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Vermont daily transcript. (St. Albans, Vt.) 1868-1870, July 10, 1868, Image 2

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VERMONT HAJT.V 'PRANSCRI.PT, J ULY LO, 1.868,
Vermont Daily Transcript,
--
ST. AL13ANS, VT. :
PninAY, July lo, 18G3.
Tin; Arraignment.
Tho Deinoomtlu Convention, In adopt-'
lug its pint form for this campaign, puts j
forth an arraignment cf the Republican
party which Ih illiberal, unjust, and in
many respects untruthful, and is one of
tho most audacious manifestoes ever,
published in the light of history and in
the face of the world.
It commences by calling (he Republi
can party by a name which it does not
own any more than the Democrats do,
for one is not more "radical" in one di
rection than the other is in another.
Tho convention says :
" We arraign the Radical party for its
disregard of right and the unparalleled
oppression and tyranny which have
marked its career, after the most s-olemn
and unanimous pledge of both 1 louses of
Congress to prosecute the war exclusive
ly for maintenance of tho Govern
ment and the preservation of the ITnioii.
This of course refers to the abolition
of slavery, and to reconstruction ; or
perhaps to the war which resulted in
the preservation of the union. Now,
who precipitated war upon the country,
anil made the abolition of slavery and
tho reconstruction of t lie broken rela
tions of states with the general govern
ment necessary? If the Democracy
maintain that the Republican parly did
this, they must of course justify the re
bellion of the South, and applaud disso
lution; and further deny the right of
tho majority to rule a doctrine which
they pretend to admiro and uphold. Tf
they admit that tho South was responsi
ble for the effort at disunion, then how
can they denounce the necessary meas
ures which brought about its failure?
It will not do for the Democracy to lug
in the stern measures which necessarily
accompany all wars, as arguments
against the Republican party. That
argument is against war, and not
against the defenders of national integ
rity; and is a begging of the question.
If .the above question has any signifi
cance and meaning, it is that such ef
forts were made in time of direful ne
cessity, when the Democratic party was
resolving that the war was a failure, to
preserve the Union of the States at all
hazards, were unjustifiable because, they
only were equal to the occasion. What
other conclusion can be fairly drawn?
The protest goes on as follows :
Under the Constitution it has repeat
edly violated that most sacred pledge
under which alone was rallied that noble
voluntary army which carried our ilag
to victory. Instead of restoring the
Union, it'has, so far as in its powor, dis
solved it and subjected ten States in
time of profound peace to military des
potism and negro supremacy. It has
nullified there the right of trial by jury.
It has abolished the habeas corpus, that
most sacred writ of liberty. 1 1 has sub
stituted arbitrary seizures and arrests,
and military trials and secret Star
Chamber inquisitions for tho Constitu
tional tribunals; it has disregarded in
time of peace the right of the "people to
be free from search and seizures ; it has.
entered the post and telegraph ofUccs
and even the private rooms of individu
als and seized their private pa pew and
letters without any specific charge or
notice ofallldavit as required by the or-'
ganic law ; it has converted the Amcri
Capitol into a Rastile. It has establish
ed a system of spies and olllcial espion
age to which no constitutional monarchy
of Europe would now dare to resort ; it
has abolished the right of appeal of im
portant constitutional questions to the
suprcniejudicial tribunals, and threat
ens control of its original jurisdiction
which is irrevocably vested by the
Constitution ; Jwhile the learned Chief
Justice has been subjected to the most
atrocious calumnies merely because he
would not prostitute his high olllce to
the support of the false find partizan
charges preferred against the President.
Its corruption and extravagance have
exceeded anything known in history,
and bv its frauds and monopolies it has
nearly doubled the burden of the debt
created by war. It has stripped the Pre
sident of'his constitutional power of ap
pointment even of his own Cabinet.
Under Its repeated assaults the pillars of
tho Government are rocking on their
base, and should it succeed in Novem
ber next and inaugurate its President,
we will meet as a subject and conquered
people amid the ruins of liberty and the
scattered fragments of the Constitution.
Now, whatever of truth there isin the
above, has or has not a proper justifica
tion. So far as it has, it should not be
chaiged against the party. So far as it
has not, tho party must suffer from it,
and ought to. It is a good and fair rule
hat charges go for nothing, unless they
are sustained. The accused is held to
be innocent until proved to be guilty.
