OCR Interpretation


The penny press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1859-1860, August 23, 1859, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025750/1859-08-23/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

RINGWALT fit iVBRV
IMPORTERS OF A.NDJDEALER8 IN
CARPETING
69 West Fourth street,
Pike's Opera - House Building.
THE PEESS.
Printed by " Caloric."
0ICI HO. 14 KST TOtJRTH STIHtCT.
CORRESPONDENCE, containing important news,
solicited from any Quarter of the world.
OIUCISKATIi
TUESDAY. AUGUST 3
Thanks. We are again indebted to S. G
Meredith, of Adams' Express Company, for
Indianapolis favors.
More Troubles in Kansas.
The telegraph despatches have paragraph
of a renewal of an old disturbance In Kansas,
Governor Houston.
San Hodtoh Is elected for tie third time
Governor of the State of Texns. The ma
jority reached will he nearly twelve hundred,
The Slave Trade.
The Administration U detailing a naval foroe
to the neighborhood of Cuba, at alleged, to
watch for slaves. It has enlarged the squadron
for the same service off Africa.
Peak and Gold at Pike's
Peak.
Additional excitement is awakened in
reference to new discoveries of gold at Pike's
Peak. The gold itself is finding its way to
the States.
The Cincinnati Normal School.
The Sobool Board, last night, by a deoided
vote, terminated the Cincinnati Normal Sohool
enterprise, which hag been latterly oat indif
ferently attended, although superintended by
ttat well-trained instraotor of Teachers, H. H.
XiSNir, Esq.
Caution to Merchants.
speculators
themselves of the telegraplo news of the ex
pectant steamer, Canada, by the barbarous
incendiarism of buroine tbe houses and outfit
cf the Associated Press Express, at Halifax,
makes a doable watohfalness aeoessary to be
secure front foul transactions in trade and
finance.
The Rain.
Water from the heavens, when the water in
ting, with blessings in its drops. Cisterns will
be filled, the river will have a new supply, the
lust will be laid, the corn will grow, the grass
will spring up, and thirsty people will have a
ohanoe for a ohoice drink of pure ater. When
the universe is to be suspended, and man to
eease, stop the water, and ha will be nowhere.
Thanks for the rain 1 During the recent
water epidemic, the street oisterns, filled some
time since, were opened, and tbe people
allowed to use tbe same. Crowds came, waited
their turn, and went from wells and cisterns.
We hope tbe gentle rain will terminate the
"reign of terror."
The Sham Battle at Chalons.
The French Emperor is preparing for a sham
fight at the Camp of Chalons, Forty thousand
of the trained soldiers, fresh from Italy, are'to
engage next month in a military tournament
at Chalons.'' This is a historic battle ground
for real and mlmio warfare. We are curious
to know who will be invited from England.
What distinguished military hero will attend
from tho British Isles? Will Prince Albebt
meet the French Emperor, in the field, lanoe In
hand? Will any blood be spilt? Chalotu,
Sur Saone, is on the right bank of the Saone,
at the junction of several great roads, and con
nected with the Mediterranean, Atlantio and
the North Sea, by the Rhone, Saone, Loire and
several large Canals. In 1273, Edwasd I, of
England, being Invited to a-tournament on hit
return from Palestine, attended with one thou
sand men-at-arms, and some dispute having
arisen, the English attacked the French, killed
a great number of them, and left the tilting
ground strewed with the dead. This event is
known as the "little war of Chalon."
The Cities.
' The cities have been thus classed : "New
"York it the bead-quarters of commerce-
a great wilderness of marble and mor
tarthe abode of merchant-princes and
millionaires. It harbor is crowded with
ships from every nation ; its mammoth mer
cantile establishments contain every variety
of fabric and produce; its streets are busy as
a broken ant heap; its spires point like fin
gers of pilgrims, to the land of the Lcautiful
above, and its grog-shops are plentiful as car
buncles on the face of the toper. It baa the
boat editors, and the poorest speakers, of any
city in the Union. Philadelphia is noted for
handsome buildings erected on straight lines;
it is the metropolis of inagazinedom where
Oradau and Govr.r make gold, and win
golden honora; it is famed for the brotherly
love of its Inhabitants, which trait is beauti
, fully displayed In the manner in which they
get op rows and send their fellow-citizens to
"kingdom come." Boston is the bank of
2?ew England, tbe beacon-light of reform, the
eat of science anil learning, the forum of
'chaste, classical, thrilling, heart-quaking,
soul-stirring eloquence. There is no city in
the United States that contains so much
speaking talent as Boston. Baltimore Is
choleric, noisy and patriotic; Philadelphia
is fastidious, lymphatic and metaphysical;
Washington while Congres is in session Is
like Babel, where there is a confusion of
languages or, like a vineyard of lazy labor
ers, where there , is a ' "winey" atmosphere;
New York " is .energetici , bombastic and
original; Cinoinnati is slow of speech, but
sound at heart; Boston is radical, forcible),
eloquent."
The American Mechanic and Laborer.
Happily, In this free country, there are no
privileged orders ; citiiens take position ac
cording to worth and merit, and not aooording
to wealth and means. Huge inequalities ap
pear, however, between men, many of which
are superimposed by erroneous custom! but
they can be surmounted by individual exertion
by personal character exacting what is due.
Our Institutions are based upon the people's
capacity to govern themselves, and oooasions
occur to awaken men to their vassalage and
subjection to Iron customs whloh gall like a
fixed yoke on the neck.
LABORERS SHOULD NOT HAVE UNREASONABLE
TASKS.
