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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, March 26, 1859, Image 1

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DAN a MBRITT,
VOLUME 3, NUMBER 84.
Ao six mouths
Half column per year
do six months••
Fourth column jn.-r year
do months
A S II i) S E
BY BEN VAN CAM E N
CA yy r.a. i. a, my yes TA
Travelers will And every accommodation
reasonable terms at the above llouie.
Stablw, Ostlers, Ac. O-.'ly
C|tlU^ling^t«tinfI!WrectoryCoDtiBoed:
PUBLISHED fiVSKV SATURDAY,
AT
E W I N MIXflESOTA.
A N S E I
9 9 per year in a a
A E S O A E I S I N
Business Curds of tive li-.*o,year,-
do tan lines do
On* column par y»ar,
$6,00
•10,00
•70,00
•40,00
40,00
30,00
25.00
5,001
B*chsquare(ie,six
in««'.orle»a)nrstinsort»on40| ..... .. -.
Each subsequent insertion .20 having erected a hrst rate
ft ilvertiesments continued until ordered out.
BOO & JOB WORK
I all its a us a
Ex'-Mitel with neatness and dispatch.
LMats for sale at the Sentinel oJfiee.
Business Directory:
MErttOPOLITAN HOI EL,
Levee street, imme liately opposite the Steam
boat Landing, Red Wing, Minnesota,
A. A. fc E. L. TEELE PROPRIETORS.
HIS new, spacious and commodious
It has been ••onstrueced under the immediate
s'uperVisloHrtf the proprietors, and nothing has
beon omitted to insure the comfort and conven
enee of thbke who may favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with the house is a
good and oo'inmodious stable.
Kei Wing, March I, 1553. 83tf
W, L. W E S E Proprietor,
KK A E 8 EAM 0 A A N I N
II W I N N E S O A
li *?'/*ge coaveyd to and from the boats froe.
[SO-mfi.]
RED WINS HOUSE,
April 24. 1*53.
HACK HOUSE.
J. fl&^K. Proprietor.
/^|N PLUM STREET, a few doors from Main
Street. l*o I Wing.
This House is entirely new and newly fur
nishod, and the Proprietor hopes by strict at
tentio.i to customers to receive a share cf pat
ronase.
Red Wing, Sept. 5.1357. 59y
E N A POINT O S E
P.R. A F. A. 1IARDT, PBOPBIETOKS.
1*1118 House is pleasantly located on the share
A. of Lalie Pepin, within a few rods of the
Steamboat Landing. Persons wishing to s-pend
a few days of recreation and leisure, will find
this the place to do it. A good and well sup
plied barn is attached to the house, and a com
petent ostler always in attendance.
The proprietors v\ ing loased the above pap
ular house and having thoroughly rcniinted
and furnished in a superior stylo, would say to
the pnblic that thing that they can do to
make al. calling, comfortably and pleasantly
situated, will be left undone.
May 23,1355. 95y
I. S. KELLOGG,
Wholesale and retail dealer in
Drags and Medicines,
CHEMICALS, PAINTS,
OILS,
Dye Stan's. Window Glass, Medicinal Zl'JrS' $&?***'
Win-sand LiquorBurning
Tobacco,Snuffs.Cigars.n 8 W
Camphene Alc-hol Fluid, A Mai
Street, Red Wing, Minnesota. 99y
3KO. SPICER. 5S& W. S. GROW.
LIVER A N E A N E
STABLE.
Plum street, between Fourth and Fifth
E WING. MINNESOTA.
The subscribers having the be»tsto«kccJ
bte west of the MiesiMippi River are prepared
to furnish the. aleasn seeking, and traveling I
public, with as good Turn Ou s. as the country
afford* come and try as if anybody has Ben
»et, we can go it. SPICER A GROW.
March lath 1953. [85-.v]
I N I E it SHELDO N
DEALERS IN
DTJ Ooods,Oroceries,Crockery, Hardware Cut
.ery, Nails, Oils, Paints Sash, Window Glass,1
Looking Glasses, Farming lmplmcnts.
