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Vermont daily transcript. (St. Albans, Vt.) 1868-1870, May 22, 1868, Image 2

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VEEMONT DAILY TKA.jLSrSOrMP035 MAI 32, 1S6S.
Vci'Jiiont Daily Transcript.
Fill DAY, MAY !!:, 1SG8.
!' Nominations.
The National Republican Convention
has accomplished Its work, and the
names of Its chosen nominees, now the
chosen nomineesof the Republican par
ty, are made known to the world. Un
der the circumstances we may with ap
parent certainty say that the names of!
our next President and Vice-President!
are known, for the election of Gun.
Grant, and of any fairly representative
man who might be placed upon the
ticket with him, are as much predeter
mined as his nomination was.
Of Gen. Grant's history, Tittle need be
said for the informatlon'of the people. It
is seldom that a man as well known re
ceives a call to the Presidential chair,
and as seldom that a nominee possesses
the respect of all people, friends and
foes, in so high a degree. Ho eminently
lit is he deemed to be for the executive
ofllce, that each of the great parties in
this country has named him at some
time with approval for the ofllce; and
upon the knowledge of his general qual
ifications, and aside from his special
opinions upon polities, has urged his
claims for the Presidency. The sagaci
ty of party leaders upon both sides has
pointed him out as a lit man for the
Presidency, and there could be no high
er assurance of his iitness, except the
grand proof of his personal history, so
inwoven with the history of national
success. His nomination will 1111 the
country with joy, and in the cars of the
soldiers who remember the few years
that are past with any satisfaction or
fondness, the news will produce some
thing like a material thrill. Itisthecall
to another campaign, and the sublime
victory of peace.
The nominee for the Vice-Presidency,
lion. Schuyler Colfax, is also well
known to the country, he havingserved
the country in seven Congresses, and as
Speaker of the House of Representatives
during two terms and a part of the third
(the present). He was born in New
York city, and is now forty-five years
old. He has followed the editorial pro
fession since 18-15, and his election and
re-election to Congress, and as Speaker,
arc sulllcient endorsement of his integ
rity and ability to secure for him the
confidence of the people. For obvious
reasons the people of the Eastern States
preferred primarily a man from their
own section to fill the place to which
Mr. Colfax is nominated ; but since this
local partiality cannot be now gratified,
wo believe it will be generally conceded
that the choice of Mr. Colfax is one em
inently fit to be made. His education
in the Speaker's chair has qualified
him for the similar duties ,of the Vice
Presidential office ; and in the possible
event of his promotion to the Presiden
cy, there would be no fear that another
"Moses" had stumbled snto the highest
seat of the nation. AVe think that the
nominations of the Convention are ju
dicious, wise, and with usual ell'ort they
will bo ratified heartily at the polls.
The resolutions of the Convention
will be presented to our readers when
correct copies of them are icceived by
us.
A New J'arty.
The talk about the formation of a new
party with Chief-Just ice Chase at his
head -will, we believe, amount to noth
ing. The Democrats are for the mo
ment quite loud in their praises of the
Chief-Justice, but they have not the re
motest idea of putting him in nomina
tion for the Presidency, any more than
they have of nominating the Tennessee
alderman whose cause they apparently
so warmly espouse. They will nomin
ate an out-and-out Democrat, one who
has been thoroughly identified with tho
party and never fell from grace. Who
the unfortunate man will be is a matter
of uncertainty. Present indications are
that Mr. Pendleton will be their candi
date, but itwouldnotbebtraugo if some
thing should turn up between this time
and the 4th of July, the day of their con
vention, that would operate against his
nomination. Tho Democratic leaders
are not fools, and they will look the
ground over carefully and put into the
field their most available man. Of this
tho Republicans may rest assured and
prepare themselves for a hard contest.
It seems to us that those Republicans
who desire to run Mr. Chase, little un
derstand tho temper of any considerable
number of that parly, If they expect
to receive the support or countenance of
such men as Fessenden, Grimes and
Trumbull they will bo mistaken. All
these gentlemen, It is stated on tho best
of authority, aro for Gen. Grant. Jlo
causo those men felt it to bo their duty
to vote for thcacqulttaloftho President It
hyno means follows that tlieyhavo desert
ed their parly. Thereto no evidence but
that they fully agree with tho Republi
can party on all leading questions, ex
cept that of impeaching tho President,
and they will do all In their power to
further Republican principled and bring
about tho triumphant election of Gen,
Ulysses S. Grant. Without tho aid
of such men It seems to us It requires no
prophet to confidently predict, that all
attempts to form a now party will prove
misorahle failures.
