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Cincinnati daily press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1860-1862, June 08, 1860, Image 2

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THE DAILY" PRESET
HENRY ItBKlJ Ac CO.,
FRIDAY..
Homicide and the Reflections
it Suggests.
'f ie lamentable amwinatioD of Mr. Craw
Jej, of Mount Auburn, and the ciroamstanoes
tinder which th crim wu committed, afford
ui the opportunity to present to the readers
of theataa a few reflections upon the ten
dency of certain features In the policy of our
municipal administration to increase the
number of similar events, through the indi
rect jnconra(remcnt which it gires to the
class by which, in general, they are perpe
trated. . la sb doing w have nodesire to call
in question the motives of any of our public
officers. Their offense If offense it is con
sists in permitting themselves to be led by
precedents and prejudices, rather than listen
to the dictates of reason and experience.
With the materials of the necessary wisdom
before them, upon which they have only to
look in order to learn all that is desir
able to know, they do, as thousands
have done, prefer theories to facts, and, as a
necessary consequence, beget abuses where
they vainly flatter themselves they are pro
moting reforms. Perhaps, in better times
that are coming, things will be different; at
least; it is consoling' to be permitted to bops
so without greatly offending anybody. There
is reason, from the knowa facts of the case to
believe that the person or persons "by whom
the deed wss committed mistook the estima
ble young ladies Who were in company with
the deceased, for people of a very different
character. Most unfortunately they were not
eaffieiently near to him, at the time when
they were accosted, to render it absolutely
certain thai they were directly under his pro
tection. A recent decree of the city govern
ment, intended, doubtless, only to reach a
certain class, in effect outlaws every woman
found In the streets after a certain hour in
the evening, renders her technically suspi
cious, and exposes her to actual insult frpm
every ruffian, brute or scoundrel whom she
happens to encounter. . .
We are not saying this in view of hypo
thetical cases, or of occurrences that may
possibly happen; but with aa eye to things
as they are. There are creatures bearing the
forms of men, who seed but the opportunity
and the permission to insult and abuse every
female within their reach. There is a base
spirit by which a lower order of men are In
fected, making them actually glory In being
abje to .heap unprovoked injury upon the
bead of an unprotected woman. Nor is the
number of such in this city small. It is large;
and under the present executive policy, the
sum of the wrong and crime, and cruelty
which they commit is terrible. . These men
stand on a high moral platform, beside the
Mayor. ' The outlawry which the latter has
pronounced, they, as vindicators of the public
virtue, feel commissioned to execute. Bold
enough at all times, they become especially
insolent at finding themselves in such excel
lent society, and carry on their depredations
with a confidence hitherto unknown. .1
The effect of this outlawry upon women
destitute of legal protectors, is to the last de
gree disheartening. Whatever they may suf
fer, they feel as if there is now no place to
which they can go for defense; and there are
hundreds of such in this city women whose
exterior conduct is, in every respect proper
and exemplary who, merely because they
are defenseless and will not permit them
selves to associate with the meanest of man
kind, are doily made to suffer insult and in
jury from those who, covered with the moral
eegit of the mayoral proclamation, actually
feel themselves empowered to do evil to the
full extent of their ability
There is aa old record of crime and cruelty
standing in the history of this city, growing
out ,ot : causes precisely similar to those
that are now at work, which tells of
a moral purgation, carried on at the
hands of a rabble, until humanity
wept and turned away its head at the awful
spectacles that were presented. Do we want,
either in whole or in part, a recurrence of
these days of terror and disgrace? If we do,
the true way to secure it is to outlaw a class
to put either in fact or in feeling beyond
the protection of the legal institutions of the
country and we (hall have bands of ruffians
in the' streets, midnight assassinations, mobs
of wretches bent on executing the moral law,
houses pulled down, women drawn through
the streets by the hair in short, all of those
phenomena that usually, in a greater or less
degree, belong among the consequences of
hasty, ill-considered and spasmodic reform,
Providence.
The Catholic Telegraph takes exceptions
to a communication which was published in
this paper, an special providence, and on the
blasphemy of charging God with the con
sequences of oar own violations of the laws
of life." The subject originated in the com
ments made in the papers on the recent hurri
cane. . The communication took the ground
that these and all the events of life are
governed by great physical laws set in motion
by Qod; but- that be does not vary his laws
to suit special cases. The following extract
gives the TVeeropA's fisw., ;
"After all, what are physical causes but the
forces which God created, measured and set
tled in their places, to operate precisely what
and whan he fiinaw and wished 1 . What
phvsical effects bat those events ia nature
which Bod produces successively to further
His all-wise views? Believers in Providence
do not suppose that Qod rets up a hurricane
to blow Mr. Smith's hat off; but they do sup-,
pose that eucn contingency was foreseen
ane desired by the Almighty, when iie put
tne hurricane on tne programme or the
world s events." t i ' '
For ourselves, we ure bumble. Inquirers
after truth, not being fully satisfied in our
own minds as to the exact dividing line be
tween general and special Providence. We
are glad-that the organ of a Church which
speaks by authority is ready to enlighten us
on this subject. A blind Providence, which
destroys indiscriminately, ' would be no bet
ter than,' blind chance; and a Providence
which destroys as a lesson to mankind, when
the lesson, ts a mystery, would not be any
perceptible impsoveiMnL' As the Telegraph
assumes tbat these event are directed by a
wise purpose, will U expound the lesson
taught by the effects of the hurricane here?
What is taaght by the serious damage suf
fered by the Catholic Churches on fifth and
Linn-streets, ant by several ' Protestant
Churches, and by school-booses?- What by
the unroofing of the ftuwwif building?
Tbat is probably, the easiest aeoountad for,
and the TeUfrapk saay begl with that ' As
these events "were foreseen, and daaired by
the AlmlgVl Vhan ha pat to hurrioaae on
the programme of His world' evealsJ"w)a,t
was the parposeT "" I ,n i ,,ip
u - ; . ) '. it!
)4J -a"
"A spirit of health, or a goblin damn'd?"