A.so, Hosiery, Gloves. Cravats, Suspenders,
ihirts.Collars,Brushes,Fancy Goods, Ac.
J. MCINTIRE.
Red Wing M. T. T. B. SHELDON.
E CITY A E
W O S
IIERRICK, Dealer In American and For
*v cign Marble.Sixth street, below Main and
Iowa, Dubuque, lo.ua.
tiiuiuMits. Tainb sc Head Stones, Man
tles, Table Tops Ac a-2m9
HENDRICKHON,
Rectitioi and Wholesale Scaler in
it oaracA
yVJNES 4- LIQUORS,
Corner Plum aad Tfcird^ts,, ?7tf
RED W|iG, MINNESOTA.
W Brown*. IH.
PHYSICIAN SURGEON
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE,
*ftt 'lonse^rtiith-eajt of the Htmline Tnatitar*
BLA CKSMJ THING
iir
E O O It*. A E
At the new Shop on Main sticet, within a
few rods of the crossing of Jordon.
RED WING. MINNESOTA. 97tf
E. C. O W A
BLACK .lilTH,
Shop on Main street, near the American House,
and next door to the Gunsmith, holds himselt
ready todo all work in his line with prouipt
ness an in a workmanlike style.
Ox and Horse Shoeing,
fo[.shoeing
and new frame
cattle, he don't met
Alvertisement4sotindoublec»lnmn,^ price «1'to be excelled either in Uxor tlorse shoeing
Farmers and all others give ham a trial,
additional.
mean to allow him-
Red Wing. Nov. 27, 1858. 12lm3
WOODBL'IiY & W I
Architects and Builders
\7"E are new prepared to take contracts, lur
nisli plans and specifications: also.Sash
'anddoors on hand, and made to order. Work
BLVXK^.—WurratUy. Quit-Claim.Special from the country solicited. ShoD near the
Warranty, Mort.'a»e Deod^, and Township Cliillson House.
Ked Wing. March 27, 1859. 86tf
\V. E. HAWKISS. O. D. BAKER. A. HALL.
AC O N S N O W O S
Hawkins & Co.,
WOULr
a
is now open for the reception of guests.— Curtain and Ornamental Painting. Graining,
Glazing. Marbling and Paper Hanging.
fey Special attention paid to all orders from
the country. 52tf
take tuis method of informing
thei triends and the public generally,A
that they arc now prepared to do
•ipjfc a a SJ
sinds, such as House. Sign, Carriage,
Red Wing. July 17.1357.
JOHN 1IISLER,
Manufacturer and dealer in
LADIES' GENTS' AND CHILDREN'S
Boots & Shoes*
Plum street one door north of the Kelly House,
E WING, MINNESOTA. Mtf
Repairing done to order and with dispatch.
BJ E N
:.:3?.3H-'-2T,P TAILO?.,
On Muiii street, next do to Laivther's
B.iak ng office in Wilkinson's Block,
RE WING, MINNESOTA.
I.'il&bsatD
Proprietor.
MINNESOTA.
J.VH BENNETT
RK.ll WIN!J,
JV"0onn -c'.ed with the IIou.sc is a larrre and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Team!) and Carriages on hand to
convey Pas.-iongars to any part of th
conn
90- tf
of French and other Cloths, kept
constantly on hand, and made up in a su
perior manner by competent workmen. Also.
(JESTS' FORNISHING GOOUS.
Rod Wing, May
-e
••j'inneto ordei
13, 1857. 96v
ADAMS
Manufacturer and dealer in
S A E S A N E S S E S
QHOPon Rush St. opposite C. J.
O stove. Red Wins. Minn. Where
Good!
oonsta,lt:1 Vf
,lillKI
fcC.
a large a^sortmen1
dies. Harnesses. Bridles. Trunks. „.,.
Whips. Fly nets, and all other articles nsnallv
kept in a harness shop, and cheaper than can be
bought this side of Chicago.
Repairing and Job work done on short notice.
and in the best style. «4tf
REMOVAL.
