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The Grange advance. (Red Wing, Minn.) 1873-1877, October 15, 1873, Image 12

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Any attempt at a description of the
articles on exhibition at the Goodhue
County Fair would be nothing more than
a burlesque. We therefore start out
with the assertion that, on the whole,
the fair was a total failure. Now let us
ask why was it a failure? Better
weather could never have been hoped
for than was had the second day. Due
notice of the fair was given in the papers.
Goodhue county is capable of making
as good an exhibition as any county in
the State, and
WHY WAS IT A FAILURE
The reason we think is, that the peo
ple, and especially the farmers, seem to
have a lack of interest. They do not re
alize that each must make an individual
exertion in order to make the fair a suc
cess. Each must not rely upon his
neighbor to take something of interest,
but must endeavor to exhibit some arti
cle that will add to the interest of the
iair, even should the premium received
but partially repay him for his trouble.
The farmers seem to have an erroneous
idea of what should constitute a fair.
They make of it a day of pleasure more
than of profit a day to congregate, talk
politics, bet on horses, collect debts, and
True, the location aYHAfefcli not the
best, and an endeavor, will be made
another year to locate it at a more cen
tral and convenient part of the county.
The place is too distant to carry ma-1
chines and other articles that would be
for the interest and advantage of the
farmer, as well as fotithe.exbibitors.
wondered at that although the number
in attendance was much larger than last
year, there should be but few articles on
exhibition. There was such a prevailing
lack of interest that farmers within but*
a fifteen minutes drive from the. grounds
were seen going on with their work as
usual, "and the vice-president of the asso
ciation took occasion on the second day'
-of the fair to make a trip to Red Wing,
and draw a load of wood.
That there were not any redeeming
features we do not claim on the whole
it was a means of profit to the farmers,
and as they got together and compared
notes on crops, a general good feeling
seemed to prevail and most of them de
termined another year to make more of
an effort for the success of the fair. The
speech by Hon. J. A. Thacher of Zura
brota was listened to with great interest,
and by a much larger and more appre
ciative audience than listened to the ad-:
dress delivered at the State fair. The
farmers seemed to enter into the spirit of
the speaker, and coming as it did from one
of their number, it was more favorably
received than the speech of last year by
several office seeking politicians. Mr.
Thacher addressed the farmers substan
tially as fojlowat ,, $«£ 7
This County Fair and Institute occurs
at a propitious time. A year of bounti
ful crops, all secured in. good condition,
in stacks or already threshed, gives our
people an occasion of rejoicing and con
gratulation. The country is full of
wheat, the valleys are covered with corn,
in every direction the eye is greeted with
stacks of grain so that our oldest citi
zens are astonished as they pass through
the country io see the evidences of
plenty spread abroad. Probably no sea
son since the settlement has been more
fruitful than that of the year 1878, and
following as it does upon a year of a
large average crop, as the season of 1872'
bestowed upon us. This to all classes
of citizens a great encouragement.
The prospects are surely brightening.
No longer can the greatest croaker or
profit of evil, say that Goodhue county
is bankrupt, that it is all plastered over
with mortgages. On the contrary it is
dotted all over with evidences of wealth,
of progress, of thrift, of prosperity.
The wheat crop of 1872 amounted to
over 2,300,000 bushels, the oat crop to
over 1,000,000 bushels the corn crop to
400,000 bushels and the barley to 140,
000 bushels. This large amount of grain
was raised one year ago,, in a county
where sixteen years previous scarcely
enough was raised to feed its own peo
ple. -Goodhue county has a great agri
cultural capacity!. To raise this large
amount of grain requires wonderful en
ergy, and industry, and a large amount
of money must be invested in tillage*
buildings, machinery, horses and cattle.