SiXAToft Summs'i speech has frightened
the Republicans. It is stated by Washington
correspondents tbat Republican members
attempted to persuade him not to make ft,
and manifested, While he Was making It, that
they did not sympathise with it. The New
York Tribune deprecates it as .endangering
the admission of Kansas. The Gazette of
this city indorses what the Tribune says of
the speech, and disparages it as "calculated
rather to provoke angry feelings . than to
persuade and convince!'' also for the rather
contradictory reasons that it-kas brought
together a vast number of facts to show the
effects of slavery, which have nothing novel
about them, and that It is the production of
a' theorist not practically acquainted With
mankind. It may be that a vast collection
of well known facts, with nothing novel
about them, indicates the production of an
unpractical theorist, in the Gazette concern.
Reason usually gets mixed up in tbat way
by the time it has revolved around its six-
cylinder. ' ' : ' - ,
The difficulty is, Republicanism is fright
ened at its own shadow. Mr. Sumner's
speech was an assault on slavery: not holding
it to be good where it is, and bad only where
it Is not, but .bod everywhere.. If Republi
cans do not believe slavery to be bad, what
justification have they for resisting It in the
Territories? If slavery is good where it is.
it is good everywhere. Unless Republican
ism can make out a case against slavery
itself, the party has no ground to stand on.
This is what Mr. Sumner undertook, and the
whole party is shaking in its shoes. It hoped
to conceal its features by nominating a man
who hod not been exposed to attack,- and to
smuggle itself into the administration, just
as the ostrich slicks its head in the sand and
Imagines itself hidden; but Mr. Sumner has
exposed its hinder parts, and the whole party
is alarmed for the consequences.
Pro-slavery men do not shrink from a dis
cussion of the merits of slavery. They have
freely challenged it in Congress and in the
press by advancing the propositions that
slavery is founded in Scripture and an im
memorial custom, that it is the proper rela
tion between the white and black races, "the
most safe and stable basis for free inslitu
tions," "the corner-stone of the Republican
edifice, "t "a great moral, social and political
blessing; "the normal condition of human
society best for. the happiness of both races,'
and that "the very keystone of the mighty
arch which, by its concentrated strength, is
able to sustain our social superstructure, con
sists in the block marble block of African
slavery.'.' " . '
These propositions hove been reiterated in
Congress. If they are true, the Republican
party has no right to be, for it is founded on
insistence to the extension of this relation.
If they are not true, and the Republican
party fears or fails to attack and overthrow
them, it has no right to be, for it fears to do
what it proclaims to be its duty. The friends
of slavery boldly fling out their banner and
challenge discussion on the abstract right of
African slavery: 'the Republican party, which
insolently assumes to -be the only party
founded on principle, shrinks from the dis
cussion of the principle, and frowns on Mr.
Sumner because he will not be gagged.
If there is any tangible principle in Re
publicanism, Mr. Sumner represented it in
his speech. If there is not, what right has a
party to moke the country hideous with its
soulless, unwholesome corpse? '"' ' ;
Mr. Sumner recapitulated the propositions
which had been laid down in Congress, in
favor of slavery and took issue with them.
The propositions themselves were an invita
tion to this. . In Congress was the very place
to discuss them. Republicans affect a great
sensitiveness about any infringement on the
freedom of the press, or of speech, or of the
government mails in the slave States, yet
they shrink from the discussion of slavery in
Congress where they have a perfect right to
it, because, as the Tribune says, it may offend
the South ; and, as the Gazette says, it may
" provoke angry feelings." It actually seems
that this party which, with a ghastly face
tiousnsss, used to call itself "the party of
freedom " is ready to give up the right of free
speech in Congress, because it may provoke
angry feelings. Starting on anti-slavery
fanaticism, it has found the doctrine of negro
human rights too heavy to carry, and instead
of helping the party to rise, the negro question
is sinking it into negro subjection. Already
it is cowed into silence on its " great princi
ple " j by the fear of " provoking angry
feelings." '
The party boasts tbat it has put in its plat
form the declaration that "All men are cre
ated equal." It is said that the venerable
Joshua R. Giddings was about shaking off
the dust from his feet against the Convention,
when he was brought back by the reiteration
of. that "self-evident" and practical "truth."
This was the doctrine of Mr. Sumner's speech,
yet it almost created a stampede in the party.
It is not likely that this speech will have
much circulation in the Republican papers.
The Tribune throws cold water on it and pub
lishes a brief abstract. The Gatette is occu
pied with a debate in Indiana, and can not
find room for the most elaborate speech which
has been made in Congress during this ses
sion, aud tliut by a Senator of the high
eat scholastic attainments.' As the Re
publican press is .-' afraid to touch this
thing, and as our IimjU. prevent us
from publishing it, we will . attempt to
state briefly the plan and general tenor of the
speech; and we will remark, first, it is strictly
parliamentary, courteous, and free from per
sonalities, and has nothing which can afford
any excuse for the Republican cowardice in
regard to it. Taking for its text the propo
sitions on the right of slavery, wlich we have
mentioned, and others of the same nature,
it takes issue with tbesa alL It argues that
slavery must be resisted on social, econom
ical, and moral, as well as on political grounds;
that it is Inconsistent with civilisation, and
necessarily results in the barbarism 'of the
dominant race;' that in the word of Mr
Wesley, "Slavery is the'sum of all iniquity;
that it destroys female chastity, marriage and
parental relations, that - It ' shuts ' out
the ' means ' of ' education,' , crushes' in
dustry, and is a dead weight on material
prosperity,'. ' Jbesa , points are divided
and ramified, and each is fortified with a mass
of evidence drawn from statistics, aud chiefly
from Southern authorities. . The relative
progress in wealth and population, and es
pecially in adooaUoo, institutions of learn
ing, public libraries, and all the means of
intellectual , culture, J shown by statistics
carefully and ingeniously collected. As an
instaaoe of the points made in this com
parison, he shows by census returns othst,
vastly grejiiar proportion of thewfattes of the
South are able td read than of the negroes
by
ef
to
by
by
m 4
The nature of slavery he shows by quota
tions from the laWs of the slave States, Ud
itlolertU taken from Southern paper!
barbarism, which 1 cause! In tte. dotni
aarit race, hrr illustrates by the evidence
Southern writers, from Jefferson down
a recent period, and mora particularly
the manners of the Southern mem
bers of ' Congress. He denied that the
Constitution recognised property in
tan, or could by its own force carry
slavery Into the Territories.. The speech oc
cupied fourteen columns of the New York
Herald, ft paper to which' the South seem to
have given the monopoly of Circulating ant!
slavery literature In tbat section. The inor
dinate length of the speech is caused partly
the quantity of evidence quoted, but
ohicfly by the elaborateness of the argument,
Whatever may be thought of the conclusions
drawn; the evidence itself is carefully selected
and of a kind that can not be impeached. '
The speech Is Republican. It takes the
only ground that the party has to stand on,
Its only offense against Republicanism is
that it advocates it with great bojdncss and
power, and with the most unsparing invec
tive and sarcasm on slavery and slave society.
