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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, April 23, 1859, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025569/1859-04-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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I E SENTINEL
IS r»*LI*HED XVZR7 BATUBDAY,
a
E WING, MINNESOTA,
I E I E & A O I N N I S
DBVOTBD
TO THE 1NTEBS8T8 AND BIGHTS
THE MASSES.
OT
As a *olltical Journal it will try all meae
end by Hw standard of Democratic
friadaiM. and will aabmit to W that
«4* Dessoeratie trot*.
COHTSHTi:
The Mmliiut will contain Congressional and
Ugialajiva^lbreicn aad Domestic-Kiw
Cosarasroial Haws—literary Matter—
Talee-Biographical a Historical
SkfttelMa «c. Ac-
I
TBBMS or suBSCBirnoN:
(SUisajr la ASteaet.)
One Copy, 1 year 1
Six Copies, 1 year too
1*0*
Of* Any person getting np a Club of Tan
•Md raauuiaf *J« SO, will bt entitled, too
•apy gratia.
SaT* Sabaaripliona to Cluba all com
aaanea at the aama time, and ba strictly in
advance.
AGBKT8.—Postmasters everywhera arc an
thorized Agen'.s for this papar.
kli~ta%
I N ALL ITS VARIOUS •HANCMM,
Exscated in a snj-irior manner, and on the
shortest notice.
BLANKS.—Warranty, Quit-Claim, Special
Deads, and Township
Warranty, Mortgage
hi
I'tate constantly on
office.
BUSINESS CARDS.
O I St A I O N
AT I'OBNEYS A COUNSELLORS AT A W
1 N
GENERAL LAND AGENTS
WINK, MINNESOTA.
W A E E N I S O
LaU Murdoch Jk £rut4,)
•literne# at Law
\m\ Notary Piblie,
BKDW1NG, MINNESOTA.
Sly
B. T. WII.BVR. W. 0 W S O N
WILDER dk WILLISTON,
mUtonievn at Law*
KKI) WINfi, MIXNKHOTA.
Will attend to this duties of their profession in
any of the Courts of this State.
W. WILLISTON,
Notar Publi and A for the fol
lowing reliable
Pre Insurance Companies:
MRBCHANTS, Hartford, Conn.
PAHXKM UXIOM, Athens, Pa.
Pinr.six, Milwaukee, Wis
S N O
rRANK IVKS.
IVES.
Attorney* af Law 4* Notary Public.
HKI WINft, MINNESOTA,
Agents for tho United States, Franklin, Fire
and Marine,
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
[into
CM* TO* t)l'R!«tI.JR. C.S.UTNOLDI.
GORNE E A REYNOLDS,
Cviisellors and Attoraeys at Law,
Red Wing, Minn.
HPOflice with Smith, Towne A Co. 93-tf
A N A
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR
A A W
XORTH PEPW msoomm
Will give special attention to'collecting Ac.
74y
BANKING, &C.
HOBACS witn ••CI.IT. WILOKB.
II. A E W I E
Banksrs A Land Agents
RED WING, Minnesota Ter.
Money loaned. Exchange A Land Warrants
bought and sold. Land Warrants, or Money
loaned to pre-emptors, on long or short time,
and en favorable terms.
Hf" Lands bought and sold oncommission Ac.
Red Wing, May, 18*7.
Lmwtfcer,
il Estate AfjetM, a
A N W A A N S
Mad Wing, Miaaeeota.
Hr^Money loaned, Land Warrants sold or lo
aned on time. Real Estate, and. Exchagn
bonghtand sold. May x8,*57.
TOWNS da CO..
DEALERS IN
ESTATE.
E WING MINNESOTA
Will attend to locating land Warrants, pay
mant of taxes, collection of notes, and to the pur
chase and sale of Seal Estate throughout tho
Territory. Surveying, Mapping, and Platting
ef every kind done to order by a practical sur
*Wer. Copies of township maps furnished.—
Deeds drawn and acknowledgements taken,
gay* All business intrusted to them, will re
eelve prompt attention.
o. 9. surra. T. r. TOWVB, ». e. vtaaca
REAL ESTATE OFFICE,
E N A O I N MINNESOTA
E subscriber will buy and sell Lands, lo
a. cate Land Warrants, enter Government
Lands, select Chrhns for Settlers desiring to lo
eata eit the Half Breed Reservation, pay Taxes
sad attend td all busiaeen tppertaialng to Ms
Loans for
proiMaVn—negotiate Loan
on unexceptionable re
Capitalists ap-
ostate security from30
raBYD.MA^RTTN.
