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The Hartford herald. (Hartford, Ky.) 1875-1926, November 06, 1912, Image 7

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 0, 1012.
THE HARTFORD HERALD
PAGE SEVEN.
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FREE SEED TESTING IS
) GRANTED TO FARMEBS
Of Kentucky How to Prepare
Samples and Amount Re
quired Of Each.
It may not be generally known to
farmers and others In KentucTcy
that the Kentucky Agricultural Ex
periment Station is well equipped
to test samples that may bo submit
ted with a view of learning their
qutMlty, either as to purity or germ
ination. A new laboratory for thiB
work has been planned and is now
nearlng completion. When the In
cubators and other appliances aro
established, it will be one of the
most complete in this country.
The Station has already won a
reputation for work of thls sort
not only in this country, but in
Europe, and those sending samples
can be assured that they will be
tested well and as promptly as the
facilities will permit. Samples will
be examined in the order In which
they are received.
TttJ get fair tests It is necessary
thMhe samples be taken from a
bulBot after a thorough mixing of
thHeeds. Samples of- Kentucky
blJgass and rye-grass should
coPun two ounces each. Samples
of red clover, sapling clover, alslke
clover, alfalfa, orchard grass, Eng
lish blue-grass and rye-grass should
contain two ounces each. Samples
of Kentucky blue-grass, Canada
blue-grass, red top and timothy
should weigh one ounce each. The
samples should be put In a stout
paper envelope, not In ordinary cor
respondence envelopes because
theo aro easily broken In the pos
offlce and let the seeds escape. .Put
your complete address, plainly writ
ten, on each envelope sent us and
jrward to the Division of Entomol-
gy and Botany, Kentucky Agricul
tural Experiment Station, Lexing
ton, Ky. n writing to us, al-
-ways state whether both purity and
germination tests are wanted.
H. GAItMAN.
Head of Division of Entomology
and Botany, Kentucky Experi
ment Station, Lexington, Ky.
Ys& KENTUCKY SY!
HAD LARGE
NOD
ATTENDANCE
Greenville. Ky.. Oct. 30. The
eighty-fourth session of the Ken.
tucky Synod of th0 Cumberland
Presbyterian Church, which con
vened here yesterday afternoon, is
toeing largely attended. At the
meeting last ovenlng the welcome
on behalf of the churches of Green
ville was extended by the Rev. Dr.
W. R. Henderson, and on behalf of
the fljlty by Judge W. A. Wlckliffe.
The addresses wore responded to
"by the Rev. J. L. Price, of Provi
dence. "
In the organization of the ses
sion the Rev. B. R. Henderson, of
the Cumberland Presbytery, was
elected moderator, this being an
unusual distinction, because Mr.
Henderson waa the only delegate
present from th0 Cumberland Pres-
ytery, which comprises the moun-
aln counties of Eastern Kentucky.
he retiring moderator, th0 Rev.
R. H. Morefleet, of Caneyvllle, did
ot ar.flve yesterday, and the open-
ng sermon was preached by the
ev. J. B. Eshman, of Hopklnsvllle.
Members of the general assembly
oards from n distance who are
resent are the Rev. J. L. Good
ight, of Lincoln, 111.; the Rev. J.
. Duvall, president of the Board
f Missions, of Missouri, and the
Rev. T. Ashburn, of Knoxvllle,
president of the Young People's
loard.
"There could bo no better medi
ae man unamDeriain s tjougn
llemedy. My children were all sick
ith whooping cough. One of them
as iiy.bed, had a high fever and
tas coughing up blood. Our doc
;r gave them Chamberlain's Cough
lomedy 'and the first dose eased
iem. and tnree Domes curea
Biu, u..u ""c , .,
em," says Mrs R. A Donaldson,
Lexington, mi. rur au.o uj
dealers.