When the party denies the argument or the
policy of this speech, it denies its own right
to exist, and proves Itself to be what m its
early days it was declared to be by the South
ern Senators, as a reason for exclndtng it
from the Committees not a wholesome or
ganization.
r
,
Sabbath-breaking in a Horn.
A milkman was arrested, recently, in Phil-
adclphia, for blowing his horn on Sunday to
announce his arrival with the lacteal nutrl
ment. The Philadelphians must be a very
unscriptural people. The horn was the chief
Instrument of worship in ancient times, and
the sacred writers speak frequently of ex
alting their horn.- The high festivals and
sacred processions of the Israelites were al
ways accompanied by a great blowing of
rams' horns, and tbey were called to their
regular devotions and ceremonies by the
blowing of horns. By custom and associa
tion, the horn is much more appropriate for
the air of the Sabbath than the bells which
our milkmen use; and when brass horns of
evory kind are allowed to be blown without
limit or reason, and the skin of innocent
calves to be beaten with that power which
characterizes American music, to bury the
dead on Sunday, it 'would seem that at least
a single horn might be permitted to an.
nounce the means of lift to the living.
The Sisters of Poor—Their Fair at the
Melodeon.
We take pleasure in complying with
request to call attention to the fact that this
is the last day of the fair of the "Sisters of
the Poor," bolden at the Melodeon, for the
benefit of St. Mary's Hospital, corner of Iinn
and Betts-8treets. This institution, which
has been recently established, and owes its
origin entirely to the devotion of the Sisters
and the donations of the benevolent, is con
ducted upon principles of the most indis
criminate charity; and is represented by those
who are conversant with its founders and its
management as highly deserving of consid
eration by the good of all classes and persua
sions. It is hoped that this last chance will
be embraced.
Ths Gatette says of Mr. Sumner's speech:
"The manner, too, in which he has com
mented upon tne characters and policy of
those he opposes is calculated rather to pro
voke the angry feelings than to persuade and
convince." v
Two or three days ago, in commenting on
the Waggoner case, the same paper said:
"We trust our readers whose blood will be
stirred by the recital of this wrong, will not
forget that the Democratic party is the cham
pion and defender of that system which this
wnoie uusiness is out tne legitimate out
growth. . Their indignation should not vent
T. i m : t . I J i .1 l .. i .
1UW1I la injiuT ucuaiuBiiuu miu vjuicu, lu-
vective, but should crystallize into efficient
action."
The Gazette professed to regard the case as
the legitimate outgrowth of the system of
slavery, and tried to make political capital
against the Democratic party as the defender
of the system ; but when Mr, Sumner attacks
the system itself, the Gazette fears tbat it
will provoke angry feelings. Ii really ap
pears as if the Gazette is very anxious that
the "blood shall be stirred by the recital of
the wrongs ' of slavery, when it can be
turned against the Democratic party, but
very tender toward the system of slavery
when the political profit is not so apparent. .
, "Where Afrlc'l tunnr fonntalns .
KoU dowa their rotdea eaude,
?liKy call in to deliver
heir land from error's chain. "
'.. The New York Tribune gires a list of nine
vessels fitted out and cleared at that port
between the 31st of December and the 21st of
May, for the African slave trade. The Tribune
sava; ' , ... '
- "The traders entraeed here in this traffic are
known; and the men who supply their vessels
with stores, who fit them with sails, who pro
vide them with sailors, are known ulso. That
knowledge, and much other that is curious
ana interesting In relation to this subject,
awaits the Government wheneverthe Govern
ment chooses to seek for it.
"It does not seek for it. It does not choose
to have it. It will not thank us even for hint
ins that it can be had. or for nrovidino- anv
portion of it. But the public is Interested if
tne uovernment is not, ana we assure the
public that we are affirming only that which
we (tnow..- t'("
' A Woman Badlt Imdbid v a Boli,.
At Montreal. Canada, a few davs aim. Mrs.
Millard, of roughkeepsie, N. Y- was in one
of ths nrincinal streets of the citv. when an
infuriated bull rushed at her and caught her
on uis corns, wrew ner up, caugnt ner again
and she fell, again tossed ber in the air. when
she fell under the feet of a horse. She wss
taken up insensible, much bruised and cut,
out qer injuries wut not prove latal.
,1 in 1. 1, 1 1 ii .1 j in.' a
Tai LsxiMOTon Rack Thibd Dir. The
races at Lexinartonon ths third da v (Wednes-
di.v) resulted is favor of John M. Clay's
"Matt Davis," against five competitors tor
two, for all urea, mile heats. Time: 1:49K.
1:52 and too. .The sweepstake race for
three year olds that never won a race, was
won cy Harper UraU's entry, roar beats
were run. j Timet fctOM; J:49X; i:boj 1:62.
1.'. i , r,..
Tbs Cbvtbai, Pabk Swam all Diab' asd
Missis-eve of the Hwans presented by
the city of Hamburg to the city of New York
were found dead in the lake of the Central
Park on Tuesday afternoon, and it was sup-
poeea uiey were poisoaea. ins oilier nve
could not be found up to a late hour of the
nignt. --- - -
A Clsb8Viii Mcidibsd it bis Slavs.
The Fayetteville (N.0.1 Obetrvtr says tbat
the Rev. John E. Chambers, a local preacher
or tne ateinoaure unurcn, in itoniomerv
County, ia that state, was murdered near his
own residence, on the 23d ult. Two of his
slaves naa oeen arrestea on suspicion.
Havana a Bdst 8ahht. In ' the port of
Havana on tne . aa ot stay, mere were ot
ships and barks, 86 brigs and 27 schooners.
Of ths ahine and barks. 40 were American,
20 Spanish, I Vreaeb, 1 British, I Chilian aini
M Aaatriann-Ot: the brigs, 20 were Amen.
cm and 66 (Spanish.1' (f the schooners, 13
wero American ana epaaisn. - -
LATEST BY TELEGRAPH.