SPORTSMEN'S DEPOT
S A S 4
S 0 0
Muzzle loading Rifles,
Target and
double and single barrel Shot G»m
Coifs, Allen's, and the celebrated
Bobbins and Lawrence Pistol*
Powder. Shot. Lead. .pa. Wads. Flasks. Shot
Belts. Game Bags, Fishing Tackle, A &c.
Cheap for Cash.
Repairing done with care and rii«pnteh.
™.
T-
GHAMBEBLIK.
Red Wing. June 14. 135S. 70m6
€,. M. COS N E IS.
Tenders his professional services to the citi
zens of Red Wing and vicinity.
OFFICE.—Corner of Bnsh and Plam street,
ap stairs.
E E E N E S
IIon.Z.KiDwxLL, M. Fairmont, Va..
Hon. J. L. DAWSON, M. Brownsville, Pa..
Prot. T. D. MUTTER, Philadelphia, Pa.,
0
Drs. MOLANE &
BROCK.»Morgantown.
A E N S W A I N
SURGEON AN MECHANICAL
E N I S
to the Drag store, Main at.
Red Wing. T0m«
A "S 2 S 2 9
me Corner of
Main and Bush Sreets, Red Wing.
E A E IN
E A I W E
WATCHES,
OLCCSS & JS^TSLSIT.
|^*AL WORK W A A N E
Red Wing, Nov. 13,1858. Il9tf
nrnjviTUHB.
ONHouse.H
BUS STREET, noar the Red Wing
All kinds constantly on hand.—
Repairing aud Turning dune to order.
Also, all kinds of COFFINS furnished to order
ANDREW COOK.
Red Wing, Jan. 1,1859. 127y
Township Maps!
Lands $1,25 per Acre.
C/ORREClTthe
Copiesof Government Maps.nhow
inz al unclaimed lands in this- district
furnished at short notice by
SMITH. TOWNE A 0 0
April 1^. 19*8. ?a«f
DirectoryContinued:
fi. T. WILDER. W. C. WILLISTON.
W I E & W I I S O N
Attorneys at JLaw*
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties of their profession in
any of the Courts ot this State.
W. C. WILLISTON,
Notary Public and A for the fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies
MERCHANTS, Hartford, Conn.
FARMERS' UNION, Athens, Pa.
PIKENIX, Milwaukee, Wis.
P. 8ANDFORD. FRANK 1VSR
S.4NDFOR 4c ITES
Attorneys at Law Notary Public.
E WING, MINNESOTA,
Agents for the United States. Franklin, Fire
and Marine,
I N S A N E COMPANIES.
[121tf)
CLINTON GUHNEE. JR. c. O. REYNOLDS.
GURNEE & REYNOLDS,
Counsellors and Attorneys at Law,
Red Wing, nn.
Office with Smith, To«ne & Co. 82-tf
A E A
O N E A N COUNSELOR
AT LAW,
NORTH PEPIN, WISCONSIN.
Will give special attention to collecting «fec.
74T
O I 4c A I O N
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELLORS AT A W
ANl»
GENERAL LAND AGENTS
BE1 WING, MINNESOTA.
W A E N I S O
(Late Murdoch it Brutol,)
Attorney at Law
And Notary Public,
REDWING, MINNESOTA.
51y
A N E W BARR,
VETERINARIAN SURGEON.
HOLDS
himself In readiness t» attend to all
diseases to which our most valuable serv
ant, the horse, i* heir to.
Res'dence in East Red Wing, a few rods east
of the Livery db Exchange Stable. All talis
will be promptly attended to. A. BARR
Red Wing. Aug. 12,1958. l*6tf
A E 4 A
A O N E S A A W
ami S in Chaaterr
A N A E N S A N E A E S I N
Real Estate,and Land Warrants.
MANTORVIMS. DODQK Co., M.
a
Jarncft
.A
Smith's
he has
of Sad
Valise
Va.,
Dr. A. II. CAMPBELL, Key West, Florida,
Dr.E. S. GAINES, KnoxvUlo, Tennessee.
Red Wing. May 23,1857. 44tf
a a
a E a A
IN
A N W A A N S
Wing, Minnesota.