Rut where is the proof to sustain these
charges? We challenge its production,
and are as reudy to meet it an any De
mocrat can be to furnish it, and to stand
by the test of fairly produced facts.
In the mean time, we call attention to
u point of rare significance, which the
convention somehow must have over
looked. Where is there, in this mani
festo, any denunciation of the South,
for breaking up, so far as possible, Gov
ernment under tjii: l OXSTlTlITION? for
waging war against tho lawful Govern
ment under another Constitution? for
"military despotism" and while "supre
macy?" for "nullifying tho right of
trial by jury?" for "abolishing tho
habeas corpus, that most sacred writ of
liberty?" lor overthrowing, not only be
fore and during, but since the war, "tho
freedom of speech and press?"
Why did not the Democratic Conven
tion denounce theso things notoriously
true of tho South and all parts of tho
South ? If true of the Republican party,
nre they only wiong in It? The ap
peal to (hose things by the Convention,
whether true or false, is wholly unfair,
one-sided, and Infamously partisan, and
no faliniinded man can endorse it, we
think. And so of the balance of the
article quoted. It is based upon assump
tions which appeal to the prejudices of
men and of the South, and not to right
reason nor love of country.
We shall give the remainder of this
manifesto to-morrow.
The Democratic Con reniion.
Horatio Seymour was nominated by
Ohio which created intense excitement
in the Convention. Seymour of course
accepted the nomination, notwithstand
ing his handsome little speech of the
day before, in which he said he could
not accept, and made a "few brief re
marks." Heavy bets were made on the
nomination of Mr. Chase up to 12 o'clock,
but as it turns out he did'nt stand tho
ghost, of a chance of a nomination. A
telegram from New York to the Boston
'Transcript says: "Seymour's nomina
tion lias fallen like u thunderbolt on the
Democratic masses, who have been
waiting around the city, in eager expec
tation that Chase would be nominated."
Tin; iiAsr hai.i.ot i on minsiuioxT.
On thcM ballot Mr. MoCook of Ohio
made a speech and nominated Horatio
Seymour, easting the whole vote of Ohio
for Seymour. Great cheering. .
Mr. Seymour thanked them for the
compliment but persisted in withdraw
ing his name.
Mr. Vallindigham insisted that Mr.
Seymour should yield his personal con
siderations. Mr. Kirwan of the New York delega
tion indorsed Mr. Seymour, and said
that State would give him 100,000 ma
jority. Tennessee gave Horatio Seymour 10.
When Wisconsin was called, Mr. Pal
mer seconded the State of Ohio and cast
eight votes forHoratio Seymour. Great
cheering. Kentucky gave Seymour
her 11 votes. Great cheering.
Massachusetts gave 12 for Horatio
Seymour. North Carolina changed her
II votes from Hendricks lo Seymour.
Cheers. Pennsylvania asked that her
vole be not recorded for the present.
Mississippi changed from Hancock to
Horatio Seymour, (Great cheering and
confusion ensued, delegates standing
upon their feet. Cries of "Sit down in
front!" "Order!")
Mr. Price took the chair and insisted
that gentlemen must take their seats,
and would recognize no one until order
was restored.
Mr. Woodward of Pennsylvania now
rose and transferred her 20 Votes to Ho
ratio Seymour. (Great cheering, and
cries of delegates all over Hie house to
their respective chairmen, to "Change
our vote, change our vote.")
Haifa dozen Stat; s at once wanted to
change their votes. Missouri changed
to Seymour 11; Illinois followed en
masse for Seymour (tremendous cheer
ing and indescribable confusion); Indi
ana changed solidly K! to Seymour;
Iowa came next 8 for Seymour and
Texas cast her 0 for him.
(Hero cannon on the street began to
lire a salute for tho nominee. ( State
after State came in but the confusion
and noise was so great that not a word
could be distinguished of what anybody
said. Mr. Seymour was clearly nomi
nated. The confusion subsiding, Alabama,
Maine and Arkansas followed success
ively with a unanimous vote for Sey
mour. Mr. Dawson of Pennsylvania moved
that the nomination be made by accla
mation, but there was so much confu
sion that notljingwas done with tho
motion.
A delegate from Minne.-ota, frantical
ly waving one of the State standards,
attracted the attention of the Chairman,
and cast the vote of Minnesota for Sey
mour. Georgia paid a tribute to Hancock, the
most knightly soldier of the war, whom
she had supported earnestly, but she
united in voting unanimously for Sey
mour. Louisiana gave seven for Sey
mour. Mr. Stewart of Michigan said that
that State came to the Convention with
the simple purpose of nominating a can
didate who would certainly be elected,
and that position she occupied to-day.
