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The penny press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1859-1860, September 02, 1859, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

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THE PENNY PRESS,
la printed and nbllatled daily, (Buudays excepted,) by
FRANCISCO & CALDWELL,
At No. it Weit' Fourth Street,
and delivered to anbiorlbars In CINCINNATI, COY
INQTUN and NEWPORT, and In surrounding oitief,
villages and towus, at
SIX CENTS A' WEEK,
payable to the carrier.
PRICE OF MAILING.
Single Ooptos, eta.; One Month, 40 cts.j Three
- Month, J I 00; One Tear, 14 00.
AMUSEMENTS.
"Wood's Theater
COESKH SIXTH & TINS Bra., CINCINNATI.
John A. Em.sleb, J a Sole Lessee and Maiiagor.
H'B'Tho rngnlnr dramatic season will com mince on
PAl'UltDAY, September 3, with an entire htm
Stuck Company, aud a succession ol tlio most hkil
mant Stab.
N. I). Lading mid pnntlcnien connected with the
Theater, nro roiiupstpil tci attend Ki-hoaraal, on THIS
(Friday) UOBMINCi, at II o'clock. sepl!
l'IKE'S OPERA -1IOIJSE.
Ciias. M. Basra. Manager.
PBICES OS" ADMISSION:
Parquatte Circle, Paruuetteand Balcony 81 00
(iallery 30
Private Boxes, oight persons 16 00
HTThire Is no FREE LIST at this establishment,
except that of the Public From.
TIT E M AN AftER TAKES GREArPLEAS
URE In announcing to the nnhlic that he has
effected a limited engagement with" the celebrated
ITALIAN OniU GOUPlRr,
Comprising In lt organization some or the greatest
lyric artlats of the day.
On JTUDAY EVENING, Roptoniber 2, will be
produced Verdi's famous oparuof
KICOLETTA;
In which ths brilliant American eantntrlce, Mrs.
CHAKLOTTE VAUIAN JAMES, whose debut here
in Concert last week was attended with 'complete
triumph, wlllnppearforthe first time in Amerlrain
opera, suRtalniug the principal role of Hilda. Mark
the follow! UK
CART OP CHARACTERS.
Dnko of ITnntova Slci. O. Shrlglia
Itigoletta, his jester, and lather to UIIiIh...". (liione,
liilda Mrs. Charlotte Varlan .lainca.
Uiivuiiiiu. her attendant Sie. Zimiiccl.
S'lamlucile, a bravo Slg. Barili.
Madduleiia, his sister Signa. Pared I,
Monteroue.au old courtier Sia. Attoni.
Count of Ceprnno big. V. Localelll.
CntmtL-ss of Cf-prano... Hlgnn. Clara.
llorsii, a roomer Hlg. Nedlstil.
Mnrulio, a conrtlor Big' Balaquer.
A Page..... ...Sig. N. N.
i'uuruerg, i,auit-s, iiorus, iuiisks, Boiuiers, dec,
TO-MORROW
TROVATOBE.
Bf&"Doors neon at 7M o'clock; commenced at fl.
Wllox Office 0n from it A. M. until 4 It. M.
Uf0"No extra charge for reserved seals.
scp2 .IJMI ER UEIiJaenrer.
PALACE GABDEtf & VARIETIES.
YINN-HTHEET BET. FOURTH AND FIFTH.
Proprietor and Manager. II. E. Morris.
OPEN EYERY EVENING WITH PKOM
ENADB CONCERTS by
MENTER'S FULL BAND.
'BARMIN( BALLADS,
BEAUTIFUL DANCES,
CON 10 SUNOS,
ACROBATIC EXEHOIHKS.
ETHIOPIAN DELINEATIONS,
Burlusrjues, Pantomimea and Farces, by a company
if thirty performera and musicians, aeiccted from the
best companies in the United Stater.
Admission Only Tea Cents.
tau.il I
LARGEST MULE LIVING.
milE UNDERSIGNED WILL, EXHIBIT
JL at all the County Fairs In onto and Indiana,
I ho lamest Mule known in the world,
J ft Hands Hlli-Vllis 1,800 rounds,
Viva Years Old.
Was raised by Dr. M'Cann, of Fayette County. Ky.
Will bo exhibited by tlKO. W. FltOBT.
r.niM-ntul
STRANGER'S GUIDE.
ARTIST.
G. W. Pliillliis, No. 5 Bacon's Building, corner
rJlxth and Walnut.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS SEED3.
Wilder, Uobhison ifc Co., Si30 Walnut atreet,
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
Anderson, Gates b Wright, 1 V2 Main it.
CABINET MAKER'S HARDWARE.
ItloAIiiin, Ilinman fc Co., 103 Walnut st.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
Kennet, Dudley Si Co., agents, 14 Main it.