'NTFItS MUST HAVE
T IPFVSF WITH THEM
fin compliance with request from
.mhfir of local hunters, who are
thuslastlc over tho new game
vb, and who are anxious that the
t,p enforced In this county, and !
thmJ r .omn who do not
'rstand the law thoroughly, wejPa88lnB ot the measures.
iblis'i below some of the most lm-
rtant points concerning all who
ah to hunt.
ie Idea prevails that when a
tor obtains a license that It J
s him the authority to nunti
n the lands of any farmer with-)by
I his permission. This Is an
legions mistake. A license does
permit a sportsman to hunt
Rn the premises ot another wlth-
obtslnlng his 'consent, and to
It thereon without consent Is
Mail Order
Business
!.'
n
BBBBBBBaaamTC:'' f O-iVwPf"--!'
Hf4& v?l' K H
i-0
iBBBBBBBBBBBBBVtHBBKSMactfiaKJil
Some papers advertise it
WE DON'T.
We know it would hurt
the home trade.
We would rather have the
ads. of local merchants.
FETCH THEM IN!
LET US DO YOUR
PRINTING!
a violation of the law. A person
may hunt upon his own land and
land he has rented without taking
out a license. Members of a family
and tenants on the place may also
hunt upon the farm without a li
cense, but before hunting upon the
lands of another a license must be
obtained, as well as the consent of
the owner of the lands on which he
hunts. A hunter must carry his li
cense with him when In the held.
LESSON IN POLITENESS
HOW CASEY LEARNED
IT
They tell me the following as a
story that the late J. T. Harahan,
former president of the Illinois
Central Railroad, was fond of tell
ing on himself:
Mr. Harahan was sitting In his
office one day, while president of
the road, when a burly Irishman
entered the ofllce.
"Me name's Casey," said he.
"01 want a pass to St. Louis. 01
worruk In th' yar-r-ds."
"That is no way to ask for a
pass," said Mr. Harahan. "You
should Introduce yourself polite
ly. Come back in an hour and try
It again."
At the end of the hour back
came the Irishman. Doffing his
hat, he Inquired:
"Ar're yez Mr. Harahan?"
"I am."
"Me name Is Patrick Casey.
OI've been workln' out in th'
yar-r-ds."
"Glad to know you, Mr. Casey.
What can I do for you?"
"Yez can all go to hell. OI've
got a Job an p pass on th' Wa
bash." Everybody's Magazine.
The chill microbe meets Its fate
in HERBINE. There are thousands
of these germs in the air you
breathe and any derangement of
the liver, stomach or bowels gives
them the opportunity they seek. A
close of HERBINE destroy them,
at once clears them out completely
and promotes a line feeling of
strength and buoyancy. Price 50c.
Sold by Hartford Drug Co., Hart
ford, Ky Donovan & Co., Beaver
Dam, Ky., 44t2
COMPULSORY SCHOOL
LAW IS PROVING GOOD
The new compulsory school law
which requires all children between
the agos of seven and twelv0 years
to attend school upon a penalty, Is
having a most beneficial effect on
the dally attendance in tho rural
onrinnln Tli . nnw low naotlv Vina
DViiivuiDi tuc nun jmi it; muo-
ing the salary of teachers upon tho
attendnnce at schoo, ,, also hav
. ,, . o .,, iaanhnra nr
I using their best efforts to increase
weir enrollments, in iaci we iwo
new laWB tnal went into enect tnia
I year are having a most direct and '
satisfactory effect. Under the law
he attendance In the county has
ben Increased at least 10 per cent.;
ver 'an year, me iramers oi we.
new law aro 10 oe congratulated
un-lver the good resulting from the
Chilblains, frosted feet or hands.
can be cured with on0 or two appli-1
cations qf BALLARD'S SNOW LIN
IMENT. It nulcklv relieves Itchlncr
or tenderneB8 of the flesh. Price1
25 B0 d ., 00 bottlo o.,d
Hartford . Drug COii Hartford
. Vv 'n.nnv,n . r Twvai. nm
I Ky., Donovan & Co., Beaver Dam,
Ky.