A great change has taken place in all
harvest implements these few past years,
and ingenuity is taxing itself to make
still further improvement. Yet we won
der how it is that machines should com
mand and secure such high, and as we
believe disproportionate prices. No
doubt the machine shops are erected too
far from us, and freights add largely to
the original cost and price. These mat
chines should be manufactured nearer
home. There will always be a demand
for them, and the county affords $?ery
facility that is needed for their manufac
ture. Goodhue county as a home cannot
be surpassed. In this northern climate
Aero are many compensations: Health,
ities that go to make up a powerful peo
ple, are best developed in the regions of
short summers and long winters. As a
consequence of the short summer season,"
no time should be lost. Lost time in
seeding can not be made up, for twelve
months. An extra day's help at the
right time may makea decided difference
in yonr years profit. Economize labor,
yet have help enough to do each branch
of work in its proper season. Econo
mize labor by hiring the best help even
at an increased price. In machinery get
the best and take good care Of it. Advise
with neighbors rather than agents. It
is a good policy and good economy
to'accounts
adopt the general experience of those
about you, in the purchase of new im
plements. A whole community is not
often mistaken.
'The attention of the whole country is
attracted by what has been styled the
farmers' movement, a movement origin
ating in the general feeling prevailing
among the farmers of the west that too
large a proportion of the proceeds of
their labor has been'absorbed by exces
sive and disproportionate charges by
transportation companies. This feeling
has at length taken shape in organiza
tions formed for the .purpose of consid
ering and discussing the evils, the inter
ests, and the remedies of the producing
classes. The General business rule
that competion will regulate prices, and
keep all the different departments of la
bor in their legitimate and proper place,
seems in these latter days to fail to apply!
Combinations of capital, control prices
of gold, of wheat, of cotton and wool,
and latterly of all trahsportion. Great
lines of railroads-built with a view to
compete for business, and thus to prop
erly regulate the charges upon trade and
travel, areriblonger competing lines.
Consolidation of lines, and consolida
tions between lines, agreements to main
tain equality of rules has entirely done
away with competition, and has left the
public entirely to the discretion, if not
the mercy, of a few railroad men, who ab
solutely control all the channels of trans
portation, and set such a price upon
traffic as they consider for their interest.
To the farmers it seems as if railroad
men were only anxious to see how far it
was possible to increase the freight on
passenger traffic, without checking pro
duction and discouraging travel and bus
iness. The production of the soil sets
all capital in motion, yet it has appeared
that business men in any occupation
were able to understand one another, and
agree upon a line of policy, except the
farming class. The farmersof the. coun
try constitute the majority of its citi
zens. The political power rests with them.
The ultimate regulation of all the ma
chinery of government can be controlled
by them. In a State like ours the predom
inating-class can see at least to it that
their interests are well represented—that
their best representative men act for
them in the halls of legislation, both
State and National.
It is not enough to say that the inter
est of the entire community is identical
that what is for the benefit of one is for
the benefit of all. While this may be
true as an abstract proposition, yet
farmers should look after their special
interests and should make some sacri
fices of time, and some effort to secure a
voice in directing and controlling legisla
tion.
Farmers must either be represented by
their own profession or if they elect that
other professions shall represent them it
must be understood that they accept,
and demand and insist that their Inter
ests shall be looked to. The railroad
problem is anew one to all classes, not
only to the people at large, but to theButter
projectors, builders, and owners of the
roads themselves.
The people desire cheap transporta
tion, the railroad men desire interest
upon their capital invested and fncome
to repair, replace, re-build, restock their
roads, a margin for contingencies and
also opportunity to build up immense
fortunes.
But the facilities of railroads have be
come a necessity to business and to coun
try. The management Of these expen
sive undertakings, so that the greatest
good shall be done to the greatest num
ber is, to be the great question of the
day. Private capital in immense amounts
has been invested in the railroad system
of the country. Subsidies of land have
been donated by Congress, bonds have
been voted by the peonle, privileges and
iranchises granted by the Legislature.
All of these united have built great lines
of communication, and have opened up
the wilderness for habitation. Like fire
the railroad is a good servant, but a hard
master. We need the' railroad—we must
have the railroad, we cannot live without
it, and yet we cannot resign our living,
our profits, our freedom into its control.