Tbe first tubjeotion that men feel to be un
just and onerous, is unreliable tasks In daily
labor. It Is just that Ml should gain their
bread by the sweat of their brows It is sweet
bread thus earned but the sweat should not
make distasteful the bread. Man should not
be over-worked.
AMERICAN LABORERS ARE THE STATE.
Laboring men in America are the State.
There is no patent-right Issued to any one in
the long alphabet of names of a free people,
conferring rpaoial distinctions not aooorded by
the consent of the governed.
IN EDUCATED LABOR AMERICANS PLACE THEIR
TRUST.
In this e xcelleoey, nnd in the surety and fix
edness of this principle of equality, education is
not only important, but like virtue, is msch"
Hal, to seoure the poor man, so-called, a proper
plaoe in sooiety.
WE ARE ALL LABORERS.
As all mUBt work to live, all are laborers,
and, as the commerce wo enguge in, anil by
which we get great gain, is but exchange of
the products of the labor of tho artisan and
the agriculturist, we in America are all
mechanics and laborers.
HOW MANY HOURS SHALL WE LABOR?
As there are a largo number of the opera
tives mere eiye, working for wages for
others, it would seem necessary to agree to
regulation as to houri cf lalor, which would
not break down the laborer, but would afford
him some little leisure for sclf-culturo, and
rescue him from being a machine kept run
ning to serve others altogether.
THE TRUE AMERICAN QUESTION.
The cause of tho operative is one peculiarly
American; it is the cause of the one who
votes of one who may bo the President
the Governor it is tho cause of tho fathers
of American children, and of the heads
American families it is the cause of those
who are the people, who mould public
opinion.
HOW MANY HOURS?
How many hours, then, should an Amer
ican laborer work? We mean work, when wo
say work; we moan intelligent work, skill
ful work; work that's well done when done;
honest work, honest in tho devotion of full
time while employed, nnd honest in the com
pleteness of what is done. How long shall
a sincere, tip-lop lnboror in his profession
servo his employer?
OVER-WORK IS BAD WORK.
Is not a service rendered beyond a reason
able time, a deterioration of the person fork
ing, by ignoring the law of nature, that man
is a compound being?
A GOOD RULE TO WORK BY.
There was a day when oporativea of an order
tbatereotod foundations and magnificent tem
ples, "wrought their regular hours." Tbe
admonition, now, of speculative Masonry,
should have an appreciating observance by
Amerioan employors and employe. As the
twenty-four inch gauge, or the instrument
made use of by builders, to measure and lay
out their work, it divided Into twenty-four
equal parts, emblematical of tbe twenty-four
hours of tbe day, we are taught, the more
noble and glorious purpose of dividing our time.
As it is thus emblematic, we are taught to
divide each day into three parts, devoting
part fur the service of God and distressed fellow
men who all are our brethren; a part for our
usual avocations; and a part, for refreshment
and tleep.
THE ONE MAN STRIKE.
In tbe United States, then, the skillful
laborer should not be made a drudge. It is
the desire of the Penny Press, to favor a per
sonal strike on tho partjof each laborer. Each
one should not esteem himself more highly
than he ought; but every man everywhere,
has certain peculiar endowments and gifts,
which, if cultivated would elevate to a proper
distinction him who properly derelopes his advantages.
PERSONAL INDEPENDENCE AND REFORM.
Spur up then, each laborer, in field and
workshop, and labor with a will, with the un
derstanding and with hope. How many hours
should an American operative be called upon
to work at hit daily task, It will be seen, is an
important question. Wait not, then, native or
adopted laborer, for concert, to strike for the
golden mean in labor ; perfeot yourself in your
art, your speciality, take ears of your health,
and declare your own independence, not in
revolt, but In reform.
Plabtkhino. We learn that the following
are the rules of measurement of work done
by plasterers in Cincinnati:
1. All work shall be measured superficially,
ineludtng openings. All bights shall be taken
from the floor to tho ceiling. 2. All staircases,
eight feet wide and under, shall be meaaured
double; all over eight feet, once and a half.
3. All passages, four feet wide and under, shall
be measured once and a half; all over four
feet, once and a fourth. 4. AH lnollned ceil
ings to measure once and a half. 6. All dor
mer windows, closeta and privies, to be meas
ured double. 6. All ootagon and circular work,
exoept oeillngs of rooms, to be measured dou
ble. All areh ceilings of rooms to be meas
ured onco and a half. 7. The deduction for
openings, occasioned by doors and windows,
when the workman furnishes materials, shall
be, for lath work one-eighth, for brick walls
one-fonrtb. 8. Tbe materials for scaffolding
and mortar'beda, and vessels for holding water,
are in all eases to be furnished by the em
ployer. Vandalism Faults on Moth Sides.
It appesrs that the Nova Scotia Telegraph
Company have got into trouble with the author
ities of Halifax. In attempting to erect tbeir
posts In the streets without permit, eolllslons
ensued, wires displaced and potts cut down;
finally, on the other side, the stable and horses
of the opposition Express were burnt nd destroyed.
PERSONAL INDEPENDENCE AND REFORM. General O. Hinton.
Formerly of this State, is announoed at an
independent Semocratlo candidate for County
Jndge of Sonoma, New Mexio.
It will be remembered that General Ilinton,
lays a California paper, was an extensive
mail contractor in tbe State of Ohio, and was
detected in the most astonishing mail rob
beries ever brought to light in the United
States. He was arrested and escaped, and for
months eluded the vigilance of tbe officers,
notwithstanding the most thorough pursuit
ever known in that country. The whole polioe
system of the State was aroused, rendering it
impossible for him to pass from its borders.