J^-Moncy loaued, Land Warrants sold or lo
aned on time.. Real E«ate, and Exchagn
bought and sold. May 23 '5?received
HORACE WILDER EtIT. WILDER.
St E W I E
Bankers & Land Agents:
REDWING, MinneStuTer.
A Lon
Lanld
Has been removed
to the west side of! Money loaned
Jordan. Mainestreetj bought and sold.Exchange»arranw,d oWarrants
aione
where may be found loaned to pre-emptors. on long or time
Warrants,short
or Monev
A .fcrormU? ternis.
S Lands bought and sold oneommission Ac.
Red Wing, May, 1857.
E A E S A E OFFICE
E N A O I N MINNESOTA.
E sabscrib-.r will buy and sell Lands, lo-
a a
Warrants, enter Government
.Lands, select Claims for Settlers desiring to lo
cate on the Half Breed Reservation, pay Taxes
aud attend to all business appertaining to his
profession- negotiate Loans lor Capitalists up
on unexceptionable real estate security from 20
t« «0 per cent. PERRY D. MARTIN.
Central Point. Jan. 1,1858. 77
Kelly House Saloon,
I N
BASEMENT KELLY HOUSE,
I S A
3*1238 HTSTXTTTTIOIT,
DON E O GUSTAVU.?, Prop'r,
•|Si—y}
3 a
I S S S
°d only pure Liquors
tonp
n. The very choiaest
A A N A CIGARS.
LAGER and other good things, constantly
on hand. Call and see him. GTJSTAVUS.
December 8,1855. jj^tf
a ii O W N E A CO..
DEALERS IN
REAL ESTATE,
E W I N MINNESOTA.
Will attend to locating Land Warrants pay
ment of taxes, collection of notes, and to the pur
chase and sale of Real E-tate throughont the
Territory. Surveying, Mapping, and Platting
ol every kind done t» order by practical sur
veyor. Copies of township maps furnished.
Da ids drawn and acknowledgements taken.
S bnsiness intrnstcd to them, will re
eavc prp**?1"' attention.
O. F. SMITH, T.g.TOWN«, J-CFIERCl
Conmonwealth ifisorance Comp'y,
Union Building*, Third Street,
HARRISBURGH PENNSYLVANIA,
Chartered Capital, $ 3 0 0 0 0 0
Insure Buildings and other Property,
Against loss OT damage by Fire. Also against
Perils of the Sea, Inland Navigation and Trans
portation.
I E O S
SIMON CAMKRON,
i»o. M. LA CMAN,
WILLIAM DOOR,
ELI SLIVER,
GEO. BERONBR,
BENJAMIN PARES,
JAMES Fox.
WM. H. KK»M*W,
A. B. WARFORD,
W. F. MCRRAT,
F. K. BOAS,
JOHN H. BERRTHILL,
W PACRBR.
O I E S
SIMON CAMERON, President.
BEN J. PARKE. Vice President.
S. S. CARRIER, Secretary.
S. B. FOOT, Agent, Hed Wing, M. T.
January 9.1PM. ^Stf
Minnesota Forever
RED WING, GOODHU
E COUNTY MNN., SATURDAY. MARC 26, 1859.
SPtfNG.
DIP down upon thenorthern short,
Oh aweet new yar, delaying long
Thou dost expecknt nature wrong
Delaying long del*/ no more.
What stays thee fron the clouded noons,
Thy sweetness frcn its proper place
Can trouble live with April days,
Or sadness in the sunnier moons
Bring orchis, bringthe foxglove spire,
Tha little speedwell's darling blue,
Deep tulips dashed withfierydew,
Laburnums, droppingwsUs of fire.
Oh thou, new year, dUying long,
Delayest the SOITOT in my blood,
That longs to burs) a frozen bud,
And flood a fresher ttroat with song.
Now fades the last lotg streak of snow
Now burgeons ever? maze of quick
About the floweringsquares. and thick
By ashen roots the vhlets blow.
Now rings the woodluid loud and long,
The distance takes lovelier hue,
And drowned in yondtr living blue
The lark becomes a Sightless song.
