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Red Wing sentinel. (Red Wing, M.T. [i.e. Minn.]) 1855-1861, April 17, 1861, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025569/1861-04-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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O S E S
?HE SENTINEL.
W. W. PHELPS*, editor
PUBLISHED EVEKY WEDNESfJAT,
I
A I N A N N
I
s.
AT
E WING** MINNESOTA,
An l-tdetfcrioent Democrati Journal.
DEVOTED
^O THE INTERESTS AND EIGHTS OF
THE MASSES.
I
.. Political .Tonrnal it will try nil mea»
jlrea arid men hy the standard ot'Democrat
principle*, and will sqbnllt to bo tost bttt
\h.t of Dcmocrati* truth.
CONTEXTS:
^he Sentinel wilt ddrttnln Confcressdonai and
Legislative—Foreign and Domestic---River
and Commercial News—Liteniry Mat-
Ur— ales—Biographical—Historical
Sketches, &:, & Ac ftc.
tSUMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
(Strictly Adfkiic*.)
One Copy, 1 year
Six Copies,! year
Si Copies 1 year 10 Od
Ten lo 00
*mr Subscriptions to Clubs must all eomc
•nonce at the same time, and be strictly in
advance.
&*»&% &miT %$&&
IN ALU ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,
eteaated in a superior munner, and on
theof
Shortest notice.
BILL HEADS,
LETTER HEADS,
POSTERS & CIRCULARS,
CARDS,
BLANKS,
BALL TICKETS,
CHECKS,
&OTES,
DEEDS, «fc
And all other irfncU of worn U'ona cheap for
hash, on short notiee.
BUSINESS CARDS.
A O N E S
B. r. WILDER. W. C. WIM.ISTOS.
WILDER WILHSTOM,
•attorneys at Law,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
Will attend to the duties oftheir profession in
any of the Courts of this State.
W W I I S O N
Notary Public and Agent for the fol
lowing reliable
Fire Insurance Companies:
MERCHANTS, Hartford, Conn.
•OUT flBR, Uttrtrbrd,Conn.
S A N O
Attorney at Law,
N O A I
Ana Land and Insurance Agtnt,
RED WING MINNESOTA.
[TANS MATTSON,
Attorney at Law,
AND JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
Particular attcntlen paid to Conveyancing
and Collecting. 157-y
r* O. REYNOLDS,
ATTORNBT AT LAW.
Red Wing.Minn.
Office with Smith, Townc & Co. 82-
J. F. PISORRY, W. W. CLAttK.
PINGREY & CLARK,
Attorneys tt Counselor* at Law.
RED WING MINN.
Office on Main st. over Baker's Hardware Store
O 1 O O N
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELLORS AT LAW
AND
E N E A A N A E N S
E W I N MINNESOTA
W. W. E S
Attorney at Law.
•REDWING, MINNESOTA,
My
•ELI T. WII.DE*.
UOnACC WILDEn-"
II. $c E.T. W I E
Bankers & Land Agents
FED WING, Minnesota.
Money lotined. Exchanged: Land Warranty
h'-tight nndsold. Land Warrants, or Money
loaned to pre-emptors, on long or .short time,
*nd on favorable terms.
fJrf Lands bought and nold oncommission&e.
Ked Wing, Jan.,IStiO.
T. V. TOWHE, J. O. IKIICK.
TOWNE & PIERCE,
DEALERS I N
RJBAL ESTATE.
E W I N I N N E S O A
Will attend to locating Land Warrants, pay
fcient ofUiert, collection ofnotes.and to the pur
chtM and itale of Real Estate throughout the
-Stat*. Surveying, Mapping, and Platting
\tt every kind done t* order by a practical sur
A4yor. Copies of township maps Isrnished.—
Do 41* drawn and acknowledgements taken.
tS9"All bttsincss intrusted to them, will
"tactive prompt attention.
E I A
r^HAS* II. CONNELLY, SI. D.,
S I I A N S E O N
RED WIITO, M15VES0TA.
lrJ
-entrance on Bush street.
A E N S W A I N
WRCSOM AND MECHANICAL
fitf TlST.
itooms—lit Rica's Plctnre gallery.
Med W 70tf
TO
RENT,ON«dOD TERMS.
The Europe Hotel, on Main street, as
{•or»d a stand as tlie town affords. For partictt
ars apply to Wm.BRECIIT.
Red Wing. March 20. 1866.
