Bt'KUUiNK, ProsWent.
H. C. I'aNU. Secretary.
no!i-lifin 1. A. Hrntit'i A?i, wnrrryor.
THE OYSTER TRADE.
t
DBALIB IN
OYSTERS!
FRESH CAN
OYHTEHS1
COVE
OYSTERS!
Spiced Oyaterat
PICK. LED O Y8TEH81
THE 8ITBHCKIBEB M NOW ItBJ Biv
IMU DAILY, by tbe Adam. Kipres., MALT-
Bis world-renowned Baltluiora
Fresh Can, Keg and Shell Oysters
ALSO
.... it nnvf mirv.n ant.
r rt-nii. iioriiiri n nil j -sHjgsitw w
PICKLBD OYSTKliS.
ROBERT ORR, Agent.
aep7-tf Depot, II West riftli-itreet,
FUE8II
OYSTERS!
Cavagng'g Oyster Importing House I
NO. 31 W. FIFTH-HTKEIST.
milB BITB8CR I B E II M NOW ItKCElV.
M. 1NU daily, per Express, Ills
ilrndld Oyit
it.lt.more on the
Having coiuplctril arraiiKOinentii tn
mftrt et4'iwfvo cnle, I will, at all tlniri durlnpt t
m pruparon iu luriimu mi irnriinn,
the rext nf mankind," with the mort l)KiaJHua
HIVALVKS impurted to the Queen City. Nono but
tho vrv buHt imiMirted. Great ludncemcnU uflerud
at thi Iuinnrtlnti-houtM. u.
UruvrH au.icllva ana prom pi iy iitwu. wiuvH.
PETER CAVAUNA,
RP1 8ule Importer and Prorietir.
7
B0
THE OYSTER TRADE. MEDICAL AND DENTAL.
! I
I
HAM I OILBOY, PhlUilel
M low phuv, and No. U Jt Pearl
of street. Cincinnati, JotlfcPH it.
name
O. E. NEWTON, M. D.,
OFFICE NO. M WB8T MEYUNXit-isT.
betweeu Vine and Kace. ltesldeiice Mo.
i m .i. .. i ... w.lniit anil Viae. Oftica
hours Vi to fi A. U.s UJilIJL.
WILLIAM M IIUNTEK,
DENTIST,
no9 tta VINB-STRKET.
J. TAFT,
(Successor to Knowlton A Tad,)
I 13 IV TINT,
TTO. Mrl WKKT FOCRTIt-WTKBBX,
XI TWSKM WALNlIand Vl.. ,.
ICBlt i;iiltianaiMV,
M. MCt'DDKR. M. J.rr0
! SflKryTud I'tlceofMedrcnT. fu tu;
tat t of UllllONItrUIMBArllCS. OlMos,
Vi,i...i.i ,..r ruurth. OOice hour. 11) A. n.
Vluo-strcet, near j'uurtu,
l?a r. n.
felo-cu
WORTY DIFFERENT BIZEt AND
MC bTYI.EH OF OLD DOM
.TV rsosn T III VII.
ION COFFKK AND TKAPOT8
for families, hotels, restaurants.
steamboats, etc., are nialiiilau
i.u Airrifl'll. n I' K S
OHKEN, Aut. 8eud for (re4o
StH EMU PI NEAPPL - PPX1,S
M fresh Plueapplos, iu glae.. I n rtore and for
A A I1II.TVH.
No. Sl and' S2I Main-street.
Diu23
1IJI B"TE A rt. UREEN AND BLACK
J Teas, pure aud fresh. Is JjJXfKK,
moM Noi. S19 and W Maiu-.lrait.
jnUBTHONEV.uoicci-M
V'U .tot. anffo. lltMl,?r.rt.
.'1 .U
PffA
MISCELLANEOUS.
rn,
he
"":
tij
Df
Be.
174
sale.
rrrTr-rrTxn--r.- t-i-i-ttti
HALL'S TATENT.
S3I
JL 111 R'll.AIt PHIHIK SArKS.-Tni-y hava given
mora antlHfnctlon than any oilier now 111 aw.
W r a reward of UN K THOI'HAND Tint,.