Now dance the lights on Uwn and lea,
The flocks are whiter down the vale,
And milkier every milky sail
On winding stream and distant sea.
Where now the sea-mew pipes, or dives
In yonder greening gleam, and fly
The happy birds, that change their sky,
To build and brood, that live their lives
From land to land and in my breast
Spring wakens too and my regret
Becomes an April violet,
And buds and blossoms like the rest.
—Alfied Ttntiyam.
From the Cincinnatti Gazette.
A Delightful Blander—How Little Pic
colomini was Kissed, and what she
thought of it.
During Piccolomini's late sojourn at
the Spencer House, in this city the
following incident occurred through
a mistake, as natural as it must have
been agreeable.
Little Pic*s peculiarities are well
known. She is as naive ingenious and
joyous as a child with anew plaything
and while at the Spencer went thro'
the corridors smiling on every one
she met, and embracing the little chil
dren, attracted by her beauty iu the
most charming manner.
A young gentleman, residing in the
northern part of this State—a hand
some, elegant and peaceful fellow—
a letter last week, from his
sister, who had been attending school
at Kentucky, staling that she would
be on a certain day at the Spencer
House, where two friends of hers were
going, and that she would look for
him to arrive in good season and ac
company her home.
Coked
The brother, Alfred, came at once,
for he had not seen his sister, for
nearly two years, having passed mnch
of that time in Ne York, and on ar
riving at the House asked for Miss.
and the number of her room.
Hoping to surprise her agreeably, he
thought he would go up unannounced,
having learned the floor and the posi
tion of the apartment. Just before he
reached the room he saw his sister
as he supposed, coming out. She was
small and plump, as when he saw herof
last, and he thought he would conceal
himself behind the corner of the hall
until she came opposite. did soAlteration
and in another moment a pair of little
feet were falling in pedal music on the
floor. She was within reach of him.vanity.
Its her, of course, he thought, although
the gathering shadows of the evening
rendered objects somewhat indistinct.
That little head with dark tresses, and
humming of an air—always his sister's
habit—made him confident. He wo'd
hesitate no longer so he extended his
arms, and clasping the diminutive fig
ure before him, and bending down
and imprinting three or four cordial
kisses on one of the most delicious of
mouths, he asked, "Don't you know
your brother, you little rogue?"
The "little rogue" looked blank with
amazement, and then muttering some
thing very sweet, but not intelligible,
slipped out of his half-enclasping arms
and retreated in the direction she hadscribed,
come.
Alfred now saw he must have made
a mistake and as no one appeared,
he went !o Col. Pratt, the senior pro
prietor, to explain the awkward po-distinguished
sition in which he had been placed,
having no desire to be compelled to
shoot at, or be shot by some genuine
brother.
The Colonel, who was well acquaint
ed with Alfred, informed him that he
had mistaken Piccolomini for his sis
ter.
For tlie first lime the brother learn
ed that the diminutive divinity was inas
the city, aud immediately wrote an
apology for what had occurred, and if
she would not be satisfied he would
return what he had taken.
When this note was translated to
the bewitching Marie, and sm was as
sured of its sincerity, she, laughed im
moderately, and %n\d she bad supposed
erhaps kissing a pretty girl (here she
very archly,) on meeting her
was an American custom. It hadItaly
frightened her at first, but now she
did not care, for she said in her at
tractive English-Tuscan: "Z kees
did me no harm—indeed it was not sotexture
dees-a-gra-ble,"
So this ovulatory adventure termina
ted, but Alfred says he has dreamed
of hybia and honeysucles ever since,
and that the kisses he so fortunately
obtained will fill his future hours with
fragranoe. W should think they
wouid, for iPccolomini has an angelic
where the honey of sentiment and poe
sy is ever hived. N wonder indeed,
The fragrant infancy of opening flowers,
Flowed to his senses in that melting kiss."
E A S
A very rare thing, indeed, is a male
face which looks better if altogether
close shaven. Yet there is here and
there one—a youthful apolloor Byron,
whose absolutely faultless outlines ot
features is marred by any covering or
by any breaking up of the harmonious
ensemble.