It must b0 Our servant in deed, and not
our master. How this state of things
shall be brought about is thequestion to
be considered. Time must be taken for
this consideration1. It is necessary to in
vestigate the subject andto condense and
apply all the information to be had. In
the meantime agitation is in order. Ag
itation may produce temporary derange
ment and excitement. Agitation of the
people upon these questions may serve to
produce retaliation from railroad com
panies. 'Agitation and retaliation mixed
and compounded will end in a.solu
tion of the questions involved. Legis
lative control must be brought about by
those most interested. Wisdom, pru
dence and sagacity must be brought to
bear upon this great and all absorbing
question. Private rights, and private
capital must not be oppressed or confis
cated.
The State grants privileges and fran
chises to transportation companies, let
the State see to it that privileges are not
exerdsed to the disadvantage and oppres
sion of the people. Farmers let mead*
with an entirely
candor and carefulness. Let me appeal
to you to take sofa political action as
will insure an early and thorough exam
ination of these questions in our State
and National councils.
To the end that all our interests shall
be well and properly guarded, it is im
perative that education, should advance
in alike ratio with OUT material progress.
A high order of schools should be fostered
and maintained, and the character of ed
ucation must be. co-extensive with the
demands of the day. In the new rela
tions of society, merely to read and keep
is not enough. The simple ele
ments of learning are no longer sufficient
for the masses of the people. All.the
facilities of the rising generation must
be educated to think, to discriminate, to
judge. Every person should be so edu
cated as to have a clear idea of his du
ties, his obligations and privileges in all
the situations of life. The study of his
tory, of political economy, offinance,of
commerce, of manufacturing interests,
should be considered as necessary to the'
education of farmers and mechanics, as
a knowledge of their own special calling.
So far as we have reason to he en
couraged by the propitious season, by
our own iavorable location, by the fertil
ity of our soil, and by our many advan
tages, let us congratulate ourselves. So
far as we find discouragement in the in
adequate prices of our products, in the
various discouragements and drawbacks
incident to the business in which we are
engaged, let us study to be more thought
ful, more careful, more considerate of
means and ends and thus secure to our
families the greatest good attainable,, and
to lay the best foundations for the future
that it is in our power Tto establish.
Thus shall we best 'fulfil our mission
and our duty to ourselves, to our coun
try and to posterity.
1 i— :.
—A number of young ladies of Macon,
Ga., have resolved to attend the State Fair
clad in homespun
(TjATHCART CO.,
[ESTABLISHED IN 1852.]
DBALEBB IN v. ,'
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
BB GOODS*
THIRD STREET, ST., PAUL.
Samples Sent by Mail. Orders Promptly Attended to.
R. STERLING & CO.
Manufacturer* and Dealers in
BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER
FINDINGS AND SADDLERY,
TANNERS OF MOCCASIN LEATHER,
and Manufacturers of
warn* Boy*' Cnstom.Mad Boo a
O E A S *,
JEALOUS Q. LINDQUlfcT,
WATCHMAKER and JEWELER,
Dealer in
WATCHES. CLOCKS, JEWELRY,
a a S Ware
in Cutlery, 4ke„
PLUMB STREET, RED WING, MINNESOTA.
gIMMONS & 8TRANDNES,
BIALM8 IH
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS,
SHOES AND CLOTHING.
Comer of Main and Bush street*, A. J. Clark's
old stand,
and Egge taken at highett market price.
*RED. J. McINTIRE.
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
GREEN, DRIED and CANNED FRUITj
Corner of Main and Broad Streets,
E E WIHO MINN
Good* Delivered Free to mfTartjfthe City.
yifi A. OR8ER,
KAHOMcmmn
HARNESS A^D SADDLES,
COLLARS, WHIPS, &e., &c,
••ite Mey tone Blocn,
RED WING, MINN.
pRIEDRICH & HACK,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS,
CROCKERY, GLASSWARE,
WTJfMS AND LIQUORS,
PLOTJB AND FEED
Corner of Bush and
ad Thlfa Streets,
RED WING,
MlNNESMnEfc
rsoN,
'J'HOS. WILKINSON,
DEALER IH
Shelf and Heavy Hardware,
STOVES, TINWARE,
FARMING IMPLEMENTS,
FAINTS, OILS, GLASS,
GAS PIPE AND FIXTURES.