IA Hfl to any paraon that ran, Mp to tlin prrarnt tlnia,
how a hIiikIb limtance wuoretu they huto failed to
froai'rve their content. ,. ,
With thin HAt'R we chatteiiire all competition, aa
being tl" beat Vn Proof, llnrglar Proof, or Urn
ami Burglar Proof now mane; anil are wining vn mk
.!. ..t.l.ll.l.n... I,, ,1.. Ilnl.iu. and the nartv
failing Hmt to forfeit to tha other the mm of
wa are preparcu 10 lurniMi a oeiier rjaie, anw ai n-,
et. than any oilier manufacturer in tha Hutted
Utataa.
rieoond-hanrl nnfng or oilier mrnten amo on nana.
We reenaclfullv Invite the anbllr to call aud exam
ine our lock before purrhaefiig elMiwhere.
11A I.L., UAKKUUIl I,'.,
auU-ey Ni IS and 17 Kant Columliia-atreet.
AV. II. DODDS,
Formerly of Hall, Dndda Co.) late Urban,
, llodils A Co.
W. B. DODDS & CO.,
AxcrACTvatu or ths
CONCRETE, FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF
SAFES,
UOUTH-WEST CORNER OT VINK AND SEC-
0ND-8TREET8.
THIN IS THE IHOMT RKMABI.B FIRB
AM) H(T.U.IAU I'KOOK SAFK tlmt in nmilo
in th Unitpti Htatn, nnri in wiirrantpil prrrctry free
from tlfiiiip; can tx oU at lower prlcen, und In of bet
ter workmaimlilp thnn ean be found e Ice where.
W hav Inrge fwnortnirnt uii hand, and arc de
toriulned to mU at prlcw that can not fall to please.
OLD J9FX3J5
Taken In exnhanfte. SECOND-HAND BAFE9 al
waj'n on hand at extremely low prtciWa
mriniMR vi.i.im. nr.
HAN FOUND
Jjm. mt litt juet what the Ludii'S have Ions net
ipeuca
R.
and looked for In vain, the UTERINE ELIXIR
The Uterine Kllxlr le warrant.-d to enre all dln-
of a uterine nntnroj Innnnimatlon of the
Womb, the KidtifyM, tho OviirlcM. and the Urethra,
ProlaiyxiiH or Kiillina of thf Womb. Puiliful MetiHtnt
tli,tt. IMilorswIu. Auiennrrhpif.infHRt.il nnrfort Cttre
in gtiaranteeii vy me use oi ironi iwo w nvr i"mir"i
the Elixir, of any dleeue whatever of the 0-nerntlve I
and Urinary OrKnns, of male or female, uo matter of j
How long Mann Miff, rrire 91 pur imiiic.
MADAME ELL 18 cat In particular attention to the
following (?ard of one of the most prominent Drug
giHte of Cincinnati:
"To the Public and the Lndie$ in Ptrticmlart
We, the nmlei-Hlgned. are not In the habit of giv
ing our name to Patent Mi'tllciiien; but knowing well
the Ladv Physician, and the medicine called the
Uterine Elixir, we cheerfully recommend It tall fo
nmlee mifTering from Kemnle DieaMert of any kind; It
in purelv vegetnhle, and In no cant, can do Injury; we
bav to all try. and our word for it, yon will find relief.
"F. D. HIIjL, Drnggint,
"Corner of Fifth and Kuce utrwtn."
ALSO
MADAME" EM.TS'S 8PANIHH RIMULATINO
COUUli AND LIVE It DAL8AM curr. without fHll,
Priln in the Breast, Brk. Hide or Llml; Couglin,
C'oldn, HoanMmtw, Difrlculty of Breathing, Head
ache, Flatulency, Heartburn, Uhronic Rheumatism,
Biliotu Colic, Cramp Colic, Griping Pal on of tho
Bowel, Dullness, Htnpor, Inactivity, Lorn, of Apiw
tlte, and in Painful Menntruntlon it a certain cure,
and given Immediate relief. In any of the above din
cfiMeB It will give relief iu twenty uiinutet, aud a per
manent enro by the uw-of two lottIe. Only 90 rent
per bottleao cheap that every peraon can get It.