Where the beauty of the face con
sists mainly in the fine formation of
the jaw and chin, a man loses by grow
ing his beard over this portion. Bet
ter wear only the moustache.
There is now and then a man whose
severity or sharpness of eye is reliev
ed by a good natured mouth—the an
imal character of th* person beino*
kindlier than the intellectual—and a
covering of the lips in such a cases, is
ot course a mistaken hiding of nature's
apology, and a needless detriment to
the expression. Better wear only the
the whiskers.
A small or receding chin, or a fee
ble jaw may be entirely concealed by a
beard and with great advantage to the
general physiognomy. So may
theto
opposite defect of too coarse a jaw
bone and too long a chin.
Too straight an upper lip can be
improved by the curve of a well trim
med moustache. So can an upper lip
that is too long from the nose down
wards, or one that is disfigured by the
of some of the upper teeth. Washing
ton in the prime of life, suffered from
this latter infliction, and (artistically
speaking) his face, as represented to
po-sterity, would have been relieved
of its only weakness, if he had con
cealed the collapsing of the upper lip
by a military moustache.
A face which is naturally too grave
can be made to look more cheerful by
turning up the moustache—as one
which is two trivial and inexpressive
can be made thoughtful by the care
ful sloping of the moustache, with
strong lines, downwards.
The wearing of the whole beard
gives, of course, a more animal look
which is no disadvantage if the eyes
are large and the forehead intellectual
enough to balance it. But where the
eyes are small or sensual", and the fore
head low, the general expression is
better for the smooth chin, which to
the common eye, seems always less
animal.
What is commonly called an "impe
rial," (a tuft in the middle of the chin,)
is apt to look like a mere blotch on the
face, or to give it an air of pettiness
or coxcombry. The wearing of the
beard long or short, forked or peaked
are physiognomical advisabilities up
on which man of judgement will
take the advice of an artist as well as
an intimate friend or two but hav
ing once decided upon the most be
coming model he should stick to it.tion
in the shape of so prominent
a portion of the physiognomy, gives
an impression of unrcliablencss aud
Middle aged men are apt to be sen
sitive with the incipient turning gray
of the beard. But they are often mis
taken as to its effect. Black hair,
which turns earliest, is not only pic
turesquely embellished by a sprinkling
of gray, but exceedingly intellectual
ized and made sympathetically expres
sive. The greatest possible blunderwhat
is dye such a beard. There is onemay
complexion, however, of which the
grizzling is so hideous that total sha
ving,dyeing, or any other escape is pre
ferable to "leaving it to nature." W
mean the reddish blonde, of which the
first blanching gives the appearance of
a dirty mat. It was meant to be de
perhaps, by the two lines in
Hodibras:
The upper part thereof was whey,
The nether orange mixed with gray."
A white beard is so exceedingly,
that every man whose
hair prematurely turns should be glad
to wear it whife for an old man's face
it is so softening a vail, so winning an
embellishment, that it is wonderful
how such an advantage could ever be
thrown away.. That old age should
be always long bearded, jo be proper
ly veiled and veneeaW^, fa the reeling,
we are sure, of every lover of nature,
well as of every cultivated and defer
ential heart.
Youths should be told in time that
the beard grows much more graceful
ly and adapts itself much better to
the face for never having been shaved
while in all beards nascent and downy
left to themselves there is great beau
ty. The yellow tinted «nd flaxen,
^iz^v^^T'iL^iiy^"
,,jjJUljg-'ii.-^i,T
with their slight ..
gold, are thought tfiV !**.*«,»-_.
and the East, while Engt.,
and this country, the dark brown anu
black are preferred.
Beards are sometimes of so coarse a
that they require to grow a
considerable length before a judgment
can be formed as the best
shapingand
of them.
The very general habit of dyeing
the beard is oftenest an exceeding
blunder. The peculiar deadness ofwhere
the tint makes it detectable by the
commonest eye, and the lack of
alllike
shading and the consequent abrubt
ness of edge, add to the falsity of itswaters
look. Much the greater portion of
those who dye," would look vastly
better either with their grey beards or
chins closely shaven.