For 11m Vmiwnt 7Von.eWjrf.
'I'louyhing and Ptottfjliy,
Ploughing 1b nnnrt but not all plough
men arc artists. j
To plough well requires that the
ploughman understand his business, ,
and have a plough precisely adapted to
the soil which he would plough ; two j
conditions rarely met at the same time.
Indeed it may well be questioned wheth
or as many as one ploughman in a thou-1
sand has a real idea of just what he
would accomplish and to what extent j
he is really accomplishing the object I
sought.
The stille-t clay and the lighest sand
are ploughed with the same implement
and in the same manner. It is a fact
well established by frequent and thor
ough trials that a still' clay soil properly
laid up in lap furrows will one season
with another produce much heavier
crops than If laid fiat. The reason is
obvious to the most casual observer. I
have a neighbor who tells of ploughing
up a field that had been laid down to
grass several years before and yet the
sods that were turned in at the previous
ploughing were found to be in a very
perfect state of preservation. They had
been turned into tho bottom of the fur
row perfectly Hat and harrowed over
till they were as hermetically sealed as
if they had been just put into a glas
jar and sealed up with wax. Of course
the crops had never received any bene
fit from the humors thus stored away.
My neighbor frequently cites this case
as proof positive that all deep plough
ing Is wrong but it only proves that
one kind is not profitable it does not
prove half so much as my neighbor
claims for it.
Again very much ploughing is so illy
done as to render the after cultivation
much more laborious and unsuccessful.
All through the country the smooth
est and fairest fields are so miserably
ploughed that the furrows present a
broken and uneven surface and many
bits of sods are unturned while all over
the field little tufts of grass or weeds
are seen sticking up, though not more
unsightly however than injurious to the
eropthat is sown upon the field.
A sandy or gravelly soil that cannot
be laid too fiat is not unfrcquently
thrown into unsightly ridges with deep
dead furrows between and all exposed
to the winds and sun to the very mani
fest detriment of the cultivator.
Such a soil being open, porous, per
meable requires only to be invertedto
cover every green thing out of the way
of tho crops to be grown, and should be
treated with an implement of an en
tirely dillerent character from that re
quired for the clayey soil.
Rut the bad work made by a plough
not adapted to its work is not more to be
deprecated than the unnecessary labor
imposed upon the team in tho use of
such a plough.
The recent trial of ploughs under the
auspices of the New England Agricul
tural Society (at Amherst, Mass) con
firmed the already well established fact
that any attempt to make a plough
without having, first studied the nature
and peculiarities of the i-oil in which it
is to be used is all labor lost and I be
lieve it moreover confirmed every look
er on in the opinion that mere occular
inspection is a very unsafe method of
determining the comparative merits of
diilerent ploughs. The practical res
ults of that trial, if the people hut heed
its teachings, must be a much improved
system of ploughing at a considerably
reduced expenditure of motive power,
The Ames Plow Co., of Boston, seems
to have been remarkably fortunate in
adapting the several kinds of ploughs
to the requirements of various soils and
I cannot but commend inmost hearty
terms the science and skill displayed by
their designer, Mr. Samuel A. Knox, in
their series of ploughs known as
Knox's patent.
Of tho seven medals awarded at the
trial they took five, ,a circumstance of
siillicient Importance to justify me in
naming the concern without exposing
me to the charge of Invidiousness I sin
cerely trust. O. S. Bliss.
Massacji usetts Democracy. The
Democrats of Massachusetts met in
Stato Convention at Worcester on the
O'h, and elected J. G. Abbott, and Jo
siah Bardwell, of Boston, G. W. Gill of
Worcester, and Reuben Noble of West
field, delegates at large to the Demo
cratic National Convention, and Messrs.
Sweelserof Lowell, J. K. Tarbox of
Lawrence, George Johnson of Bradford,
and T. F. Phinkott of Pittslield, alter
nates. A resolution which pledged tho
Massachusetts delegation to George H.
Pendleton was promptly laid upon tho
table. Pendleton stock isevidently not
very good in the Old Bay State.
