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Red Lodge picket. (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1889-1907, December 26, 1902, Image 12

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DELINQUENT TAX IST
Continued from Seventh rage.
THOMPON. , ARB,:'- personal prop
erty; tax '$32:62, penalty $3.26, publi- U
cation 50 cents; total tax, $36.38.
TONETTI, Joanna, personal proper
Ty; .tax $11.05, penalty $1.10, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $12.65.
WICKSON, E, & Son, personal
property; tax $7.11, penalty 71 cents,
publication 50 cents; total tax, $8.32.
WALTERS, W. H. & E. W., person
al property; tax $18.15, penalty $1.81,
publication 50 cents; total tax, $20.46. F
WALLILA, Alex, personal, proper
ty; tax $11.20, penalty $1.12, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $12.82.
WALLILA, Matt, personal property;
tat $8.87, -penalty 88 cents, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $10.25.
WILLIS, George, personal property;
tax $6.35, penalty 63 cents, publica
tion 50 cents; -total tax, '$7.48.
WELLS & WELLS, personal prop
-erty; tax $21.22 penalty $2.12, publi
cation 50 cents; total tax, $23.84.
WEATHERSON, J. H., personal
property; tax $12.00, penalty $1.20,
publication 50 cents; totaltax, $13.70.
WEATHERMAN, J. F., personal
property; tax $5.78, penalty 57 cents,
publication 50 cents; total tax, $6.85.
WEAVER, John, Jr., personal prop
erty; tax $19.80, penalty $1.98, publi
cation 50 cents; total tax, $22.28.
WILSON, William H., personal
-property; tax $8.72, penalty 87 cents,
publication 50 cents; total tax, $10.09.
WASHINGTON LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY, personal property; tax
$2.62, penalty 26 cents, publication 50
-cents; total tax, $3.38.
WEBB & BENBO, personal prop
erty; tax $195.51, penalty $19.55, pub
lication 50 cents; total tax, $215.56.
WOODWARD, F. C., personal prop
erty; tax $13.48, penalty $1.34, publi
cation 50 cents; total tax, $15.32.
WORTHINGTON, G. W., personal
property; tax $5.85, penalty 58 cents,
publication 50 cents; total tax, $6.93.
WRANGLER DITCH COMPANY,
personal property; tax $19.19, penalty
$1.91, publication 50 cents; total tax,
$21.60.
WELLS, H. J., personal property;
tax $111.94, penalty $11.19, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $123.63.
YATES, W. H., personal property;
tax $6.84, penalty 68 cents, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $8.02.
YORK, Charles, personal property;
tax $5.25, penalty 52 cents, publica
tion 50 cents; total tax, $6.27.
YONG, John T., personal property;
tax $5.86, penalty 58 cents, publication
50 cents; total tax, $6.94.
YENSON, A.,' personal property;
tar. $23.35, penalty $2.33, publication
50 cents; total tax, $26.18.
STATE OF MONTANA, S
ss.
COUNTY OF CARBON.
Office of the County Treasurer, Red
Lodge, Mont., Dec. 24, 1902.
Notice is hereby given that the
foregoing contains a list of persons
and a description of their real estate
and personal property in Carbon coun
ty, owing taxes for the year 1902;
that said taxes have become delin
quent; that said list contains the de
linquent taxes, together with the
costs and percentage, opposite each
name; that unless the delinquent
taxes, together with the costs and per
centage, are paid, the real property
upon which taxes are a lien will be
sold at public auction in front of the
county treasurer's office beginning on
the 19th day of January, A. D. 1903,
at the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., and
continuing until 3 o'clock p. m. of said
day, and continuing from day to day
until all of said real estate and per
sonal property has been sold.
(Signed)
County Treasurer.
TERMS OF DISTRICT COURT.
Be Held in Carbon County in Feb.,
May, Aug. and Nov.
Order fixing terms of Court in the
counties comprising the Sixth Judic
ial District of the state of Montana:
It is hereby ordered that the terms
of court in the counties comprising
the Sixth Judicial District of Mon
tana for the year 1903, shall be as
follows:
Park County.
Fourth Monday of January.
First Monday of April.
First Monday of July.
First Monday of November.
Carbon County.
Third Monday of February.
Second Monday of' May.
Second Monday of August.
Fifth Monday of November.
Sweet Grass County.
Second Monday of March.
Second Monday of June.
Fourth Monday of September.
Third' Monday of December.
The order heretofore made on the
20th day of December, 1901, fixing the
terms of court in the counties com
prising the Sixth Judicial District, Is
hereby revoked.
FRANK HENRY,
23t3 Judge.
SAYORkI) BY NATURE
United States District Attorney Bai
ley Writes Entertainingly of This.
County's Natural Resources. 0
RANCH, RANGES, MINES
Physical Conditions Contribute to Our v
Enduring Wealth and Prosperity t
Everywhere Abounds.
