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The Montana nonpartisan. (Great Falls, Mont.) 1918-192?, October 19, 1918, Image 4

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EDITORIAL PAGE OF MONTANA NONPARTISAN, OCTOBER 19, 1918
THE
Montana Nonpartisan
A CONTINUATION OF THE INVERNESS NEWS.
A NON-PARTISAN PUBLICATION
Published Weekly at Great Falls, Montana by the Montana Nonpartisan.
Entered as second class matter, September 7, 1918, at Great Falls, Mon
tana, under the act of March 3, 1879.
Place of Publication transferred from Inverness, Montana, Sept. 7. 1918.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR
All communications should be addressed to the Montana Nonpartisan, Box
1625, Great Falls, Montana. The Montana Nonpartisan will accept advertise
ments of reliable firms desiring to do business with the people of Mon
tana. Advertising rates will be furnished on application.
GET AN ABSENT VOTERS BALLOT TO YOUR NEIGHBOR WHO
HAS GONE AWAY TO WORK IN THE HARVEST FIELDS, SHIPYARDS
OR OTHER WAR IND)USTKI. DON'T WAIT FOR HIM TO GET IT, HE
MAY NOT HAVE TIME, ITS UP TO YOU.
CHAS. H. COOPER
"I am for justice in simple form without technicalities, without pre
judice, without delay and without unreasonable expense."
With this expression of his sentiments on the vital matter of dispensa
tion of justice, Chas. H. Cooper, the League nominee for Associate Justice
of the Supreme Court goes to the people of Montana. These ideas are
sound and show breath of vision and a fine appreciation of what is wrong
in our legal methods. Cooper should be in a position to know for he has
had a wealth of experience, having trained for the legal profession under
the watchful eye of no less a person than Col. W. F. Sanders, late chief
justice of Montana.
Aside from his experience however, he has graduated into a class which
marks the difference between a man and a cringing sycophant in Mon
tana-he has earned the undying enmity of the copper crowd and in con
sequence must suffer the tornado of abuse and billingsgate which the cop
per press mistakes for journalism. Since it has been known that the
League, going carefully over the list of candidates for this office found one
whom it considered worthy of indorsation, the copper crowd has never
ceased to abuse Cooper. This of course bothers nobody, for in Montana,
so thoroughly have the people come to understand that the correct way to
read the copper press is to reverse exactly what it says about public men
and women, that to be abused by them is really a boost. In any case, the
League is going to send Chas. H. Cooper to the supreme court, to the end
that "Justice in simple form, without technicalities, without prejudice,
without delay, and without unreasonable expense," may become an actual
entity instead of a cherished dream.
To the copper-law ridden people of Montana, Cooper's declaration looks
almost like a new Magna Charta.
THE PRICE OF COPPER ASSISTANCE;
8. K. Wheeler has been forced from office, his "resignation" is in the
hands of the U. S. Attorney General and all the copper press is illumined
with the cold and grisly glow which approximates enthusiasm amongst them.
There is congratulation and chuckling on the sixth floor, a smile (!) of
pleasure crinkles the epidermis of the Employers Association. The gang
gloats.
The people, however, the farm organizations, the Trades Councils, and
unions, the wage earners generally, the ministerial associations, and great
groups of professional men stand aghast that Senator Walsh should have
at last deserted Wheeler. That he knew, of all men the battle which
Wheeler had to wage, that he was well aware that there was no stain
upon the record of the U. S. District Attorney and the fact that he was
attacked by the anarchistic elements in this state proved his integrity.
Senator Walsh knew these things, yet he allowed matters of political
expediency to induce him to sacrifice Wheeler at the bequest of the very
people whom he knew the Attorney had prosecuted rightfully and justly.
B. K. Wheeler has withstood the test and never failed, he has emerged
from this period of travail, head erect looking the world in the eyes, where
ever men foregather his name is mentioned with the respect which comes
from confident knowledge of his unbiased administration of the office.
He has been enrolled as one of the sturdiest opponents of the great and
terrible period of copper mis-rule. Senator Walsh however has fallen
from his high estate, knowing the Department of Justice ,as well as the
people, wish to retain Wheeler and had plainly told him so, he choose to dis
miss himself from the minds and affections of his erstwhile admirers; too
great a price to pay for the left handed support of the copper crowd, since
they are giving to Laudstrum their right.
PAY TOLL OR STARVE.
"Millions of pounds of fruit being wasted", press dispatch.
"Food is amlmunition, don't waste it!" National Food Administration.
The first of these quotations appeared in the Great Falls Daily Leader,
of October 12th, and betrays a startling state of affairs in the fruit grow
ing districts of California, while the second everyone has seen and every
one at least amongst the working people tried to live up to. That there is
something "Rotten in the state of Denmark' 'besides fruit appears
every now and then when such news as this fruit story comes leaking
through the close meshed net which the interests have spread to catch
all such ugly truths and intern them before they get abroad to do their work
of enlightenment. That this one really escaped appears certain for it goes
on to say.