Poiht.Jan.l.lSSS.
iff
#. i. SJAWXWS. 0. a. BAxaa. A. BALL'
ACTIONS—NOT WOBDS.
Hawkins ft Co.*
W *f*» *Wa method of inlbrmiag
*7XJ^T WgWhtm pabliafeaeraUjr,
thai they are Bow prepared to do
Of ell kinds, such as House, sign, Carriage,
Curtain and Ornamental Paintiac, Oraiaiag,
Olasing, Msrbling and Paper Haojtlnff.
Hr*Speeml atWattoa paid to elfcrdersfroni
the country. Mtf
Bed Wini.Julr 17.16&T.
BLACKSM1THING
BY'
O E O O W A E I I
BED WING, MINNESOTA. f1N#
VOLUM
E 3. NUMBER 38.
O E S
METROPOLITAN HOTEL,
Levee street, immediately opposite the Steam
boatLanding, Bad wing, Minnesota,
A. A. & E. L. TEELE, PBOPRIKTORS.
THIS
new, apacioca and commodioaa house
is now open for the reception of guests.—
It haa bean constructed under the immediate
mipervirion of the proprietors, and nothing has
been omitted to insure the comfort and conven
ience of those who may favor them with their
etronage. The numerous rooms are all well
hied, ventilated and furnished in a superior
manner. In connection with the house ia
good and eommodioua stable.
Red Wing, March 1,1853. SStf
E N A O I N O S E
1*. B. A F. A. 1IARDT, PaormsToas.
THIfSLake
and and for sale at this
House is pleasantly located on the shore
Pepin, within a few roda of the
Steamboat Landing. Person* wishing to spend
a law days of rocreation and leisure, will find
this tU place to do it. A good and well sup
plied barn is attached to the house, and a com
petent ostler always in attendance.
The proprietor* h*\ ing leased the above piop
ular house and having thoroughly renainted
and furnished in a superior style, would say to
the-pnblic that thing that they can do to
make al. calling, comfortably and pleasantly
situated, will be left undone.
May 28,1S53. 95y
E W I N O O S E
JA«OB BENNETT, Proprietor.
N E WINK, .MINNESOTA.
I^fConnected with the House is a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave dailyforthe
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
convev Passengers to any part of the country.
April 21. 1858. 90-tf
A S O S E
E N VAN CAM E N
OA.Y.VOy FALLS, MINNESOTA.
Travelers will find every accommodation on
reasona*e terms at the above House. Good
StablvB, Ostlers, Ac. t«2ly
A O S E
J. HACK, Proprietor.
ON
PLUM STREET, afew doors from Main
Street. Red Wing.
This House is entirely new and newly-fur
nished, and the Proprietor hopes by strict at
tention to customers to receive shure of pat
ronage.
Red Wing, Sept. 5.1857. 59y
MISCELLANEOUS.
L. IIKNOttlCKSON,
Rectitlut and Wholesale lcalerin
AZXCI. VoareBlfjsav
WINES 4- LIQUORS,
Corner Plum aad Third Sts., S7tf
RED WlAtf, MINNESOTA.
O S N S
KSP.3S.&.2TT TAILOR,
On Main street, next do to Lntrther's
Bankin office in W in so Block
RE WING, MINNESOTA
rH
E bust of French and other Cloths, kept
constantly on hand, and made up in a su
perior manner by competent wcrkmen. Also,
GENTS' FURNISHING coons.
EBP Cutting don* to order, fSj
Red Wing, May 23,1857. 9«y
A A S
Manufacturer and dealer in
SADDLES. HARNESSES &C
SHOP
on Bush St. opposite C. J. F. Smith's
store. Red Wing, Minn. Whore he has
constantly on hund a large assortment of Sad
dies. Harnesses, Hr'ullcs, Trunks, Valises,
Whips, Fly nets, and all other articles usually
kept in a harness shop, and cheaper than can be
bought this side of Chicago.