Carbon county, in developed wealth,
diversity of resources and multiplici
ty of industries, is surpassed by no
county in the state. Travel it in any
.sixty miles in width you see comfort
able houses, improved farms and land
as fertile as any under the sun. Ar
riving at Red Lodge, the county seat,
you find the most progressive, sub
stantial and energetic business center
of 3,000 inhabitants in- the entire
state.
No more splendid monument could
be reared to energy and industry than
the progress the citizens of this young
county have made in the past seven
years. Less than ten years ago, four
fifths of the present area of Carbon
county was an Indian reservation,
without vestige or mark of civilization
or improvement.
Not quite eight years ago the prom
ise of development of the great nat
ural resources within her borders in
duced the state legislature to create
a new county, and since that time the
population and wealth of Carbon
have increased fourfold. The valleys
of the Stillwater, East and West Rose
buds, Red Lodge, Rocky Fork and
Clarke Fork, all traversing the count.
from south to north, have become the
happy homes of farmers who had the
faith to undertake and the grit to
complete great agricultural enterpris
es.
Unsurpassed in Richness. bt
These valleys are unsurpassed in of
richness and raise the finest of grain p,
-barley, wheat and oats-and alfalfa
and timothy hay. The large produc- hi
tion of the finest grade of wheat crea- V
ted a demand for a flouring mill, w
which was met by the Carbon Milling tl
company, comprised of enterprising n
citizens of the county, and a plant, vi
modern and up-to-date, was establish- bi
ed at Joliet. This handsomely sup
plies the markets with the finest pro
duct.
Though the settling of the valleys
has made the herds of thousands of
cattle an impossibility, yet the pos- ir
session of smaller herds of fifties and g,
hundreds, owned by nearly every b
farmer, more than compensates the y
apparent loss. In the last eight years v
the sheep industry has reached vast b
proportions, and it is safe to say that E
today it divides with cattle the hon- v
ors in importance, values and net re
sults.
Natural conditions have aided great
ly in the development of Carbon coun
ty. The streams flowing down from
the mountains on the southern border,
distanced from one another for the
easy irrigating of the country, con
veying the melted snow to the fields
of grain and the thirsty stock, have
become the friends and helpers of the
sheepman, the cattleman and the far
mer. Such conditions existing to such
a vast extent the natural result has
been the constant appreciation of the
value of land, so that now the farmer
has a splendid investment, becoming
more valuable every year; or if he
wishes to change his business he sells
at a price that enables him to start
again where he may wish.
Large Property Valuation.
Six million dollars is a small esti
mate of the present value of property
in Carbon county. One million and a
quarter is in livestock, which is in
creasing in numbers yearly.
The grade of stock is probably the
best in the state, there being a num
ber of stock ranches devoted to the
breeding of nothing but thorough
breds, including Shorthorns, Poll An
gus and Herefords. One of the larg
est of these is the Mountain View
ranch, which supplies registered
Hereford cattle to the surrounding
B breeders, and makes it easy for all to
obtain a choice of blooded stock at
home.
Ten thousand people are now living
in comfort in the new county, where
the only conditions exacted of the
newcomer are application and indus
try. If one is a farmer he buys, rents
or homesteads a ranch, and finds a
home as good as he could get in any
state in the Union. If. a carpenter, he
finds employment for every working
day in the year at wages that guaran
tee success and comfort. If a miner,
he finds larger mines, more steady em
ployment at larger wages than to be
found elsewhere and better homes to
live in. I may say the same with truth
of the other trades and vocations.
Work For Many Miners.
The mining industry is confined to
coal, which is a lignite and is the
best coal for steam and general use
in the northwest. The Rocky Fork
Coal company operates the largest
of the mines now being operated. This
company has a capital of $2,000,000,
upon which it pays a handsome divi
dend.
The Rocky Fork coal mine is situ
ated almost within the limits of thy;
City of Red Lodge, employs an ave
age of 500 men; at present it has a
daily output of 2,300 tons and is con
stantly increasing its capacity. It has
seven workable veins of coal, aggre
gating forty-two feet in thickness, on
ly three of which veins are being
worked, and has enough coal in sight
to supply a population of two milliou
people a half century if it could be
mined fast enough. The output of
this company for the year 1902 will bh
500,000 tons.
Other coal mines situated at Brid
ger and Gebo in the Clarke Fork val
ley, yielding a good quality of coal,
surrounded by prosperous towns, and
it is a matter of but a short time
when the railroad will be extended
from Bridger to the Bear creek coal
fields, situated about four miles east
of Red.. Lodge, where the largest
known field of coal in the state ex
ists. The coal fields of Carbon coun
ty are inexhaustible and only need
markets, which ere long will be sup
plied near at hand.
Future Smelting Industry.