.44t2
s Th0 follow who Is always look
ing for a Job Is generally an adept
at finding fault.
SAYS TROUBLE IS NOT
ALWAYS WITH THE LAND
But With Farmers in Failing
To Adopt the Proper
Crop Rotation.
' Judson C. AVelllver, Washington
correspondent of Pnrm and Fire
side, writes In the current Issue of
that periodical an interesting ac
count or the United States Bureau
of Soils. Ho says in part:
"Dr. Milton Whitney, chief of the
soils bureau, Insists that proper cul
tivation and rotation will mako
run-down soils produce again as
well as ever. 'The trouble is not
with the land, but with the people
farming it, and tholr methods,'
stoutly declares Dr. Whitney.
"The Bureau of Soils Is trying to
ttnd out all about the changes In
soils that are wrought as a result of
cultivation. It declares that the
mineral and metal basis changes
very, very little. The products of
vegetable and animal growth, on
the other hand, change greatly and
modify soil qualities very much.
One will bo useful and benevolent,
another vicious and harmful.
"A certain soli, once producing
excellent crops of wheat had be
come "exhausted." Cow-peas
ground very fine were applied and
it was found thoy had restored the
soli; It produced a good crop, and
"did the thing three times in succes
sion; then the soil lapsed back Into
its first condition of non-productivity.
"Why did the cow-peas have that
effect? The Bureau took llke pro
portions of' potash, phosphoric acid
and nitrates the plant-food ele
ments of cow-peas and put them
Into the soil; and It didn't produce,
the effect of restoring Its fertility.
The point seemed to be that these
various elements, mixed together
and applied to the ground, didn't
have the genuine cow-pea effect.
"Doctor Whitney In a recent ad
dress gave this explanation of the
operation within the soil of various
agents introduced through rotation
of crops. He seems to have a con
siderable backing of authority and
experience In favor of his theory
that fertilization is, at least, much
less necessary, If scientific rotntlon
Is followed. His bureau's problem
Is to develop the correct scientific
rotation for various solls and cli
mates. '
ooooooooooooooo
O HOP YEAST DREAD. O
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Take Hops, one fourth ounce
(one handful); pared potatoes,
four pounds; salt, one half pint;
sugar, one half pint; ginger, one
tablespoonful; water, four quarts;
yeast (home-brewed), one half
pint. Boll the potatoes In three
quarts of water and pass them
(with the water) through the col
lander; boll the hops ten minutes In
one quart of water; strain the wa
ter on the potatoes; add the su
gar, salt and ginger. The whole
should measure five quarts; If It
lacks, add tepid water. When luke
warm, add the yeast, mix well and
leave In a warm place till light;
this will be Indicated by bubbles on
the surface; It does not Increase In
hulk like thicker yeast. Keep It
In a covered crock, and in using,
stir it from the bottom. A gill Is
sufficient for one quart of milk or
water nnd the bread will require
little, if any, additional salt. In a
dry, cool place, this yenst will keep
for months.
Not On Exhibition.
Jimmie had been a naughty boy,
wo presume, but there Is a nte of
pathos with the humor of tho con
versation he conducted with the lit
tle girl next door on the day after
his sixth birthday, says the Cleve
land Plain Dealer. I
"Show me what you got for your
birthday, Jlmmle," begged the lit-1
tie girl.
"I won't do it," said Jimmie.
"Oh, please. Ain't I, nice to
you?"
"Yep. Your're all right."
"Then show me what you got."
"I darsen't honest, Marg-rot, I
darsen't!"
Investigation revealed tnat the
poor kid had received ncthlng but
a spanking.
SOMETHING ABOUT THE
MANAGEMENT OF HOGS
A pig Is nothing more nor less
than a machine whose function Is
to convert farm products Into sala
ble meat products. Very often he
Is rated as a scavenger, fed only
because he squeals, and Is looked
upon merely as a convenient source
of disposing of refuse products.