FLUID INK MANUFACTURER.
J.J Butler, 3 Vine at.
LOCK AND KEY MANUFACTORY.
Geo.McGregor,133 WestFil'thstreot.
MEDICINES.
Dr. C. W. Kobnck'M Scandinavian Blood Pills
and Blood Purifier, No. 6 East Fourth street, sec
ond building from main.
PAPER MANUFACTURERS.
Pelloek fc McCnll, 234 Walnntst.
- PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Dm. Malcne& Reck, S7 Broadway.
SEWING MACHINES.
Geo. B. Slont fc Co,, 54 West Fourth street.
SUGAR-CANE AND GRAIN MILLS.
Hedges. Free Si Co., 0 Main at,
TRUNK MANUFACTORIES.
O. W. Hholl, S7 Walnut atreet.
VETERINARY SURGEON.
J. C. Meyer. South-east corner Pike and Pearl sta.
WATCHES AND JEWELRY.
A. A. Foster, Nos. ,'141 cV !iTI, Western Row.
Ue Ik Smith, (i West Fourth at.
WINDOW SHADES AND OIL CLOTHS.
Knovfileni Otte, 'Jl West Fourth at.
WIRE CLOTH AND PRODUCTS.
8. 0. Burnett ct: Co., '4? Walnut at.
SIX CENTS WILL PAY FOR THE
PENNY PRESS ONE WEEK.
DIl. SArfl'L SILSBEE
ESPECIALLY TREATS DISEASES OF
TUB SKIN, RHEUMATISM, D1SKASES OF
WCMKH, and such Chronic complaints as may lie
benefitted by the Dygyenic and Atmopnthic system
of his office.
Vapor, Sulphur, Iodino, Araonlc, Mercury, Tur.
kiah, Ruailan auil Electro-Chemical Baths, a Dls
pensnry of Medicine, and evory manner or Klectrlc
und llagnetlc Apparatus.
NO. 67 WEST SIXTH-STREET.
e-0flke haurs 9 A. U. to ft P. M. aul9-tft
TO HOUSEKEEPERS.
Important Improvement!
WELLiFp ATENT
F0LDI1SPRIHMESS
WEIGHS ONLT 03 LBS! MANTJFACTtEBD,
WHOLESALE' AND RETAIL, BY
BENNETT & CO.,
jy2,!"1"" HvcKmore street, Velow Fifth.
j?R0NT - STREET FACTORY
AM)
LUMBER DEPOT,
No. lii! East Front Streot, bet. Pike and Butler-st's,
Houth-alde.
HAVING FITTKD UP THE PREMISES
with the most improved kind of machinery,
am prepared to furnish, at short notice, all kinds of
House itnd Stenmbont.Oarpetiterand Joiner's work.
Sath, lllitids, Doors, 1 'rallies and Wolillngs, of all
descriiltious. i Stmmboan l.iimber, Weather-bonrd-ug,
Shingles, Biding, Flooring, kept eopstnntly
on hand. Partlculur attention paid to planing, rip
vlng anil scroll sawing. Heavy framing lumber pan
bmilBneil and tnied ID feet lonis.imd anlurhrs wide.
PersoiiiBbout to build, will lili.l It to t heir advau
tane to give me a call. Vt W. JJiHfcS,
auiS-bui Proprietor,
VOL. 2. NO. 11.
CINCINNATI, FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 2, 1859.
PRICE ONE CENT.
Arrivals of Trains.
Indianapolis A Cincinnati 9:40 A. .; 3:35 I. H.i
f):3i M,
Cincinnati, H amiitok and Dayton-T:45 a. a.; 10:17
a. .; 6:40 p.m.; Hi:10 p. m.
Littlk Mum-7:30 a, H.i 1:30 p. H.;7:1S P.M.; 10:45
Marietta and Cincihnati-10:20 a. 9:15 r. m.
Ohio and Mihsipsippi 7:16 A. M.; 2:00 p. M.; 10:1 r.
tOVINOTON and JjEimoion10:20 A. H.; 7:06 p. H.
Departures of Trains.
Indianapolis and Cincinnati-5:50 A. .; 12:00 .i
:0 P. M.
Cincinnati, Hamilton and DATTON-Indianapolii
and Cleveland, 6:110 A. M.; Sandusky Mail, s:00 A. H.i
Sandiiiiky, 4:30 p. H.j Accornmodatlon, 6:00 ?. M.
Liitlb Miami Cleveland and Pittabug,6:00 A. H.i
Ulevelantt, Pittsburg and Belluir, 8:30 A.M.; Colum
bus Accommodation, 4:10 p. m.; Cleveland, Pitts
burg and Ilellnir, 11;30 p. M
Ohio and Mississippi St. Lonla, 9:00 A. H.i Louis
ville, 2:00 p. u.; St. Louis, fl:3u p. m.