Repairing and Job work done on short notice,
and in the best style. 94tf
JOHN IIISLER,
Manufacturer and dealer In
LADIES' GENTS' AND CHILDREN'S
Boot* Sr Shoes,
Plum atrect one door north of the Kelly House,
E WING, MINNESOTA. »ttf
Repairing done to order and with dispatch.
€,. O N N E g»..
Tenders hisprofessionalservices to the citi
sens of Rad Wing and vicinity.
Orvioa.—Corner of Bush and Hum street,
up stairs.
N E S E N S
Hon.Z.KiowxLL, M. Fairmont, Va.,
Hon. L. DAWSON, M. Brownsville, Pa.,
Prot. T. D. MUTTER, Philadelphia, Pa.,
Dr.J.C. Coorxa,
Bev.Dr. DBUMXOMO, Morgantown, Va.,
Drs. MCLANE A Bnoeu, Morgantown, Va.,
Dr. A. H. CAMFBKLL, Key West, Florida,
Dr. E. 8. OAIMBS, Knoxville, Tenneasee.
Bed Wing,May 23,1857. «4tf
I. S. KELLOGG,
Wholesale and retail dealer in
Drags a
CHEMICALS, PAINTS,
OILS,
Dye Stuffs, Window Glass, Medicinal
Winesand Liquors. Tobacco, Snttfts. Cigars,
Camphene, Alcohol, Burning Fluid, A Main
Street, Bed Wing, Minnesota. My
WOODBUHY & WRIGHT,
a\rchitooU and Baildars,
WEnish
are new prepared to take contracts, fur
plane and specifications: also. Sash
and doers on hand, and made to order. Work
from the country solicited. Shop near the
Chillson House.
Bed Wing, March VI, 1858. Mtf
N I E dk S E O N
OXALUKBIN
0'FO««ds,Oroearies,Croekery,Hardwara Cut
.ery.Naila.Otla, Paints Sash, Window OIass,
Looking Glasses, Farming lmplraents.
•i£\
1
!.
0
E' CravaU, Suspenders,
8Urte,Collara,Brushes,Fancy Goods, A
mm MClBTIBB.
Bed Wing M. T. T. B. SBILDOK.
DUBUQE CITY MARBLE
WORKS.
N*HEBBICK.
Dealer in American and For-
••SeMarble.Siath street, below Main and
Iowa, Dubaque, IOJSB.
MoaaaaesitsvTosnb ad S to Mam
ties Tabl a A stmv
A E N S W A I N
SURfiEON. AND MECHANICAL
DENTIST.
•vor the Drug starey Main ar.
Ros'Wfnt '0'' 'L'
:wa«
W E A WAITING O E S 1 N
ST WILLIAM BOM WALLACE.
"Loaging for loo M%j."—8onj.
Wear/, weary, weary waiting
For thejoyous wild-bird's wing
For the shout of unchained waters
For the coming ofthe Spring
For the gloryof the Spring!
Weary, weary, weary waiting
For the laughter of the leares—
Kissed to soft and boundless laughter
By the South*wind in the eres,
Ia the crimson-tinted eras!
Then the moon willfearlesswander
Through her company of stars
Glittering in a silent triumph
On their silver axled cars
On our angel•guarded cars.
Then the Earth wi!!, slumber-folded.
Dream away in still delight
Dream of all her ancient eplendors
Dream until the morning's light,
Morning's wide, imperial light!
Weary, weary, weary waiting
For the music of the birds,
Musicfitto make a bridal
With a poet's sweetest words
With a poet's holiest words.
Weary, weary, weary waiting
For the rose-enwrea 'uing hours
For the shouting of my daughters,
Margareta, Agnes shouting
In a victory of flowers
In an Ispahan of flowers!
Weary, weary, weary waiting
For the lovers in the glen,
Folded in their young love's Eden
Faraway from cold-eyed men,
Mammon's hard, cold-hearted men
Come, O come, thou Soul offlowers!
Quickly bird and blossom bring!