Cheshire Railroad. Tho stuck
holders of this road mot recently at
Kecno, N. H., and re-elected tho old
board of directors, as follows :
E. Murdock, Jr., Thomas M.Edwards,
Charles W. Cartwright, Georgo Hunt
ington, William A. Brlgham, Henry
Elliot, Samuel Gould.
Tho receipts of tho road for the year
Gliding Dec. 1807 were $088,409, and the
net Income $80,097. Tho road seems to
bo In excellent running condition for
which much credit attaches to Superln?
tondent Stewart, and his elllclont'subor
dlnatcs, among whom wo may mention
our friend, Oharlos G, Chandler,
National lirjmttiran Contention.
a
The National Republican Convention,
which met in Crosby's Opera House, in
Chicago, on the 20th instant, was called
to order by Gov. Ward, of Now Jersey,
Chairman of the National Executive
Committee, at half past twelve o'clock.
Gov. Ward soke of the purpose of the
Convention to select candidates and to
declare that the National Republican
parly would take no step backward on
Reconstruction; to declare that tho war
was not a failure : to sustain the Union,
the slaves who nave been tried, and
with the Union men of the South, to
help to restore the Union.
rney were nere ic organize vietorv.
and he believed their acts would meet
the approval of the country. An allu
sion to Gen. Grant was received with
hearty cheers.
Prayer was ofiered by Bishop Simp
son. He closed by reciting the Lord's
Prayer, in which many of the delegates
joined.
Gen. Carl Shurz was made tempo
rary Chairman.
Ho was received with cheers and wav
ing of hats. He also spoke briefly, cx
toling the past of the Republican party.
It has overthrown tho prejudices of
caste, and saved the nation and freed the
bondman, and now the Southern States
are returning with equal rightssecurod.
Two great problems aro still before us.
Wc must save the country from tho con-
sc jiiences of reaction, and this will re-
quire devotion and wisdom.
They must not let provieation or res-
cntmeut lead them away from the path '
of dignity. They must be just to the
soldiers, to tho Southern union men, to
freedmen, to national creditors. They
must crush corruption inside or outside
of the party.
Though there are some discourage
ments, there was nothing to dishear
ten. Victory would be true to the party
if it was true to Itself. Applause. The
American people will not trust the men
who yesterday tried to destroy the pub
lic, and would now degrade it.
Three temporary Secretaries were then
appointed.
The name of the Committee on Cre
dentials was called for.
A discussion about tho California dele
gates followed, and the question of dis
puted delegates from that State was re
fencd to a committee.
A gentleman called attention to the
fact that tho Southern States had been
called.
The Secretary said they were included
in the call of convention.
It was voted to call the names of all
the States.
Maryland having contested seats, the
delegation presented no name.
It was moved that Colorado be called.
A Wot Virginia man opposed this,
and said that the Southern States should
not vote.
Judge Spalding, of Ohio, opposed the
admission of Colorado unless other ter
ritories are also submitted.
The whole question concerning the
territories was referred to the Commit
tee on a Permanent Organization which
was appointed after further discussion
about the Southern Slates declarations.
The Committee on Resolutions was
appointed, and it was voted to refer all
resolutions to that committee without
debate.
Ohio favors admitting the Southern
delegations.
The convention voted to call Colora
do. A discussion then ensued on call
ing the other territories.
A committee from the Soldiers' and
Sailors' Convention was admitted, and
presented the proceedings of that body,
after which the convention adjourned.
The Convention reassembled on the
-1st, when calls were made for various
speeches.
Gen. John Cochrane, of New York,
took the rostrum, but the Committee on
Resolutions appeared at 12 o'clock and
he retired.
The Resolutions Committee submit
ted their report as follows :
Tho first congratulates the country on
the universal success of the Reconstruc
tion policy of Congress, as evinced in
Hie recent action of 'Southern States.
The second is that equal suffrage at
South is demanded and must be main
tained. In loyal States the question
belongs to the people.
Tho third declares repudiation a na
tional crime. Tho national honor re
quires tho payment of indebtedness to
all creditors, according to the letter and
spirit of the law.
Tho forth states that taxation should
be equalized and reduced rapidly.
The fifth states that the national debt
should be extinguished by redemption,
and that It is the duty of Congress to
reduce tho rate of interest when it can.
Tho sixth states that capitalists should
loan money at lower rates of Interest
while repudiation is threatened.
The seventh advises economy in na
tional expenditures.