XXXVIth CONGRESS—FIRST SESSION.
WASHINGTON, June 7.
SENATE A large number of House BiUs
were reported dpon. -
Was
Mr. rJavara maae a reuor upun vuo yun
:nn r.t v' R. nnhnrn. asklnir to be relieved
from obligation to appear before the Horner's
erry uonimiuee, ana aoacu mm uis uui
ciary Committee be discharged from the
further consideration ot the said etition. t
fixing the day of adjournment, butwith-
flrew it. -
Mr. . moved to take up the veto mes
sage of the President in the case of Arthur
(.awards ana nis ossociai.ee. in mu woo w
allow Edwards A Co., for mail service on the
Nnrthrrn T.akes. and was vetoed oy tne r res
ident, because the charges allowed were ex
orbitant. ... '. ' ' ,
Mr. Yulee opposed ana Mr, n savo-
cated the bill. . ,
The filiation helnB taKen, " snail me Din
pass, notwithstanding the President's veto,'
- 1 . ID, MOW fl
Ik WU IIBJWW 1 1' " " J
Mr. Bright renewed his motion to take op
the resolution fixing the day of adjournment.
The resolution provides for adjournment on
the 18th inst., at noon. ' ' , .
Mr. Cameron hoped that no Republicans
would vote for an odjournment until . the
Tariff Bill was acted on.
Mr. Bigler took the same view. ;
Mr wriann nnnoscd the resolution. The
Senate was not in condition to adjourn, and
conld not do so in justice to the public inter
est. Mr. Rmwn thnnirht it then to be their duty
to stay and attend to business. Ho was ready
to meet the tariff aucstion. as all otners,
Mr. Green thought that neither House was
prepared to adjourn. He had hoped of get
ting up the Fociric Koilroaa Bin ana appos
ing Ul IV I U1B BBMIUU.
Mr. Hale advocated the resolution
Mr. Seward moved to lay it on the table.
Lost. Ayes 83, nays 20.
Mr. Bie-ler moved, as an amendment, to ad
journ on the 27th inst.
1 no suojeci was luruicr ucunini uj awio,
Fessenden. Cameron and others.
Mr. Cameron moved to postpone the sub
ject till to-morrow. He said it had been pro-
misea Dy tne Democrats oi rennayivama
that we should have a tariff bill this session.
Ho believed that his colleague honestly made
this promise. .
Mr. Bright thought that they eould get
througii by tne ltmi inst.
, Mr. Bicler's amendment was rejected.
The resolution was then adopted, by ayes
29. navs 27.
Ayes Messrs. Bayard, Benjamin, Bragg,
Briirht Chesnnt. Clark. Clineman. Critten
den, Davis, Fitrh, Fitzpatrick, Hale, Ham
mond, Mempmll, Hunter, iverson, jonnson,
of Ark- Johnson, ot Tenn.. Kennedv. Mai-
lory. Mason, Powell, Pueh, Rico, Sebastian,
SlidelL Thompson, Toombs, and Wlgfnll 29.
Nays Messrs. Anthony, Bigler, Brown
Cameron. Chandler. (Jollamer, Doolittle,
T 1 1 f 1 - Hmui ftmmaa
iruiftK. r.Hvuucii. .'iuiu, viu, w.u,
Owin, Hntnlin, Harlan, King, Latham, Nich
olson, Polk, Seward, SimmonSj Sumner,
Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and
Wilson 27.
Mr. Wade moved to take up the Kansas
Bill. Lost ayes, 27; nays, 32; a strict party
vote, except Messrs. Bigler and Pugb, who
voted with the Republicans.
Mr. Douglas was paired off with Mr. Clay,
and Mr. Crittenden with Mr. Johnson of
Ark. i. i .''
Messrs. Kennedy and Saulsbury were ab
sent or not voting.
witn these exceptions, ail tne riepuDUcans
voted aye and the Democrats nay.
The Army Bill was proceeded with. Vari
ous amendments were discussed ; one by Mr.
brown, nxing- the term ot study-classes this
year and hereafter, entering at West Point,
at fire yeorj for the lower class, and four for
tne upper, was adopted, as was one by Mr.
Iverson, providing for the payment of Inter
est in settlement of accounts of States which
have advanced money to the General Gov
ernment, for military purposes, by ayes 28;
nays 17.-
Mr. Jonnson ot Arkansas moved a recon
sideration. '
After debate, and without taking the ques
tion, the senate, at hull-past five o clock, ad
journed.
Conclution of Wtdntidati Proceeding t.
HOUSE. The House sent the Sereeant-at-
Arms after absentees, who returned with a
number of them, and many amusing and
riatcuious excuses were maae.
A great deal of time was consumed.
The House did not adjourn till a very late
hour.
The House continued in session, endeavor
ing, with the aid of the Serjeant-at-arms, to
get together a quorum until one o clock, this
morning, when a quorum being finally ob
tained, it went into Committee on the Fortifi
cation Bill, Mr. McKean, of New York, having
tne noor.
Mr. McKean made a speech on the slavery
question. After some uninteresting debate
the House adjourned till Friday.
er's
.
in
i. ,
Ult.
!
il
T
ln
From Philadelphia.
Pbilaoilphia, June 7. The most exten
sive arrangements are being mode for the
reception of the Japanese. It is the great
topic of the people. The Japanese will arrive
about 8 Saturday P. M., and will be received
by a large body of Military. The Committee
of the Council are holding daily meetings,
They intend giving the public every oppor
tunity of observing the strangers, open
barouches will be employed for the Embassa
dors. - i ne nrst city troop ana macs, nussars
will act as a special guard. Places will be
assigned in the procession for the Governor,
Commanders Stewart and Reed, and the
Judges of the several Courts. A torchlight
procession of the Firemen, and a trial ot the
steam nre engines is contemplated, ine cm
bassadors have accepted an lvitatlon to a
Matinee at the Academy of Music, to be given
on 1 ueBaay, unaer ine auspices oi iieauey
ana UlarK, or tne Arch-street i neater
Gubernatorial Inauguration.
