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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, December 25, 1858, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025569/1858-12-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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A N S. MERITT,
VOLUME 3, NUMBEK 20.
PUBLISHED EVEKY SATURDAY,
AT
E W I N I N N E S O A
A N S E
Terms,' $9 per year, in advance
S 5 0 if not paid within six months,
Or S3 at .the end of the Year.
BLANKS.—Warranty, Quit-Claim,Special
Warranty, Mortgage fioeds, and Township
Plats for sale at the Sentinel office.
Business Directory:
A S 11 S E
BE N VAN CAM PEN,
OAXXOy FALLS, MIXXESOTA.
Travelers will find every accommodation on
reasonable torrns at the above
Stables, Ostlers, Ac.
Cjjeiplitmg^flrtkl Directory Continued:
A E S O A E I S I N
Business Cards of five line, year, $8,00
do ten lines do 10,00
One column per year, 70,00
io six month* 40,00
Half uolumn ]cr year 40,00
do six ni" h» 30,00
Fourth column per yoar 25,00
do six months 15,00
Each square (10 'ines, or less) first insertion 40
Each subsequent insertion ,80
All advertiesments continued until ordered out.
Changes made in advertisments, charged at
80 cents per thousand cms.
Advertisement* acti a double cellimii.
additional.
v^
price
BOO & JOB WORK
I a its various Branches,
Executed with neatness and dispatch.
METROPOLITAN HOTEL,
Levee street, immediately opposite the Steam
boat Landing, Red Wing, Minnesota,
A. A. & E. L. TEELE, PROPRIETORS.
^11 HIS new, spacious and commodious house
I is now open for the reception of guests.—
It has been constructed under the immediate
supervision of the proprietors, and nothing has
been omitted to insure the comfort and conven
ience of those who may favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with the house is a
good and commodious stable.
Red Wing, March 1, 1858. 83tf
W. I.. W E S E Proprietor,
N EA E S E A O AT A N I N
E W I N I N N E S O A
I4. ^ag9 conveyd to and from the boats free.
[SO-mo.]
RED WING HOUSE,
JACOB BENNETT. Proprietor.
nr.n WINK, MINNESOTA.
!3f"Conneeted with the Ifu-« 5S a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on band to
convey Passengers to anv part of the conntrv.
April 24.1833, 90 tf
House. Good
62ly
HACK HOUSE.
J. HACK, Proprietor.
ONStreet,M
PLU STREET, a few doors from Main
Red Wing.
This House is entirely now and newly fur
nished, and the Proprietor hopes by strict at
tention to customers to receive a share cf pat
ronage.
Red Wing, Sept. 5.1857. 59y
E N A O I N O S E
P. R. ft F. A. 1IARDT, PROPRIETORS.
THIfSLake
House is pleasantly located on the share
Pepir, within a few rods of the
Steamboat Landing. Persons wishing to spend
a few days of recreation and leisure, will find
this the place to do it. A good and well sup
plied barn is attached to tho house, and a com
petent ostler always in attendance.
Tke proprietorship ing lcasod the above pop
ular house and having thoroughly repainted
and famished in a superior style, would say to
r.he pnblic that thing that thev can do to
make al. calling, comfortably and pleasantly
situated, will be left undone.
May 29,195?.
I. S E O
Wholesale and retail dealer in
95v
Drags a Medicines
CHEMICALS, PAINTS,
01L8,
Dye Stuffs, Window Glass, Medicinal
Wines and Liquors. Tobacco, Snuffs, Cigars,
Camphcnc, Alcohol, Burning Fluid, &c. Main
Street, Red 'Wing, Minnesota. 99yl
OKo. SVAC» B, 3 3 5
W*S#
O W
LIVERY AND EXCHANGE
STABLE.
Plum street, between Fourth and Fifth
E WING, MINNESOTA.
The subscribers having the best stocked sta
ble west of the Mississippi River are preparod
to furnish the pleasn seeking, and traveling
public, with as good Turn Ou'e, as the country
affords conie and try as if anybody has Iten
net, we can go it. SPICER & GROW.