STEAM and GAS FATING att branch*..'
A W a warn wnrat, MINK.
WARRANTED
To Scour,to be Hardened through
and made of best
SOLID CAST STEEL.
J£LLSWORTH & KNAPP,
OLOTBING, NOTIONS,'
A S S CITY I N
J.
B. DORMAN'S
Address, MONITOR O W WORKS in a is in
DEALER IN
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
Hats and Caps. &c &c.
it i.
EXCELSIOR STORE
BUSH STREET,
BEAU* IN
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS,
SHOES
AND
SECOND DOOR FROM MAIN STREET Muslin Delain, Embroidery and Ribbons.
Coats, Pantaloons, Carpets, Rugs, Table Covers, Ac,
GROCERIES, &c.
W E E TO FIND THE
GREATEST BAEGAINS!!
W. EISENBRAND Co.
Will and do tell all of their Goods consisting of
CLOTHING.
BUFFALO ROBES,
BUFFALO COATS,
SHIRTS sad SHIRTINGS,
PIECE GOOD8,
TRUNKS siid SATCHELS,
WOOLEN YARN,
HATS snd CAPS,
READY MADE BOYS1 SUITS
and
SUITS CUT AND MADE TO OBDBB,
at
GRANGE PRICES FOR CASH.
Give us a call and yon will find what we say we mean.
WM. E I S E N A N CO.,
Sign of the Green front, Main Street,
T.
Bod Wing, Minn.
B. & B. F. SHELDON
DEALERS IN
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
CARPETING,
HATS AND CAPS,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
/CROCKERY, CHINA
AND GLASS WARE.
A GOOD ASSORTMENT
ALWAYS ON HAND
AND SOLD AT THB
Mwiif riion.
MUSIC HILL BLOCK, END WJNG, MINN.
D. WASHBURN & CO.,
(ESTABLISHED 1863,)
Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Every Variety of
PINE LUMBER,
MINNEAPOLIS and ANOKA. MINN.
We desire to call the attention of .Bridge and Rail-
road Contractors to the unusual facilities we hare for ,/
Filling Orders for lumber,
ANT DESIRED LENGTH AND SIZE MTITH
PROMPTNESS,
Having now on hand and in boom, at our Mills, a
large quantity of Logs cut expressly for bridge Tim-
ber.
I
OFFICE a A i»t MINNEAPOLIS
On Washington Avenue,Opposite St. Paul and Pacific
Depot -e
AND AT MILLS AT ANOKA!
]y[INNEAPQLIS
Steam Dyeing and Scouring
W a Street Nea S on id
in a is
-.'#
JOHN D. MEYER, Proprietor.
The advertiser Dyes in every variety of Color, all
descriptions of Woolen Dresses, Crape Shawls, Hose,
Bonnets, Net Silk, Damask, Satin, Gros de Naples,
cleaned in the most perfect manner. KID GLOVES
cleaned and colored. The strictest attention paid to
all orders.
HERSCHLER,
STORA GE, FOR WARDING
and
Commission Merchant.
Dealer in all kinds of
GRAIN, FLOUR, HIDES, LIME,
SALT. CEMENT, &c.
OAT,
and
TICKET AGENT.
Tickets for sale to all important points via River
and Rail, East, West, North and South.
STONE WAKEHOUS E O N LEVEE.
B. DODGE,
Wholesale and Retail Manufacturerand Dealer in
BOOTS,
SHOES,
MOCCASINS,
TRUNKS,
FURS, GLOVES, Ac,
Corne Thir a a Street*,
RED WING. MINN.
JJROWN & McINTIRE,
STORA GE, FOR WARDING,
and
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
and Dealer* in
FLOUR, GRAIN, AND WpOL
MED WIWO, MINNESOTA.
KEMPE & CO.,
Dealer* in
Dry Goods, Millinery Goods,
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY, HATS, CAPS, NOTIONS, Ac,
WINES AND LIQUORS,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
Clanson's old stand, corner of Mmnb and ThirdMM

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