After several weeks of such vigilance, the wily
fugitive was rearrested, but he had influen
tial and wealthy friends, and a brother-in-law
went his bail for $10,000.
This bond General 0. Ilinton forfeited, and
escaped to California. Here he was pursued
by Officer Mills, of Akron, Ohio, and was fol
lowed from place to place in California and
Oregon, finally escaping, if we mistake not, to
the Sandwioh Islands. At any rate, the officer
was unable to arrest the fugitive, and returned,
after a fruitless chose, to Ohio.
Expansive Force or Slow Oxtdatiok or
Iron. At a late meeting of the Manchester
Philosophieal Society, says the Scientific Ameri
can, II. M. Ormorod produced two epcoimens of
iron used in buildings which have beoome so
oxydized as to injure the structures in which
they had been used. An iron oramp taken from
a buttress of the Manchester Parish Charoh had
become treble i's own thicknoss by rust and
bad thus split the building in tho oentre, and
lifted about twelve feet of the wall. It was
inserted about ninety years ngo. The othor
piece of iron was a smail wedge taken from the
steeple of St. Mary's Church; it was three
eighths of an inch originally, but had Inoreased
to seven-eighths of an inch with the rust.
There were several wedges used, and these had
lifted the stones whloh they were meant to
keerj in their nlaces. and aomo of them had
even been split by the slow but certain force of
rust expansion, ine steeple was ereoted in
17.'6, and the upper part had become so ruin
ous by these wedges that it had to be taken
down pursuant to a notice given by the city
surveyor.
a
Great Hail Stbm. An extraordinary hail
storm passed ovor Northampton last Wednes
day afternoon. It commenoed as far west as
the .'eastern boundary of Chesterfield, and ex
tended in an easterly dlreotion as far as Ilad
ley. Its greatest force was at Robert's
Meadow, Leeds and Horse Mountain, where
hail fell so plentifully that the ground was
completely oovered, tbe fields looking white.
Tho stones were of almost marvellous size. At
Robert's Meadow and Leeds stones fell that
measured leven imhtt iu ciroumfermec. Stones
measuring four or five inobet fell by the
thousand. A great many panes of glass wero
broken, particularly in Leeds. Fortunately it
passed over a region not extensively culti
vated, but where it found oorn and tobacco
fields it made Bad bavoo, particularly with the
latter. Worcester Transcript.
ffC-iFA million years ago, there lived among
the slant forms of this young world, the eoni
of invention 1 huge fruits and flowers of rank
and noisome growth, ohokeu the dark dells
with worse than upas vapors; unsightly crea
tures crawled with slimy tracks, and sported
their heinous forms in oumbrous gambols ; they
lived and passed away others came and so
through tbe ions oenturies or time, race tol
lows race, until man, tho mavtor, came. The
Eternal procession of time displayed invention
from birth to death, from year to year ; ex
panded fields waved with grain, temples
looked proudly from tho earth, machinery gave
countless hands to few. Invention still adds
ber blessings to the world. The last work of
this extraordinary geni was the sowiDpr-ma
chine, sold by P, Evens, Sr., oorner Main and
1 ourth-Btreets well known as Evens .
A Wisconsin Lawtkr Murdered. A. letter
from Lacrosse, Wisconsin, Augut 10, says:
The Hon. H m. pennison, of this city, was
yesterday beaten to death while out in Mor
mon Cooley, somo fourteen miles from town,
with a brother-in-law, trouting. Some words
passed between them, nbont their right to
tako the trout from their lands, when they
came to blows, which resulted in the above.
The parties (father, two sons and two daugh
ters,) are now safely lodged in jail. Much
excitement prevails in town, Mr, D. was at
the head of the law profession, partner of the
present Mayor, and much respected by the
community. Tho deceased was formerly of
Freedom, Portage Couuty, Ohio.
Emigration Across the Plains. Mr. Gree
ley, in a letter from Salt Lake City, dated July
12, estimates the total number of emigrants
now on the plains and bound for California at
about thirty thousand persons, with teams of
oxen, mules, horses, and loose cattle, amount
ing at tho start to littlo less than one hundred
thousand head. Of these more than half are
working oxen. The emigration oovors tbe
great trail for an extent more than seven
hundred milos, or fully half tb,e distance from
the settlements of Kansas to those of California
west of the Sierra Nevada. Tho bead of this
magnificent oolumn will enter the valley of the
Sacramento early in August; its extreme rear
will be struggling down the mountain slopes,
sad, lank and footsore, as late as the first of
October.
The London Times. A correspondent says:
The London Timet has eighteen reporters at
the Houses of Parliament, and for these, as well
as the majority of its compositors, the working
hours are the night hours exclusively. It owns
four cabs, which are employed solely in carry
ing reporters and reports at nlghtto and fro be.
twoen Printing-house Squaro and the Palace at
Westminster. Tbe roporters relieve each other
at tbe House every quarter hour, and thus,
though tho debate in the Commons lasts till
four o'clock in the morning, the Tiiae gives it
in full by sunrise, though it cover two whole
pages of thejournal.
Tho following from theChioago Trihun
is good; in fact, very good, and cannot be
passed by bocause it is personal :
Into Him. A vaporing Cinoinnatlan at the
Tremont Houeo, expatiating on the "vine clad
hills," ic, olaimerl that tho Ohio was "the
Rhine of tbe New World."