He proceeded to eulogize Mr. Seymour.
South Carolina went for Seymour,
and Maryland changed for Seymour.
Mr. Tlldeu of New York announced
that Seymour had the unanimous vote
of his delegation. (Three cheers, great
confusion, &c.)
All the States having voted, tho re
sult was announced. Horatio Seymour
votes.
The audience and delegates arose en
masse, and cheered, and throw up their
hats, fans, &e,
Mr. Price, acting chairman, announ
ced Mr. Seymour as the Democratic
standard bearer.
The Convention proceeded jo ballot
for Vice President,
I'OUKTH DAY'S l'ltOt'KKDINdS.
When the results of the ballotings
were announced, the building rang
with should oftriumph from the friends
of the candidates vlu0e votes were
strongest. When New York dropped
Mr. Church, and announced through
her Chairman that Hendricks should
havo the support of her US delegates,
there yas n slorm of applause which
lasted for several minutes ; when, on
the 12th ballot, Tennefcseo gavo Frank
lin Pierce one vote, and California paid
one-half as a valuable compliment to
Chase, the enthusiasm was unbounded.
No words can deseribo the tempest of
applause which greeted the name of Mc
Clellan when some unadultrated fossil
announced his preference for that chief
tain of renown, nor can any ordinary
pen do justice to tho warm gusli of pat
riotic joy which welled up from tho
overloaded bosoms of 2,000 Democrats,
and struck upon the air with a mighty
sound, when the valiant Van Voorhees
of Indiana was introduced. Scores of
times during the session the feelings of
tho vast multitude were too dec) for ut
terance, and the ears of tho people out
side were left unblessed with tho music
thoy would havo made under less affect
ing circumstances.
When Connecticut's Chairman an-
nouiifcd to tile Convention that the del
egates from his Slate had changed their
minds, and would admit Mr. Pendleton
to share with Mr. Hendricks the favors
they had been bestowing upon Gov.
Kngllsh, there arose a storm in the lit
tle delegation which came near to end
ing in a dire shipwreck of two or three
of Connecticut's most promising Demo
cratic children. A member arose, and,
with one flashing eye turned full upon
his Chairman, the other fixed upon va
rious points or tho Convention compass,
lie bore down upon his leader with a full
head of oratorical Impulse, which
threatened for a time to leave the Nut
meg State" In mourning. Rut, when
Mr. Katon arose, and in the emotive and
demonstrative style peculiar to Demos
thenes when launching his Philliiipics,
he proceeded to lay out the delegate, the
apprehensions oft lie sober people were
more than doubled, while the general
crowd enjoyed the break, and cheered
the speaker lustily. Then there was a
rejoinder. Then the contentious spokes
men were silenced by the Chairman of
the Convention ; whereupon they enter
ed privately into an argument, in which
there was much abuse and little reason.
They forgot the speech of the Showman
Short to his partner Codlin : "Don't say
such things as them in a spear which is
devoted to something ploasantor;" nor
did they, as that philosophical artist
advised, "respect, aooeiations," even if
they did "cut up rough." It was long
before quiet was restored in the Connec
ticut delegation.
si'Kix it or ax ii.r.ixois dkmxjati:.
One of the last ballots, perhaps the
last, in which Illinois was ' announced
as giving a solid vote for Hendricks,
was somewhat confused for a time ; but
tho promptness of tho Chairman of the
Convention, Ihesnrewilnosa of the Dele
gates who cried down every attempt to
edge in a word in favor of a weak can
didate, saved the reputation of the De
mocracy, and left the records ol the
Convention without a blot. A Dele
gate from Illinois rose to his feet imme
diately after the announcement of the
vote ot jus Delegation, and snout' as
follows:
"Mr. Chairman, every American citi
zen who (cries of 'Sit down!') who
feels, Sir, a pride in the freedom (Put
him out ! m the tree (Order! !Sit
down! Dry up!) in the freedom of
speech I won't sit down, Mr. Chair
man, until 1 have spoken for my con
stituents of the till District. I say, Sir,
it is so. Tho palladium of our liberties,
Sir, is the right (Wrong! Wrong! Sit
down!) 1 won't Is the right to speak
the feelings of the patriotic heart when
ever and wherever the occasion demands
the exposition. (Cheers.) For one, Mr.