Food that might feed our European allies as well as our own troops
is going to waste in the state of California today. Such is the
state of affairs as disclosed by a census of the state industrial condi
tions now nearly completed by the Home Industry league of Cali
fornia.
"Tens of thousands of dollars' worth of the choicest tomatoes
are lying rotting on the ground of the ranches in this neighborhood
today." is a sample of one report out of six received by the league
through its canvas of the industrial situation of the state. This re
port came from a local board of trade. The report concludes: "Local
people have subscribed $7,500 for stock in any company which will
come to the neighborhood and start a vegetable cannery to take care
of the thousands and thousands of dollars' worth of tomatoes and
other vegetables which today are useless to the growers for lack of
a cannery or transportation facilities."
Among the kinds of fruits and vegetables which the census shows
to be going to waste on the ranches are peaches, apples, berries,
olives, nuts, oranges, lemons, figs and dates.
Many of the communities in which those foods are going to waste
state that "there is plenty of good labor available-if we only
had a local packing house or a cannery."
You will observe, there is "Plenty of good labor available", so that
it is not the inveterate laziness of the wage worker which is responsible
this time ,no there is something else, for
In a large number of the communities heard from there is no or
ganized board of trade or other commercial clearing-house of that
nature, ,and the information has been received over the signatures
of the editors of local newspapers.
Numbers of the replies make lively appeals for "government aid" in
the immediate establishment of factories, canneries or other es
tablishment for the making of apple butter, cider (bottled), vinegar,
sugar from beets.
And that just sums it up. This food is wasting, not because the grow
ers are not anxious to have it marketed, not because the food admin
istration does not want it, but because there stands in the way a set
of arrangements and barriers which make the marketing of it impossible.
The people of that district see only one thing that these barriers must
be swept away if this food is to be saved, they must have Government
aid in the establishment of canning factories.
Good people, we must warn you, Big Biz will have it this is pro-German,
seditious, disloyal and non-patriotic, for it would brush aside and render
impossible those petty little grafts which come to fruit commission agents,
jobbers, wholesalers, etc., it would succeed in marketing your fruit in the
most effectual and economical way, thus adding to the nation's food supply
and our friends the packers could not have THAT, it would be Un-Ameri
can.
That must be their view point of the matter, for the Nonpartisan league
is seeking to establish just such plants all over the nation and so far as we
know the only opposition comes from those who are content to render the
food administration's efforts nugatory, in spite of the urgent necessity of
the war, while they fight the League and howl the cat-calls of the gutter
press. They say in substance if not in actual words, The fruit may rot, the
grain sprout in the field, the sugar mould, the nation starve, unless WE
are allowed to stand across the channel from producer to the market and
take toll of all that passes. The League is going to put a stop to that, that
is why they seek to put a stop to the League.
Absent Voters Law
USE IT IF YOU ARE AWAY
1. Any qualified elector who has registered may use the Ab
sent Voters law.
2. ANY TIME WITHIN 30 DAYS BEFORE THE ELECTION
THE ABSENT VOTER SHALL MAKE APPLICATION FOR AN
OFFICIAL BALLOT TO THE COUNTY CLERK OF THE COUNTY
IN WHICH HE RESIDES AND IS AN ELECTOR.
3. Application must be made on a blank furnished by the coun
ty clerk. The application must be witnessed and sworn before a
Notary Public or Justice of the Peace.
4. The voter on making application shall transmit to the Coun
ty Clerk thirty cents, which shall be treated as official receipts.
5. Electors cannot receive ballot on election day or unless his
application is made before the delivery of the official ballots to the
judges of election.
6 . As soon as the ballots are printed the Clerk shall mail the
applicant the ballots and an envelope which shall carry the name and
office address of the County Clerk and an affidavit on the other side,
which must be filled in and sworn to before a Notary Public or Jus
tice of the Peace. The elector shall in the presence of this officer
.mark his ballot so that the officer shall not see for whom he votes.
He must then fold it in such a way as to conceal his vote and then
place it in the envelope without detaching any of the stubs. Then
seal the envelope. Then the officers will place his seal on it, when
the elector will send it post prepaid to the County Clerk of his home
country, that is, where he votes.
7. YOU MAY VOTE AT HOME IF YOU ARE THERE WHEN
THE OFFICIAL BALLOTS ARE PRINTED AND THINK YOU
WILL BE GOING AWAY BY ELECTION TIME. GO TO THE
COUNTY CLERK, NOTARY PUBLIC OR JUSTICE OF THE
PEACE AND HAVE HIM ADMINISTER THE OATH, AND VOTE
IN HIS PRESENCE.