O the heart is we iry waiting
Hear us then, thou lingerng Spring!
Incense-breathing, sacred Spring!
Triumph! —Triumph!—Lo! a flashing
On the South-side of the hill
Triumph!—Triumph!—There's a crashing
Of the ice on yonder rill
Spring is stooping o'er the rill!—
Spring—dead Nature's shining angel!
Thou hast come to prisoned worth
Back to the stone of slumber rolling
From the sepulcher of Earth
Giving light and life to earth!
LECTURE OF GEN. SHIELDS UPON
MEXICO.
We copy from the Baltimore ^lmer
iean the following remarks of Sena
tor Shields, dilivered before the Ca-religious
tholic Institute of Baltimore on Mon
day last:
"r
The subject of the lecture was Mex
ico. We can give but a brief refer
ence to the leading ideas of his ad-same
dress. He commenced by describing
the physical characteristics of Mexico,
the beauty of the country, the variety
of the climate, from the heats of the
torrid zone to the regions of perpitual
snow. Any plant which could grow
in any other country could grow in
Mexico any animal which could live
in any other country could live in
Mexico.
Tho speaker alluded to the conquest
of the country by Spain—the Romans
of those times. He believed that the
reports of history concerning the vast
empire and advanced civilization of
the country when conquered were
greatly exaggerated. He had seen
much of Mexico. From Palo Alto
under General Taylor, then under
General Wool, and finally under Gen
oral Scott from Vera Cruz to the city
of Mexico. He knew also what Indi
ans were. He had lived among or
next neighbor to them half his life,
and he had found in Mexico five mil
lion of inhabitants who were neither
more nor less than our Indians, soft
ened by climate, somewhat civilized,
gentle, and in their manner temperate
and frugal, but still Indians, and he
could not believe their ancestors had
ever possessed the high degree of ci
viliaatioti attributed to them by Span
ish historians. The accusation that
the Spaniards had exterminated the
natives were also untrue. Tney con
querred, subdued, but did not exter
minate them. W ith the Spaniard, the
propagation of his faith was the chiefcurity,
object He came with the sWord in
one hand and the cross in the other.
He plundered, tor all soldiers of that
day were plunderers and exposed not
the priest* or the devotees of the
Indian God but that ho exterminated
the people was not true, for there they
are still there, slightly changed perhaps
from those who dwelt in Mexico at
the landing of Cortex.
The lecturer spoke of the straggle
which resulted in freeing Mexico from
Spain. They adopted our form of
government 5 the model was good, bat
probably it was too far advanced for
tsbam. T*e revolution waaiaedaeded ,„
by two parties who contended for tsjaifjtn
THE RED SENTINEL.
«WiMii*#*f«JWmW4rJ
RED WING, GOODHU
E COUNTY, MINN., SATURDAY. APRIL 23. 1889.
mastery. They were founded upon
I Masonic distinctions. One parity was
the so-called Scotch masons, the other
the York masona The former' corn-
{igend
migration of the stronger European
races. The York masons were the
natives they called the other foreign
party: they were for keeping "Mexi
co for the Mexicans." Unfortunately,
they prevailed. They expelled forty
thousand Spaniards fromthe country.
This gross act of injustice did not pass
unpunished, for the men who could be
thus unjust towards others could not be
just among themselves, and has ever
since been the Mexico field of anarchy.
The Lecturer would not point out
what should be the policy of our coun
try relative to the acquisition of Mexi
co, but he would say he was opposed
to filibustering. If we did take it at all,
we should take it by a national and
It is stated that Lord Stanley, the
new minister of the Crown of'India,
who is understood to be decidedly an
ti-evangelical in his religions opinions,
had drawn up a proclamation devoid
of all recognition of the authority of the
Bible, and ignoring the sovereignty of
the Lord Jesus Christ When it was
submitted to the Queen she at once re
jected the draft, and with her charac
teristic firmness gave instructions, that
were not to be gainsayed, to have a
proclamation prepared in accordance
with her own Christian principles.