N. B. For sale by F. D. HILL, PrucgUt, corner
of Rce and Fifth-otretH ; .1. D. PAHK, corner of
Fourth and Walnut; SUIRE. EOKHTKIN & CO.,
corner Vine and Fotirth: JOHN DICKSON, corner
of John and Sixth-ita.; PAUL REINLKIN, corner
of Eighth nd Freeman; EDWARD HCANLAN t
CO., corner of Main and Fourth; aud MADAME
KLL1H, H4 West Blxth-Btreet. ep27-ay
$30. $30. $30. $30. $30.
MOORE'S
Thirty-Dollar Double Lock-Utltoh
Family Sewing Machines
BKCURED BY KECK NT LKTTKRS PATENT.
THIS MACHINE HAS BEEN PRO
KOUNCKI) by all oonipetent jndKon, who baye
tinen It. to he the bent and most
to bo tbe bust anil most desirable Family
H nlno Mnohlnn vnr littriwliirtMl. iroaidlKM
prioe. It will ew Jill kiudu of family good, from
the very thlckeKt to flie very fluent fabrlcM uiado, and
uwn all kinds of thread, from No. S to 200.
No Oil if uxi on top of ths Maehlmt.
Kend fur circular, or call and vee It In operation.
Upon early application, State and County right may
be secured . , A
An euertretlc penton can make a fortune In a nhort
time. AgeuU wanted iu all unsold Territory.
H.O. HURT MAN,
Bole and exclusive agent for the United State.
nopU-tf M West Fourth-it reet, Cincinnati.
CANDY! CANDY!
II. IV. CLARK,
(snecusoa to myem a co.,)
manufacturer t wholesale dealer
in
FIXE AND PLAIN CANDIES,
NO. 40 MAIN-STREET, CINCINNATI, O.
ray")
II. P. ElalAS'S
NEW WHOLEBALB
Watch k JeAvelry House,
16 West Fourth-Btreet,
WHERE CAN BE HAD BVBIIV ABTI-
T I'LE uppertuinliiR to the buiiienii, at s much
lest prlc, for CASH, than hat ever boture beeu ottered
la thia market.
GIVE US A CALL,
And see fcr jrouwelvei. apU
ROOFING ! ROOFING !
TnE OTTTCALT ELARTIC METALLIC
KOOKIN'U iit ofTered to tho publican tue IwMtand
cheapest Metal Hoof now used, IU nieriU bavlug bee
tented by an experience of years In this city unci v..
rinttv Atinliorl ta flfit nr ntMn. old or nitw build-
lliKM. To somer uneu mniviivn rwvuraiy uuuuv v
Pmpareil riheets, boxed for shipnieiit to any part
the United tttutes, can be applied by any one with or-
diuarv mociiauicai saai. uruei a pnnnpui iiueu,
Urdei-s Bruliiptly nllii
t'Al.llWlil.lj I'd.,
133 West KfOiinil -street.
mylft-tf
Saocharated Lime.
64flHI8 PREPARATION," 8TATEM
M. llr. Lleiaua, "is
the best we hava.
t Is
strouarer and more
leasaiif than M.gnc.la, aud doe. not weakeu
luutlr,n like the Alkalies. All excellent Tolric
the alimentary system In Dysnopsla." Kor aale by
n 1 . 1 I. .V . . . II . 1 kj, .'I ...I.., .
malS B. W. cor. KiKhth-st. anil Central-avenue.
For Toothache.
DR. ETANH'M TOOTHACHE DROPrt
I'repared from tue recloe or the celebnitod
American Dentist In Pari. will cure the must
violent Toothache Instantaneously. For sale by
AI.HKltT KU88, Druggist,
ma 13 8. W. cor. lite-hth-at. aud Ceutral-av.nue.
. RIBBONS,
FLOWERS,
Etp., Etc.
I AM HEI.IiINO AT A HIHAI.l, ADVANCE
un New York prices, wholesale and retail.
J. WKU1I, Jr.,
154 yifth-atreet, bet. Hace aud Elm.
A. B. OOLVILLE,
' ifite'ii
ft Mb 1 M
Koala Mannfacturer,
TeTO, 41 KAMT WECONII-MTREET,
1 VWKKN Hyisiuore and Broadway, t iiiclimatl,
kepa every description of Counter. 1'iatforui, Uatllu,
Kailroad Depot, aud Track ttcaieui T'uoas,
Wagon., Ac.