Tho eighth deplores the death of Lin
coln, and regrets Johnson's accession to
tho Presidency, and denounces John
son as having abused the cxecutlvo
power, and having opposed reconstruc
tion in all ways, as having been justly
Impeached of high crimes nnd misde
meanors, (great applause,) and properrly
pronounced guilty by thirty-five Sena
tors (great euthusiasm.)
The ninth presents tho European doc
trine of once a subject, and urges pro
tection of American citizens, native or
naturalized, wherever he may bo, and
declares if tho duty of government to
interfere in his behalf.
Tho tenth eulogizes soldiers and sea
men, The eleventh is for the encouragement
of foreign emigatlon.
Tho twelfth declares sympathy with
all oppressed people.
Gen. Cochrane moved to add to the im
peachment resolution that nineteen
Senators voted improperly,' but tho pre
vious question being answered on tho
report of tho Committee on Resolutions,
ho withdrew his motion, and tho report
of tho Committee was unanimously
adopted.
Tho commltteo reported an additional
resolution that this convention shall
not dlssolvo but shall convono after ad
journment when called together by tho
' Tho resolution was adopted.
I Gen. Carl Schurz ofl'crcd an additional
resolution recognizing tho principles of
I tho Declaration of Independence as the
foundation of Democracy. Also, ares-!
olutlon commending the magnanimity
which received the reconstructed rebel's
back.
The revolutions were adopted.
General Logan arose and said: in
the name of the loyal citizens, soldiers, I
and sailors of this great republic of the ,
United States of America in the name;
of Loyalty, of Liberty, of Humanity, ;
of Justice, and in the name of tho Na-
tlonal Union Republican Party 1 nomi
nate as candidate for t he Chief Mngh-'
tracy of this nation Ulysses S. Grant. !
The whole convention rose to their I
feet amid great cheering and waving of i
hats and handkerchiefs. The applause
was prolonged and ended in three cheers J
for Gen. Grant. The hand plaved ,
"Hall to the Chief." ' j
The states were then called, and each
voted for Grant. The vote of Georgia
was announced by Gov. Brown. who1
said that Georgia Republicans, many of
whom were the original secessionists,
recognized the maxim, " Enemies of
war; in peace, friends." During the
progress of the call, each successive vote
was received with great enthusiasm.
General Sickles, arising to cast the New
York vote, was received with cheers.
The territories were represented by
two each, except Colorado, which was
allowed six.
The chair announced that 050 votes
had been cast, and all for Gen..Goant.
As the vote was announced, a new
drop curtain in the rear of the stage was
uncovered, presenting a fine portrait of
Urani supported ny ijinerty, and above
was the motto. "Match him."
The band then played "Hail to the
Chief," and ''Yankee Doodle."
On motion three times cheers were
given for the nominee.
The Convention joined in singing
" Rally Round the Flag" accompanied
by the bunds, then the enthusiasm was
indescribable.
On motion the President was author
ized to telegraph tho nomination to
Gen. Grant.
Mr. Seolield of New York, moved to
proceed with the nomination for Vice
President.
The first ballot was as follows : Wade,
149; Fenton, 11T; Wilson, 110; Colfax,
112 ; Curtin, 51 ; Hamlin, 28; Harlon,
10; Crcswell, 14; Pomcroy, 0 ; Kelley,
0. Total 020.
The following is all the proceedings
of the Convention which have conic to
hand up to the time of going to press.
Eds.
Millinery and Dress Making.
Miss Dumas would respectfully announce to
tho Ladies of Kt. Albans and vicinity, that sho
lias just returned from market witha
NEW and STYLISH ASSORTMENT
-or-
MILLINERY GOODS
oonristixo or
BONNETS1AND HATS:
FAWN,
NORMA,
LA ROSE ,
CRESCENT,
CONSTANCE
CHATEAU,
SUNNYSIDE
fi: consKTs,
'III HEAD LACE COJ.LA 1M,
Monixixn sets.
Kin a loves,
111. A I) UAJiJliS.
LACES,
FLOWERS,
RIBBONS,
EMBROIDERY,
FRINGES,
GIMP,
BUTTONS,
&e., &o.
Our htocl; of Mourning Goods is complete. Our
roojns arc neat and tasty, and visitors and cus
tomers will iind a pleasant welcome to tlicm.
Hats and Emmets in groat variety, and at low
nriees.
ROOMS over FULTON MARKET,
MAIN STREET,
St. Alb.uiH, Vermont.