Pittsbubo, C'OLtiMBUs and Cicinnati (Stenbonyllle
Short Lino) East Front-street Depot-8:00 A. n.;
8-.IKIA. H.;ll:30p. h.
OlrvrijANd, Columbus and Cincinnati East Front
street 0:00 a. h.;.,30a. m.; 11:30 p. u.
Cincinnati andMasibtta :1Sa. m.; 3:30 p. m.
Central Ohio From Kast Front-street Depot 8:30
A. M.; 11:30 p. m.
Covington and Lkinoton :25 a. m.; 2:30 p. ,
News and Gossip.
non. Rotort Dalo Owon arrived at
home on the 20th inet, aftor an absence abroad
of six years.
SfT-We fear that rattlesnake bitos will
grow frequont, now that whisky is nnnounced
as a sovereign cure.
Sfl-Tho scouring of yonr floor by two per
sons, eaoh anxious to aecompliah more than
the other, may bo justly called a srrtii race.
0lr Lynchburg contains about twelve
thousand inhabitants, which tna'nej it the fifth
oity in size in Virginia.
S-'T Ex-Presidont Tylor, who is In good
hoalth and spirits, has lately bcrn sojourning
at Old Point Comfort.
tf Henry Ilulflingor, colored, convioted
at llarrisburg, Tenn., of the murder of his wife,
was, on Saturday, sentenced to ')o hung.
pB The Clnrke (Va.) Jom-nrd nominatos
the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter an the Demooratic
oandidute for the next Presidency.
fl-ffMrs. Catherine Snmmis, mother of the
lato Hon. Mike Walsh, was nccidontally burnt
to death, in New York, on Thursday of last
week. . .
pS" Senator Douglas decls ros that more
Africans havo been imported in to the United
States during the last year than during any
year when the traflio was legal.
"Have you Goldsmith's Greeoe?"
asked a gentleman, on entorlt g a book store.
"No, sir; but thoy have somo excellent bear's
oil in the next door," replied the counter boy.
A woman in Middlesex. Eneland.
named Newton, recently bit off the nose of
Thomas baverland, wbo attempted to kiss her.
He sued her at law, but the Jury acquitted
her.
A Cheap Pr.Ars to Livb. The chaplain of
a linitou Mates vessel, stati oneii in the China
sea, says that a laboring mi in can live comfort
ably in the intorior of t'ant country on food
costing only a cent per day.
Intehestiko. The last nows from Europe
conveys the important intelligence that the
Empress Eugene is again tneicntr.. The Em
peror has been to the wars. Wo do not affirm
there is any connection between the1 two facts.
SA Paris correspondent says of NnpO'
leon that he is, by raco, an Italian, by birth
Dutchman, by sohool education a German, by
military education a Swiss, by political
studies an Englishman, and by his crown
xrenenman.
Nbvt Suspension Bridgb av Whebmno.
The work on this structure prose eds rapidly.
Two cables have already been strt itched from
tower to tower, and workmon nro wrapping
them with wire. The estimated cost of the
work is $37,000.
-The Grand Trunk Rf.ilroo.d asks the
City of Montreal to give it a ve.-y valuable
piece of property, the St. Anne's Market, and
the use of one of the principal thoroughfares,
as a condition on which that Toad should make
Montreal a terminus. It is violently opposed.
The Rev. Mr. Snureeon. in a lato scr
mon, denies the story of hie. having been left
a fortune. Ho says if ho had a guinea for
every lie, toiu at his expense, he would hav.'
"money cnongn to build ins projected chapel,
wihi a Buiucieni surplus Tio run up a CRtne
dral or two."
53-BIondin is pronounced a myth by a
correspondent of the Now York Titnei. The
correspondent resides at Niagara, and says
the stories about crossing a rope and cooking
omelets, carrying men, standing on his head,
performing gymnastio feats, Sec, are all pure
invention made up to put money in the purses
of the haok-drivers and hotel-keepers.
The Dkstitutk in tub Azorb Islands. A
private letter received at Boston announces
tho arrival at Fayal, July 18, of the bar.k
.Asore, Gaptain Burke, from Boston, with the
contributions for the destitute of the Azore
Islnuds. Tho arrival was hail ed with, lively
demonstrations of gratitude.
Health of Nbw Orleans. As yet not a
single authenticated case of yellow fever has
occurred in Now Orleans. The Delta soys:
"We doubt if it can bo snid of anv previous
summer for the last forty years, thnttlio
twentieth of August has arrived without a
single symptom of the presence of this pesti
lence." TARItlKO AND FEATHKRINfl. A follow BamCtl
liates, keeper of a house of i'tl-famein Elyrin,
Ohio, was dragged into far, streot, Sunday
night week, and tarred ond feathered by a
party of citizens. Tho women were ordered
to leave town, which they did forthwith;
Gates hud the mob arret ted, and they waived
an examination.