March l»th 1859. [8«-y-]
I N I E A S E O N
DIALERS III
Dry GoodsjQroccries,Crockery, Hardware Cut
.ery, Nails, Oils, Paints Sash, Window Olass,
Looking Glasses, Farming lmplmcnts,
A.so, Hosiery, Gloves, Cravats, Suspenders,
Shirts,Collars, Brushes, Fancy Goods, &c.
,1. MGINTIKE.
Red Wing M. T. T. B. SHELDON.
DUBUQE CITY MARBLE
WORKS.
N•IIERRICK,
Dealer in American and Kor-
cign Marble,Sixth street, below Main and
Iowa, Dubuque, Iowa.
M»ntint uts, Ti»mb«£ II»ad Stones, Man
tles, Table Ac fi2m9
17. F. IIENDRICKSON,
Reotlflei and Wholesale dealer in
S m*x3l
IF/AiW 4- LIQUORS,
Corner plum and Third Sts., 97tf
RED WI«G, MINNESOTA.
If* Brown,
in.».
PHYSWIAN
orriCE A*D PtSIDENCE,
Fir*"t house south cas-t of the Hnmlme In.-tjtijt?
BLACKSM1THING
BY
O E O E W A E
At tho new Shop on Main street, within a
few rods of the crossing of Jordon.
Shop on Main street, near the American House,
and next door to the Gunsmith, holds himself
ready to do all work in his line with prompt
ness ami in a workmanlike style.
D. C. HILL.
ARORZTEOT
Office over the Register of Deeds' office,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
E E O
S. SHEPABD Architect A Builder, Nashua, N.II.
L. BRIOOS, JR., Architect nnd Civil Engineer,
Boston, Mass.
J. E.EARIE, Architect & Mechanical Draughts
man, New York.
W. W. DERBY, Contractor Builder,Chicago.
April 10,1858. 88tf
W. E. HAWKINS. O. D. BARER. A. HALL.
A I O N S N O W O S
Hawkins & Co.,
WOULr
LADIES' GENTS' AND CIIILDllEN'S
Boots & Shoes*
Plum street ouc door north of the Kelly House,
E WING, MINNESOTA. 04tf
Repairing done to order and with dispat'di.
AissaoT-rr AND
ait&uraimsm
^m
RED WING, MINNESOTA. 97tf
E O W A
BLACKSMITH*
Ox and Horse Shoeing, jjggg
He having erected a tirat rate and new frame
for shoeing cattle, he don't mean to allow him
self to be excelled either in Ox or Horse shoeing.
Farmers and all others give him a trial.
Red Wing. Nov. 27,1S58. 121m8
WOODBURY «fc WRIGHT,
Architects and Builders,
WEnish
arc now prepared to take contracts,fur
plans and specifications also,Sash
and doors on hand, and made to order. Work
from the country solicited. Shop near the
Chillson House.
Red Wing, March 27, 185S. 86tf
take this method of informing
thei friends and the public generally,
that they are now prepared to do
& a is tr a 53 tt
Of all kinds, such as IIouss, Sirn, Carriage,
Curtain and Ornamental Painting, Graining,
Glazing, Marbling and Paper Hanging.
JST"Spocial attention paid to all ordersfro?
the country. 5:itf
Red Wing. July 17.1S57.
FLETCHER,
House and Sign Painters nnd tilazir.rs.
WORed
respectfully inform the citizens of
Wing that they arc now prepared to
fill all jrders with which "we may lc favored
oti the shortest notice. We hope*by strict at
tention to business to receive a 'ibcral share of
patronage.
J3g?".y/e../ the earner or I'lumhanii Fourth Sir'*.
liotl Wing. Mav -23.1-*.'T. 44tf
JO HIV 1I1SLER,
Manufacturer and dealer in
f96y
Main street, Red Wing.
__
HSP.OHA27T TAILOR,
On Maia street, next do to Lnwther's
Rankin office in Wilkinson's Block,
RED WING, MINNESOTA
J.MIE
best of French and other Cloths, kept
constantly on hand, and made up in a su
perior manner by competent workmen. Also,
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.
E5?" Cutting done to order,
Red Wing, May 23,1857. 96y
A A S
Manufacturer and dealer in
SADDLES. HARNESSES &C.