Hay 2 th, 18-J8. d7-tf
WARD &. BURNES,
Dealers in alll kinds of
GROCERIES,
LAKE ST., ST. ALBANS,
First door above tho St. Albans House, keep
constantly on hand a full assortment of
TAmxxrs: groceries:
Consisting of
Flour,
Meal,
Provender,
Shorts,
And
Feed
Of all. kinds ;
Pork,
Fish,
Hams,
Sngar,
Teas,
Lard,
fresh liuttcr
And all sorts of articles usually kept in business
of their kind. Highest cash price paid, fur all
kinds of country Produce,
GIVE US A CALL.
dl-tf WARD & RURNES.
171 OK SPRING STYLES OF HATS AND CAPS,
; call on WM N. SMITH .t CO.
&0 TO VM. X. SMITH & CO'S far Grav's
Patent Moulded Collar,
JRiemovecl.
DR. S.S. CLARK has removed to i-outli Main
Street. Oflico at his reside
St. Albans, Vt., May. 2, 18CC ' 80-tf
CLOTHING, Clothing for Spring at
WM. J. SMITH .V CO'S.
1710R NEW SPRING SUITS OF ALL KINDS,
call at WM. N. 8M1TH A CO'S. 1
PANTS and Vost, all kind, ut , n
WM. N. SMITH A CO'S.
FOR SPING STYLES OF PANTS AND VEST
call nt W.M. N. SMITH A CO'S.
SADDLERY, C ARMAGH,
BUILDING- HARDWARE.
We haui the largost and besrassorted Htocl; of
poods or eery dosertption, in tho above line, to
In- found in the State. As ngonts for the largest
licltini; l'actorios, we keep a supply of
LEA THER BELTING
Of all sizes on hand. Wo offer a full and com
plete ast'oftment of
Carriage and Harvest Aral-era' Sappl ',J
And aro constantly receiving consignments iiPa
superior article of Oak and Hemlock Harness
Leather, Patent Collar and Russet, drain and
Split Skirting and Winker. Hard and soft Dash,
Ennanicled Oil Top and
O Ji A 1 Ar li O O T L E A T IT EH.
ALSO
CARPETING AND Oil CLOTH,
Which we oiler at a low cash llgure.
MoGOWAN ,v JiltOWX,
.i. ntornixiiiiAjt ji'how .v, i St. Albans, VI.
or.oiKii; w. mtow.w t dl-tf
Of dill'eieit pat terns.
OIL
.SHADES,
CURTAIN . '
FIXTUHES,
' ' COuI).,
AND
TASSELS.
A!so,
F U R N I T U R E
Of all kinds, jn-st received, at
Id-tf II. LIVINGSTON ,V SONS.
THE PEOPLE'S DRUGSTORE!
riIHE subscriber otVersfor sale to tho people of
JL St. Albans, Franklin County and Vicinity, a
very w ell selected stock of choice
Drugs, Chemicals, Uwinoiiis &r,
Perfumeries and Fancy Articles generally such
as are kept in a llrst class City Drug Store.
I'A TEST MJDC1XICS.
HAIlt HESTOltEliS. -Mrs. Allen's, Hall's,
King's, Maltha Washington, WhIisIci-'h, Sterl
ing's, Barrett's, Shedd's, Mexican .vc, .Ve.
TltUSSES,
SUPPOUTEIIK,
SHOULDER
HIJACKS,
AO., AO
Choice Druggists' Groceries !
Such as pure spices, Cream Tartar, Soda, Mus
tard, Soaps, Flavoring Extracts, Farina, Corn
Starch, Y beaten Giits, Ac.
J'rcsrriittions Carefully I'rejxtred
And Druggists' and Physicians' orders solicited.
This store will not be undersold by any on goods
of the sanio quality, but will sustain, at all
events, its reputation for cheapness and relia
hilitv, and in all eases wo shall bt happy to re
ceive our customers, and wait on tlieni with
proper care and attention.
Dr. A. M. Plant, late ot'Milton, will bo pleased
to receive, all his friends and aecpiaintaneos.
ST. ALBANS LIQUOR AGENCY.
Pure Liipi i I'M constantly on hand for Medicinal
purposes.
dl-tf
8. 1!. DAY, Agent.
VICTOR ATWOOD,
WllOIXSAI.E AN1 liKTAII. DlIAUUl IX
STEEL,
GLASS,
NAILS,
OIL,
I'AIXTS,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
SEE DS
' MECHANICS TOOLS,
SHELF
HAliDWAIW
AND
G AMU AGE
MAKERS
STOCK.