Information in regard to the above toVcitic
tiebcau be obtained at thid olbjM.
VOLUME 5, NUMBER 88.
O E S
E O O I A N O E
Lcveestrcct, immediately oppositethcStcam
boat Landing,Bed Whig, Minnesota,
A. A. & E. L.TEELE, PROPRIETORS.
THISnow
-$ 2 At
new, spacious and commodioushouse
is open for the reception of guests.
It has been constructed under the immediate
siipertisionofthc proprietors,and nothing has
hecn omitted to in* 1110 the comfort and conven
ience of tnoke who may favor them with their
patronage. The numerous rooms are all well
lighted, ventilated and furnished in asuperior
manner. In connection with the house is
good and commodious stable.
Red Wing, March 1,1861. SStf
KELLY WOITSE.
DAVID KELLY, Proprietor.
Near the corner of Main and l'linn street.
The proprietor, who bus jnst taken possesion
the House bus furnished it in the most clc
gaat and comfortable manner.
The Table—Is set with every necessary and
luxury the market affords.
All the appointments are excellent, and the
position of the House, both as regards the
Levee and the business part of town is
better than that of any other hotel.
A good stable, ottering every convenience to
the teams of farmers ana travelers is Con
nected with the house.
Red Wing, Mar-h 1st, l&til. 239
E W O S E
JAl'OB BENNETTjProprictor,
E W I N MINNESOTA.
I^"Connccted with the House i» a large and
convenient Stable. Stages leave daily for the
interior. Teams and Carriages on hand to
convey Passengers to any part of the country
April 24,1S61. »o-tf
O O N O S E
CORKER OP UROAD ASB THIRD STREETS
A. B. MILLER, Proprietor.
THIoSf
now Hotelffe now open for the reception
the traveling public, where they will
find the best of accommodations. There is a
good stabto attached. Passengers and Bag
gage conveyed to and from the Routs free of
charge. ITl-ly
UOODHUE UOl'SE.
JOHN WILLIAMS, Proprietor.
This new and commodious House is situated
on Plum street, Red Wing. It has been built
and furnished under the special supervision of
the proprietor, all the rooms are well lighted
ventilated and furnished, and all persons wish
ing to pet the worth of their money arc res
pectfully invited to givo him a call, and no
pains will be spared to make comfortable all
those who may* favor him with their patronage
tn connection with the House is a good stable*
•indwell of water* Ostler always fn attendance.
January 2nd, 1 SOI. V?9tf\
I S E A N E O S
*T» 0 A, "S ~S: S I II,
FASlIIONAhLE TAILOR!
Next door to Smith Meigs & Co.'s ilank.
BED WIX5 MINNESOTA.
I N
E S
AND
DEALER S I N
E A I E S
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry,
Red Wing, Minnesota.
1ST ALL WORK WARRANTEt).J£|
Aitg* 13,1859. 198-tf
A I A N S
A E N
E S
OF ALT. RINDS.
FAIRBANKS & GREENLEAF,
35 Lake street, Chicago*
E S I N O I I E S A E
II• 1! It A D.
Saddle and Harness Maker.
(Next door to the Ked Wing House.)
Main STREET, RED WING.
Will keep constantly on hand the very best
Harnesses, Saddles, Bridles, Martingales, Fly
Nets. Whips, Cards, Combs aud Brushes, and
everything in the Harness line nccessarv to rig
out a Horse or Team. All kind of work made
to order, and
REPAIRING
•f all hinds done in a most superior manner
and at the shortest notico.
T. L. ADAMS, Foreman.
IS59. RtSt* WING 1S50.
STEAM A N I N I
SASH, DOOR AND* BLIND FACTORY
(One Bloek above Freeborn's Saw Mill.)
WE
SHALL BE PREPARED TO FTJR
nish at all times, any thing in the above
line of business, and shall keep on httntl all
kinds of plaited and matched Lumber, Mould
ings, etc.
Orders promptly attended to, which may al
so be left With Brown Si Botcher.
Produce of all kinds taken in exchange for
work. COGEL & BETCHER.
142-ly
2t»3tf
Rod Wing, April 19,1S59.
HAWKINS & CO.
Painters* Glazier*
AND
PAPER HANGERS,
All orders promptly attended to and faith*
fully exentcd.
Red Wing Jntic 1S00.
BLACKSMITHING
BY
GSEOltGF W A E
At tlie new Shop on Main sticot, witilin
id rodsot'ihecrossin of Jordon.