CoKconu, N. H., June 7. Gov. Goodwin
was inaugurated to-dav. There was an an.
nual military and civic display on the occa
sion. The uovernor s Horse uuaras, a new
corps, was deservedly admired, composing-,
as mey no, ine euie . ana tuivau t ui iuo
State. The Governor's Message is brief. It
.i . . . ? j , r
Is mainly devoted to local affairs, of which be
sneaks encouruuinirlv. He soys, in conclu
sion, that New Hampshire declares to all dis-
organlzers ana aisumomsts, wnerever iouua,
that she stands by the U mon ana tne uonsti
tution as interpreted, not by any uew lights,
sectional clique or party platlorms; but by
itself, Its frame rs and the precedents of all
departments of the Federal Government. -
Georgia Democratic State Convention.
MaLiDusvii.LB, June 6. The National
Democrats met in convention last nivht.
Judge Warner presiding. Resolutions were
adopted reaffirming the Cincinnati Platform;
declaring that pronertv exists in the slave.
and favoring the Dred Scott decision. The
convention nominated a full delegation to
Baltimore.
Fire in New York.
Nsw Yobk, Juue 7. A lire to-flay in Bus-
serman s International Gallery of fain tings,
destroyed valuable Daintinirs worm sa,uuu.
The charra asrainst Geo. Ward burnett
Surveyor General of Kansas, after a thorough
cjtaxumwiuw, uave. oeea vuvirwjr uibiwvu,
Louisiana Democratic State Convention.
. New . Ohleasb. June 7. The Donaldson
ville Convention .adjourned to-day. " The
secession at Charleston was condemned. " It
was resolved that the Louisiana delegates
pledge themselves to support ths nominees
oi tne oaiiiworc ioovenuun. . -
. ...
From Washington.
1 WitniNOTow, June 7. The Democrats of
the Senate held a caucus this morning, at
which tbey agreed to vote on Mr. ureen
amendment to the Kansas bill, changinff the
boundaries and sending the question bock to
the DeODla. l - -.
r -
4
From Washington. River News.
v PlTTBSCRli.
six inches
', vuim f HimiiiH.uvi'n.r'
by tbs pier-mark, aiul lismg
olovflVj I Weather clear and warm,
Late and Important from Mexico.
(Vnw Oklsavr. June 6. The Po-
from Vera Crui. on the 13th ult, has
her. V V'V
Messrs. Jecker k (.. beakers, had failed.
immense lrwes throngbout the ooun
try. ft. Gabrioc, the late French Minister,
in great di.itres, having lost all by Jeck
failure. '
The diplomatic corps naa suspended all
relations with Miramon's Uovernment.
Miramon was near Uuerato, surrounded by
Gene.al Uraga with 12,000 men, and unable
toescape. ... r- ,t
racheco, tne new opanisn minis wr, naa
arrived. "i)f-i-",,',"7'"
The depositions or Capl. Turner and others
reference to the Captured steamers are re
ceived,
1w OaLiAMi! June T.-Jerker k Co.'s 11a-
i , . ,M uw. . .M.ia it rwffl nnn l
UlllblV ItlO --w-.. , nonvjvu, .
They ask an extension of five Jears, promis
ing to surrender twenty per cent, of their
capital each year, together with six per cent.
interest, ins creators reiuseu me proposi
tion. They were to meet again on the 28th
" ''- ' ' " " ' . ' . ' ' .... ...
It was reported that Uraga had met Mira
mon's vanguard and overthrew it. .
Mr. McLane was sick. He will, return
home if the treaty is not ratified. ' ,
'
Arrival of the New Mexican Mail.
IitoiriKDSNCS, June 1 The New Mexican
Mail, with dates to the 31st ult, arrived to
ay. . ''."'
The Navajo Indians made an attack upon
Fort Defiance a few days before the mail left,
and came verv near takinff it. as the troops
were not expecting anything of the kind.
Fortunately, however, by some mismanage
ment, their Dresence was discovered, and
after unme fiuhtinii thev were routed.
SIX companies ot soiaiers were on iteu
! . 1 1 U , r..m I.i.linn.
The mail came through without an escort. I
JiU tUUIMIs VV V C BVtiU UU uw avwai . i
A train of nineteen woeons left here to-day ,
for Denver Citv. and others are making pre-
novations for leaving in a few days. The I !
news here from the gold mines is very flatter,
nrt I,a rrpjitadouite astir. I
The weather here is still ary ana no pros
pects of any rain. -rj, .
Michigan State Republican Convention.
DrraoiT. Mien. June 7. The ¬
can State Convention met here to-dny and
made the followinir nominations : For Uover
nor. Austin Blair, of Jackson County: for
Lieutenant Governor, James Birney. of Bay
Conntv: for Treasurer. John Owen, of Wayne
County; for Auditor, Gen. 8. G. Berry, of
Lenawer uouniy. lor Attorney uenenu,
Charles Upson, of Branch County; for Super-
nitenaant orj-uouc institutions, joou m.
Grcirorv. of Washtenaro County: for Secre
tary of State, James B. Porter, of Allegan
Countv: for Land Commissioner, Samuel S.
Lacy, of Calhoun County: for Member of the
Board of Education, Edwin Milletts, of Mon
roe Countv.
The Presidential Electors at laree are H,
O. Wells, of Kalamazoo Connty; and Rufus
Hosmer of Ingham County. The Convention
was entirely harmonious.
- A large ana entnusiastic uepuDucan meet
inn is beinir held at the Citv Hull this even
ing, to ratify the National and State nomina
tions.
From Albany.
Albany. June 7. Dispatches were re
ceived here this eveninir from St. Catharines,
C. W, stating that John L. Schoolcraft, Pres
ident ot tne commercial Bans oi mis city,
wouia not survive tin morning.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
Bf-SsPERFUMERYFOR FINE
aWfiTLOONK WATkU. either bT the oui
CO-
uleituntlv nut ud in bottles, call at ths Vjurfh-BtrMt
it Art, or
rerluowiT IH-poU
PALMER'S SOAP DEHTItir ICE .
In composed of Soap and other articles well known
fur tbeir beuetlclal action upon the teeth and gnniH.
It contains no article that can possibly Injure the
leoin, ana can cousuiiuentiy im useu wlto perluoi im
punity njr perilous 01 ail ages.
l Manufacturer and IniDorter of Perfumerr.
je7 No. 38 West Fourth-street.
KNNRTtV'H ltf KnmAT. TTBrfV.