SHOP
on Bush St. opposite C. J. F. Smith's
store, Red Wing, Minn. Where he has
constantly on hand a large assortment of Sad
dles, Harnesses, Bridles, Trunks, Valises,
Whips, Fly nets, and all other articles usually
kept in a harness shop, and cheaper than can bo
bought this side of Chicago.
Repairing and Job work done on short notice,
and in the host style. 94tf
REMOVAL.
SPORTSMEN'S DEPOT
Has been removed
to the west side of
Jordan, Maine street
where may be found
a good assortment of
SHARP'S RIFLES,
Target and Muzzle loading Rifles,
double and single barrel Shot Guns,
Colts, Alleys, and the celebrated
Robbins and Lawrence Pistols,
Powder, Shot, Lead, Caps, Wads, Flasks, Shot
Belts, Game Bags, Fishing Tackle, A A
Cheap for Cash.
Repairing done with eare and dispatch.
Red Wing, June 14,1858. 70m5
H. CONNELLY, JD.,
Tenders his professionalservices to the citi
zens of Red Wing and vicinity.
OrncE.—Corner of Bush and Plum street,
up stairs.
E E E N E S
Hon. Z. KinwELL, M. Fairmont, Va.,
Hon. J. L. DAWSON, M. Brownsville, Pa.,
Prof. T. D. MUTTER, Philadelphia, P».,
Dr. J. C. COOPER,
Rev. Dr. DRL-MMONR, Morgantown, Va.,
Drs. MCLANE A BROCK. Alorgantown, Va.,
Dr. A. II. CAMPBELL, Key West, Florida,
Dr. E. S. GAINES, Knoxville, Tennessee.
Red Wing,May 2ft,1S57, 44tf
A i. E S W A I N
SURGEON AN MECHANICAL
E N I S
Dm st.re,
Ro.inv- cr the
Red W in
SURGEOX
rIAXOS»tfr .sale or t.i rtn!
Angti 1.22, Mtf,
Main si.
7«)m
D.C.HILL
7.tf
BED WIN
Director?Continued:
F. SANOrORD. MAN IVXS.
8 A N O I E S
Attorneys at Law $• Notary Public.
E WINQ, MINNESOTA,
Agents for the United States, Franklin, Fire
and Marine,
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
[I21tf)
CLINTON OITRXIK, JB. O. O. BKTNOLDS.
O N E E A REYNOLDS,
Counsellors and Attorneys at Law,
Red Wing, Minn.
Office with Smith, Towne A Co. 82-tf
A N A
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR
A A W
NOR Til PEPIN, WISCONSIN.
Will give special attention to collecting Ac.
74y
O I & A I O N
ATTORNEYS A COUNSELLORS AT LAW
AND
GENERA A N AGENTS
E W I N MINNESOTA.
W A E N I S O
LaU Murdoch & £rittol,)
Attorney at E*aw
And Notary Public,
REDWING, MINNESOTA.
MISS A I E II MILLER
At her Father's residence, corner 4th tt Dacota We
Continncs to give to the Ladies of Red
Wing lessons in
PIANO FORTE PLAYING.
crms per term of 12 weeks $10 payable in
advance.
Red Wing. June 19,1358. 9Stf
A E A PRATT
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
and Solicitors in Chancery.
AND AGENTS AND DEALERS IN
Real Estate, and Land Warrants.
MAXTonvitE, DODGE Co., M.
a La wilier,
A S I I
Real Estate Afrent, a Dealer
IN
LA.ND WARRANTS.
R«tl Wing Minnesota.
8ar"Monoy loaned, Land Warrants sold or lo
aned on time. Roal Estate, and Exchogn
bought and sold. May 23, '57
HOBACK WILDEB KM T. WILDEII.
II. E W I E
Bankers & Land Agents:
REDWING, Minnesota Ter.
Money loaned. Exchange & Land Warrants
bought and sold. Land Warrants, or Monev'
loaned to prc-emptors, on long or short time".
and on favorable terms.
J3P Lands bought and sold oncommission Ac.
Rod Wing, May, 1857.
REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
E N A O I N MINNESOTA
I E subscriber will buy and sell Lands, lo
rn cate Land Warrants, enter Government
Lands, select Claims for Settlers desiring to lo
cate on the Half Breed Reservation, pay Taves
and attend to all business appertaining to his
profession—negotiate Loans for Capitalists up
on unexceptionable real estate security from 20
to «0 per cent. PERRY D. MARTIN.
Central Point, Jan. 1,1S58. 77y
J. H. ELDER,
DEALER IN
LANDS AND TOWN LOTS,
Lumber, Shingles, Produce. Horses, Wagohs
and Wood. Will make Collections, Pay
Taxes, Buy and Sell County Orders,
Uncurrent Money &c &c.
E W I N MINN. 93tf
W I W I S O
ATTORNE A LAW A N
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT
Office 5 a to
Agent for the following reliable Insurance
Companies:—
FARMERS UNION, Athens, Pa.,
WASHINGTON UNION, Cleveland, Ohio.
How, Painesville,
REFERENCES:
Hon. W. H. WELCH, Red Wing, Minnesota
E. T. WILDER,
It. HITCHCOCK, Painesville, Ohio.
A. G. RIDDLE, Cleveland, Ohio.
H. D. KBNOALL,
H. WILDER,. Conneaut,
August 22,1857,' 57v
Commonwealth Insurance Comp'y,
Unio Buildings Third street,
IIARRIfSBURGH, PKNNSTLVAKIA,
Chartered Capital, $300,000!
Insure Buildings and other Property,
Against loss or damage by Fire. Also against
Perils of tho Sea, Inland Navigation and Trans
portation.
I E O S
SIMON CAMERON,
GEO. M. LADMAN,
WILLIAM DOCK,
ELI SLIFER,
GEO. BERONER,
BENJAMIN PARKE,
JAMES FOX.
M. J. CHAMBERLIN.
8
WM. H. KEPNER,
A. B. WARPORD,
W. F. MURRAY,
F. K. BOAS,
JOHN H. BERRYHILL,
WM. F. PACKER.
O I E S
SIMON CAMERON, President.
BENJ. PARKE, Vice President.
^.
CARRIER, Secretary.
S. B. FOOT, Agent, Red Wing, M. T.
January 9,1858. 75tf
A N I N O S E O
SMITH, K3X9S & 90.,
RED WING, MINNESOTA TERRITORY.
P.SM1TO. B. L.MEIGS. W. S.DICKINSON
RsdWiBR.Sl.T. BsaMr. N/Y.
AN.KNAPP.
w. t-Kauirsov,
MaUHW.N.Y.
WEtionsl,
wil give special attention to Collec
payment of Taxes, and to the pur-
chase and sale of Real Estate.
Land Warrants for sale or toloan.—Mon
ey Receive on Deposit*
REFE TO
Messrs. Green Sewoll,Bankers,New York.
W. A. Wheeler, Et.q.,Cash'r Malonc B'k,N,V,
Messrs, E, A- Blrchard Co,, Boston,
E. I. Tmkham, Esq., Banker, Chicago,
Dapiel pish. Esq., President of Farmers' Ba ,k,
Lanstngburgh, N. Y.,
Messrs. Brockaway, Wason, Everett
Bankers. Cleveland, Ohio,
Justus White. Esq., La Crosse. Wisconsin.
JchnC. Smith, Pres't Canaiohsrie Bank.N. Y.
Red Wing, June «.1§»7. 48m«,
•Minnesota Forever
From the Scottish Ecclesiastical Journal,
Earthly and Heavenly Knowledge.
The world grows old yet knowledge with
it grows,
Not grey and feeble, but more strong and
keen
The sage's harvest yearly richer glows,
And larger handfulsfoilto those who glean.
Some sounds ofdoubtor discord yearly cease,
Which once perplexed the teaching of the
wise
Harmonious witness yearly makes increase,
As clearer truths expand to patient eyes.
The gracious elements their secrets yield,
And lend their powers the sea-beat olifls
unfold
Theirstoried pages from the starry field
Have distant orbs their weight and mea
sure told.
And mighty ministers of life or death
Or healing sleep, are press'dfromore and
flower,
Or captured from some subtle ether's breath,
'Tis well man claims his God-permitted
powers.
God gave the eye, the brain, the inductive
mind.