Chairman, I have not cast my vote for
Mr. Hendricks. I have watched with
interest and with pride, Sir, the course
of a man who is dear to every citizen
Miio loves his country, and licsiies to
see the rule of Radicalism broken off
short in the middle. (Applause.) Ho
it is for whom 1 shall A'ote tho' patriot
and tbe sage, the untcrrlficd, the incor
ruptible statesman, Andrew Johnson."
A complimentary report of this remark
able speech will be found below; but in
it the reader will not bo instructed as to
how the orator stood while speaking
how he planted himself lirmly upon the
floor, with legs wide apart, and arms
folded after the manner of Forrest In
"Motamora," and of Edwin Adams in
the " Stage-Slruck Barber" how he
glanced defiance at his broad-chested
chairman, and gazed Avith indifference
upon the yelling multitude, who would
force him to silence how lie held his
ground till he had finished speaking his
piece, and how ho sat down with a
thump which set tho galleries in a roar.
Maixk Rni'inujicAN Coxvhntion.
The Republicans of Maine met in Con
vention at Portland on the 8th Inst., and
renominated Gen. Chamborluin for Gov
ernor. Gen. George L. Real and the
Hon. S. P. Strickland were chosen
Electors at Large. The resolutions ad
doptcd are in substance as follows:
First, approving the Chicago plat
form ; second, indorsing Gen. Grant;
third, indorsing Colfax ; fourth, com
plimenting Mr. Chamberlain; fifth, ex
pressing gratitude and homage to the
loyal dead; sixth, declaring that the
Democratic State Convention ipsolu
tion, relative to taxing bonds, is a fraud
on tho people; seventh, that the Demo
cratic National Convention in Now
York is an attempt to revive rebellion,
its first aim bofng to destroy public
credit, and Its second to revive Rebel
governments in Rebel States.
The Convention was addressed by
lion. John A. Bingham and Gen. Sick
les, and great enthusiasm prevailed
throughout the entire proceedings.
Dumophatiu Statu Convention.
The Democrats of Vermont are prepar
ing for a "big time" at their State Con
vention, which meets at Montpeller
on tholTth. Tho Argus announces that
Gen. W. F. Smith, the old Commander
of the Vermont Brigade in tho Army of
tho Potomac, and John G. Sinclair, of
New Uamiwhire, will positively be pre
sent.
Hunting for the Coirs,
Many of our farmers have wasted
years of valuable time, just because they
do not teach their cows to come home at
night. Any one who has ever lived or
travelled in the country, will iemember
the familiar Co-bos, Co-bos, of tho far
mer's son, or hired man, as they endeav
or to coax tho cows from tho woods, or
the tall grass in tho great pasurp. We
havo had a little experience ip theso
mattors, and well remember how many
times we havcAvadod through tho brush
and bogs looking for the cows, and, boy
like, m'o thought them dreadful contrary
aniijials. Rut wo havo lived long
enough to learn hotter, and now think
that tho bliieil was tho moro contrary
auii.ual of the two. Boys, we will tell
you a secret that will save you a great
deal of trouble, and it is this : Just sow
a few rows of corn in drills, whero it
will lie handy to thoniilking-placo, and
every time the cows are driven up at
night, or in tho morning, give each one
a good armful of tho fresh-eut cornstalks
and our word for it tho cows will al
ways bo tm hand at milking-tipie. Ro
sidos this, they will givo more milk,
and forgot to kick over the milk pail,
even if you do whistle a little too loud.
San.
liciicrt.
Motto for Hairdressers Cut and comb
again.
it Is said there Is but one negro In
Worth county, Missouri, to enfranchise, !
and he is unanimous against negro suf
frage. All prisoners of debt within the juris
diction of the North German Parlia
ment have been liberated under the au
thority of the law which came Into
operation last month.
In Paris one of the lasliionablo diver
sions now is to pass an hour in tho ali
in a balloon which is held down by a
stout cable; and elegant ladies and goif
tlenicn take their iiliernoou airing thus
instead of on wheels.