The following portion of the procla
mation has given much satisfaction to
a large part of her subjects, and with
the asanrranee of perfect toleration in
matters, wUl commend the
Christian religion to the natives In
dial
"We hold ourselves -bound to the
natives of our Indian territories by the
obligations of duty which bind
us to all our other subjects and those
obligations, by the blessings of Al
mighty God, we shall faithfully and
conscientiously fulfil.
"Firmly relying ounelve* on the
truth of Christianity, and acknow
ledging with gratitude the solace of
religion, we disclaim alike the right
and the desire to impose our convic
tions on any of our subjects. W de
clare it to be our royal will and plea
sure, that none be in any wise favored,
none molested or disquieted by reason
of their religious faith or observances,
but that all shall alke enjoy the equal
and impartial protection of the law
and we do strictly charge and enjoin
all those who may be in authority un
der us, that they abstain from all in
terference with the religions belief or
worship of any of our subjects, on pain
of our highest displeasure.
"And it is our further will that so
far aa may be, our subjects, of wbatev
er race or creed, be freely and impar
tially admitted to offices in our service,
the duties of which they may be qua
lified by their education, ability, and
integrity duly to discharge."
am ,,::
-LL
E E N O E
ISLANDS
trise the more respectable and intel-, ticular, to the British empire in general
olasses—men for inducing im- will be called on to take the tide iin
open act. He spoke of the riches of ]aud there are three large rivers, one
Mexico, and pointed out that country
and South America as the future In
dies of the United States.
The lecturer also give a highly in
teresting sketch of the Captures of the
city of Mexico. He said the true his
tory of that war was yet to be written.
All the attempts so far had been une
qual to the subject Space forbids
our folloing him further.- The lecture
was throughout of unequalled interest,
and the speaker was saluted at its close
with the most lively demonstrations of
applause.
E E N VICTORIA'S RELIGIOUS
FIRMNESS.
We stated in the last Mmenger that
in the proclamation -'to the princes,
chiefs, and people of India," announc
ing that hereafter that country would
be governed by the Crown instead of
the East India Company, "the chris
tian character of the Bntish Govern
ment is firmly declared An inter
esting fact respecting the clause in
which this is stated has transpired,
which furnishes another illustration of
the strong religious character and de
cision of that estimable woman, Queen
Victoria.
E CAMNIRAL
Should the Feejeans succeed in got
ting annexed to Australia in Par-blue
addition to that recently acquired by
her on the reconquest of India? -Be
this as it may, considerable interest
attaches to these klandd owing to the
talk of their cession to England, and
this description of them will be ac
ceptable
The group covers about 40,000
square miles of the South Pacific.—
There are 225 islands and islets, eighty
of which are inhabited. Two of the
islands are more important than the
rest though all are fertile, well watered
and abound with good harbors. The
largest island is Yitilevu, which is
some 360 miles In oiroumfferenoe, giv
ing about eight millions of acres of
land, of the richest kind. In this is-
of which is in some places 50 feet, in
others two hundred feet wide, and
navigable by small craft This river
has been traversed in its windings a
distance of ninetv-one miles by Dr.
McDonald of IL til. Ship Herald. The
country is well timbered and produces
many kinds of beautiful furniture woods
equal to mahogany also timber for
ship and house building. Pigs, poul
try, and fish, vegetables, yams, and
bread fruit, pine-apples, bananas, pa
pais, melons, &c., are produced in
abundance. In addition to these, Fe
jee furnishes two products of especial
value—*. «., cotton and paper, the tworose
articles now moat eagerly sought
The cotton tree will bear in nine or
twelve months after planting it con
tinues to produce incessantly for ten
or fifteen years, as the tree may live.
The production ofcotton would appear
to be the natural employment of the
Feejeans, seeing that it does not require
mechanical skill or hard labor. The
plant for making paper is used by the
natives. They are familiar with its
cultivation, and if they are once as
sured of a market, they will produce a
very large quantity. Though the na
tives have been cannibals, they are now
anxious to become civilized,* and in
deed are making visible progress in
that direction. They are the most
energetic and enterprising of all the
Polynesian tribes. Some of them are
still cannibals but they will not mol
est White traders, if the white traders
do not molest or cheat them first—
The Fejee group is in the centre o:
several other minor groups. The
Friendly Islands lie to the East, Samao
to the north, and New Hebrides and
New Caledonia to the West, all these
places are distant only a few hundred
miles from the Fejees. These lands
command the Panama route, although
they are not directly in the line. Their
central position would naturally make
them the depot of the trade of West
ern Polynesia. They are only six day's
steam (1,750 miles from Sydney,) and
and about 900 to 1,000 from New
Zealand.