Let us add by the way, that the lift
of the head above the shoulders, so
necessary to a well-bred air, may some
times be interfered with by a heard
worn too bushy and long. The effect
of the beard itself is very often spoil
ed by a standing shirt collar, so worn
as to cut off its outline. Shirt, coat,
and cravat should all leave head and
beard unobstructed to view—particu
larly with persons of short stature.
There are various incidental motives
of course, which, arbitrarily and quite
independent of taste, affect the wear
ing of the beard. Clergymen, tutors,
deacons, bank directors, and under
takers may think it, more or less for
their interest to "shave,"—to satisfy
let us say, however, very unreasona
ble expectations in the eyes for which
they do it! But there is for here and
there a man, a secondary consideration
affecting the natural policy of theinches.
beard. W speak of one whose air
and manner are not sufficiently sub
dued—one whose style requires abat
ing. Beard is an obvious intensifier
one who is naturally too showy, and
he would de well to propitiate the gen
eral impression by its sacrifice.
ICHNOLOGY.
The Journal of Commerce has a
very interesting article on the Ichnolo
gv of Massachusetts, as illustrated by
the Geological Cabinet of ^mherst
College, and the writings of Prof. Ed
ward Hitchcock, on the tossil foot-prints
found on the slabs of free stone which
he has there collected. The Journal
says:
The visitor finds slabs from three
inches to thirty feet in length, contain
ing often long rows of the tracks made
by animals "once alive. The large
slabs, the visitor finds, are generally
placed upon their edges, upon horizon
tal or inclined tables, snowing track
on both sides the others are seen to
be placed npon the walls, sustained by
strong wires, or disposed in vertical
cases. A a whole they constitute the
ouly Cabinet in the world entirely de
voted to Ichonlogy, (the science of
tracks,) and embraces some of the
finest slabs of tracks ever exhumed
for this Cabinet is located in the vicin
ity of the track deposits, just as itswhich
commanding position overlooks the
valley where the animals that made the
tracks roamed about, and is the work
of Prof, Hitchcock, who has been col
lecting these specimens from time to
time, for more than twenty years, as
he has been gradually unfolding the
science of Ichnology.
In disenssing the age of the forma
in which these tracks arc fouiid,
the author finds an economical appli
cation. For he proves the rock to be
of the same geological age with the
coal rocks of Eastern Virginia. Hence,
the discovery of coal in workable quan
tity in the Connecticut valley, would
not be an improbable event. This,
however, does not place the formation
in the true coal measures, but in the
equivalent of the Lias of England.
The author next proceeds to state
the principles of Ichnology. He states
characters of the feet of animals
be regarded as peculiar to their
respective groups, or example, he
states that birds generally have a cer
tain number of joints or phalangs npon
each of their three principal toes
three upon the inner, four upon the
middle, and five upon the outer toe.—
Hence it is affirmed that all tracks hav
ing these characters are ornithic.—
Again, a kangaroo like animal has
large hind feet, small front feet, and a
large tail. All of these would at times
make an impression so that where
we find these characters we may pre
sume the former presence of a marsu
pial animal. Dr. Hitchcock has men
tioned thirty-one such characters, and
has applied them to the fossil foot
marks.
Among the largest of these animals,
we notice the birds and kangaroo-like
animals asihemnst*«»*'—«»««»«Tju Trnese
were -trie matters of the Connecticut
valley in oolitic days and the largest
of the birds is the largest bird ever}*
described. The nearest approach is in
the recently extinct birds of Australia,
from ten to twelve feet high, whose
bones have recently been dug up by
'..^^ir^y.--r'-^'^:^r,rrTrr^7^
-,*v.