And set material wonders in our sight,
Where intellect, with tendrils fast entwined,
Might, like the rock-plants, grow from
height to height.
'Tis so with nature's mysteries but how
fare
They who tho spirital marvels thus would
sound!
Has process traced, has secret law laid bare
At last the painful toil of centuries
crowned
Has the long search of many a strenuous
mind,
Through different paths pursued, to union
led?
Has surer knowledge mended, purged, de
fined,
The immature conceptions of the dead
Ah, no from time to time, from place to
place,
The worn debates pass on and ever fail!
The going" of »he Spirit who can trace,
Or pierce the awfu! sacramental veil
The
1
visible things are ours the
things"
Are God's nor prayer, nor fast, nor watch
of pain,
Nor faith's strong vision, nor lore's ardent
wings,
Shall to the workings which He hides,water,
attain.
O blessings, which we will not stoop to prize!
The way, the work, are His, the fruit is
ours
We reason on the miracle which flies
To touch our helpless souls with saving
powers.
Ah! that some angel, such as they wbo hide
Their faces from the light in which they
stand.
Between the Church's severed ranks might
glide,
Breathing his warning hush" en either
hand!
Then, wo. Id not pens be dropped and words
grow low,
And men with wonder as with shame be
bowed
Remembering, how, where none can say "I
know,"
They taught so boldly, once, and strove
so loud
ENTHUSIASM IN A SUNDA SCHOOL.
The following story is an acknow
lodged "good un," and has only lately
found its way into the papers:
A few years ago some roguish boys,
in a town a thousand miles from the
capital of New Hampshire, persuaded
Joseph N or as he wag gener
ally CSlkcl, Joe," to attend Sunday
School. Joe was an overgrown, half
witted, profane lad, and the boys an
ticipated considerable fun out of him,
but the answers to the various questions
propounded were given so readily and
correctly that no one could for a mo
ment suppose that he was not thor
oughly versed in theological lore.
Joe was duly ushered in and placed
on a settee^ in front of the one on
which his friends were seated, and the
recitation commenced. The teacher
first questioned the classes on their
regular lessons, and afterwards return
ed to Joe.
"My friend," said the teacher, "who
made the worid we inhabit?"
Eh?" said Joe, turning up his eyes
like an expiring calf.
Who made the world we inhabit?"
Just as he was probably about to
give the answer, one of the boys seat
ed behind inserted a pin into Joe's
pants, about nine inches below the or
namental buttons on his coat.
"God Almighty!" answered Joe,
in an elevated tone and rising from
his seat,
"That is correct," replied the teach
er, "but it is not necessary that you
rise in answering a sitting
posture is just as well."
Co.,should
Joe was seated, and the catechism
proceeded,
RED WING, GOODHU
E COUNTY MINN., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2S. 1858. WHOLE NUMBER 128.
Who died to save the world?"
The pin, -watt again inserted, and
Joe replied-*
"Jesus Christ! "in a still louder
voice, rising as before from his seat.
That is also correct, but do not
manifest so much feeling do be more
composed and reserved in your man
ner," said the teacher in an expostulat
ing tone.
After Joe had calmed down, the ex
amination went on.
What will be the final doom of all
wicked men?" was the subject for con
sideration, and, as the pin was again
"stuck in" and Joe thundered out,
with a higher elevation of the body—
Hell and damnation!"
"My young friend," said the in
structor, "you gave the true answers
to all these questions but while you
are here, we wish you to be more mild
in your words. Do endeavor, if you
can, to restrain your enthusiasm, and
give a less extended scope to your
feelings.
O N I
The following picture of John Bright,
just now very conspicuous in English
politics, is from the Philadelphia Press:
A good looking, well built man, with
good nature as well as determination
nad firmness in his face. Clear blue eyes
brown hair in gentle waves, broad
chest, erect body—altogether person
able, not prepossessing. Rather gay
than grave in conversation Gives and
takes a quid. Listens with pleased
attention to a good story, and barters
back another, quite as good in return.
Social, and fond of discussion, yet does
not seek to monopolize the talk. A
capital man to sit oposite to in a rail
way carriage, from London to Man
chester with his remarks on men and
things—as Charles Grugan has expe
rienced, we dare say. He has travel
led largely over Euiope, and can well
describe what he has closely observed.