The ore from mines of copper and r
gold being developed in the Sunlight
basin in Wyoming will naturally be s
brought down the Clarke Fork valley i
to smelters that will be established
on the river banks near Bear creek
and Bridger, and the haul of ore will
only be sixty and seventy-five miles
down hill. Nature has prepared the
means at hand and it will soon be
made use of.
Red Lodge, being the center of the
business operations of the county has
most wonderfully developed into a
splendid, substantial and steadily
growing city, with a property valua
tion of three-quarters, of a million.
The distribution of from $35,000 to
$50,000 a month to the laboring men
of the city contributes to the active
business and life, and gives assurance
of prosperity and growth unsur
passed.
Those citizens are fortunate who
have made this rich and progressive
county their permanent home. Those
who shall become such will show
their good judgment and wisdom, as
nowhere can be found 'more rapid ad
vancement in substantial growth, or
brighter prospects of future develop
ment.
GEORGE H. BAILEY,
Saved at Grave's Brink.
"I know I would long ago have been
in my grave," writes Mrs. S. H. New- a
som, of Decatur, Ala., "if hL had not
ben for Electric Bitters. For three
years I suffered untold agony from the
worst forms of Indigestion, Water
brash, Stomach and Bowel Dyspepsia.
But this excellent medicine did me a
world of good. Snce using it I can eat
heartily and have gained 35 pounds."
For Indigestion, Loss of Appetite,
Stomach, Liver and Kidney troubles,
Electric Bitters are a positive, guar
anteed cure. Only 50c at Armstrong's
drug store.
LOADED THE REPORTEP.
Conrad Tells Anaconda Paper a Nice
Little Story.
Standard: W. A. Conrad of Kalls
pell was in the city yesterday enroute
to California, where he will spend the
winter. He went there in September,
but returned a few days ago to attend
the funeral of his brother, Charles,
who died recently. Mr. Conrad is suf
fering somewhat from rheumatism
and it is necessary for him to remain
in a warmer climate in the winter
time. He is a pioneer Montanan anI
has withstood the rigors of many hard
winters, but now he prefers to remain
away during the severely cold months
and bask in the sunshine of the trop
ics, while away up here in Montana
they wear furs and arctics and won
der how long the cold snap will last.
"Ashby" Conrad,-as W. A. is known
all over the state, told an interesting
story yesterday just before he left for
the depot. He was associated with
his brothers, W. G. and Charles, in
business, and they had branch stores
and banks in Red Lodge, Billings and
Laurel during the construction of the
t Red Lodge branch of the Northern
Pacific 13 years ago, and the sorrow
: ing brothers are still interestel in
business at those places. Mr. Con
rad had charge of the banking busi
ness at Laurel and at Red Lodge then,
s and he used to take the money from
t the main office up to Red Loige to
r pay off the men. Checks were issued
to the miners and the construction
gang on the bank at Red Lodge and
"Ashby" used to carry the bags of
money up to the coal camp in time
for the cashing of the checks.
a One day he left Laurel with a big
r satchel containing silver, gold and
h bills amounting to enough to pay off
about 600 men for a month's work,
He intended to catch a construction
a train in the morning and reach Red
a Lodge in the evening so that the mon
e ey would be in the bank on the fol
k lowing morning to meet the demands
of the checks that would be present
ed at that time for payment.
He waited around the material
yards for some time and no train
appeared. He walked on up the line
expecting to meet a construction
train and flag it and have it return to I
Red Lodge with him and his import
ant package, but no train came and I
he walked and continued to walk and
had covered about 25 miles of the 65 I
when he came to a crew of telegraph
pole setters. He walked among the L
men with the air of an official of the
road, a part he played well, and said
to one of the gang:
"Just toss one of those hand cars
onto the track for me. I want to run I
up the line a short distance," he said,
and a dozen strong arms lifted the I
car on and bade the stranger good
luck. After he had gone a few miles 1
he ran into asteep grade and he had
to get off and push the car to the top
of the hill. After this it was a pleas
ire to ride for a few miles. farther,
as it was all down grade. Then came
another hill.
It was getting late and the money
must be in Red Lodge sure. Mr. Con
rad looked across the gulch and saw
the top of an Indian tepee. He called
1 to the Indians and two of them came
out riding their "cayuses."
He gave them some silver and or
dered them to attach their lariat
ropes to the car and draw him into
t Red Lodge. This the red bucks did
n smilingly, and he reached the camp
in time and in safety.
c "Robbery?" said Mr. Conrad. "We
k never thought of it in those days. We
11 used to make the trip every month
g without the least feeling of apprehen
e sion and we were never once molest
0 ed, although now I think it would be
a risky proposition to make the trip
as we did then. I have often given
Le the monthly pay roll into the keeping
s of the porter of the bank, and he al
ways showed up at Red Lodge on time
with it."