There Is no animal that responds
to feeding and decont treatment
more promptly than the prg, and he
ia a dependable source of profit If
given average care and fair treat-
ment. It must be remembered
that tho most economical gains are
made When the animal Is young, I.
e., under 9 months of age, and that
gains are costly after full growth
and maturity are reached. Pigs
gain most economically when from
4 months to 10 months ot age, and,
generally speaking, It costs more to
put on the last 100 pounds of
weight of a 300-pound hog than It
does to produce the first 200 pounds
of body weight. A feeder that does
not secure an average sain of ono
pound per day from birth with his
pigs, either has Inferior specimens
or does not feed and care for them
In tho most up-to-date manner. Tho
most profitable tlme to market a fat
hog is when he weighs from 225
to 250 pounds live weight, and he
should tip the scales at these fig
ures when 8 months old. Larger
gains are common with our best
feeders. The pig that will develop
Into the heaviest quality hog, In the
shortest length of time, and make
the best gains from a given amount
of feed fed, 13 the Ideal pork-making
unit. New Jersey Live Stock
Commission.
J.OOOOOOOOOOOOOU
O LUKE MrLl'KK SAYS. O
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Men are not all Ingrates. Ten
years ago a Montana woman re
fused to marry a man, and last
week he left her $250,000.
Love may be blind, but It can
always tell when there is a dime
missing from the pay envelope on
Saturday night.
Once upon a time a man Invented
a common-sense skirt for women.
It wu3 roomy and gave the wearer
perfect freedom. It did not fit
tight across the hips and had no
crease In the rear. It did not show
thf shape of the limbs, and you
couldn't ?ee through It. It was
warm and comfortnble. The poor
sucker o'arved to death.
A woman gets tired of cooking
for her husband. But how she
does enjoy cooking for an outsider
who praises her efforts!
A man who bragged that he
cussed, smoked, played poker and
shot craps was married by a woman
who wanted to reform him. Now
he has added booze drinking and
tobacco chewing to his other ac
complishments. One good way to start trouble Is
to clip a paragraph out of a news
paper ad then bring the paper
home. Your wlf0 will bo sure to
see the hole In the paper, and she
will worry herself sick trying to
Imagine what It was that you didn't
want her to sse.
Nowadays If a man finds that the
girl he I as married has her own
hair, her own hips nnd her own
biiBt, he should overlook a little
thing like n bad temper and con
sider himself lucky.
Married While You Woik.
A Kansas Judge established a
precedent last week by marrying a
couple In a broomcorn field. The
couple had eloped and found the
Judge at work In his field, as he
was short of hands. He married
them upon condition that they
would work out the charges In that
field, which they did.
' i i
GHIIdrwrt Cry
FOR FLETCHER'S
CASTO R I A
oo ooooooooooooooo
O FIRST CllltlSTIAN CHURCH. O
O W. II. Wiight, Pastor. C
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Preaching eve.:- fourth Sunday
morning nnd een;np.
Bible School every Sunday at
9:30 a. m.
Communion service at 10:30 a.m.
Prayer meeting every Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock.
Senator Heyburn, whose chief
claim to distinction" was his bitter
hatred of the South and who wa8 a
continual waver of the bloody shirt,
died a few days ago. He was a Re
publican and represented the State
of Idaho.
What oil is to machinery polite
ness is to every-day life.
A FACT
ABOUT THE "BLUES"
What Is known as the Blues"
Is seldom occasioned by actual exist
ing external conditions, but In the
great majority of cases by a dis
ordered LIVER.,
THIS IS A FACT
which may be demonstra
ted by trying a course of
Tutt'sPills
They ceatrelaadret-Ictatbe LIVER.
-They brlaghopeaadbouyancy to tho
ariad. lThey bring health aad elastic
ity t the body. ,
TAKE NO aUaWKiTUTK.