"Yes," ejaculated old X . tho pork-
Rhino."
There was a pause, then several exploded,
and then the crowd took a last view of the
whole subject through tho bottoms of glass
tumblers, at the expense of tho Hogopolis man.
The Southern Cotton Crop. The boll-worm.
is said to nave made its appearance among the
ootton in South-western Georgia,in oonsequence
of the protraoted wot weather. In many parts
of middle Georgia, they can, it is alleged, do
no harm, for thero are very few bolls for them
to destroy. The Selma (Alabama) Courier also
complains of tho ravages of the boll-worm on
the bottom-lands in that State, but expresses
tbe hope that the damage will not prove gen
eral. pS' Mary A. Sam mis has commenoed suit,
in Suoramento, for a divorce from her husband,
Benjamin W. Summis. They were marriod in
Saoramento in 1863, and went to Dayton,
Ohio, in 1854. Dofendant returned to Califor
nia and corresponded with plaintiff until June,
1855, when, as she alloges,'he wholly aban
doned her, and withheld necessary supplies.
Ail Old Turtle. Mr. Isaao Hoover, living
near New Holland, Pennsylvania, found in
one of his fields, a fow days since, a land turtle
with tbe date and Initials, "18101. II.," out
on the under shell by himself in that year.
The turtle was alive and active, and not any
larger than it was forty-nine years ago.
pF "Tho pen is mightier than the sword."
A Lieutenant in tbe army recently undertook
to flog tbe editor of the Indianola( Texas) (Vu
ttlte. Th tables were turned on him, and he
himself was mads the recipient of a severe, but
doubtless deserved castigatioo. -
LATEST BY TELEGRAPH.
REPORTED FOR THE PENNY PRESS.
From Washington.
Washington, August 22. The Adminis
tration has bestowed on tho subject of the
African slave-trade its earnest attention, and
with a view of auppressinjr as far as possible
this traffic, has initiated measures more effi
cient and more extensive then ever before
for that purpose. The squadron for tho coast
of Africa, as arranged by tho Secretary of
the Navy, will consist of tho following named
vessels; The steamers Mijme, Sampler, San
Jacinto and Mohitjnn, and tho sloops-of-war
Uonitellation (toe nas-ship). rortumoullt, Ma
rion and Yincmne: The most efficient offi
cers are assigned to their command. Those
of the steamers Myitie and Snmpter are, re
spectively, .Lieutenant W. . x,eroy nnd
Xiientenaiit 0. i . Armstrong. These gentle
men were, at their own request, ordered to
this service; their vessels being of light draft,
can penetrate waters too shallow for those
which have heretoture been on that coast,
besides having the advantage of steam.
Hence, slavers will bo more closely pursued.
The joint treaty with England requires
that the United States shall keep there a force
of eighty guns, but by recent arrangement
on the part of the Administration the num
ber of our guns will be one hundred and six
teen. Mr. Birney, who sucoeeds Mr. Morse, as
naval storekeeper, went ont in tbe Constella
tion, with instruction to remove the naval de
pot for the African squadron, from Port Praya
to San Paul de Leander, which is three hun
dred and thirty-six miles distant from Port
Praya.
This new depot will consequently be much
nearer than the former to the prlnoipal points
of trafiio on the coast, and will, in a great
measure, obviate tbe necessity of a long cruise.
On our own coast, too, there is to be an effici
ent naval forco, composed of the steamers Cru
sadvr, Lieutenant Jlaffott; the Mohawk, Lieu
tenant Craven; the "Wyandotte, Lieutenant
Stanley; and the Fallow, Commander G. G.
Williamson. They are to cruise in the neigh
borhool of Cuba, for the purpose of capturing
any slavers whloh may, by their expertness,
escape the vigilance of our naval force on the
African ooast, These arrangements will soon
go into full operations, and the Secretary of
tbe Navy is now hurrying tbe preparation of
sucn 01 tne vessels as are yet in port for this
Important service.
Fire in Boston.
Boston, August 22. Yesterday morning a
fire broke out in the City Hospital Building, on
Deer Island, which led to a general fire-alarm
In the city, and several engine companies were
dispatched to the Island; but tba fire, for
tunately, was oonfined to the east wing, and
the main building escaped damage. The up
per part of the east wing, used as a house of
reformamation for juvenile offenders, was des
troyed. The loss is estimated at from $10,000
to $20,000. Throe boys William Coughlin,
Thomas Gordon and J. Biley confessed to
setting tbe building on fire, by plaoiog 00m
bustikles In the ventilator. It was intended to
set it on fire at midnight ; but Coughlin, who
applied the match, overslept that time. Riley
was formerly an inmate of the Reform School,
and has twice attempted its destruction.
Fire at Halifax—The Express Horses of
the Associated Press Destroyed.
Sackvule, N. B., August 22. We learn
from Halifax that MoKays stable at Touro has
been burnt, and that all the horses, ten in
number, perished In tbe flames. As these
horses are included with those used especially
for expressing steamers' news from Halifax to
Saokvillo, for the Associated Press, it is feared
that there will be unusual delay with the
Canada'i news, now really at hand. The fire was
undoubtedly tbe work of an incendiary, and
as it may bo a part of the machinery by which
seme fraud is to be perpetrated in connection
wita the next news from Europe, the com
uiercial publio should bo more than usually
cautious until the authentio intelligence shall
have been received by tbe Associated Press.
Later from Havana.