HoMicinn in CoLuitius, Kv, A difficulty,
growing out of some bi siness transaction, oc
curred at Columbus, Kentucky, last Tuesday
evening, between two Den named John Cald
well and J. T. Wood, during which the farmer
Btmok the other a hes.vy blow with a stick and
then shot him with a pistol, producing almost
immediate death. Mr. Wood wag formerly
olerk of the steamer Admiral.
Handsome Floor. The handsomest dining
room floor In tho United States has recently
been Inid nttho ladies' ordinary nt thoAmor-
lcan J louse, uosion. Jt is an inlaid mosaic
floor, composed of fivo thousand pieces of
wood of four different growths mahogany,
rosewood, black-walnut and white-ok, artistically
nrrunged in magnificent figure,.
."Charles Stark, of Lebanon, Con nenti
eut, murdered his wife on Monduy ' night
last. Ho cut mid mangled her in a most horri
ble manner. Wbon diseovered, ho was biking
tho body away in ft hand-cart. He said ha
wns ofrnid of the Indians, who were tryi ng to
kill his wife and himself, lie was sufl'ering
.from mania caused by tho stuff sold about
tho country ns ardent spirits.
rThe 6'reaf Eentrni, the mounter British
vessel, soon to visit Portland, Maine, has
a capacity of twenty-six thousand tuns.
The tiinniigo of tho largest line-of-buttle-Bhip
of our navy, tlio Ptmwlvauia, lis but
3,241 tun. The united Uitinage of the largest
ton vessels of our navy is but 23,131 tut if;
that tho Ureal A'irVr lacks but 2,1 .'11 tu ns
a capacity equal to that of the whole ten tre-mondou8"ilne-ot'-battle-ships
of our navy.
Operating Under Water Without Communication
with the Upper Air.
The Philadelphia Ltdyer of August 26, says:
Yesterday afternoon an interesting experiment
took place at Now Castle, Delaware, with a sub
marine salvage boat, invented by Mr. Tilleroi,
who descends to tho bottom of toe river with
out any arrangement for receiving a supply of
fresh air from above, the boat being intended
to supply itselt with the quantity of air needed
while under water, enabling It to remain sub
merged any length of time required. As sin
gular as this may seem, the experiment yes
terday showed that it was perfectly practicable,
for eight men went down in the boat, and re
mained there an hour and three quarters with
out any communication from above. The mode
of generating air to supply the boat is yet a
secret, but it is belived to bo by some chemical
arrangement. The boat is made of boiler iron,
and is perfootly round, and shaped somewhat
like a fish. It is thirty-fivo feet long, forty
four inches in diameter, and propelled by a
screw three feot in diameter. It has two rows
of bull's eyes on the top for the purpose of
givini; light to the interior. On each side, near
the bow or head, are placed pieces of iron
about eighteen inohes square, which are moved
like the fins of a Csh, and are intended to di
rect tbo boat up or down when under the wa
ter. The only place of ingress or egress in
this singular boat, is through a trap-door on
the tup, and when ber crew of twelve men en
ter, it is covered with a heavy iron cap and
fastened on the inside, thus shutting out all
communication from the outside, preventing the
admission of air. To sink tho vessel, after
everything has been prepared for a submarine
voyage, water is pumped by a machine into
largo gutta-percha bags, within the boat, until
a sufficient quantity has been obtained to sink
her, ond as soon as this takes placo, the screw
is sot in motion, by means of straps worked by
six mon, and at the same time the inventor Bits
near the head, to give it direction by the fins
beforo mentioned. Aftor the boat reaches the
spot where it is intended to operate upon tho
bottom of the river, a trap door is openod in
tho bottom of the boat, and the workmen get
out, taking with them the means of obtaining
a full supply of fresh air from the boat, which
is kept stationary by means of a piece of iron
in the shnpo of a cone, which is let down from
the bottom.
The Cholera in Europe.
The cholera is said to bo making destruc
tive progress in Hamburg. 1'heLondon ifa'
icul Timet stntoa Hint, from tho 20th to the
Illst of July, there wero four hundred and
twenty-four cases in that city, of which three
hundred and thirty-three were fatal. Tho
European Timet, of the 13tTi of August, soys:
Tho cholera hns again appeared in this
country, and it comes to us, as usual, from
Hamburg. "We pee that during the lastweck
twenty-four deaths ore stated to have occur
red from this cause in London. We seem to
know as littlo as before about this grim and
mysterious stranger, but wc know enough to
avoid his track, and even to defeat him should
he attack us. He fastens for the most part
upon those who onn not or will not protect
themselves. Great and beneficial sanitary
changes havo taken place in England sinco
the cholera first invaded this country, nearly
thirty years ago: but weare not yet in rtstate
of complete defense; yet if half ns much
money wore expended in protecting ns from
the cholera ns wo now see lavished in pro
tecting us irom ino I'rencn, uio cnoieruio
visit of 3859 would bo the last.