Speaks better of his political opponents
than, on the average, they deserve.—
Has no faith in the Liberalism of Pal
merston, and never believed in theof
pseudo-patriotism of Lord John Rus
sell, whom he believes to be aristocra
tical to a degree, with all his blarney
about popular rights. Respects the
memory, and laments the death of Sir
Robert Peel, just at the time when he
had learned the lesson,—by statesmen
slowly taken to heart—that an honest
evident to the people, will al
ways be sustained by popular support.
secretpurpose
Thinks that Bulwer would be better
in his library, writing novels, than in
Downing street governing colonies.—
Looks upon Lord Derby as a break
to prevent the overflow of Pal
racrston and Russell into office. Re
gards Lord Stanley as Che most rising
young politician in England, and des
pairs not of seeing him the most liber
al and popular Prime Minister Eng
land ever knew. Would probably
consent to sit in the Cabinet under
him, and would most certainry become
a great failure if he did—for he would
quarrel with all his colleagues, one by
one, in tho course of the first fortnight.
Drinks nothing but cold water, yet is
so belligerant on that pure element,
that his friend, Cobden, one day said
halfjest and half earnest, that if John
Bright had not been bom and bred a
Quaker, it was evident that nature
had cut him out to be a prize fighter.
And, indeed, as he stands in the House
of Commons, a political Ishmacl, with
his hands against all parties, and
most of them against him, John Bright
involuntarily reminds one of an intel
lectual gladiator.
STATISTICS O SUICIDE.
Mr. Buckle has asserted, in h:s able and
interesting recent work on Civilisation, that
the number of suicides is a "constant quali
ty,"—in other words, that suicides, like oth
er so-called "crimes," occur very regularly.
In the five years, 1852-6, it is shown by the
Registrar General ofEngland that 5,415 per
sons put a period to their earthly career by
self destruction, viz: 3,866 males and 1.529
females. The annual average of male siii
cides is 777.2 and that of females 395.8.—
The general average shows that upwards
of 1,000 persons 1,073.0 put an end to their
sufferings in every year of grace. The low
est number of suicides was 1,020, in 1853,
and the highest 1,182 in 1856. Poisoning
being the easiest, is a common, but by noforty
means a general mode ot self-destruction.
The favorite poisons are arsenic, opium,
laudanum, (the tincture of opium,) prussic
acid, (the most rapid in its action, and es
sential oil of bitter almonds. It is a remark
able fact that female suicides manifest a
strange predilection for the very painful ir
ritant poison called ovalic acid. As many
as thirty-four were so foolish as to choose
this compound of oxygen and carbon, wbile
only fifteen males resorted to it. On theance,
other hand, sixty-seven men resorted tc hy
drocanic acid, and eighty-three to the 1
otAbdallah,
almonds, whde only eight women had the
resolution to swallow the former fatal pois
on, and eighteen the latter, Strychnine was
used by
,nar
ai,d
jftm ?ry
one woman, and in
one case camphor was used. But hanging
is by far the most general mode of suicide,
for nearly half of the annual average ofsui
cides terminate their miserable lives by sus
pension. Cut-throats and drowning stand
next in the order of frequency eight tenths
of all suicides are committed in one of these
three ways. Asphyxia proper, or suffoca
tion by the fumes ofcharcoal, is by no means
a favorite mode ofsuicide hore, as in France.
The greatest number of suicides occur be
tween the ages of thirty-five, thirtyrthroe
persons of both sexes oommiilcd suicide at
ten years of age, and fourteen persons of
both sexee at tiie age of eighty-five.
E A WOMAN*
Oft I've heard a gentle mother,
As the twilight hour began,
Pleading with a son, on duty,
Urging him to be a man.
But unto her blue-eyed daughter,
Tho' with love's words quite as ready,
Points she out the of er duty,
Strive, my dear, to be a lady."
What's a lady It is something
Made of hoops, and silks, and airs,
Used to decorate the parlor,
Like tbe fancy rugs and chairs
It is one that wastes on novels
Every feeling that is human.
If'tis this to be a kdyv
'Tis not to be a woman*.
Mother, then, unto your daughter
Speak of something higher far,
Than to be mere fashion's lady—
"Woman" is the brighter star.