KfcD WLYJ.UlNNJ-i3.Ji'
MiNOT'S E E
BY FIT2 JAMES O'BUIKX.
Like spectral hounds across the sky,
The white clouds scud before the storm,
And naked in the howling night
The red-eyed tight house lifts its forth.
The wares with slipperyfingersclutch
The massive tower, and climb and fall,
And, muttering, growl with baffled rage
Their curses on another world.
Up in the lonely tower he sits,
The keeper of the crimson light
Silent and awe struck does he heal
The imprecation of the night.
The white spray beats against the panes
Like some wet ghost that down the air
Is hunted by a troop of fiends,
And seeks a shelter anywhere.
E A E O fciltiRUBUSCO.
From Claiborne's life of John A.
Quitman, we extract the following re
garding the conduct of South Caroli
nians at the battle of Chernbusco. It
is well wol'tll reading:
Col. Butler, of the South Carolini
an, had left his sick bed against the
remonstrances ot his friends, to lead
the Palmettocs to the combat. Early
in the engagement «his horse Was shot
under him. Soon after he received a
painful wound in the knee, and yield
ed the command to Lieut. Col. Dick
inson. Taking the Palmetto flag from
the hands of Sergeant Baggs, Dickin
son placed himself in front,and Baggs
was immediately shot down. Col.
Butler now came up to resume the
command, and was killed by the side
of Dickinson while standing under the
flag. Dickinson himself soon fell mor
tally wounded, (he died some weeks
afterward^,) and Major Gladden re
ceived it from his hands and committed
it to Lieut. Baker, who, being unable
from debility and exhausttioh to Carry
it, Major Gladden placed it in the
hands of Patrick Lcnnafd, and led his
rpc-imotit to the charge Ili inert fell
rapidly, but not one wavered from
first to last) Under the concentrated
fire of the enemy. In the
history of the war there has never
been a more striking example of in
difference to death, the result of stern
resolve. Each man fought for
theand
honor of Carolina* Several compan
ies were almost annihilated. Some
had not men enough to bury their
dead or bear their wounded to the
ambulances. The uniforms of some of
the officers were literally torn from
their persons the color bearers were
shot down, but the flag, bathed in
their blood, was always seized as they
fell, and were borne to the front.—
Prondlv it floated through the tempest
of dentil until the victory had been
won, and then, all torn and blood
stained, it drooped over its own glo
rious dead."
E E S I E N A N A N
Mr. Buchanan's style of living,since
his return ltome,U as it has always
heeti when here, plain arid iinostenta«
tioUs. Occasionally he is visited by
some of his personal friends, who are
treated with the hospitality which we
might expect to receive from a polite,
Well-informed country .gentlemen—
"one of the olden timet" His four
years association among trie refilled
and bi'illiatit circles of Washington,
has Hot in the slightest degree-, dis
posed him in his retirement to imitate
the flash and fashion Which blazed
around him there Everything is
quiet and unobtrusive, strictly in ac
cordance with the Democracy of the
old school, and entirely stripped of its
court tinsel or its inimickefy. Al
though the owner of asfinea span of
horses as I have ever seen, and a su
perb carriage, he prefers walking into
the city to church on Sabbath morn
ing, and during the week to the post
office, where he can usually bo found.
This will not be the case, however,
after the Republican, Mr. Cochran and
his assistants, have taken possession.
But no doubt his quarters then will be
equally agreeable. He discusses little
now about Government affairs, his
appetite in relation to them,no doubt
having long since been fully satisfied
and quite as little of prominent and
distinguished men, his experience, like
that of many other's, being that they
are not always the saftcst counsellors
or those in whom the largest amount
of confidence can be reposed. He isprinted
evidently preparing his mind and dis
position for engagement in those liter
ary pursuits with which he designs to
close up his labors of a life time.—
Wathington [Sunday] Chronicle.
«.
OCrThe Bishop of London, who has
evinced great readiness to preach to
the poor and neglected classes, during
a recent visit to Derby was invited by
the employees of ft railway turning
shop to address them. lie did so
and a congregation of more than a
thousand clerks, engineers, boiler
makers, drivers and porters, and the
wives of many, were present, to whom
he preached, a temporary desk being
formed upon tlie brass rail around
locomotive.
TH
E RE WIN SENTINEL
Minnesota Forever.