3P"Major John Diddle, a brother of the
lateNicholas Biddlo, died suddenly of apoplexy,
at the White Sulphur Springs, Va., on Thurs
day, the 25th inst. Ho was advanced in years,
and had been for some time in delicate health.
Ho was born and eduoated in Philadelphia,
and in the year 1812 entered the U. S. Army,
in which he established a high reputation as
an officer during the war with Great Britain.
At its close he was retained on the peaoe es
tablishment. After many years service npon
our Western frontier, he retired from the army
and fixed his residence at Detroit, Michigan.
There he held several positions, among others,
those of Delegate to Congress, Indian Agent,
and Register of the Land Office, and in the
discharge of his various functions, strict in
tegrity und superior intelligence were uniformly
shown. In his character, courage and capacity
united with most amiable social qualities, and
he was as much beloved in private as he was
respected in publio life.
Schiller Festival in Boston. The one
hundredth anniversary of the great German
poet's birth falls on the 11th of Novembor,
ond the Germans, in New York especially,
and other citios of tho United States, are
making enthusiastic preparations to celebrate
tho day. They will, of course, have the
sympathy of thousands of students and ad
mirers of German literatnre, and especially
of Schiller, among our own countrymen.
The Germans here in Boston are determined
not to rcmnin passive while their brethren in
other cities are engaged in this inspiring
patriotic net; and a movement has com
menced already in the Orpheus Gloe Club,
.'.hat genial circle of the sons of harmony, to
Traveller.
Ck'PELtton the Plains. It is reported to
us, on what we deem reliable authority, that
wagon -masters on the Plains are apt to indulge
in the severest cruelty towardsj those in
their embloy ns subordinates. C. Finer, from
Newport, Kentucky, and D. Ritchie, from
Ohio, we are told, died recently from the
savnge treatment they received at the bands of
a man known as Buck Bowman, who is
wagan-maste. employed by Majors it Russell.
The facts connected with these revolting truge
dies have boon given to ns in detail, and we
only rofrain from publishing them in the hope
that Majors A Russell will probe the mattor
to the bottom, as it is something in whioh they
have a vital interest.
Unprkcedkntkd Drocoht is Mainr. Our
Machias correspondent wri tcs that the drought
in Maine is very severe. In many towns the
wells are died up, brooks that never were
known to be dry are now entirely dry, and
people find it difficult to get water for family
purposes. Fires are raging In the woods, and
the atmosphere is thick with smoke in many
of the towns in Washington County. Vessels
that arrive in port report very thick amok
along the coast; at two miles distance from
land the smoke is thick as sea fog. The rivers
are low, and nn lumber can be sawed
Boston Advertiser, Aug. 26.
so
of
jtfr Tradition insists that oorsets were first
invented by a brutal butcher of the thirteenth
oentury, as a punishment for his wife. She
was very loquacious, and, finding nothing
would cure her, ho put a pair of stays on her
in order to take away her breath, and so pre
vent her, as he thought, from talking. ThiB
cruel punishment was inflicted by other heart
less husbands, till at last there was scarcely
wife in all London wbo was not oondomned to
the like affliction. The punishment became so
universal at last that the ladies, in their de
fense, made a fashion of it, and so it has eon
tinned to the present day.
NXORO ExniTRHKNT IN HOPKINS CODNTT,
Kentucky. Thore is a good deal of excite
niont at Madisonvllle, Ket .tucky, in conse
quence of the alleged discovery of a concerted
plan of the slaves of that neighborhood to
escape to Canada. : . . ,
History of Mrs. De Marbais.
The last Lowislown (Tenn.) Gazette con
tains a history of this unfortunate woman,
which is as follows:
Several years ago there resided in Lewis
town a woman, noted for her beauty, grace
ful form, end neatness and taste in dress,
together with acuomplishmonts that would
have rendered her an ornament to society;
but, unfortunately, in other respects, sho
answered too well to tho description of tho
"Fallen Angol" in Lewis' Monk. Sho was
tho daughter of a rcspcctablo citizen of one
of the Susquehanna Bivcr counties in this
State, named Chambers, and in early life was
married to Mr. Zorbe, a blacksmith of this
place, who died a number of years since.