The Queen further declares: it will
be «oor earnest desire to stimulate
peaceful industry, to promote works of
public utility and improvement, and to
administer the government Tpr the1
be-sail
nefit of al) our subjects resident there
in. In their prosperity w|ll be
purly,,
strength, in their contentment our se
and in their gratitude oar beet
reward. And may the God of all
power grant to ns, and to those in
au-without
thority under us, strength to carry out
our wishes for the good of our people."
—American Msssimger.
•„•. .'"•, um .'•.'••••••
A young extluieite was lately
listening to a lady ftfend singing a
song, in which the. following line oc
cur:
By that fair,brow where ipnorease repose*
Like moonlight rooting upon spotless enow."
Looking at him intently, aha divided
HOOPIANIA
Some writer haa compared a lady,
when dressed in the heighth of fashion
to a ship skimming over the billows of
the ocean under a full press of can
vass. There is an appropriateness in
this comparison, when speaking of
the ladies hereabouts—the unevenness
of the pavements, giving them, when
on promenade, something of the undu
lating movement of a vessel when it
ascends the wave and then sinks into
the trough ot the sea. When there is
breeze blowing up,through the streets'
the—aimtie is complete to the eye of
one who can appreciate the fine arts.
Scenes of this kind were numerous
on Saturday during the gale that pre
vailed through the day. One heavy
craft in particular, in the vicinity of
the post office, under" an immense
spread of canvass, and making at
least nine knots an hour, was overtaken
by a tremenduou* Squall as she wasof
rounding-to for the purpose of running
before the gale. The craft evidently
had not sufficient ballast for. the sail
she carried, causing,some of the main
braces to snap asunder. In this plight
she made several ineffectual attempts
to right herself, and Came very hear
being thrown on her beam end. After
many vain efforts to breast the storm,
she took shelter in a cove, in an alley,
below the post office and shortened
under cover of a board fence—
after which she obeyedher helm sweet
sailed majestically out of the cove,
and when last seen by our flying local
Wat running beautifully before the
wind. The craft finally reached port
any irreparable damage to the
figging.
E I O S O O O E
TROWSERS
As everybody knows, who have
watched matters and things connected
with the fire department, a certain
class of firemen are devotedly wedded
to the praotiee of rolling the bottoms
of their trowsersabove the tops of their
boots. This is particularly die case
the words in the first line in a manner witirtotne ofthe companies down town,
not particularly complimentary thus:
a
whose members, except on Sunday, are
newei'tobeseenw^tti^lefged nn
mentknablet. One of the must radi»
WHOLE NUMBER 142.
cal lire companies in the city is located
in the vicinity of Southwark. Her
men delight in red flannel shirts and
trowsein—the latter rolled'np at
the bottom about eight inches.
The"mersheen"in question is a down
town bully, and does business ou a plat
form peculiar te itself. When a mem
ber wishes to resign he doesn't Send
any paper to the secretary. He mere
ly "rolls down his trowsers" and leaves
the house. We recently dropped into
the engine house, aud spent an evening
with the ."boys," jnst to see how they
managed matters. One of the great
questions that came up was a resolution
by Jim Curley, that the engine "should
have anew pair of pumps given her."
This was opposed by a member named
Mike Welling, and in the following
stirring: "Look here, boys, you must
not think that Mike Welling is a foo
foo, and thai you can make him swal
low any thing you Cake a notion to.—
No you mustn't I've belonged to the
company for ten years, and love the
engine as I do my father, mother, and
two little sisters. It's cause I love her
that I'm down on them gingerbread
{ey's
mmps. ou've all heard Jim
motion. Now, all I've got to say
is, if you adopt that motion I rolls
down my trowsers, and leave you to
your fate."