KY is acknowledged by the most eminent
rbydicians, and by the most careful drugKista
hroughout the United Statee, to bo the most effec
tual blood-purifier ever known, and to have relieved
more sunerinil. and effacled more nermanent came.
than any preparation known to tho profeeeion. Scrof-
uiu. tNU, iwieuui. friiM u. Bcrna-neea. writ R.rus-
tlons of whatsoever nature, are oared by a few bottles,
and the system restored to full strength aud vigor.
e uu anu explicit directions lur tne euro OI Ulcerated
oro loas Had other corrupt and running ulcers, It
iven id tlie Daniulilec Wltb naoh bottia- Faraatt. bv
OHM P. PARK. fllTTRK. KI'KHTLIH 1 I'll., and
-rsWEST-KND AND BRIGHTON
rsrfi iii.K. urrici
Cincinnati dtrrbt Rail.
emu, kusruii tiuuiniiBii,
Mar 1. IKK). The Cars of
this Company will leave tho corner of fourth and
Vlne-itreetit. for the Junction of K ream nn street and
rntra.l-ivsiniui rr Hinlltnnroad .. everv nix 111 in
10 P. M., and thereafter every fifteen minutoe, until
11:49 Jr. H. An extra uar win run on rtinin-B.reei,
hMt.t)nn PrtvtniiLn And I.liin-strisssta. for the acooni-
molation ofthorte wishing to make tho circuit bj
nth Sinn i taimin rAsirji
PaiHengen will be carried from ths corner of
Fou rib and vine, to any point wee. oi juounu, on
Nlnth-elreet, fbroHF. axe; or from any point went of
Mi.nnrl. mi tUvMnth.iitnwt. to the corner of Fmrth
and Vine, for ow jars; or frem any poiut mmth of I
inth,on wmnut-Bireet, to any point anorc oi tn
terminus of the Bond, on Fttfmau-fltrrnt, for oni
mt: or from the corner of Fourth and Vine, to any
point oa Llnn-treett north of Liberty, for our vauk;
ur HVIU I IWUIimiior,i, t nil; H"iu. uu usar-
erty, to the corner of Fourth tnd Vlno-ttreeta, for
ONI r ARE, si. sU lAiiinu, I
UiyVam rretimeii..
ARTIFICIAL TEETH.
rb - v. n. nniwr!N.
DENTIST,
1.16
AaWT' WmI Mlvth-.treet. hetwnflB Race
and Kim, Inserts Artificial Teeth In all the i
Jinnrent atvln. now Braiitlced. PerHOUS in
want of Teeth can have theiryihes fully met at
All operations tn ltsnttsttr perrormefl. ' asyM-am
OHIO WHITE SULPHUR : SPRINGS.
THE OPENING PARTY
Of the Beason. at tlie OHIO WHITE HULPHUB
j . jf ornlAtiB, Will to giveu
On : Thursday June 14, 1860.
Menter's Band will be In Attendance.
Tieketa for tlie Round Trio. J.1 ner Little Klaml
Railroad and Cinciunatl. flainllton aud Dayton
Railroad, tia roriuafleld la White buIdIiui Station,
as t A. m.
Tickets for the Round Trio. 8 per Little Miam
Rjtllmail. at A. 11. and 11 V. M.. and ner Cincin
nati, Hamilton aud Hey ton ilallroad, at lOllO A.
at
Tta Oolumuus to Lewie Oeuter.
. , A, WILON, JK i,
jiil.tti Propxieior O. W. e).
I
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
B. c. c o.
.NEW. BOOKS
. . I .,i Jmt reoslved and for sale by
Ilobert Olarko c Oo.
t ; S3 WEST rOUBTH-HT.
!
1 tl
'" ( -' I.
.ivl.
.ti ' ;w
DANESBURY HOOSB.
, Wood. Tlie rive-huudred
ISmo, muslin. SU cents.
I - - ". II. '
Br- Mrs. Henrr
JJollar rt Tale.
ll-'h . t,.' in.
THR V7ESf INDIES AND tHB SPAN.
. Illll U,IV Stir1 A,.,l.....v lr..ll..n... .Illhi..
! "locor Tliorur," "The Biirtrains,''1 '
' 'Illcuiaond,'.', "The 'ilirea.C'luka,'.!
Ceatle
tamo,
A MOTHER'S TRIALS A Novel. the
: auuuiioi "sir iwxy mo( nuiauif sif ,x,j
1 ' ' ' . .. a . ;f.,i.L!' fi''t SII'I'J
RUTWDGE-ANovsl,, imo, ojuth. i l. .:
' i . ':' r-jiTe ..u'ui V. i
HOME AS FOUND A mew Tolume of
Sarlty't Uooper." Oa sol. sssa- SI w.
)efr-a . ; KOBBHT CLARKE sfciCO.
.rjl INDLBT CH AVE Ii SUN DAY-SCHOOL
Uifntti Farlur Urove pa AAXURpAV.
tbi ytU inHhtDt. The t'-nmer CIIAH-i
I' I ON U aiiuisaMsl tot th trlft. and wi!
ai rit;M 11119 oonwwi nwm einutjeu ff-rp- .
will leave the
Ibot rf WeBtoi u-rtw at I A. M, proniptly. toaohloc
hK.fl tt tl AtaAssTch. caeasirof (.'HnLnil tmd Jnkn.Atsi
All rlsrula mr MirillUlIT IttVlfAff Tlrlrtn isn t
(hi I ri4ay txrieiUUM, uti ai tUa pu$ m VMirw
morning.
BANK KNVBI.OPH PAPKH.-IM 1m
sWSl s I
.fj . ttasrft Walsatiswssi,"
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
-
DELAND &'
GOSSAGE,
.1'
I . - - ' -V ' 1
V P&P, VP UI tll-"ir3 1
Have jnet reeelved
. LARGE 1NYOICBH OF
Seasonable ; ' t Goods,
notjpiiT at
25 PER CSNT.'t LOSS
TO THK IMPOBTER,
i , Which thr will offer at ntraaalr
,v,y,;i .at arx cents;
FOULAXID CILII3,
.m vt :' rr "rfi-i a
SUPERIOR i BLACK SILKS,
t :. ' VBRY IOW,
til'-'
A IAK0H ASSORTMENT 01"'
JLiJjlgllSJl. J-S&l3gf
. y,
' AT 1!,H CENTS PER YARD,
'. ' .... ..TWO i'LQUMCED ftii,
tl A li V. d V. T? O Tt "R S
4J A XfcXl VT.Xj., AUDO,
Ui ( t
AT TBJtEX DOLLAR!.