A coat of gum-copal varnish applied
to the soles of boots and shoes, and re
peated as it dries, until the pores are
filled and the surface shines like pol
ished mahogany, it It, said will make
iuu tuies waier-prooi, anil also cause
them to last three times as long as ordi
nary soles. '
Gen. Canoll Thiers, of Philadelphia,
who is raising a regiment in the United
States for the Papal defence, was an of-
i peer in inc Tiiruisii in in v in the Cri
mean war, commanded a federal regi
ment, made up of rebel prisoneia, in
our own war, made a runaway match
with a wealthy Philadelphia heiress a(V
tor the cruel war was over, and has
lately been appointed one of the pope's
private chamberlains.
In 1851 the London Punch humor
ously gave a list of things " Impossible
to bo realized." Among them wore the
followimr : "Tho nuiiv nr !-, mnv
from Prussia:" "Tho Vr-nnilmii ,t M,n
Press,, from Austria oi Italy;" "The
abolition of Serfdom, from "Russia ;"
"Tho emancipation of a slave, from the
United States." Every one thought
Punch had. made a very safe list, and
yet, in les than twenty years' time,
every oneof these "impossibilities" lias
uecumc a reality. impossibilities"
shouldevidently fine no place in Puncli'!
or any other man's dictionary.
George Alfred Townsend desciibes
Senator Hendricks for the Cleveland
Leader: "Senator Hendricks is a com
posed, direct, orthodox, vigilant man.
His mouth is full of honey,' and vou
cannot near ine Decs nuzz when he
speaks. He has beautiful auburn hair,
aim will ho presumed to trot the full
red-headed vof ni'ili ommirv Tile
exterior is sand-papered to rid him of
iin.v iiuosyiicracies, ami ne can construct,
a syllogism upon three falsehoods, out
oi wnose moral lessons he will make
you weep."
SPE0IALN0TI0E.
XTTK tumid give thin nulico to our former
V IVimwIu .iiwl introuu !...( .11. nil,,,. U...
, T ,,, mu..P, uitu mi uuu iuu j niv
1st ilny of. Tunc, lHiiS, v nhall well our tfooilh
mi
STRICTLY CASH
AND
ONE PR8CE !!!
Having luul sullicicut uxiM'rii'iu'c in tlui credit
system of lining IjiHiicxh, wo have conclmleil to
malic a chant,'.', unit try tho Cash Nvslein be
liovintr that wo can null our -roods clionnm- hv
adoiitiiif; such a nilo- Although a nnVelly in .St.
moans, we are (leiermnieil lo trv the plan. Wo
nave on lianil a laifje Mock of
READY MADE CLOTHING-
-AND-
Furnishing Goods,
Which uinler tliif plan ,e will nirivo lo sell tr,
jm-1- ( (...st than any other linn in town that
do imsiness on the credit system.
Take notice, anil govern yomself ncconlin;;lv,
SMITH & FOSTER,
XT O
a
DA 11 ROW BLOCK,
w217-:)m
Kt. AJlmua, Vt.
ril7-lm
LOOK TO YOUR INTEREST,
Phoenix Mutual
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
Of UAUTl-OIiD, t'ONX.
ITS ASSETS ARE NEARLY
syooo,o o o .
AK.NU.U. INCJOMII,
NEARLY ' TWO MILLIONS ,
AND CONHl'AN'llA INCIIUASIXO,
Annual Dividends, 50 Per (,Vii.
All ltd 1'olloius mo Non-Koifclllu,'! No to
stiletinn on Travel, Location or Kmiilovnicnt !
ljiyiileiuls upon tho full J'roiniiiiiiH paid on all its
Tables 1
Noten taken if desired for half of tho I'remium
lor tho tlrwt four yoni'H, nml in caHoof iloatli,
thoy nrouaiil hy tint Dividends and Riven
up and not deducted from the Policy,
and
The Full Amount1 oflnsurauce is raid.
It has paid in loau.i in ifa 1'oljoy lloldeih over
Sj.-ion.mio, (nullum novor contested n claim
diuins tlio 17 years of its oNlntoncti. No
ctra Premiums charged for iiwur
inif. Females, Kaili-oad KmiiloyecsorHeamon
w.M'"l'.V.v ' V10,, 1'"",X Is Plopcilv eallnd n
holo W orld 1'olley. It pennitH tho insured to
Irnvel or viMi1n ni ni.c.i-lnn... :. n... it..:....i
.,11 ... .hi tui.i niiuiu in mil milieu
SlafeK or Knrriim nt n,tv uh-ilhh .(' 11... .......
wthout extra charge.
NELSON H. ARMINGTON. Anent.