Hepairing done on the .hottest uotlea, 1
F" INlfO.D BUANDY7wiNE, AiiE. Pt.K
TKll, Ae. Just recelTcd, per ship Zttluml,
New Orleans, S3 quarter casks llue old Brandy; I
Sua Alto Dtuiro Port Wine; 4 butt, tine olnmsso
-Hlierry; 1 puueheon Una Havered. Irish Whisky,
till; 36 rasks Kast India Pale Ale; s cask. London
Porter. S'or sale wholesale and retail by
JOHN BATKH,
. 'National Theater Bultdlnf, bycamorestreet.
lniall
ALB AND POKTKR.-JJ HXRIiCEIVBD
) casks, ouarts and piuta, Scotch Ala aud
aou rvrwr. g or saw wuuai. mwwi oj
ita'lM Wut f eartf '
I CO,,
Melt
ftttaOraasI
h'lUnt,
,-ioiivi t .
RAILROADS.
CINCINNATI,
AND INDIANAPOLIS
—AND—
—AND— Cincinnati & Chicago
—AND— Cincinnati & Chicago RAILROADS.
GREAT TOIfOJjr. TO THE
INDIANA roLL
I 1 11 11 e. nni 1 b. , .
l.AKAYFTTK,
J.tKIANHrilUT,
HIHMNOIOK,
((CINCY,
HT. LOt'I,
(MH'AOO.
PEOBIA,
UAJlllSall'lllll a.'.lil
IM .lliM I II.
Twoditily thnmnh tniins leave Plxth itrwt Tepot
at 0 A. M. and 3i 10 V. M .
Xhroutfli .0 Indluiiiolirt -without
Clianuo of Jam.
VtrrH OenneW.oH Jfo(e by both Trot
At Richrn'Oid, with I'lnciniintl and l'hlcao Rell
road, fr AnderMon and all polnta on the lt1lffon
tnioe R.llnmd Line; Kok.-nio, Lr'iTniirpirt, Poniaud
all polntu on the Wn'm-h Valley Rulinmd.
t lmJInnapolH fnr Terre ILnitc, Muttoon, ronn.
8t. Louis and llllnoh (Vntml Itiillmad.
k 1 aiai nt (a. r,.r li.nn ill... Tdlttiio. DtTHtMr. Hnrlna-
fleld. NhbI''", Qulnc,ttiid llaiinibal ami Ht. Joseph
KAtrclliVcaro for Itiiclne, Krmmha, Mflwankle. 1,n
cniflne. St. Paul, PrHirlu du Cltieu. Rock Island and
Iowa City,
The 3a0 1. M. Trnln makes direct connection nt
TjoffHitHpurt with Lnaanport, Peoria and RurllnRton
Ri.llnad, for Oilman, Kl Pato, Poorin, DurltnKtcm,
Uuinry, Oalesburg, Uulcna and Duuleith, making tha
dietauce
TWENTY-FIVE MILES SHORTER
THAN BY ANY OTHER BOUTB,
AND
IOO MILES SHORTER
TrtAN VIA CIIICAOO.
Fare as Low and Time an Quick
as by any other Route.
Tills Is erlnlvrly a Western anil North- ostr-rn
Ttoiite, IihvIiik as fiivoraMii nrriingfiiitriits wltli con.
iiiTlhn Kistrls ns any other ltoute. I'wliil( throuiili
a hlKhly-cultlvnteil country, with nmneroiw loans
ami vlllnirps, It oflers to patrons more ploamnt accoui
nimlatinii for safety, Comfort anil interest than any
other Koiite for tho aliovo.nnmoil points
For ThroiiBh Tickets or any lurtlnr Information be
sure anil apply at
TICKET OFFICES:
169 Walnut-street, lietween rourth ami Fifth .street',
near Ulbion Housi;
Nortll-east corner Front anil Broadway)
West sido Vliie-streot, between Burnet llonias aud
Clndlmutll'lialilllton n-l Dnytoj Depot. Fifth and
8lxth-.troet. D. M. MultKOW,
a bupcrlnteilflent.
W. If. SIIIPMAX, ra.enKer Aitent.
B-(lninlhiisis will roll lor piiHsengers by leaving
theliMiame, .it cither of tl.cTI, Agent.
—AND— Cincinnati & Chicago RAILROADS. NOVEMBER 14, 1859.
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton-
RAILROAD.
SIX DA II. V TRAINS! LEAVE T II E
Mxth-atreet Depot.