From that time her career seems to have
been downward, whether from natural de
basement or the acts of designing men, we
have no means of knowing. About the time
the Pennsylvania Railroad was located and
constructed, sho occasionally resided at Hunt
ington and Lewistown, and subsequently at
Philadelphia, under the name of Annie Dun
bar, as the mistress of one or more, who, un
der an infatuation as strange as that of Do
Marbais, spent thousands in contributine- to
her fondness for dross and showy life. Money
she seemed to regard lightly, excopt for such
purposes, having frequently given away $10
and $20 at a time.
While on a visit to Lewistown. a fewvears
ago, she was indicted for disorderly conduot,
and was released on bail, and forfeited it;
though like most other cases of this kind, we
presume the recognizance was never sued out.
Since then her visits here have been few and
far between, and her name seldom heard. The
tragedy which occurred in Cincinnati lost week.
and created so much sympathy for the "bean-
titui anu romantic Ulan die," has revealed the
fact that the heroine who was willing to be led
out to die was the Anns Dunbar, of Philadel
phia, (titan Mrs. .erbo, formorly of Lewis
town. She has no relatives in this part of the coun
try that we are aware of, as it is stated in the
Philadelphia papers; a younger sister named
Clara residos in that city, with a character sim
ilar to that of Mrs. De Marbais, before her
last marriage.
This unfortunato woman is still at St. Johns
Hospital for Invalids. Shewas yesterday quite
easy, and able to converse freely. De Marbais
remains at the Lunatio Asylum, at times a
raving maniac.
A Speck of Difficulty.
The last advices from California brought in
telligence of the seizure, by the United States
Government, of the Island of San Juan, off
the entrance of Frazer River, on the Pacific
Tho following is the nature of the controversy
which has occasioned the seizure, and which
calls for settlement between the British Gov
ernment and our own :
The treaty of 1S10 provided that the line
separating the British and American Terri
tories should commence at the summit of tbe
Rocky Mountains, ia latitude 49 degrees, to
which point it had previously been brought
from the East, thence run westward with the
49th parallel to the middle of tho Gulf of
Georgia, thence southward with the main chan
nel to the Straits of Fuca, and through the
middle of those straits to the ocean. Now
it so happens that between the point
where the line leaves the 411th parallel
and the point whore it enters tbe Straits
of Euca, there is the Archipelago do Haro,
tnrouga wnicn several large channels run;
the two main ones being the Rosario Strait
and the Canal de Haro. Tbe former is
the one most used by vessels going from tho
ocean to the mouth of Frazer Rivor, but the
latter is the wider, though obstructed by some
small islots. Both are wide channels, deep
enough for the largest ships. Between them
lie a dozen islands, the chief of which are San
Juan, Lopez and Orcas Islands, and altogether
they may include about two hundred square
miles of land, or one hundred and twenty-eight
thousand aores. San J uan Island is the most
valuable, and has about seventy thousand
acres, much of it is good soil, covered with
fine grass. The British assert that tbe Rosario
Strait is the "main channel" meant by the
treaty; ana the Americans say tbe Uanal de
Haro is meant; and the settlement of that dis
pute will determine who is to be the owner of
the islands. Soma British subjects already
occupy San Juan Island as a sheep pasture.
A Pooa Wat to Build up a Nw Countbt.
At the time of the Frazer River excitement,
thousands of American citizens rushed into the
British territory to get a share of the filthy
lucre. Tho British Government, beginning to
fear for the loyalty of the Inhabitants, or, for
some other reason, manifested much jealousy
of the "foreigners," and placed them under
many needless restrictions. In consequence,
large numbers were driven away, so that out of
the sixty thousand emigrants said to have been
in Vancouver's Island and British Columbia last
year, about five thousand only remained in
cluding three thousand now at Victoria.
a
The Whaling Interest or New England.
New England possesses five hundred sail of
whaling vessels, employing sixteen thousand
seamen; one hundred and twenty-three vessels
were recently in port, and three hunlred and
forty-six at sea. The Old World and her col
onies have only two hundred sail of whaling
vessels. England once had one hundred
sperm whalers, but has now abandoned the
trade. The sperm whale is nearly extermin
ated. The right whale will be exterminated
in another century.
Ciiinksr Christians. The North China Her
ald notices the marriage of a couple of Chi
nese Christians, by the Rev. K. C. Wong, a
Chinese minister, as the first instance in
which all the parties concerned were at once
Chinese, Christian and Protestant. The bride
wan entirely hidden under the red robes,
crown-shaped hond-drcss, and red crape voil
of the Ming dynasty, a costume which the
Tartar conquerors have never succeeded in
changing. There was music, and a profusion
of garlands and flowers.
Elofrmsnt or a Circus Actrirs. Miss
Carroll, connected with Davis k Croibie's Cir
cus, eloped from Bloomington, a few days
ago, with one of the "showmen." W. B.