RED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY, MINN., WEDNSDAY, APRIL 17, I86L
MIS'IAKE O REFORMERS
"He who labors for mankind, without a
care for himself, has already begun his im
mortality."
We clip the above from the "Wi
and Wisdom" column of lending pa
pen Doubtless it was thought to qe
long to the wiStmta persuasion it co'd
hardly be taken for wit. If there is wis
dom in it, it is not very obvious to us,
and we think it is greatly liable to be
abased in nplicatioiJ. This is an age
of reforriis, and aliiidst every one
thinks he has a mission as a reformer
always of others. Now it is well
enough for ever one to be a reformer,
the mistake is in going away from
home to find a StlbjeCt for reformation,
ones self is the right subject and the
most effective way to work for
theice
good of mankind is to make the most
spiritually and materially of ones self.
Of all the pitiful objects otic illeets,the
most so are those deluded beings who
imagine they ate doing Gtid and
Humanity service by spending ail
heir time and energies on reforming
others, neglecting themselves, until by
and bye others have to provide for
and take care of them. It is an ntter
and diabolical perversion of the true
order-
W A A N ART"«
In his second lecture on the
"Political Economy of^rt, Mr.
Ruskin speaks of the baleful influence
which War exerts on art:
"Fancy what we should have
around us now- if-, instead of qurrel
ling and fighting over their work, of if,
even in their conquests, instead or ef-bridge
facing the memorials of tho&e Who
succeed and subdued, they had guard
ed the spoils of their victories. Fancy
what Europe would be now, if the
delicate statues and temples of the
Greeks—if the broad roads and mas
sive Walls of the Romans—if the noble
and pathetic architecture of the mid
dle ages, had been ground to dust by
merehUmttU rage. You talk of theartillery
Heythe uf Tib-*, a*»d tW tooth of Time.
It tells yon, Time id toothless and
And scythless it is we who gnaw like*
Whole ihe Worth—We Who smite like the
scythe. It is Who abolish ourselves—
ourselves who consume.
We are the mildew, and the flame,
the soul of man is to its own
work as the moth, that frets when it
cannot fly, and as the hidden flame
that blasts where it cannot illume.—
All the lost treasures of human intel
lect have been wholly destroyed by
hitman industry of destruction
the marble would hare stood its two
thousand years in the polished statute
as in the Parian cliff: but We men
have ground it to powder, and mixed
it with our own ashes. The Walls and
the ways would have stood—it is we
who have dashed down the carved
work with axes and hammers, and
bid the mountain grass bloom upon
the pavement, and the sea winds
chant in the galleries.
A GUODCRO W STORY.
The ornithological reporter of thefrom
Bunker Hill Aurora is responsible for
the following:
A few days ago a very large flock
of crows visited Chelsea beach, to
obtain food, it being difficult for them
to get enough elsewhere—the ground
being covered with snow, and the
brooks aud ponds sealed up with ice.
They numbered by estimation a thou
sand, or more,and were probably from
the South journeying northward. They
were very hungry and would eat
rockweed, seaweed, muscles, clams, or
any animal matter which they could
(hid. A couple of gunners on theRECEPTIO
beach from Maiden, who informed us
of these facts, state that they shot fif
teen wild ducks that day and evening,
some of which they did not find until
next morning and in the meantime
the crows had picked their feathers
off, and eaten their bodies, all except
ing the skeletons, which were picked
clean. One duck had dived under the
ice in a creek, and died there, and the
crows picked down through the ice
and eat the flesh all off his breast.
There are now and then some spicy
debates in the French Senate. M. De
Rochejaquelin charged the Prince
Napoleon with having accused him of
lying. The Prince said he had not
done so. His opponent quoted the
report of the debate, and the
Prince denied its accuracy. Allusions
werc^madc to a demand for satisfaction
but finally the Prince's explanation
was received.
There is a Meteorological Depart
ment in the British Board of Trade,
which is now nnder the superintend
ence of Admiral Fitzroy. A map of
the world is divided into squares, and
numbered and books are issued to
sea captains to be filled up with their
observations during their voyage. The
entries to be made are nnder the
barometer, thermometer, hydrometer,
Winds, weather, currents, variation,
soundings, Crossings, passages- stroms,
ice, shooting slars,meledrs, aurdra,and
electricity.
FORT TAYLOR AND KEV WEST.