Trains run tlirouuh to Clevelnnil, HnlnUKky, To.
Ivdo ami Iniliiiniipolis, a Ithont i liauire ol cars.
Thronijh Tickets fur all Eastern, N estorn, AiirtH
em and Niirtb-we'itorn cities.
H A. .11. EXl'KESS TRAIN for Itiinilllim,
mi llluoilil. Illltllllllipoli.. I.llliivetle, Chicnun, llllll nil
Western cities. Connects ut Klchmoliil wltll l.iind
C. ltooil for l.ujTHii.pi'rt. etc. ,
iHO A. 31. TRAIN for Buy ton. HnrlmrrSehl,
danduskv, Toledo ami lliiiaeo. 'lliis train iiiakea
close connections wltll nil trains leaving I hioago tho
anme evening. Also connect- at I rbann for Coliliii
bus: at llillcrontniue with II. I. It. K. lit forest
with Pittsburg, Fort Wii) no nnd Cliicugo Hallroad;
at Clvde wllli Clevelnnd and Toledo ltullroad tni ns
for Clovclnnd; at Dayton for Orecnvllle, I iiiou, Win
chester ami Muncle; nt llamllton for Oxforil. etc.
10 A. M. EXPRESW TRAIN f;;r Clevelnnd
via Deluanrc; for Dunkirk, lliiltulo, llisitim. New
v... i ..ii ..i.iu. tu! eniitieets at l rest-
llne for l'lttMlnirg, Pliilttdc'lphla, Baltimore and all
K3i40 P."5ir. TRAIN f,r Hamilton, nichinond,
Logunsport. Peoria and Burliligtoli; also ludianap
oils, Terre Haute nnd St. Tioul..
5l30 P. 91. TRAIN for pa) ton. , Snringttcld,
Bellefoiitalne, Limn. Fort Wayne and Chicago; con
necta at Bellcfontuino with B. I. It. It.; also ot
Hamilton for Oxford nnd College Jl'o'ncr.
Jli30 V. M. EXPRESrt TRAIN for Cleve
land via Delaware: lor Dunkirk, Buffalo, Boston.
New York, ami nil Eastern cities. Also, connects at,
Crestline for Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Baltimore aud
all Eastern ritlca. . . , . .
rThe night E (press Train, leaving Cincinnati
at 11:30 P. M., leavoe ibiily. sxeeW alanhijsi. AU
other trains leave dally, ercept Siirf;'j.
For further InfiTiiiHtlou und tickets, apply nt the
Tlrket-uiHotts: tiorth-enst corner Front und Bronil
way; No. lii Wnlimt-.treel, near ullisou Muilse, ill
the new Ticket -nttlce. on the wet side of Vine-street,
between Postolhcound Uurnet House; or at thcBmli
street Depot- .. .,,. u. i...
UMlZ 1'. inciinnriii. i-1. ii ..... ... .
Little Miami Columbus and
Xenia Railroad.
I m, . Mam nt ! It'flM'frfiflJl.l'Ij.
Three Trains Daily.
TWO THROUGH EXPRESS TRAINS.
FIRST TRAIN-DAY EXPHKHH AT 10
A M., comncls via Columbus and Cleveland; m
t,liinilius,Cn stllne uu Pittsburg; via ( olunibus
and BebilrfWheellnitl. Also, for SnrliiKneld. Tins
train stops botwecii.C'inctunutl aud Columbus, at all
the prlnriiml stations.
HKCOND Til A1N Columbus Accommodation
at 4i40 P. M. This train stops at all station, be
twoen Clucluuatl aud Columbus, aud Cincinnati and
8IUUDTRAIN-Sleht Express at 11i30 P.
M.. coniiccts via Columbus and Belair (.W liuel lug ,;
via Columbus. Crestline end IMttsburji; via Colum
bus, Ktculieuvllle uuil Plttbuik'; via Columbun and
Cleveland. . . .
Th s Train srops nr i.oveiiiu. .-i vvr
London. MLKKVI NO CA US ON 1 II 18 1 KA I N.
i) The Day Kxpress runs tbroUEh to Cleveland.
WbecllliK and Pittsburg, via ateubeuvlllc, Wliuoiu
The Niaht Kxpress Trnln leaving Cincinnati at I !