COUGHS AND COLDS IN CHILDREN
Recommendation of a Well Known
Chicago Physician.
I use and prescribe Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy for almost all obsti
nate, constricted coughs, with direct
results. I prescribe it to children of
all ages. Am glad to recommend it to
all in need and seeking relief from
colds and coughs and bronchial afflic
tions. It is non-narcotic and safe in
the hands of the most unprofessional.
A universal panacea for all mankind.
-Mrs. Mary R. Melendy, M. D., Ph.
D., Chicago, Ill. This remedy is for
sale by all druggists.
T -Z ZA.
Beu, the _The Kind YoHaeAw Be*
iSgast.sr
ef
THE BEST STEAMING
COAL IN MONTANA -"i
ROCKY FORK O
A F"EW REASQON :.
Burns Freely,
Does not Clinker,
Leaves little or no ash,
Has more carbon,
Less Sulphur, and is the
Cheapest on the market.
The United States Government has adopted this coal at Forts
Custer, Harrison and Sheridan. The Helena School Board has also
adopted it for use in the Public Schools of that city.
You will find Agents of the
Rocky Fork Coal Co.
of Montana
ANYWHERE IN DAKOTA,
MONTANA OR IDAHO.
There is no limit to the supply-2,500 tons can be furnished
every day as readily as only one ton.
. The mines are down 2,300 feet,-and are situated at
Red Lodge, Mont.
. HE CHRISTMAS STOCKING.
"Dear Santa Claus," wrote little Will
In letters ·truJy shocking, 4
"I'se been a good boy, so-please fill
A-heapin' up this stocking.
I want a drum to make pa sick
And drive,my mama crazy;
I want a doggy I can kick,
So he will not get lazy.
I want a powder gun to shoot
Right at my sister Annie,
And a big trumpet I can toot
Just awful loud at granny.
I want a dreffle big false face
To scare in fits our baby;
I want a pony I can race
Around the parlor, maybe.
I want a little hatchet, too,
So I can do some chopping
Upon our grand new piano new,
When mama goes a-shopping.
I want a nice hard rubber ball
To smash all into finders
The great big mirror in the hall,
An' lots an' lots o' winders.
And a real live Noah's ark;
And a fish pond full of water,
- So I can float our baby in,
r And play old Pharaoh's daughter.
I I want a hammer awful bad
j To smash the front door lock;
I want a good strong fishing pole
To wind the kitchen clock.
t An' candy that'll make me sick
| So ma all night will hold me,
| An' make pa get the doctor quick,
p An' never try to scold me.
e My pa says for my size I am
e The worst boy in the city;
h But don't believe him, Santa Claus-'
·. It's just his being witty.
t. An' Santa Claus, if my-pa says
*e I'm naughty, it's a story;
p Just say if he whips me I'll die
n And go to kingdom glory.
g The little angel boys up there
1- Would welcome me, I think,
e To help play ball with shooting stars
And make the still ones blink."
-Chicago Herald.
The Great Falls and Canada rail
n, road, running north from Great Falls,
has now been completely changed
' from a narrow to a standard gauge.
1:1.
TO VESTIBULED TRAINS-DINING CABS
SST. PAUL
MINEAPOLIS TIME CARD-RED LODGE.
DULUTH WEST BOUND. ARRIVE. DEPART.
AND POINTS No.21. Red Lodge local. 11:55 am
SEAST SOU H EAST BOUND. I
- O HNo. 22. Billings local,.... .......... 1:00 pm
BUTTe Passengers for the west will change car. at
ULTA E LLaurel to make close connection.
SPOKANE TIME CARD-BILLINGS.
SEATHLE
SEA TTLECOMA WEST BOUND.
TACOMALN No. 1. North Coast L't'd. 0:37 am .....am
PORTLAND No. 3. Pacific Mail....... 2:40 am .... .a
CALIPORNIA No. 5. Burlington........ 5:05 am ......am
CHINA EAST BOUND.
NALASKA No. 2. North Coast L't'd. I 9:00:p I Pm
ALASKA No. 4. Atlantic Mail..... 11:10 am .... ..am
A. xH.S H.,l, Agent, I Chat. S. FI G. P.A.
BaD LOSiE. MONT. I ST. PAUL, msxi. Pullman First Class aad urstlepigCars
5he Picket
PJob
Printig
Hotel.
Spofford
* T. F. POLLARD, Prop'rj
SRid Ledgeui,
Mentang.
Only First Clams Hotel in City I
Steam Heat!
Electric Lights!
Best of Baths! .1
BarandSampleRoomsConnecte
:HOUSE
A. MORRISON, PropI
Newly Furnished
and Renovated... .
s RATES $i.oo PER -DAY.
Board and Lodging
by Day. Week or Month.
1l Opposite Opera House
S * *
diie

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