WHOLE NUMBER 138.
son. In Australia, these two classes,
the gigantic birds and kangaroos, lived
Zf\,er.a*
raembe"
ofthe same fauna,
tr$Lthe kangaroos still remains. Aus
Journ\§ the land described in the
Nov. 18, Commerce, in its issue of
where th«as the land of contraries
the south trth is the hot wind
swans are black, and uJ where the
where certain quadrupedsdes white
hills, feet and spurs of aquatic-*, the
the kangaroo has five claws o..
his paws, three talons on his hind legs
a bird, and yet hops on his tail,"
and where our river fishes inhabit the
of the ocean, and vice versa.'1''
This report of Dr. Hitchcock shows
us that Ne England was once this
land of contraries, for its inhabitants
were the animals now found in Aus
tralia. The description of the kanga
roo referred to, corresponds precisely
with certain tracks found in this book
—five-clawed paws of the front feet,
the three talons of the hind foot, with
the mark of the tail found upon the
stone, all indicate a similar animal.—
These tracks, with those of the large
birds, make the resemblance qnite
complete so that we cannot say that
New England was once inhabited by
animals fitted to walk upon an unfin
ished continent, but that Australia is a
land inferior at the present day, in its
progress of development, to all the
rest of the world.
This Connecticnt bird, as has been
calculated, must have been 12 feet
high, and have weighed from 500 to
800 pounds for its foot was 18 inches
long, and covered an area of 13 inch
es, and its stride varied from 30 to 60
The "ornithoid lizards or batracMans"
from a group of animals never before
dfscribed, being intermediate between
birds and lizards or batracians. Th
largest species is distinguished from
the largest bird chiefly by the presence
ot a lone, slender tail, which often was
turned from side to side as the animal
waddled along.
The most remarkable of all these
tracks is that of a supposed frog, whose
largest foot measures 20 by 14 inches
covering an area of about one and a
half square feet. Its front feet are less
than half the size of the hind feet the
hind feet are webbed, and terminated
with pellets instead of claws, and the
mark of a tail is sometimes visible up
on the specimens. Such a frog was
truly immense, and might appropriate
ly be styled the father of croakers.
The description of seveaal species of
tracks formed in the historic period,
presents one interesting addition to
this subject Among these are the
tracks of man and the conclusion is
certainly fair, that had he existed when
the other animals left their footmarks
upon stone, his would be found among
them. This conclusion is not new, but
corresponds with the whole testimony
of geology, which can point to no ani
mal created later than man.
There are several conclusions at
the author arrives. First, the
tracks were made while yet the rocks
containing them were in a plastic siate,
and have since been hardened by heat
and chemical agency. Second, the
tracks were made on ttic shores of an
estuary, or lake, or river, where ani
mals resorted for food, as they now do.
This estuary extended from Ne
Haven, Ct., to the South line of Ver
mont, along the Cunuecticnt river,
varying io width from 1 to 80 miles.
Third, the a was tropical.
Fourth, an interesting moral conclu
sion we give in the authors language.
"We see, in the preceding details, how
the slightest actions of ours, even the
most unnoticed decisions of our wills,
may make an impression on the globe,
which will endure, and may be read as
long as the earth exists."
N E W MOD E OF REPRODUCING E N
GRAVINGS.—M. Victor has pointed out
a mode of reproducing engravings by
means of the vapor of phosphorus.—'
When an engraving is exposed to the
vapors of phosphorus,- bftrning slowly
in the air, the black lines above become
impregnated with them if a sheet of
paper, rendered sensitive by chlorid of
silve be applied to the prepared en
graving, and image formed of phos
phide of silver is represented on the
paper, after a quarter of an hour's con
tact. This representation, when suf
ficently vigorous, resists the action of
chemical agents diluted with water.—
The best mode of operating is to place
the engraving in a bcx, opposite a card
well rubbed with a stick of phospho
rus it is necessary to rub the card
with phosphorus for each experiment.
The^ action of the phosphorus vapor i»
not interfered with lur~t»»—r-*—r"'ult*"
~r-T»-tayer ot" water a centimetre or
more in thickness. If the engraving*
be exposed too long, the print is af
fected generally, and an imperfect im
pression is obtained.
English geologists, and a specimen oflat Savannah March 12th. It is ru
whose leg and feot may be found in
the Appleton Cabinet," where it ha*
been plaoed fer purposes of compar
The Slave Ship Wanderer is
advertised to be sold at mashal*s sale
mored that fifty of the Africans brought
by her have been arrested in the low
er portion of Afrteei. -'4 «„J -*tffhw"

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