Having dilivered himself in this
manner, Mike took his seat, while the
secretary took the vote of the mem
bers upon Jim's motion about the
pumps. The vote decided tho matter
in favor of Jim's motion, when Mike
and addressed the "cheer."—
"You've voted me down, old fellers,
and I'll keep my word. I rolls down
my trowsers and slams to the door."
Having said this, he "rolled down his
trowsers" and left the house. He will
probably never run again with En
gine in the whole course of his life.—
The next day his name was taken from
the roll, his resignation being in keep
ing with the bylaws in such cases
made and provided. Queer institu
tions, these rough and ready engine
companies.—Phil. North American
WBATHBBIN ENGLAND.—A morn
ing paper says: "The nightingale was
heard in England on the eighteenth
of February. That is a remarkable
fact It had been repeatedly heard
since so the declaration may be be
lieved. Over the greater part of the
pasturage of the kingdom the grass
has not ceased to to be green through
,fjout the winter and the roses and
honeysuckles put out shoots almost as
soon as their latest leaves drooped.
AH the spring flowers of our gardens
welcomed open-eyed the coming in of
March. The elm, Lorabardy poplar
and thorns, have burst their buds at
the very beginning of the month, while
the willow catkins have overhung the
streams as in April. Apricots and
peaches were in bloom above a week
*go *nd in the fruit growing counties
where^ the cherries and pears are
blooming already, the growers are in a
state of high tension. A touch of
frost between night and morning we'd
cost hundreds of pounds each to hun
dreds of proprietors of orchards. "Thethe
oldest inhabitant," of many of our
agricultural district hardly remembers
so mild a season. He must go back
more than twenty years to find any
winter that can bear a comparison
with it
There have been great floods in theguns,
north. Fifteen inches of rain fell in
January alone, whereas the average
for the year is only seventeen inches.
Improved drainage has prevented any
important damage from the flood.
PECULIARITIE S O E A A N
ESE.
An English officer who accompanied
Lord Elgin to Japan, says:
"At Siraoda, as at Nagasaki, every
one seemed eternally taking notes of
what every one else was doing. Each
Japanese had his breast pockets full
note paper, and a convenient writ
ing apparatus stuck in his belt, and
everything that was said and done
and even thought was no doubt faith
fully recorded. In Japan men. doThe
not seem to converse with one another
except iu formal, set speeches there
is no interchange of thought, by means
of the tongue, but the pen ia ever nt
work noting down observations of one
another. Sometimes we saw them
comparing notes and grimting assent
or dissent from opinion* and facts re
corded. At first we felt this to be a
System of espionage, but we soon be
came accustomed to it and' 'provided
C.very man, wrote down what he saw
and heard it may be more satisfactory
in the long run to have to do with Cap
tain Cuttles who have "bade a note
of everything, and so have more than
their memories to trust to."
'..'•"" ".'.V *.' .',••
{de?" Dean Swift proposed to tax
female beauty and leave every lady to
rate her own charm*. He said the
tax would be cheerfully paid, and very
productive.
Ida? No doubt there is room enough
in the world for men and women, but
it may be a serious question I
S whetherand
the latter are not taking up more than
their share of it just now.
A E S O A E I S I N
Business Cards of ve lines, 1 year,* .§6,00
-10,00
do ten lines do
One column per year, 70,00
six months' •40,00
Half column per year 40,00
do six months 80,00
Fourth column per yeur 25,00
do six mouths 15,00
Xaehaquare(1C ines, or less) first inscrtion 75
Each subsequent insertion-•• ,25
legal Notices, per sq., (first Insertion) 4o
." each subsequent 8.5
All advertiesments continued until ordered out
Advertiaementssctin doublecelumn, price
additional.
KaT* Advertisements will be changed us often
aa desired, by paying 25 cents a square-tor
composition. :•_,
Hf* Business Notices appearing in the Local
Column, will beebarged 15 cents per lice-for
the first, and 10 vents for each subsequent in
sertion.
The late eminent judge, Sir A.