Carroll, (her father, we presume,) offers a re
ward of fifty dollars for tbe delivery of Maria
Carroll at tho Pike House, and fifty more for
the incarceration of John J. Brand and one
Mahoney in any jail, wherever taken;
Miss Carroll is about fifteen years of age,
and said to be very beautiful and attrootivo as
Chicago Herald.
m
Ak American it Trouble. A letter from
Central America states that E. J. F. Conway,
an American who killed a German in an affray
at a supper party at a hotel in Punta Arenas,
has been sentenced to six years hard labor on
the publio works. He has appealed from the
sentence of the Lower Court to the Supreme
Court of the Republic In tbe mean time he
Las been taken to San Jose and kept in prison.
' Nauvoo. The Ioarian community at Nau
voo sold all their property a few days ago, it
having been previously assigned for a debt of
eighteen thousand dollars. They realiie
about ten thousand dollars mere than is neces
sary to meet the debt. Tbe old Mormon
temple lot, and what remains of the temple,
sold for one thousand three hundred and fifty
dollars.
Peculiar Customs of the Japanese.
A letter from Japan gives some particulars
of the manners and customs of that peculiar
people. In some respects they appear to be
more virtuous than people boasting of a higher
civilization. Malversation by a functionary,
embezzlement of public funds, extortion,
bribery of officials, coining of false money,
murder and robbery, are punished with death,
aud not only of the guilty person, but of his
father, children, and even all bis male rela
tives, who are executed at tbe same moment,
however distant they may be onefrom another.
This system, which is repugnant to European
notions, and to sound prinoiples of justice, ap
pears to be adopted by tho Japanese from the
belief that crime is owing to bad education.
The modes of punishmont adopted in Japan
are of different sorts, but all are horrible. The
principal is orucifixion, and is reserved for
traitors, murderers, and incendiaries. The
culprit is fastened on tbe cross head down
ward, and is left to die, unless he obtains the
favor of being dispatched by stabs from a
poignard. For panicade and adultery, cul
prits are plunged into boiling oil. Petty rob
beries, insults, calumny, fraud, even at play,
and false testimony before magistrates are pun
ished by hanging or beheading. If the of
fenders be gentlemen or soldiers, their bowels
are opened they have even the privilege of
performing tho operation themselves. Pecu
niary fines are almost unknown. The corporal
punishment of tbo whip and bastinado are re-
servea lor slaves and servants, and are in
flicted by thoir masters, not by public execu
tioners. The Japanese consider corporal pun
ishment so degrading that mothers never strike
their offspring.
Although the olimateis enervating, vet chil
dren are brought up hardily. They are made
to bear hunger, thirst, cold, uain. excessive
labor, and the rigor of tbe seasons. Horror of
falsehood ond fraud, and lore of modesty, jus
tice, and virtue, aro diligently inculcated. One
of the results of this system of education is to
inspire tbe Japanese with a passion for books,
which causes surprise in European visitors.
The bookselling trade in Japan is BubjeotedJ
to no restriotion, and there are everywhereI
even in towns ot small population, numerous
book shops, Great part of the literature of the
Japanese is Chinese; and their knowledge of
arts ana agriculture is derived Irom the same
people. The language oommonly employed is
every year becoming more Chinese in charac
ter. And yet the Japanese despise tbo Chi
nese; they do so because from their early age
they have been taught that the Chinese are not
soldiers; that in ancient times a Japanese army
defeated an immense Chinese army in the Co
res; and that Coxinga himself, who was the
scourge of the soa, and the terror of the Chi
nese Empire, was a Japanese us were also the
greater part ot his companions.
Treatment of the Piano.
A sensible article on the piano in the 7om c
Journal has suggested to me that further in
struction from a practical tuser and repairer
would be of service to the large class who
havo these instruments.
Tbe piano is now very common, but its in
ternal economy is little understood, and, of
consequence, it is abused from ignorance of the
natural laws which govern it.
Tbe piano should be placed against inner
rather than outer walls, in a room of even
temperature. Extreme artificial heat is very
injurious, and alternate beat and dampness
are nearly ruinous to the piano. Dampness is
the greatest enemy; in fact so Injurious is it
that in those tropica where winter is tha "rainy
season," the piano is so swollen and racked
that it can never be brought into general use.
To keep out damp and dust, oloee and cover
the piano when not in use. If the treat
ment is not in frequent use, occasionally open
it, in dry weather, to air. Avoid laying pins,
soissors and other hard substances on or in
tho piano, as they are apt to fall upon the
sound-board and jar shockingly, and to jar
even upon the outside; also, to scratch the
varnish.
It is generally thought that the "drum
ming" of children untunes the piano more
than the playing of adults. This is simply
absurd. The playing of Thalberg untunes the
strings in proportion as his playing is louder
and more brilliant than that of the child.