The Newport Mercury publishes a
long, interesting communication from
Key West, dated March 10th. We
make the following extract:
Fort Taylor is rectangular in shape,
that is, it has three regular fronts and
one irregular or gorge front. It rests
on an artificial island, the base sixteen
feet Irigh and eight feet thick, is of
northern granite* bedded in the coral.
The fort is constructed of Pensaco
la brick being eight feet thick. It has
four bastions which rake the front with
twenty four pound howziters. It has
two tiers of casments armed with eight
inch columbiads. The tier plane or
upper tier, has forty four ten inch
swivel gunsj And twelve ten inch trav
guusi
The fort has but one entrance or
postern which is nine feet wide. The
gorge front is 600 feet in length, and
the three fronts are 820 feet.
The fort is about twelve hundred feet
from the shore, and is connected by a
temporary bridge, but when comple
ted this space will be finished for
officers' quarters, as a dyke sixty feet
wide will be built and covered.
The short line will have a breast
high wall, defended by six twelve inch
columbiads. With the completion of
this covered way the fort will be com
pleted, and Will be one ot the strongest
fortifications in the world.
Owing to the disturbed state ot the
country, Captain Hunt on his arrival
last fall, immediately commenced to
put the fort in a proper state of defence.
This was done by removing the wharf
at the west front, constructing a draw
and. closing the lower parts
except those occupied by guns. He
has continued through the winter to
strengthen the Fort'inevery possible
manner, and after making it impregna
cle, he gave the military department
to Captain Brennan, First Artillery,
United States Army.
The force to be stationed at the
Fort will consist of three companies of
under Maj. French, who is on
his way from Texas.
Beside the Work done to put the
Fort upon a war footing} a tcry great
amounfof wOrk has been done toward
completing it, the number of men
employed being about one hundred,
forty of which arc slaves. The men
very orderly and free from dissipation,
and not only willing to work for an
honest living, but, if need ceJighe for
the Union. The health of the men has
been usually good so far, and they
expect to close their v.'ork about the
middle of April.
Had not Captain Hunt placed the
fort inftstate of defece as soon as he
arrived here, it would have been in the
hands of the Seccssionts, but by
hisland,
foresight the fort is preserved to tlie
Government, who can hold it as long
as they desire.
The town of Key West is situated
on an island six miles long and twot
wide, the Inchest elevation of which is
about twelve feet above the level of
the sea. 3,800, 500 of which are ne
groes, the rest are a heterogenous set
all quarters—but the larger part
are known as Conks, from the Bahama
Islands. Their occupation is gather
ing sponge, of which they sell about
$100,000 worth per year many of theIsland
inhabitants are wreckers, and the rest
get a living by their wits. There are
but few very old Southern families
here. On the island arc four church
es,a court housejail and two whipping
posts. Drunkenness abounds. Li
cense for sellieg liquor $50 per annum.
For drinking, it is eithci four hours
Chevalier Bertinatti, who is contin
ued in office with the title of Minister
Resident, was presented to President
Lincoln on last week, aud expressed
the congratulations of the King of
Italy. The President replied as fol
lows!
CHEVALIER BEKTINAT*I:—With a
degree of pleasure no less than that
which you express in presenting it, I
receive and accept the letter of
hisSouth,
Majesty, your august Sovereign, which
accredits you as his minister resident
near this government.
While I hold it to be the duty of
the tfnited States not to interfere
with the differences offoreign govern
ments and countries, I trust I may,
without offence to any, congratulate
your Sovereign and yourself upon the
high position which Sardinia holds in
the scale of nations. I hope, too, that
whatever has been or shall be done,
may result in the augmented prosper
ity and happiness of the people con
cerned.
Please assure your august sovereign
that his good wishes for our country
arc reciprocated by us for his, and
that it shall be our constant care to
maintain the frindly lclations now
happily existing between the two.
Chevalier Bertinatti, your personal
promotion is a subject of satisfaction
to the government of the United
States*
WHOLE NUMBER 246
E I N A N
Real liberty is a plant of very slow
growth. They have been cultivating
for centuries, in Great Britaia, the
rude original/Until it begins [thanks to
the impro¥efilefit to Which it has been
subjected!] to look vCry much like the
genuine thing- Whett England, a
short time ago, got Up her penny
journals, we did think she Was ifl a
fair way to become (except in name)
truly republican. We thought that
the spirit of democracy had Waved its
pinions to sotnt pnrpose over that
country—for we look on the disscmin*
tion of universal intelligence as theWe
first element in the composition Of
liberty. Who would have believed,
before that, in such an innovation
upon aristocratic principles, even in a
kiilgdom so liberal in its interpretation
of human rights? We considered the
reign of Uigdtry dtld irttoleretloe over.