Park, said at a public meeting in
London:
We live in the midst of blessings
till we are utterly insensible of their
greatness, and of the source from
whence they flow. We speak of our
civilization, our arts, our freedom our
laws, and forget entirely, how large a
share is due to Christianity. Blot
Christianity out of the pages of man's
history and what would his laws have
been? What his civilization Christi
anity is mixed up with our very being
and our daily life there is not a fata
iliar object around as, which docs not
wear a different aspect, because the
light of Christian love is on it—not
a law, which does not owe its truth
and gentleness to Christianity—not a
custom which cannot be traced in all
healthful parts to the Gospel."
Correspondence of the Journal of Commerce.
O ELGIN'S EXPEDITIO N
E MISSISSIPPI O CHINA
Cur-merce
U. S. FLAO SHIP POWHATTAN.I
HONO KOBO, Feb.5, 1359.
One of the grandest and most im
portant feats in the interest of com
and civilization has just now
been most successfully achieved, which
was ever enterprised in China, or any
other part of the world. According
to a provision in the late treaty between
China and other powers, the great
river Yang-tse-Kiang, which has been
closed to foreign commerce and inter
course was to be opened to foreign
trade, and points were to be selected
along its course where commerce
should be conducted. While the
Powhattan and Minnesota were lying
at the mouth of the river below Shang
hai, by the side of the English fleet.
Lord Elgin announced his purpose to
ascend this immense river with a part
of his fleet and after actual survey se
lect the points which should seem the
most eligible for his object. Mr. Reed
our Minister, I am informed, was ex
tremely desirous to show the stars and
stripes a thousand or two miles up
this immense volume of water, where
ihey never had been unfurled, not
however, wishing to accompany Lord
Elgin, still less to follow him, but in
an independent, but not jealous or un
friendly movement to" anticipate him.
Commodore Tatnall, however, con
sidering the extreme shallowness ot the
river, aud the frequent sand bars run
ning across it and the great draught of
his own noble ships, did not think it
safe to make the attempt in them, and
the object was abandoned—not how
ever Without deep regrets in many of
our hearts, which beside the personal
gratification of seeing the immense
terra incognita in the very heart of
the celestial Enpire glowed with patri
otic desire, to spread the*"flowery
flag," as the Chinese call the Ameri
can, to the gentle breeze which blows
over the interior waters of this majes
tic and mysterious river.
Lord Elgin has achieved his object
and returned to Shanghai from whence
he is expected shortly here. Ample
details have been communicated of the
progress and results of his expedition,
most important of which 1 hapten
to communicate to your readers.
The expeditionary force of Lord
Elgin consisted of the steam frigates
Furious and Retribution, the steam
sloop Cruiser and the gun boats Lee
and Dove. The Furious carried 16
the Retribution 22, and the gun
boats 4 guns each. The Retribution
now lies anchored near the Powhat
tan and compares with it in size and
strength as the gunboats do with itself.
The light draught of the British ships
ensured the success of the enteprise,
but still did not preserve it from trou
ble and danger, since the frigates got
aground in the ascent and were got
afloat again only by the unexpected
rise of the river.
The distance from Shanghai to Nan
kin is but 180 miles, and yet owing to
the difficulty of navigation, occasioned
by the ever changing sand bars and
channels, twelve days were consumed
before the fleet succeeded iu reaching
it. Here again it encountered serious
difficulty, but of a different nature.—
rebels appeared in great numbers
and the extent of their works of de
fense and offense was alarming even
to the brave men on board the fleet,
who had seen tight in the Crimea.—
On the left bank of the river was seen
one long and continuous line of fortifi
cations, and on the. opposite a large
fort, whilejunks heavily armed crowds
ed every available point on both sides.
Lord Elgin had hoped to make a pas
sage through the country occupied by
the rebels, without giving offense or
coming into hostile collision and soon
approaching this old capital of the em
pire, but which the rebels have held
for some half a dozen years, sent a flag
of truce, which, however, was at once
fired upon, the rebels disregarding it
and opening a heavy fire. The fleet
then steamed up, and coming within
range engaged the forts, and continued
a heavy cannonade till all the torts
were passed, the rebels returning tha
fire to the last Lord Elgin and
ship, had a narrow escape, the ship be
ing struck in her hull a dozen times
Lord Elgin's barge was«omplete
destroyed by anothea shot, wrfiite "an
other out a rope just above his lord-

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