CTM'H' U ii77rrM
flf
i
m.
jftfcgelaulePrcparationTorAs-
slmilating UtcFoodanclReguIa-
ung mestoioacns anauowcis 01
Promotes Digestion-Cheerfulness
and nest.ConMins neither
Opium.Morplunc nor Mineral.
up:
Nc
OTNAltCOTIC.
Jbnpe OUHrSUUHPnXJIER
lcryjun Seal'
1
fcdulUSJ-
jwuefofd
BiurtaialrSiiia i
llSrmSrfJ.
J
JlmifudSUgnr
tEtiffjrwn nay
ApcrTecl Remedy forConslipn
Ron, Sour Stomach.Diarrhoca
Worms .Convulsions .Fcvcrish
ness nndLos9 OF Sleep.
FacSinilo Signature of
NEW VOT?K.
U
.1
iff
!
EXACT COPY OF WRAPPER.
7VIOL.ES HND IflZKRTS
O lii'inoved with MOI.KSOKK, without pain or (limner, no mutter how O
O Iiii'kc or how far rnl-ed above the Mir face of the .skin. And they O
O will never return and no tiuce or cur will ln lelt. MOIiKSOKF O
O Is applied directly to tin MOMS or .ltT, which entirely dlap- O
O pears in about Mv days, killing the Kcrm and leaving the skin O
0 smooth and iintuial. O
O .MOI.KSOFK Is put up only in One Dollar bottles. O
O Each bottle Is forwarded postpaid on receipt of price, Is neatly O
O packed in a plain cise, accompanied by full directions, and con- O
O tains enough remedy to remove eight or ten ordinary MOLKS or O
O WARTS. We sell MOI.KSOFF under a positive OUAIIANTEB If O
O It falls to remove your MOLE or WART, we will promptly refund O
O tho dollar. Letters from personages we all know, together with O
O much valuable Information, will ho mailed free upon request. I
O Guaranteed by the Florida Distributing Co., under the Food
O and Drugs Act, June 30, 190G. Sella!, No. 4.1G33.
O Please mention this paper Florida Distributing Company,
O when answering I'cnsacoln, Florida. O
oooooooooooo ooooooooooooooooooo
Light and Power Company
(IXmill'OKATKD)
E. G. BARRASS MGR.
Will trirc your house at cost. Electric
Lights are clean, healthy and safe. No
home or baslnrss house should he without
them when within reach.
JOB PRINTING.
The kind that makes you look good in the eyes of tbe whole
sale dealer and the city merchant that makes your neighbors
proud of you, Increases respect and sets you right in the minds
of all people; this kind is
NEATLY DONE
And promply delivered by the HARTFORD HERALD. Every
body in any kind of business needs Printed Stationery Noie
Heads. Cnrds. Envelopes, Statements, Etc. nowadays. Prices
the lowest; work the best. Call or write us.
She HERALD. Hertford. Ky.
HARTFORD HERALD'S
Clubbing Hates
FOR YEAR SUBSCRIPTIONS.
Tho Herald and Weekly Courler-Iounial $1.50
" " " Weekly Louisville Herald 1.35
' " Louisville Dally Kvcnin Post 3.50
" " " Farmers l!oiie Journal 1.50
" " " Dally Owentiboro Mcnscncr 3.50
" " " Cincinnati Weekly Knquirer 1.33
" ' Twice-a-week Owcnshoro Messenger 1.75
" " " Dally Ow-cn.sboro Inquirer 3.23
" " " Twice-n-wcek Owcnsboro Inquirer 1.75
" " ". Kentucky Farmer Louisville 1.23
" " " Itryan's Commoner . . , i 1.30
" " " Thrlce-a-week New York World 1.05 i
" " McCall's Magazine Fashions 1.30 V
" " " Norman K. Mack's National Magazine 1.18
" " " Llpplncott's Magazine 2.70
Address THE HERALD, Hartford, Ky.
CASTORIA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have
Always Bought
Bears the
Signature
of
Use
For Over
Thirty Years
CASTORIA
TWt CKNTAU- COM PANT. NtWVOftKOtT
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