Kor Finnlillu. (Irani! Isle and Lainoillo counties.
u. ij. ii.u5i.uuiv, Ktato Audit,
il22.u220.tr ltutlaml, Vt.
Dissolution.
rI'lir, ffl.ll'irf nni'ulu'.i 1im..t..l'. ...ii ii..:. .ii.i l.
tho stylo ol Boulo A iJentloy, is this day ihWlvcd
hy mutual poiibont. All demands duo tho linn
nro lieiehy transfeiml toA.O. Houle, ami all
liabilities to ho settled hy said Koulo, who will
continuo the business nt tho old stand.
A - HOUL12.
FalrfloW, Juno 22(1, 18C8. 11, K, BENTU3Y,
DEWEY, NOBLE & CO'S
IN S U K A. N 0 Ej
AGHNOT.
"ETNA INSUHANOE COMPANY OF
H.WITFOIIP, CONN,,
CAPITAL ..V SUltp .VH, 9 1 III :iti.
HOME INSURANCE COMPANY OF
NEW YOHK.
CAPITA!. A .VI) SUlt PLUS, S:i((VJ:i IIC,
HAU'l'FpHI) KIKE IN. COMPANY
OF IlAlt'l'FOIll), CONN".,
CAPITAL AMI SIMIPH'S, tf-J,U00,O(M III).
INS. COMPANY NORTH AMERICA
OF l'llll.ADKI.rillA,
CAP1TVI. A! !iV II PLUS, a-.!(iiO.(,tli;o Oil,
NIACARA KIRK INSURANCE CO
OF NUYV YOHK.
CAPITAL AM) SCU PLUS. 31,-011,1100 0(1
SECURITY INSURANCE CO. OI
NKYV Y011K,
CAPITAL AM) .sl!UPLll!, sl.177,77? li.
LORI LLARD FIRE INS. COMPANY
OF NKY YOHK,
CAPITAL AX 11 Nl'KPLUN, .31,rnKl000 00
NORTH AMERICAN FIRE IN. CO
OF NKYV YOHK.
CAI'lTM. .1 .V Sit It I' I. US, t7 i,ikio oil
CORN EXCHANGE INS. COMPANY
OF NKYV M)I!K,
V. 1'ITA I AX1) Sl'llVl. US, ?.-,.-,il,iSiiil 00
NORTH AMERICAN FIR 10 INS. CO,
OF llAltTFOni), CONN.,
t'Al'lTAl, AXI) Srill'I.US, f.WO.OOO 10,
ROGER WILLIAMS INS. COMP'Y
OF I'HOYIDKXOK, 1!. I.,
CA I'lTA I. AXI) SUIU'L US, $201,:as HI,
(JJjENS FALLS INSURANCE CO,
OFOl.FNS FALLS, N. Y.,
cA I'lTA i. a xi) scan, us, 2iH,:i2!) is.
Fir.i a I nl aiarlno Insurance etlected at this Agen
cy m any ol tint above well known Companies,
TAfti Insurance. .
THE MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO. OF
KUW YOJtK,
The Oldest and Largest Mutual Insurance Com
. pany in tho United State.
04 n 7 VI - .1 47) . I SSKTS, $2d,CO(),0(iO 00.
Li'a and Arvittcnt Insurance
Either seperately or combined, at the lowest
rates of Premium in tho
TRAVELLER'S INSURANCE CO.
OF HAKTFOltl), CONN.,
O. I I'lTA li A XII A SSJ-ITS, i 1 ,000,000 00.
All losses piomplly attended to and settled at
this Agency. I.wgt' Security, Fair J'rvitu, ami
Prompt J'aynuuit,
Iusuraiico to any amount effected on tho most
satisfactory terms.
DKNVKY, NOHLK fc CO.
Olllco coiner Lake and Main fit., St. Albans,
Vormont, ld-tf
ladies store,
Opposite Mine of Mum. ,V Mace build, nit
;.ri r v. , " v"" I"1"' nll " mi 1 aort
Lacesi
Fringes all colors,
Edging
Insertions.
Muslins,
Lawns,
Collars, CuiIh
Veils,
Fans, a rich lot,
Vnloncioiics and Thread Lacq
Collars.