Chintz Colored Barege Robes,
AT VI VR TlOT.f.ARS. ..
.'M,r. .. .......
Great Bargains!
Io LINEN BHKRTINOH. IRTHTT LINRNB, DaM-
ABB.8, aud ilUUHKHBCt'inU UUUxlB
- Ocnerally.
j. fu-e flam sitfiain Dussiuin fiw.
superior Assortment of BLAUK LACK POINTS
auu nniiLLAn, wiiiie. da naun nais-ti i.
TILLAS, FANo, Ac, lor upera use.
LADIES' AND HISSES' '"' f jf
HOOP SKIRTS!
DELAND & GOSSAGE, '
NO. 74 WEST FOURTH-STREET.
lje3-tf . . '
H '7
with
We
A
and
fuily
On
.
.
at
All
on
'
GAS FIXTURES
AND . ' ' 1 ' "
GAS PITTING
-FOB.- .. . !.-'
CINCINNATI, i-' ,;.
COVINGTON AND - !
NEWPORT.
RESIDENTS OF THE ABOVE PLACES,
wbu tiro atxiut IntroUnciui ga ioto thetrdnrell
iD(H or ntore, will flud it to their advantage to ex
amine our extensive aasortuent of new and beauti
ful Oae Fixturee Ik-fore purchasttis elHewkure.
t T fl iiaTa n nana aa enuseei Taneir m
Brackets, Pendants, r. ,.,
3,4, 5, 6 & 8llght Chandeliers,
. Portable Stands, Pillars,
.. ,i And eYerrthins in the i.-
GAS-FIXTURE LINE.
It will ear those In want of Gas Flttini or Fix.
tones to call at . , ; "
IVr HENRY & CARSON'S
Lamp and Gas-fixture Depot,
NO, ie MAIN-STREET.
I
1
GRAND FIONIO!
Bons of IXTeLlttKn
fflHERE WILIi BE A GRAND PICNI
X Kirtm at Clifton UifthU (FRANK UOTHKBT'i
on (TUM)AY( 9th InaUnt. A full Band of Mui
GRAND PfCNIC
Bnnd of Muilo
will be in attendance,
Admittance rroe. Kerreith.
menta of
all ktndu aud of the. bettt quality to be had
ii the arounda.
sMT Johnnon'1 OmnlbuaeR will loave the enftir nf
rourtn and viue-Htreetaat io o'clock, ana make reg
nlar tripa during the day. jeft-o
HOOP SKIRTS!
TUST RECEIVED, A
SWFPLT
mm oi me
must popular makes, frt
from . . .
EIGHT TO FORTY HOOPS,
WHICH ARI OFFERED VEST LOW.
W. P. DEVOU & ROCKWOOD,
. S3 AND 83 PEARL-STREET.
. . , u7-calpl , ,. . , : V '
jtiXON, CHATFULD & WOODS,
Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealer in
Printers' Csrds snd Card Sheets,
PRINTING INKS AND FA PER MANC.
VACTUREK8 MATERIALS.
, 11-- . ......... 1
AGENTS FOR THE MAGNOLIA MILLS WRITING PAPER.
in' '.' Also Manufacturers of VJ tj
EXTRA WRAPPINO AND MANILLA PAPER
Noa. 77 and 79 Walnut-street
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
SHARER HOODS!
I rjlWOUNDRED DOZXN, A880RTEO
I "WXxXX And Colored,
lit-. I ' jnat received br 1
V;?.: Devou & Rockwood
$3 ANP 83 PKRaUHTRKKT.
Fortcne-telllng and rhrcnology
ALL PKRSONH WIHHINtt TO KNOW
-rm. inuir iiiiur vrtnpru coxt nnvu iiicni
Utttd
1... .1 iiAIIIU - aiak V.....
coruur of Ufa, wlisjie u iuy b uouiultuti uu nil
Ul U IMlUUirj JB S-i 1A JttJasT uui tu-ivinii,
mat tern concerning; love losirriisge. couruUip. Uw
mittertt. biuliiMii aiflnj. and will tell tho muim uf
Um liul or g)utleoitt they will uiarry ; 1ik tLu
lsMt or thtir vilitorsi. je-c
rr
ipXS. VATKNT HINO-NECKK1I
MMW Jftra, auarti nd Ii4lf-ia)l(iri, for min nt
fsv:tory priumu Ala 'timul, or Wx, r wHni
)eT-w J. is. corner oi rmu ana mwiu-atrMw,
Dixon's JUackbcrrr CarminatlTe
NOW ADMITTED Vti BM A IA1
and reliable reraiilr for ch.iieiajuoruus and s
tinillar aflectloas. tienarjd Piilv by ,
JeT-aw 1 ., M, . Qoron Ifil'h and ataln-etreeta.
llMJW-.Fa?!'E2,ff',"?Ti
lOW. Hrniil,l. ' k
n . at. eoraev m utsi ana jaaui-aweeie.
.. K - w iiL .Li u-r "1 "
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
DEobriTidii s
Trari k narencios,
PrcsidchtfaV Campaign .OCI360.
-jtt- -.r' ' ' ' !T-1 1t.
THltrtNCINNAtf fiMrtlKFRIH fH.
PAHKD to fnrnisli ell ttntes and ell Fiirtiea
the alio ee-tirles, a shnru nortte and lew retee.
hftveon band tne luU'wma
1f WR ICAK VMria-Of all !". from Ore
Inches to flrtra-n ret lone;, with or withoat name of
Uandloatee pnnten on tni-aa. , - t t 'i M ', i
4MBRIOa!HHIKI,IH-'vVittianie.of8Utea
Uaadioatoa.i ' ' ' r
IMtRTR ArTM OW slAKiniDATRS-Beantl-
printed iu Color, oa iapet or AtUella.ifi :: '
Figures of tha Qoddes oMIberty r
Paper and M nslin; anil, In short, every thlof re-
(lairaa inline penaism vauiviKn, ior
DEOQIIATIIJO
BaildlDfs, Prooeseloni, Boms, Wagxma, Halls.
Banner for sLitberty-polea t
, ,. , SUPEB10B IN BTTLC.
Orders from a distance wilt receive prompt atten
tion. Address
- ' 1 FARAltl IMeLKAN, .
Jrl-hawtf.v T . I.J . Cincinnati, Ohio.