New Oblkans, August 22. The steamship
Cahaieba, with advices from Havana to the
18th instant, has arrived. Sugar was firm at
8 rials. Lard buoyant at 18(1 9o. Sterling
Exchange, 45 per cent, premium. Ex
change on New York, JJ premium. Two
cargoes of coolies had arrived at Havana,
The correspondent of the Creicent says that
the Tehuantepeo mail robbers found nothiog
valuable in the malls, which wero recovered.
From Leavenworth.
Leavenworth, August 22. Some confirma
tion of the reported outbreak in the South
has reached here on the Jag llawk. Mont
gomery is reported to be in the field. Con
siderable uneasiness existed in anticipation
of a renewal of the old disturbances.
The Niagara Railroad Convention.
Niagara Falls, Aug. 22, The Convention
has agreed to reduce the rates to Memphis, via
Cairo, to 181 and 144, on first and second
class, and 185 and 149 to points below Mem
phisthe third and fourth classes to remain
at present rates.
Texas Election.
Wabhinoton, August 22. The Galvestin
CWianofthe 13tu inst. thinks that Houston
is elected by from one thousand to twelve
hundred majority,
j uuat
NEWS BY THE LATEST MAILS.
Californians Killed Indians on the
Plains.
[From the San Francisco Bulletin.]
Oeorge Davis, of New York, who has just
arrived in this city overland, via the South
Pass, informs us that on June 17th, whilo pass
ing up the Sweetwater River, near South Pass,
his party discovered a man named O. II. Hall,
lying in the road mortally wounded. They
took him up and oarried him with them till
June 19th, when he died. From the wounded
men Mr. Davis obtained tbe following narra
tive, which he has kindly furnished na:
They were all sleeping, when the Indians
stole in upon their camp, and seizing the
guns fired upon the sleepers, killinr Steph
enson and Moore, and fatally wounding Hall,
who was shot through the shoulder and hip.
Captain Florence sprang upon an Indian who
carried a club. At this point of tbe affair,
Hall fainted. When he returned to con
sciousness again, he found that the teut was
rilled of its contents, and himself stripped
all his clothing.
On April 30, Mr. C. H. Hall, of Cinoinnati,
Ohio, George Stephenson, of Pittsburor. Penn..
and David Moore, of Lanonster County, Penn.,
nwl ft, II -Mi -e n 1
auw v.uvmu USUI J.'Juruuu UI lnrilB10.
Penn., left Sacramento with the intention
going to the East overland. After reaching
the Sweetwater River on the 15th, Moore fell
siok and the party baited in a canon on the
banks of the river, about fifty miles from South
Pass. On tho third day of their halt, tboy
were suprised by a party of Crow Indians.
Upon turnlcg his eyes aside, he saw Captain
Florence standing bound hand and foot about
ten yards distant, and the Indians holding
oouneil, In their own language, a few yards
further off. In a short time they led Captain
Florenoe away, and soon afterwards Hall
heard the trampling of horses.
Tbe Indians bad gone off with their prisoner,
leaving Hall, whom they supposed to be dead,
without clothing or food.
Although mortally injured, he mansged In
tho course of a oouple of days to walk half
mile aad readied the main road, where be fell
and remained two days, when Mr. Davis and
his party passed and picked him up.
The party spent some time seeking for the
Indians and Captain Florence, but without
avail. All that could be found was a trail
leading In the direction of the Crow nation.
Captain Florence belonged to the Masonlo fraternity.
MARRIED.
At tli DpniilM.n iloue,ln llilirirv, liytheTlav,
Clinton W.Hmw. IV it. H'Cinnusnir, Ksq,r.f Omaha,
N. V., lo Ule Kmiia Tiukld.oI Uxford, Ohio.
DIED.
On Sunday. August list, Mart 11 , elileat (laughter
of Ororgeaud .ii. Wrrlng..ii,gfd nluetton years
ml Ave mouth.
The funernl will take plnceuu Tilexluv, 2341 Instant,
at Imlf.pniit liiliu o'clock A. N., from tho timllr rcni-(li'iK-o.
vlue-HtrcKt Hill. Ciirrhiii.ii will Irave the
odloeof John t. Wllte-, o rni-rof Plum anil Long-
voirii-sironn, ni nu.pai eignt o clock, to convey
frleuila to the fuueral.
DIED. EPITOME---AUCTION SALES.
Kir.ioon 4 Williams TuwUv Morning, Angnit
21. ut 9!i o'clock, Ilomoliohl, Parlor, Chamber and
Ollice JTurnitiire, tc. Sou adv.
H. 8. Slit.pn too., 33 Main street. Tuesday morn
Ins, August S3, at y o'clock, Groceries, Ac. See
advrtlHeinimf.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
BtrsiNF.S8 MEN'S PRAYER
MEKTTNGR nr linlri ornn, nrnrnlno In ,h
iamillon of the First Church . All are Invited, irl
LEONARD SVYAHTZ WILL
ba a candidate fnr dmintv nnmtnlH.Iinur nf
but'iuent County at the ensuing October election.
aul)-tf
SOFT HATS AND CAPS.
All the now styles, French Folt and Ledger
liuts, and Full Caps In great variety at
DODD'S HAT STORE,
au20 144 Main, east side, be low i'ourth
THE GOOD SAMARITANS
ANDPAi;i!HT TiSrF HAM ATM A lntn,l
liolniiig their Sixth Annlvorsary, rulDAY EVKN
IfG, August 20, at FRANKLIN HALL, corner of
Sixth ai.d Sycnmnre-etreeta. 'i'liny will lie addresecd
by MHS. Kit N KST, of TheEauiihtora of Tomperaiicp,
at which timetliore will ho a grand festival, au2.1-
STUDENTS OF Oil) WOOD.