I r . ,,c" i11'11' "I l;icch Cambrics and Vanov
! m t' HV iV,ww KM '' wliioli HUi pas,., , V
I i iiiitvd. All ol which wl:l l,e sold nt Vi ilsonabhi
prices. Lii.ll.. will Hod it t (!,. 1
I rn and exam ,,.- for thm.,v'.w, 1
m!1!' i'i"1.' ll,ttW,"l ,in varied..,,
it liilur the skillful supervision f JUs Kllen
Moore Uxp and favorably known to the iiih ,1, 1
I tinitsol this Mllniri. and ilelultv
Awnt fur WILCOX A- OIHITS fWhur Machino.
' r- Kimitow.
ITHE ST. ALltANS MWJAR BA.NH
Are pi i pined to furnish mnsi Coy
FIREMEN mill
MILITARY
PARADES,
PICNICS,
EXCFRSIONS,
, , DANCES,
And on other oceiiKious when- Hand ami Mlllii'
Jluslc is lviniired. '
Ol del h addressed lo
GEORGE E. KINSLEY,
Ol! TO
W T-T cj TT T 'n t
,1 , A. J. . ..J iTi x JL ,
At the Tlcnioiil House, will iveeivi pr.rii i I m
trillion. dJ.tr
M'fflW&Iff St BROWN,
SADDI.hlli Y, CMUUAdF,
B UILD I N ( r H A K W A R E
YVc have the liu ;;esl mid l.e.t .issovted stock of
Kood.1 ol every description, in the above jm., to
be louii.l I in the Stale. As Rents fortl.elaruUt
lleltlllU 1'iicloiies, we keep a supply of
Hi A TIlEli iiHfrrxn
Of all siesonliiin(l. y oner full .mil com
plete atsoitinent of
Oarruttji' unit fanuw Maim' Sttj,lic,
And are constantly receiving consi;nmeiitM of a
superior article of Oak and Hemlock Harues
o v!1'1! y.at,,,lt t,'"111' :'d Kuswet, drain and
Spill SkirtniK and Winker. Hard and sort Dash,
Lnnaineled Oil Top and
O Ji A IN J) OO T L E A THE It.
ALSO
CARPETING AND OIL CLOTH
Which we oiler at a low cash lif-uro.
Met iO WAN A JlliOWN,
i. nioriiiNoii.wi m'howan, ) St. Albans, Vt
fii:oiioi: w. mtow.v. ( dl-lf
VICTOR ATWOOD,
WllOI.KS.U.i: AMI IWAH. IwiALKU IX
111 OA',
S'MIil,,
GLASS,
XAI,S,
OIL,
'A I NTS,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
SEUDS,
mJUfANWS TOOLS,
SJIKLF
II A it) WAKE
AN J)
CAlllllAGE
ATA KIMS
STOCK.
BAJINES' BLOCK, LAKE ST.
St. Albans. .May 14, 1HIIS.
kl-tf
K. o ,
FIRST PREMIUM J
Of a Silver Meilol k
tf M8 AWAIim.il T.I j,
BARRETT'S HAIR RESTORATIVE TO
"r.the N. II. stale Agricultural s.,,,
Ui air, liul,lon in Niikliiiu, Sej.t. ve, Jl,
It A JE It IVI'T'M
Vegetable Hair Itestoi'nU' a
Jtc
in
Itn.lnr.i II..t.- li. i,.. .111
, 11 J nwir in na Yuiiinu i.oinri ,
....... Ki,iii ,11 iiiu uiuri lliaui;., lit
li ? !'" na lluin.iri liriti-un "Ci
... .v ,..,ii uiiiiii ..ruiiiiic 11. 'nun 1 vriuli
. ii'ir imiinKiml t l atlllii rliir Dnnluir Mr.J
. nconliilii, no iiijiiilnu. Inur. iliinli V
nl'lf, "rtl.-l.i thmugliuiit llif
yr Ijiht, WYst, North, uuil TV
nonm.
J. R. BARRETT & CO., Proprietors,,
MANCHESTlUt, N. JI.
Sold. by all Druggists.
ASAHE1 S. HYDE,
11AI.KU IN AI.I, KINDS 01"
First Class Groceries ! I
DAltllOW 1U.OC1C, ST. AL11ANS, V'J
Consistiiif,' hi part of.
Pari;
Fish,
Sugar,
Teas,
Removed.
DH. fS.S. CLAHIC has reniove.l to f-outli Jfnhi
Htreot. Ollico at his rusiile
Kt. Albans, Yt., May. 2, 180C 894f

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