RED CEDAR
JUST hKCEITBD FKat.tsTBAIHEK
Wenotis," -
T5.O00 feet Tenneeeee Bed Cedar, and for sale
Tery low prions.
e)400j tiedar Fenea Poata - , ,
$.009 IrfXHist Vence Pkete ;
40.000 (eet Pennine BoarneJ
Orilcrs for Oedar Boards, foists. Posts, flooring,
c, dllcd at short notice.
)ki,(mmi ft. aiMw'd H and t in. 1st oota. Plna Lombcr ;
Iimlihio ft. eeasM 1. 1 . S and 3 in. elear do. do. i ,
LoiSMDio fl. second ano third ntimmoa do. do. ;
0W,uw . ' in, rvpwii vnt man uwiiuu, m us.
Scantlins;
well eeaaonrd, and will Iw sold low for cash, or
short Uiae, .ta ujliwoi for m atock, br-
Thos W, Farrin & Co.,
Wholesife) and- Retail Lumbef Dealers.
svat Tard on Treeman-street, opnoelto
neat to ii., XL. and 1. B. B. Dapot.
Ueorgo,
jeo
Ivj:l.il.ti3Y,j.
celebrated and superior
' 1 1 '"''' ' i -
Hermetioally Sealed i. ,
a. n r
SFXOZID
0YSTERS'.
. i , -PTJI'OP-'..' .!
Epeclall7 for Summer Use. ,
TH BY ARB EXTRA IN HIZB, AND OF
the mott exqiiisilte flavor. Mo axpenaa or labor
taped lu getting tbm up. Tha object was to got up
KXTUA . ARTICLE!
Which hai boen luccaMffjllr aWsiplUha4. .
GIVE THEM TRIAL. SATISFACTION WARRANTED I
! ROBERT ORR. Atrent.
JeMfl,
Depot Mo. 11 West Fifth-street.
GE0VEB& BAKEB'b"'
, 'v NEW AND IMPBOVfD y-''
SDVTTLE OB LOCK-STITCH
SEWING : MACHINES ! :fi
THR BEST AND ONLY Iff ACHINK" IN i,
the market mitable fur all klrnk of mauulacturt. .
iu$ purpoeet at tho 1 '
LOW PRICE OF, S50. ,
GKQVKIl So BAKEB.
i 8KWINO MACHINK 00, - "
68 WEST FOURTH-STREET -
' ria-tf) -
i
I
REMOVED.
ADAMS, PECKOVER & CO:
Have removed the Sales. room of tha
ALLIGATOR COAL COOKING STOVE
from No. 333 Tnarth, to their new store. m ;
B. VT. OOBNEK OF FIFTH AND ELM.
nT. si.i-OrderB lb- the fnnnder reeelvad aa ssuul aft
oar old stand. Mo. 333 West Fourth-street, unti) ,
further ttoiloa.---
,7
riv-ta
White 'Sulphur, Springs.;';,
TION. ...... "
. M . T(A-..-.. - '""iXJ
XenlaaaiSpringaebl,orIartoiiandBprtntfleld, $5,
Columbus to jjewfs bentef.HH'3L!lI....,HH',,,!r.$6s
i .. i ABB HOW OM 8ALK, ., ,
At ths Offiosw of tha Campsnies.
P. W. HTRADKJt,
jeD-h i ,. .., - Qeaeral (Ticket Agent. t j
; THE EROVAPOlt
PORTABLE - COOK -STOVE!- ,
f THING NEITHER WOOD, COAL,CHAK. ' 4 1
U COAL,nor(i.. . '."",.. ,,, . ,i
No Smoke, No Dirt, No Heat!
To dliRommoile the operator. The beri pod moeC
eoououical ttiuaiaerari'aacemeiit extaat. 1 In prao
ical oourtttlon every day, at 11 A. M., No. H West
)foiinfi-sitreot, '
County Blghta for tale. , jol-M . ,, f.
bwkD atfaili, and can ve tuuad at Uur resttaUaoe, ,f f
Mo. 4V. ou the west aide of Jontw-sitrMt. twiweea "
LiiDU muii uuiuir ana jirir aaa wtMif, wnrt Hie j
preeentaud futuvu eveute bv alaneu.
attimutry,
to oonault
Lv urrti. Tnall thfisiM who msv trials
ner ou lue wen i iftiflLiirea, or auy ooder
takioK. Journuysi,
a, watriwoay, lot-
:eta. ntirfMit
tlrlf'lGtitm will
ours from 9 A. M. to 0 P. M
im Mivea.
Vrioue low.
pent for nnm.Tn th nttwrb op tUw luuiia, yytH-am .
IMTANTnrArTIJHF.D HY JOHN L SVilt.
la ill. Kit, ufMillcrmik rovrushin, and nut ea.
olld br any article In the niurket. ror sale la aur . .
uuantltr br . ,. AIJIKKT JtoSB, Druaalst, , t fcnlt')
Mouth-weat oorner tV'ntral-aveaue and liishth.
Isayni .,in i .
Dr. Evan&gf Tdolhiich Drops.u
I)re wrod fronii -5i7Vie
K DROPS. , a
Auiertcan veiusi m 1'arls
Sorsaia by 1
li t HOtm, I)ruj
ct.iDraieq
ALUKli
oath-vesteorner Uentr.l-aeenu and IlKhth;- '
0trt.fl.
ltey71
IH GOOrf f AftrP. (- DKf RitiT, "m kit hh, ITT
Wea.-Mn XfT f.' BDi'lAH, Aoui-li.ar -Sir1. 1
wejee.se uu us 19 ui ;vu v t ll .ji -. Jli.
; , , EXCELSIOB FLUID INKS,
t order iutisilnsluw.
. ., Youra trul
1 jes-ao
MS BKATTT.
jt-ruit-uan cement XI -
kalfeuuaree south of thelliirnet House.
CaauI1kuantltloarice.. ! -
t t , . . . liaylesulriwl I .-' ""ai'ii il'n
l. II 4
Vaoleeaia
' u.i-v. uuuui very sn
caaous very siisertur UUe Oil.
J of sale
retail, oi
V"
MUI
t a. aiiiKidjLD A fjo,
aw axaiHia wee f".
. i.i,i, iMb.-ji ar M rvsJBtVSCIf. jli .a
1 e
ii
rt s - I
. I ! Wl J
wi. Ii

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