We fancied that Church sUprettiaCy
and exclusive privileges were all ap
proaching their efldj and we rejoiced
at tiie coming millenium.
We were mistaken, however. Lib
erty is easily enough planted but does
not flourish in all its vigor and health
fulness, without assiduous care and
patient' painstaking- The penny
journal system, as ft system has failed
in England. The people were not
preparedforit. The masses were not
sufficiently educated, in advance* to
enable them to appreciate a newspaper
at its real worth nor were they favor
ed with sufficient political influence to
make a newspaper dcepiy interesting
to them as an exponent of the popular
opinion. The penny journal system
was ahead ot the age in that country.
It must bide its time. It Will succeed
by and by, when the public mind has
been ripened for its use- Now it is a
superfluity. But the time is coming
when universal sufferage and universal
education will do their work. They
will pave the way for the penny press.
They will make it a necessity. And
then, with a general knowledge of
ofhuman rights, will come a generous
expansion of political sympathies.—
Thus will liberty "beautiful on the
hill tops," become just as beautiful in
tlie plains and valleys of Great Britain.
•—Hew Yertt Mercury.
SPANIS
INTRIGUES
JHING0.
A ST D€m
WABIUXGTON, April 1.
Senor Alvarez arrived hero this
morning, direct from St. Domingo,
with dispatches for the Spanish Min
ister. He left this afternoon for New
York, and will return at once to St.
Domingo, carrying with him dispatch
cs from the Spanish Minister here.
The high handed and outrageous
conduct of Spain, in seizing that is
may lead to serious complica
tions between our government and
that of Spain. The administration
are in lull possessions of all particil
lars of the recent action of Spain, and
is very evident that the new Sec
retary of State intends to take the
necessary steps in this matter, and
will immediately call the attention of
the Spanish government to it Here
is another embarassing difficulty which
must be met and disposed of.
The proceedings under the auspices
of the Spanish government upon the
of St. Diraingo have produced
a deep sensation in administrative
circles. Mr. Patterson, bearer of dis
patches from the United States Con
sul at Havana, in reference to the ex
pedition of a Spanish army ot occu
pation, arrived here yesterday, and
had two protracted interviews with
Mr. Seward. It is known that the
in the sweat box, $20 fine or S9 lashes, information brought by him has been
the subject of consultation between
the President and the Secretary- of
N O E S A O N A N
MINISTER.
State. It is expected that the latter
will immediately address and ener
getic protest to the Spanish govern
ment. This is all the federal power
will be able to do in its present crip
pled condition,
Strange to say, the prospect of
trouble With a European Power is
hailed With anything but regret by
many public men. They assert that
a war with a foreign power would be
a perfect godsend in the present dan
ger of civil strife, as it would at once
revive the national sentiment in the
allay the secession fever and
in the end result iu a reconciliation ot
the country.
W A E "SEVEN SISTERS'* IS
NOT.
From reading the following in the
New York Tribune ot the 26th, one
has a distinct idea of what the
play of the "Seven Sisters is not." But
the range of the negative is so very
great, that one is inclined to wonder
"what it is?"
Laura Keene's Theatre was well
filled last evening to a piece called
the "Seven Sisters." The "Seven Sis
ters" is a very nice play, not quite a
tragedy nor can we call it a farce
nor yet is it an opera nor would we be
justified in denominating It a specta
cle aud We are Unprepared to pro
nouncc it a rriclo-drama and Would
not like to assert that it is an epilogue
and it is not ci-rtalnly a horse piece
and there uiight be difference of opin
ion as to ill being a burlesque though
RATES A E I S I N
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do Hixmoiiths 16,00
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Each subsequent ihMsitioii---•••.-••••• ,35
Lcga 1 Notices, per »]..( first Insertion) 40
,T
each subsequent I I
AH adverticsmeutfr cbhthintd^nntil ordered
out.
Advertisements Set in double e«lumn,}{
price additional.
Advert,i«!rrlCfilsiHlJ bt changed as often
as desired, by p'ayifig 26 cents aqnara for
composition.