WARD. A meet In I! of Ihn Slmlenla nf (11,1
WooUivsrd Colleen High School will Ira held in the
Komlon Hall of tho School Board, cornor Sixth aud
Vlne-strodts, THUItSDAV KVENINU, lltli Inst,, at
eight o'clock. All who ever attended that Institu
tion, now in tliis city, are urgently invited and ex
pected to he prenent, as bneiiioes of immediate Im
portimro and of interest to every one, will hn reported
ou for Haul action. W. VI. COGSWELL,
O. W. M'ALPIM,
J. W. DALK,
J. B. POLLOCK,
II. r. HAN Y,
auZMt Committee on Monument.
t
Otssr'
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
of
a
a
t5
roI, lie
REWARD For the detection of the
Demon who Stole a nalr of OvrtilIIi and
lielonffinfl to Red Alleu. from tho cornor of
KTHTW" BOOKS,
1. COUNTRY LIFE; A HANDBOOK OF
AGTtTOULTI'RIC, H OUT IO V LT DBR, AND
L N DSCA l'K GARDEN IKU. By R. 111. Copclaud.
Illustrated.
8 vo, cloth S 2 CO
2 THEODORE PARKER'S EXPERIENCE
A3 A MINISTER.
12 mo. cloth fa SO
8. NOTES BY A CLERICAL FURLOUGH,
SI-ENTOUIKFLYaN THE HOLY LAND. By
Uev. llobt, Buchnuau, O. I).
Bq. 12 mo. cloth , ,. $1 90
New Vols. Bonn's Libraries.
BUTLER'S HUD1BRAS. Edited by II. Q.
Bonn.
Priso $1 25
jbuijjEH-s HUiUBiiAS. Edited by II. U.
Bohn. With nnmoron norrrait.
2 .o! $2 IO
CRAVEN'S YOUNG SPORTSMAN'S MAN.
1'AL. ftjBl
Price $ 25
liU W iN LUi'S UlliLlUUK A I'll EIl'3 MANUEL
Tart IV 8i oo
NOVUM TESTAMENTUM GRAECUM.
Price $1 no
IN U V U M TESTAMENTUM OltAEt'L M.
With Lexicon,
Price Si 2!
Complete Sets or Holin'n I.ibraileH ulwuys
on iinuti.
ROBT. CLARKE & CO.,
au23-b 53 WEST FOURTn-STItEKT.
AUCTION SALE. BY JACOB GRAFF
k CO Excellent f'nriiltiiri-, I'lnno, iVr-.
Will lie Hold lit Auction ou TUESDAY iU'JltNlM),
AusilHt 2.1. at nlllo o'clock, at tho rPHiriencu nl Jim. P.
IitKKri, Krn., No. .W Went Hlxlh-street, MCond door
etthioi rara, mo outiri g urniiure, iz:
Pariahs, K. W. Hair Cloth Sociiihles; do. do'
Sofa; M.ihosuny Both; six ltuewoml Hair Cloth
( hairs; Fauuy II air Cloth Chair; Muhogany Arm
Chair, en-en cloth; Cval Koaovood Murhle-top Table;
Inlaid iVIarbloCeritorTaMo: two Inlaid Fonov Tiihlnii:
French Plate Mirror, 66 by 20; Klaxero; Htoula; China
nuuiioi i.iuck; jTiitutoi uinauioniu; ianuoiauiaS)
Ui-onzo Brackets: TaDeBtrv: brutoJoln Citrrjetn. &t:.
Piano Foiitr, Mvhic SfANii, On. Paintinos and
Emiiiavisoh, Mitti no-room and Chambers. Sofa
HudMoad, Mahogany Book Cane, do. Wardrolw, Ma-
noK.my iiair uioui unttiro. nooning wiaes, winonw
III nil. Mi'.ttinit. lioouwood hiilf-canonv IteditHHd.do.
Drnimug Bureau, marble top; do. do. Waeh bland,
ImitRtiuu Honeuoodaud othor BedsU'tida, Mahogany
and Walnut Wardrobes, tjimrlotte 'ruble, Ladiot'
Work Table, villi Writing llenk; Mjilioituny Arm
I'hnir, llockiuK Chair, t'ano-float I'hairH, Kecoptlon
Chiiim. Horinu. Hair and tilinck Aloltrenson. Feath.
en, Holiiters and Pillown; fine Moaquito Burs, Chiniv
ana oiner louoi new, urusaeis anil tnree-piy uir
petH, Window Shades.
Hail ant Dinino-boom. Hat Buck, Door Mats,
nan ana otair uirpciH, manogany nuicuoara, no,
hxtengioii Table (Over, Cane-neat Cbnira, China
Dining aud Tea Ware, Glass Ware, Knives and
rork", uriiannia wuro, Trouio-piatco Hare, vu.:
Tea Bet with Urn, six pieces; Waiter, Castors,
Wator Pitcher, Cake Banket, butter DhIioj, HiiKar
PiMiel, &c, all of the boit quality; Cooking Stovo
auu apparatus, auu an aHuiirrment oi mtciten urni
ture. JACOB UKAief, Auctioneer,
nwa No 1 Eaflt;Kourtli-troot.
SCHOLARS
At THE
Public or Private Schools
OF THE. CITY, WILL FIND AT
25 AVE ST FOURTII-ST.,
(SOVTU SinE, BETWRKN HAIN AND WALNVT,) ,
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF THK
School Books
Used in their Classos,
SLATES, PENS, INK, PAPER, COPY B0OK8,
AND ALL VARIETIES OF
SCHOOL 3TATIONE
CHEAP FOB CASH.