If ye, in your strong affection,
Urge your son to be a true man,
Urge your daughter no less strongly,
To arise and be a woman.
Yes, a woman—brightest model
Of that light and perfect beauty,
Where the mind, and soul, and body,
Blend to work out life's great duty—
Be a woman naught is higher
On the gilded list of fame
On the catalogue of virtue
There is no brighter, holier name,
Be a woman—on to duty,
Raise the world from all that's low,
Place high in the social heaven
Virtue's fair and radiant bow!
Lend thy influence to each effort
That shall raise our nature human
Be not fashion's gilded lady—
Be a brave, whole-souled, true woman.
THE FORTUNES OF ABDALLAH.
A. PERSIAN STORY.
Abdallah was a prosperous barber
Shiraz. He married a woman of
great beauty, but she was excessively
vain, so that his whole substance was
consumed in providing her with dres
ses, trinkets, and the luxuries of the
harem.
So, observing the eccentric practices
of the astrologers, he took a brass ba
sin and a pestle of steel into the bazaar
and smiting his basin cried aloud that
he would calculate nativities, predict
the events of the future, detect thieves
and recover lost properly. His neigh
bors were astonished, and^all said,
"Abdallah, the barber, iscertainly
gone mad!"
But it chanced that a certain lady re
turning from the bath, walked through
the bazaar with her veil torn she ap
peared in great distress, and upon
hearing the cry of Abdallah, sent one
of her slaves to him with this message:
"If you are an impostor my husband
shall cause you to be bastinadoed If
you are really an astrologer, inform me
where I shall find a necklace of pearls
I have lost to-day." Poor Abdallah,
bewildered gazed upon the lady, and
gaining time to invent an answer, said:
"She can find the pearls when they are
near for the veil is torn J" These
words were reported to her by the
slave, and she uttered a ciy of joy.—
&
Above all other women, the wife of
Hassan, the kings astrologer, was en-violent
vied by the wife of Adallah, the un-door.
ostentatious barber for this lady af
fected great grandeur, and could af
ford it on account of the large salary
and handsome presents bestowed upon
her husband.
PUBLISHER AND FftOFBXBTOB.
barber petrified with perplexity, she
approached him and in a soft voic%
said, "O astrologer! I confess that in
an hour of avarice I took the jewel.
Restore it without sending me to con-.
demnation! Abdallah sternly re-.J
plied: "Woman I knew thy guJlt,-~
Where is thy jewel?" She answered:,te
"Under the fourth cushion from the
door in the apartment of Cashom, my
lord's Georgian slave.1* Abdallah
hastened to the palace was rewarded
with a robe of honor a thousand pieces
of gold and a costly ornament,
Urged by his wife Abdellah essayed
once more. The king's treasury had
been broken open, and forty chests of
money had been carried away. Net ft
trace of t\e thieves had. been discov
ered. The royal astrologer had tried
every sort of divination and failed, and
was therefore in disgrace. But the
fame o.f Abdallah, which was now spo
ken qf \n all Shiraz, had reached the
ear ojf the king, who sent for him and
gave him audience in the hall of Kal
net Serponchidah- Abdallaht" ho
said with a severe expression in his
face, "art thou truly able to read the
stars?" Put me to the proof I"
answered the barber, who was now
prepared for the worst. Then dis
cover the forty chests of money whioh
have been stolen, as well as the orimW
nal. Succeed and thou shalt marry a
princess and beoome mv minister fail
and I will kill thee!" There must
have been forty thieves!" said Abdak
lah, making a fortunate apd not very
difficult gqess, "Grant me forty dfcysl"
"Forty days shalt thou have," said
the king, "and thou shalt die, or live
for riches and honor."
So the barber went home and told
his wife and sai I, I h&ve forty days
to live I will sit upon my ^prayer mat
and meditate upon the blessedness of
death. Give me 1 beg thee forty
beans. At the hour of evening pray
er daily will I give thee one, that by
counting the remainder, I may remem
ber how many days I have to live."