Trun»icnt advertisements must be paid for
in advance, continued advertisement* quar
terly and legal advertisements before the day
of sale.
some people might, with a slight show
of reason, Call it iirt extravaganza
and yet we could not fairly contradict
any other man who should insist that
it is a domestic drama though there)
is no reason why it should not be
styled a Scryptural play or, for the
matter of that, an infernal play for it
really it is not an operetta or a bor
lotta* or a comedietta nor is it a pro
logue} nor jet ah" afterpiece and a
man who should term it a pantomhle
would be no nearerttbftditilelycorrect,
than he Who should Call it a series, of
tableaux though for our own part,' if
should deem it necessary to give
it a ndttfe, We should Call it a p'tetoTal
comedy, if We did not say it is a his
torical tragedy, though on reflection,
it is more like a rustic interlude.
HOW 0*CONNELL SOLD MR. ttt'lf
SEL.
row the New York News.
The Mr. Rnssel, who now retoferieiitJ
tho London Times here, is the same
gentleman who was sent by that jour
nal to Ireland to report Mr. O'ConnelPs
speeches during the Repeal agitation.
One of the first meetings the newspa
per man attended was in Kerry.—
Having heard of O'ConnelPs polite
qualities, he thought ho would ask
the gentleman's permission to take a
verbatim accout of the oration. Tho
"Liberator" not only consented, but,
iff his oilest manner informed the As
sembled audience th.tt "Until th.1t
gintlcman was provided with all Writ
in' convanienances, he wouldn't spake
a word," assuming an extra brogue,
which was altogether unnecessary.
Russell was delighted. The prepara
t'ons began, and Were completed
Russell was ready.
"Are you quite ready?" asked
Dan.
«Quite ready."
1L*'NoW, are you sure you aro entirely
ready?"
"I am certain, sir. Yes."
The crowd becoming excited and
impatient, Dan said:
"Now, 'poo my concience, I won't
begin tho speech till the London gin
tleman is intirely ready.*
After waiting another moment of
so O'Connell advanced his eyes
glistened ears were all attention and
the reportorial pencil arose. Dan
gave one more benignant smile on tho
correspondent, winked at the auditors,
and commenced his speech in the
Irish language, to the irrepressible
horror of the present editor of tho
Army and Navy Gazette, and to the
infinite delight ot all Kerry.
FOItEIGN GOSSiFr"
Frem the New York Evening Past.
M. Lamarline having disposed ot his
property in Macon, is about to return*
to Paris and offer his works for sale at
his own home-
A StCam Carriage for common foaiti:
invented by General Bordino,has been
exhibited in the streets ot Turin, car
rying twelve people, easily managed
but evolving clouds of smoke.
Four or five hundred beople are
daily dying of hunger in the north
western provinces of India.
tf ena Sahib is still alive and lurking
among the Kepaul hills watching his
opportunity^
"A mvsterions i-ersonagc of1 the nando
of Ziarlichinni, who has been for
long time in prison because he would
not be liberated until be was fairly
tried,is on his way to the United States
with 20,000 francs given him by his
friend Count. Cavour. His Incarcera
tion Was owing to his having been Art
invader of the Papal states-
Secret proclamations are front tirHd
to time prepared at Rome, by a na
tional committee, which afterwards
have a large circulation. They, are
aimed at the Papal abuses, and th
committee style themselves "Sorts oT
Liberty and the Gospel."
Ma2zina is said to be under the sen
tence of death, and the Italian. Parlia
ment will be called to revoke it
The value placed upon meteorology
by the French government is indicat
ed by the fact that there are i^rerjtt
fonr points in France froni .wHibh,
every morning by telegraph' i* sent
to Paris the record of the barometer,
thermometer and wind: Thus ap
proaching storms may be guarded!
against.
Lord Adoiphus Vane TctHpest, re
cently arrested as a drunken "lnnaiid.
married the daughter of the Duke* df
Newcastle, Who wtta.irt thU cri-fiilry
with the Prince of Wales, The Duke
has never forgiven his daughter for
this act, and she will probably never
forgive herself.
SENATOR BRBCKIKRIDGR made a
speech before the Kentucky LegleU*
ture yesterday. He advocated a Bor
der State Convention) and fajld trt**t
the Crittenden Conip'rontiso should be
made tlie ultimatum of thai Body.—
^Twelve dead bodies have been
picked up on the shore at Marshfiehl
arid Scitu.ite, the victims of the fcflrfiil
storms which prevailed during idst
week

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