?0 P.M. runs daily, except 8oturdus. Tho other
rains run dully, except Sundays.
For nil inioruiaiion auu imu iKn m.". . .....n...,
New York, Philadelphia. Baltimore, Washington,
IlUTiltlo, piniaare rini. i.ui'.", ' . ' ,
burg. Wheeling and all the Eastern places, apply at
the orllcm: Wulliut-stieot House, No. 4 Uuruet jloUfj,
No. 4 East Thlril-etroel, souui-eaei ituniw "i
av and Front-streets, and at the Kuatern Depot.
Tratus run by (lolninbus time, which la seven min
utes tustor than Cincinnati time.
Omnibuses cull for passengers by leavtiiff dlri'CtiolU
INDIANAPOLIS AND CINCINNATI
SHORT LINE RAILROAD.
Shortest Route by 30 Miles.
of
tue
of
TTO CHANGE OF CARH TO INDIANAP-
iH Ol. Id, at w hich place ll ulillu. witn railroads
for aud from all points iu tlei We.it and hoilh-wcil.
T11RKK PASSHNUEB TRAINK
Iieare Cincinnati daily from the foot of '31 ill and
I'ront-stroetH.
Oi.1l A. CIIICAOO MAIL. Arrives at III.
dlaniipolls at U:10 V. M.: Chicago at 1HUUI P. M.t
J'i'l.i P. HI. Terre Haute uud Iiafayettc Accom
nifxlutloii arrives at 1 lidiumi oolis at rt:IO P. M.
7lU 1'. M.-CHICAUO KXI'HKKtt.-Airlves at
Iliillatiupolls ut U'.ljA. M.; Clilcagoat lU:3nA. M.
rileeliilig Cars ure attai-bcd to all niglit-tralnson
this llui and run through to Chicago without
C lijfl"Be sure yon are In the right tlcket-offlce liefora
Iou purchase your tickets, ami ask for ticket, via
iiiwreucuburg aud Indianapolis.
Fare the auuio, aud time shorter tuun by any other
route.
ilaugiige checked through.
Til HOI lilt TU B
KKTri. good until Itsi'il. cull be ob.
talnil at tho ticket unices, ut Hpeiicer House corner,
North-west corner of Broadway and Front; No, 1
Burnet House eoruor; at the Walnut-street House;
No. 6 East Thlnl-street, and at Depot oltlce, foot of
Mill, on Front-street, whure atl necessary lufonua
tiou cult bo hud.
Omnibuses run to and from each train, and will
call for passengers at all hotels, uud all parts of thu
city, by leaving address at cither oiltce.
jalT II. C. LOItl), President.
COMMENCING DECEMBER 4, 1859.
OHIO AND MISSISSIPPI
RAILROAD.
CINCINNATI & ST. LOUIS.
THROUGH WITHOUT CHANGE OF CARS.
BE.
Iron
rot
pipe
old
Jiuu
i
TWO DAILY TRAINS FOR TIN.
CKNNKS. Culro and Ht. Louis at 7ri0 A. M.
and 7lSU I. M.
Three dally trains for Louisville at 7l'i0 A. M...
!) P. M. ami 713 0 P. M.
One train for Evausvllle at 7l30 P. M.
The trains oonneet at Nt. l.ouls tor all points Iu
Kansas aud Nubraskaj Hannibal, Qiilnoy and Keo.
kuk; at Bt. Louis and Cairo for 31uiupbU, Vlcksburg,
Nutcheu aud New Orleans.
One through traiu ou Sunday at 7t30 P. M.
Returning, fejit Hue leaves hast ot. Louis, Hundaya
ex on ol , d, ut Ii30 A. M ui living at Cincinnati ut
lQilS P. M.
kxpress train leavus Ht. Lout, dally at 4 P. M.. ar
riving at Cincinnati at NrA A.M.
Vol- through tickets to all point. West anil SViuth,
r lease apply at the olticee: Walliut-street Houm,, bc
wcen Hixth and Heveiitli-streels; No. 1 Burnet House,
corner olltoe; North-west corner Front and Broad.
fay I Hroiiicer Uonse Oflice, and at the Depot, corn, r
rout and Mlll-.treou, Cuiiiibuses roll f ,r pnsscu
W. H, CIiIMKNTU,
WW Otu.ralluMrlntud.nt.

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