She complied and every day at the
exact hour of sunset, Abdallah gave
her a bean, and said with great firm
ness and solemnity, "there is one of
them! And on the last day he said in
an excited manner, "There is the
whole forty of them! What was
his astonishment when at the instant, a
knocking was heard at the
fn
One day the discontented beauty an
nounced to Abdallah that she would
no longer continue to live with him un
less he gave up the miserable business
of barber and adopted thai of astrolo
ger. In vain did he represent to hersaid
that trimming beards was his habit,
while of astrological predictions he
knew nothing she insisted, and thethy
unfortunate man, infatuated by his af
fection, resolved to obey.
Admirable prophet!" she exclaimed,
"Iplaced my pearls for safety in a rent
in the veil of the bath*" And she or-being
dered Abdallah to be presented with
pieces of gold. Now it should
be known that in the Persian baths
there are screens, the name of which
is tbe same as the native word for
"veil." So Abdallah by a lucky ac
cident of speech, had not only saved
himself from the bastinado, but he
gained forty pieces of gold-
At length, another lady, the wife of
the king's treasurer, made her appear
and just at that moment a mes
senger from the treasurer came up to
in the bazaar, and spoke to
him. The lady stood close by andand
listened. "Abdallah," said the slave
"my master has lost the king's great
ruby if thou hast the wisdom of the
stars thou can'st find it if not thou
art a pretender and I will surely cause
thee to be bastinadoed." This time
the unfortunate barber was at his wit's
end. "O, woman! he exclaimed,
thou art the author of all this." He
meant his own wife, but the wife of the
treasurer thought it referred to her.me
Guilt is always pale the poet says.—
She herself had stolen the king's ruby,
and believed that tho astrologer was
aw*?* of he? crime. So when the
A crowd of men were admitted
and one of them, evidently the chief,
said, O, Abdallah, wise astrologer,
thou shalt receive the forty chests of
old untouched, but spare our lives!"
supreme bewilderment he answered
"This night I should have seised thee
and thy wretched companions tell mo
on thy head, how knowest thou that I
possess this knowledge?" "We heard/11
the chief of the robbers that" tHS
king had sent for thee. Therefore one
of us came, at the hour of sunset, at
door, and heard you say, 'there is
one of them.' We would not believe
his story, and sent two to ascertain it,
and thou wast heard to say, 'there ar-o
two of them!1 aud this night, O, won*
dcrful thou didst exclaim* there aro
the whole forty of them,' but restore
the king's money, aud do not deliver
us unto the cxeeutiones,"
Abdallah promised to do what he
could. Being admitted to the palace,
he declared that, owing to some mys
tery of the stars, it was given him to
discover either the thieves or the treas*
me, but not both. The monarch, at
length, oonsented to take the forty
chests and fulfilled his promise with
Abdallah.
aware oe crime when the done on my part, to produceli* tame!
messenger had departed, leaving the happy result." T.
WOODEN CANNON A A A Rus-
sian correspondent of the Rochester.
Union relates the following anecdote
of the Russian Czar, which shows that
not even emperors are not exempt
from the operations ot sharpers:
The Emperor gave a large order:
for the manufacture of cannon baJJs to
some concern at Heisingfort, a port,
on the Gulf They completed the or
der, stacked up and delivered the
balls, received their pav, and put thq(
moftey in their pockets" The Emperor
there one day, took it into liis
head to inspect the balls. Taking ono:
up, he discovered it to be exceedingly)
light for iron, and taking out bis knif«v
scraped it and behold it was a wooden
ball painted black, as was the entire
lot. He caused the arrest of the'
swindlers and they were transported
for life to Siberia."
(KT Mr. Buckmastcr, one of the can
didates for the governorship of Deh
ware, brought down the house with
storm of applauses, a few days since.—
He said that when a young ln&n, he
visited a lady with "senons intentions,"
a set declaration, all committed
memory. But when the important
moment come for the denouement, his
speach evaporated into thin air, and,
in his confusion, he stammered out the?
question, if she would accept him for
her governor! "And now, gentlemen,"
he remarked, I do not know what I
can do better than ask yon the same
question: 'Will you haveroetor your
governor?' The young lady acoente4i
for her governor, and everytluiig.
has since worked togetherforour goo^r
and if your reply shall bo in the affirm
ative, I assure jou everything shall bed
done on ni

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