BARNES' BLOCK, LAKE ST.
St. Albans, May 14, 18G8.
d3-tf
THE ST. ALBANS BRIGADE BAND
Aro prepared to furnish music, for
FIREMEN and
MILITARY
. PARADES,
PICNICS,
EXCURSIONS,
DANCES,
And on other occasions whero Rand and String
Music is required.
Orders, addressed to
GEORGE E. KINSLEY,
on to
W. H . SMITH,
At tho Trcniont Houao, will recoivo prom pt at
tention, Persons desiring tho services of this Rand on
tho 1th of July, should hand in their bids before
thoIUtliofJune. dl-tf
( 1 ENTS' FURNISHING GOODS OF ALL
X KINDS, you will llnd at
YiU. li, KAUTU iV UUB,
r i rna pah ir''(
iM noeciir. C'
i'Auuuik. JUilUXU IV Jill fll
LAKE STREET, ST. ALBANS,
Constantly keep on hand a fresh and lain sup
piy oi i in. nest
FAMILY GROCERIES.
Consisting of
Flour, Grain, Feed,
Butter, pork, Fish,
Vegetables, Etc,,
Sugars, Molassen
Teas, Coftees.
Spices &;o
And indeed an assortment eoiisistiiiK of artt.-hs
tooiuiineroiis-toinenti(,n, but all sunh as are
needed for family use, and at the most reasomi
bio prices. Call and examine our slock and
prices, and satisfy yourselves.
SCOF1EL1) .v VINCENT
-t. Albans, Mnv 12.
dl-tf
ON
LAKE STREET.
MORTON & PERCY!
Ibniii!; boilKbt of G. W. illodfjutt his now and
elitil" stock of
CLOTHING,
FURNISHING
GOODS,
HA TS
AND -CAPS,
ROOTS
AND
SHOES
Feci satisfied in saying to the public that they
can sell f,'oods as low as can bo bought in Frank'
lin County. All wo ask is to have customers
come in, and satisfy themselves, before pur
chasing elsewhere. We have, and are leeeiviii?,
all tliA new styles from market, e.msisting of
READY MADE CLOTHING,
FURNISHING
GOODS,
LINEN
AND
PAPER
COLLLARS
Of endless varieties, and a largo and well selected
Stock of
Boots and Shoes, Rubber Coats
and Boots,
Which we will soil low for oash. We have the
largest assortment of
HATS AND OAFS
To bo found in Northern Vermont, if you don't
believe if, call and seo for youi'si'lvm. Our
Clothing is New and Desirable, consisting of
SPRING
OVER
SACKS,
TRICOT
SUITS,
FANCY
SPRING
SUITS,
RLACK
SUITS,
LIGHT
COLORED
OASSlMKIiE PANTS
PANTS AND
AND VESTS,
VESTS, LINEN
LINEN VESTS,
PANTS, CUF1-S,
TIES, AND RUTTONS,
Boys' and Youths' Clothing,
Wo have a few Winter Over Coats left, that
wo will sell at a big discount from cost, for cash.
Remember tho plaeo, Two doors West of tho
American House, Lake Street.
MORTON ,V PERCY.
Hr.xitv G. MoitTON. Auuiivr N. Pr.ncv.
ld-tf Formerly with Win. N. Smith ,V Co
SPECIAIjJOTIOE,
"VT7"E would give this, notico to our former
V friends and patrons, that on and after tho
1st iliiy of .Tunc, ItiOS, ayo shall sell our goods
for
STRICTLY CASH
AND
ONE PHTCJD ! !
Havinj; bad sutllcient oxpcrieiico in tho credit
system of doing business, wo bavo concludod to
make a change, and try tho Cash System be
hoving that wo can sell our goods cheaper by
adopting such a rule Although a novelty in St.
Albans, wo aro determined to try tho plan. Wo
havo on hand u largo stock of
READY MADE CLOTHING-
AND
Furnishing Goods,
Which under this plan wo will agrco to soil l!
per ecu lest than any other tlrm in town that
do business on tho credit system,
Tuko notico and govern youiself neeordlugly.
SMITH cV FOSTER,
NO. 2 , DA R R O W BLOCK,
w217-3iii St. AluaiiB.Vt. d7-lm
wi mm w m i
flMlE Subscriber b
muH

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