- BEME1IDEB TIIE NUMBER,
RY
25 West
Fourth-Street.
lauM-c
FRONT STREET FACTORY
Ann
LUMBER DEPOT,
No. 167 East Front Street, bet. Tike aud Butlor-st's,
South-side.
HAVING FITTED UP THE PREMISES
with the moat improved kind of machinery, I
niu prepared to furniill, at short notice, all kinds of
Jlonno and Steamboat, Carpenter and Joiner's work.
U-..1. 1.11.. V-.... 1 U..UI - r i.
OIUIl, X.IIUUB, I7UUIH, XllllllOP IIIIU J" UIU I IlgV, 01 BI1
descriptions. Hroamlioat Lumber, Woalher-bonrd-
ng, nninginn, oiuiiik, r looring, c Kepi constantly
on hand. Partiuulur attention bald to nUn inir. rin-
nliia and scroll aawing. Heavy tmiuliig lumber can
lie planed and trued 40 feot long, and 30 Inches wide.
rersona auont to utmo, will nnd It to their ailvan-
tugo to give uio a can. m. iiiflr.K,
aii22-bin Proprietor.
BRANDY AND GIN COCKTAIL.-John
Batea would call the attention of nloon and
hotel proprietors, to hii superior Brandy and (in
Cocktail. They are niado from the heat brandr and
gin, and are exiiiiaitoly flavored. They are iiiperior
to anything of the kind that lias been made. For
sale, wiioioaalo nnd retail, National Theater Build
Iny, Hyeamoro-street. anlfi
AUCTION SALE. BY II. S. MILES
CO., Mo, 3.1 Maln-streot. Oroccrlnn, (ilium
want. e..at Auction. We will anil on TUESDAY
I10UNIKO, Aug. 23, at V o'clock, a senoral variety of
uruvenoa anu uiaanware. u, B. jiliaiHH a uj.,
au22 Auctioneers.
VCTf ON SALEU BY KELL0Q3 k
WILLIAUS-Sale-rooms 12 and U East Third.
trcot iiarite nalo oi goon furniture, tarnets. Cut
lery, Ac, at Auction, On TUESDAY MOltNINO,
Almost 23, at o'clock, a (dock of good Household,
nnur. viinmuiT, viiiuig-rooni auu outre r uruiiure,
ALSO 20 plecea of Ingrain and other t'arnoti.
ALSOA stock of Jilno Ivory and Bona Tables.
Cutlery, common do., Plated Were, and a variety of
other goods, . . ,
u22 ' A, KELLOGG, Auctioneer. .
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
Choice Havana Cigars.
WE HAVE "JUST RECEIVED AN
OTHER supply of thote utrorlte brands
Punch, Henry Clay,
La Prima Vera, 4c.
Our assortment Is so large that connoisseurs wilt
he enabled to select from the best brands of Havana
Cigars imported. For sale by
SUlUIi. EUHBTIIHIW.i
au22-fl OddohUi the PostoGBc.
Burnett's Cod-Liver Oil.
5 GROSS BURNETT'S COD-LIVER OIL,'
perfectly frosh and iweet, received and foraale by
SUIKG, KCK8TBIN 4 CO.,
au22-0 Opposite the Postofllce.
Tarrant's Seltzer Aperient.
THIS MUCH ESTEEMED AND HIGHLY
valuable preparation will not fall to enootiullr
rcraovo uyspepaia or innigwion, otuiuui niiutiyu..
Headache. Heartburn, Acidity of the Stomach, Cos
tivonoss, tlauaen, or Vomiting. 4o. For sals y
SUIBK, TiOKSTKIM 4 CO.,
n22-o Opposite tne rostomce.
fclni T-i nrl "rVTQarnasta
3 CASKS JENNING'S CALCINED MAG
NESIA, in one-pound cans, received and for
sale by til'IBE, ECKSTEIN 4 CO.,
upponitc tne roetomce.
Collapslon Drinking Cups.
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED AN IN
VOICE of these novel and convenient Drink
ing Cups for Travelers. Sportsmen, Ac. l or sale by
SUlkE, JKCKSTKIN ft CO.,
au22-c Opposite the Postoffice:
Dissolution of Partnership.
TIIE undersigned begs leave to announoe to
the public, and the patrons of the late Arm of
J. H. EU0LE8T0N 4 CO., No. 3.17 West Slxth-alreot,
II. KOGLKSTON, in the tlriu wbkh la now dissolved,
and assumed the payment of all debts due by tbe old
partnerahip. All persona indebted to the late firm.
mat no nan purchased tne entire interest oi air. .
will ninuMi, onll nnif aettlA tha SAtue with the under
signed, who will carry on the Butter Store at tho
samestand. J. F. LAKE MAN,
J. U. EGULEtiTON.
Cincinnati, AtMfiwt 18, 1W. auai-o
, JOHN H. DETERS,
FASHIONABLE
BOOT & SHOE MANUFACTURER,
Mo. 33 We at Fourth afreet,
IIA9 now on hand the largest and beat stock of
Oentleinene' fine Slippers ovor offered In this mar
ket. Call nnd ace them. aula
DR. SAiJl'L SILSIIEil
ESPECIALLY TREATS DISEASES OP
TIIE SKIN, BHKUMATIBV, DISEASES OI
WOMhN, and Much CUronlo complaints as may be
benefitted by ibo Hygyenlc and Atmopathlc system
of his office.