8. If you have voted while you are away and return home be
fore election day, you can vote in person, providing YOUR BALLOT
HAS NOT ALREADY BEEN PUT IN THE BALLOT BOX.
9. If you have marked your ballot as an absent voter and you
return home before election or on election day, you may have the en
velope rpened in your presence or you may ask for a new ballot, in
which case your previous ballot would not be counted. SHOULD
YOUR ABSENT VOTE BE REJECTED AS DEFECTIVE YOU
MAY STILL VOTE IN PERSON IF YOU ARRIVE AT THE POL
LING PLACE IN TIME.
SANVIK SAYS STATE
MUST HAVE NEW LAWS
"What is the MatterWith Montana',
By Ole Sanvik.
There are many people especially
In this part of the state that are
asking the question above. I ar)
a t.armer and have been on the jo'l
ever since I came into the great stat
of Montana. nine years ago. And I
amt going to try and answer at least
in part the above query, or in other
words. give mny views of what is
wrong. The farmers and laboring
people have not been representel
(with few exceptions) in our state
or county governments and the rc
suits are that the laws that we have
on our staltute books and that we are
trying to live up to were placed there
about thirty or forty years ago. We
might just as well try to use th,
same shoes that we used thirty or
forty years ago. They would fit about
as well as our present laws fit us atc
the present time.
Laws Out of Date.
When most of our laws were mlad
the chief industry of this state was
ranching and" mining. No one wai
farming to amount to anything. Those
that did raise any grain did so mostl:
to feed their stock. About tell years
ago the government throw open for
homesteads most of northern Mol
tana and the settlers came and sar.
ed to change this from dl'ln1i1ti(.
farming. Now we must sent some
of our own class to change the laws
so that they will fit the present ant
not the past. We can never expect
to get any changes made as long as
we have the men that are there at
this time, as they are the ones that
made thile laws we now have. Bu ,
thank goodness, we have an organiza
tion called the National Noupartisa
League. which is started for the
purpose of educating us to stick t(,
gether and plaillg men ill ontrol ot
our state capitol who will take their
orders from thie farmers anud labores
in place of the Copper Attorneys i'
the Ilennesey Building in lButic.
The League Programl.
Hlave you, brother farmers and cil,
workers and small business men, stt
died the League program and col
sidered what it means to O.,lr .
I anl going to mention the plrozra,
as sollle may not rememilber wI-at t
conllsists of.
Fi rst--Exelmp t ion of farm il -
provelents from taxation.--The la \s
as they now stald put a fine ever\
year on a mnan that dares toi buiild
a decenlt house or barn and othe r
improvements on his farm.
Second---ltural credit banks, ope
ated at cost.--Twelve per cent ard
many times a bonus on top of thl t
is what we are lno i used to.
Third-State terminal elevator',
warehouses, flour mlills, stock yard-.
packing houses, creameries and cold
storage plants.--Does anyone think
this would hurt the producer or cot
sumer In any way?
Fourth-State hail insurance,.-- e
have something called that now. lii
the law was made by someone wl,
did not know much about furniine.
or it was made in the interest of tl e
other fellow.
Fifth-State inspection of doclas.e
and grading of grain.-This sat s
the farmers of North Dakota about
$100.00 per farmer a y.ear.
Sixth--Torren's |and title systexm
-Did you ever stop to think who.,
this would save the Montana farmer
in dollars and cents?
Sesventh -- Non-part isan elet.i..l
law.-Something we hadly need fti
the welfare of all.
Eidghth---Equlna taxalion of rii
roads, nmines, Inlcgr-af, leiefoe, i l ..a
trio. light and pio\\wer coimlpniios al.1
all public utilities ic-n(iporatilns.
Nineth---St!it rural teletfoln sy
tern olperatleil it no:1.
If we 'an lpillt this pma-rsi .
operation, people \\will thein quit asi
ing the questionl above. WeV will ha i
one of the greoatest stales in thb
Ilnion ai s soaon s 'o I: irimIrs at. i
workinig Ipeople ill u t together :lr-i
pull i lthe halrnes's of pmo'.eris' . \\,,
inve' :;ltr ied to w\orly toglo thlr , lt i -;
hnarich ri'ht down the line and sweatp
eri-rytlPlig that looks and smells lil.
^"lhppir iiterests out of o: i way. lu.,t
like our brave borothers and soi,s
I aro.s ithe pond are sweeping tt,
Ill., ild mlake IMonlltanlla a sa'e
place for lenmocracy: a p)laice, w'hee
every iiana, woman and child will he
pionld to live; a place, \lwer every
one will get a square deal and special
privileges to no one.
SOLE SANVIK.

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