Vapor, Sulphur, Iodine, Atsenlc, Heronry, Tur
kish, Busslan and Eloclro-Chemlcal Baths, a Sis
pensary of Medicine, and every manner of Electrlt
and Mugnotic Apparatus,
MO. 67 WEST 8IXTH-STBEET.
SWOfflcehursA.M.toP. M. anl9-tft
Dissolution of Partnership.
flUIE Partnership hortofore existing between
M. thonnderslgneihundorthoflrrnnamo of BEGGS
& SMITH, Is th Is day (Unsolved. II. K. Smith having
pitrchaaed the entire lutorost of .loneph P. Boggs in
the saidconcern. JOSEPH P. 1IKGG9.
I1AURY It. SMITH. .
Notice of Copartnership.
THE nndersigned have this da; formed a
Copartnership, retaining the Arm name of
Braes St Smith, and will continue tho JEWKLBz
BUSINESS, No. ( West Fourth-street. Cincinnati.
HAKltr K. HJUTII,
OHAltLKS G. IIOEKNEB.
JACK. BUN SLAKE.
While retiring from the lalo firm of Bsnis A
Smith, and thus dlsKolvliig my business relations
with that concern, I still hopoto retain an Interest
In Its prosperity and success, and would cordially
recommend the new firm to the consideration ana
patronage of my friends uiidthe public.
JOSEPH P. IIEOQ8.
Cincinnati, August IS, IMP. Biil7bw
INCREASED EXCITEMENT.
HUME'S
WITHINGTON BEER.
THIS CELEBRATED BEER, INTRO
DUCED by the tlndereigiieil. a few months
since, for tho first time lu tills city, Is rapidly super
ceding in uue nil otlion. lu popularity Is equal to
Muaty Alo, which can inly be procured genuine at
the Hnaty Ale CuttaKe, No. 104 Main-street, between
Third and Fourth-streets.
Hume's Ladies' Ale,
Superior to any in uso, either domostlo or Imported,
for Indies who are tiuraing, and their bnbes. The
f ropertien of this Ala lire highly tonic and invlgora
ing, and is particularly recommended by the 1'ao.
ulty.
THE MANY IMITATORS
Of HUME'S MUSTY ALE, have, one Iiy one, oloscd
their doors, or had tlicm closed by the Sheriff, and
thenndersigned will givo Fifty Hollars bonus, to any
individual who will produce) asingle glaas of Huaty
Ale, Wlthington llcor, or Hume's Ladies' Ale, at any
othereHtiibliahnient tluiu tho Mualy AloCotlage,
My stock or tho original and only gonulno Alusty,
Cliampaiitno, Bitter Old Amber, and other choice
brands of Alos, and also Porter and Brown Smut,
comprising iu all about SKVEN UUNDBED BAB
RELS.iauucnuulcd lu the Union,
ul7-tf J. B. HOME.
FRESH OYSTERS.
I AM bow receiving dally, per tne Adam
Express,
MALTB Y'Sfi
CELEBRATED
BALTIMORE CAN 07STERS,
Put np by a now process, especially for the warm
Weather, WAfiKAKTED FBESU AND SWEET.
ROBERT ORE, Agent.
ulS-bwt Depot, 11 West Fifth-street.
REMOVAL.
E. MENDENHALL,
Illnp, Book nnd l'rliit-Scller nnd Htatloner,
Has removed his business to the more spacious
aud convenient prctnlae,
NO. 10 WEST FIFTn-STREET,
(North side, near Maiu-stroet,)
Where he will bo pleased to see bis old friends and
eutomers. u!7
MerreU's Blackberry Anodyne.
TniS MEDICINE IS OFFERED TO THE
public as one of the best, if not the very best med
icine that has ever beeu invented for DiiRimn, Dys
entery, Cholira iNt'ANTUH, and all other derange
ments of the Hlonmch and Bigestlre Organs, which
are so prevalent and fatal In our country corrects
the deranged condition of tbe Liver; allot s Nervous
Irritations, snch as ta caused by Teething, gives
tone and healthy action to the bowels, and withal, is
pleasant to take. iy33-bmt
COMPOSITION ROOFING.
THE undersigned Is prepared to put on a
Composition Boot of the best quality at short
notice.
Office In J A B. Xrucs's Carriage Bepesitory, cor
ner Third and Vine.
sur Booilng material constantly on hand, and for
sale, (jy-3in) J. U. NUDLK.
Cincinnati Female Seminary,
Corner Seventh and Mound th-eeii.
The next Session of this Institution will open on
MONDAY, Septembers, m.
Wo invite attention to tUe completeness of cur
facilities for asubsiuntlal and finlsliod Education.
Catalogues may be had at the (SoaJsM ey, and from
John 1). Thorpe, No. 74 West Foia STlri-et .
BUUBUWS ABAYLEB,
Cincinnati, Aug. 1.1, law. mtr Principals
LAN E U BODLEY,
lllNDTAOTUBlM Of
Wood-Working Machineiy,
AND CIRCULAR SAW MILLS, .
Corner John and Water sts., Claclnintl.O.
aol-lr
B. KITTREDGE & CO.
134 MAIN STREET, CINOINNATI, O.
KITREDQE& FQLBOM,
tn St. Obarles street, New Orleans, La,,
Importers of Gan tic Sporting Apparatus
,ul AND DEALKBS III GUR POWDER,
Pure, Still & Sparkling Wines,
. jameseToelby. fs

xml | txt