Many people think that an untuned piano
is good enough for children to praotice upon;
but this is vitiating, nay, ruinous to the musi
cal senso, to be constantly playing a tuneless
instrument, and such praotice is worse than
lost; skill thus acquired is simply mechanical.
Another common error is to suppose that dis
use of the piano puts it out of tune. The re
verse is the faot. Use tends to "limber" the
action, but untunes the strings. Tuning
should be done as often as necessary say,
from once a month to once a year. A piano
much used should never go untuned more than
three months. If never played, once a year
will preserve it from injury, but if played, it is
an abuse to let it get so shockingly out of tune
as it must in a year. If people eannot afford
to tune their pianos, they had better dispose
of them.
Fatal Accident on the Cleveland and
Pittsburg Railroad. As the train on tbe
Cleveland and Pittsburg Railroad was passing
the village of Sewickleyviile, on the Ohio
River, about three o'clock on Monday after
noon, running at tbe usual rate of speed, Mr.
William A. Ellis, tbe Postmaster at that place,
attempted to cross the track in advance of the
tram, when nis loot slipped and he lell on the
traok. In an instant the train was upon and
passing over him: his body was literally mashed
Cleveland Democrat, 31st ult.
J0T Mr. Joseph Harrison, jr., of Philadel
phia, has now in operation a newly invented
steam-boiler, which, it is said, cannot explode,
or, at least, to such an extent as to be feared.
This boiler, though shaped like most others, is
entirely different in its construction, being com
posed altogether of cost iron globes, to the
number of about three hundred. These globes
are about six inches in diameter, and have at
each end tubes about two or three inches long,
which oonneot one globe with the other.
p?r Blondin is not yet satisfied with his
tight rope performances at Niagara. Having
walked and tan, danced, stood on his head,
turned summersaults, hung by one band, and
by one leg, carried a man on his back, aad
cooked an omelet on the rope, by daylight, he
now proposes to give a pyrotechnic exhibition,
at night, on the center of the rope, in which he
will appear performing over the black abyss,
surrounded by a blaxe of fire-works.
A Plan job. the Redemption oftbe World.
The Examiner, a Baptist paper, suggests a
method by whioh the whole world might be
converted in nine years. The plan is simple,
and, if all men eould be induoed to submit to
Christ, practicable. It is this: "Let eaoh
member of the Christian Church bring oneioul
to Christ eaoh year. This would double the
number of Christians every year, and in nine
years tho whole world would be Christian."
The Webster Statue. Tho foundation for
tho Webster statue, at Boston, has been com
pleted, and the workmen are now proceeding
to erect seats capable of accommodating
2,500 spectators of the inauguration cere
monies oh the 27th of September. The seats
will be erected near the portico, on both
sides of the steps. It is proposed to make
tae Btand for the orator flush with the portico
floor, and midway between the seats.
BATES OF ADVERTISING. -
Terms Caiti.
Advertisements not exceeding flve lines (Agate.)'
One ln.rtton...J.....,,..,... to 2f
Oni VM(,,.uw...,..,,.,,,Mm. 1 ou
One mniJZ2ilZl!Z.!!Zl.......n I to
Larger advertisement! inserted at the followla
rate, for square often line or 1ms:
One Insertion...- -......,...SJ0 Ml
Each additional Insertion.......................,., is
On week. .................. 1 IS
TWO 1 1 ia s e m w we e eesiwe s hms w s miM S (41
Three " , ..., 4 (si
One month.
t 0
BUSINESS CARDS.
Book Binding
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES! . ,
NO. 8 EAST FOURTH STREET,
Between Alain and Sycamore,
CINCINNATI.
torite-blndlng in every style. Music Hooks neat
ly and durably bound. 0. CBOPPEJl.
jy29-6 ' .
ANDERSON & HANNAFORD.Archltect,
Manchester Bnlldlng,
B. W. corner Third and Sycamore it., ,
Jyl CINCINNATI, OHIO.
Madison House,
MAIN STREET,
BETWEEN FRONT AND SECOND, CINCINNATI.
F.P. CAUILL, Proprietor.
jyllcm
WILLIAM GUILFORD,
WOULD RESPECTFULLY INFORM
the citizens of Cincinnati that he has opened
anoffloe at No, 131 West Hlxth street, Tor the treat
nioutof CONSUMPTION and CUUON1C D16KASK3
generally. Consultation free.
BHrotfiee hours, 10 to 12 and 2 to 4.
SuTIloiiiileiice, 233 West Fourth street. JolO-em
PULLAN A WILMAMSON,
(At the old stand of Pullan, Hatfield ft Brown,)
WHOLESALE GROCERS'
Ho. S3 WEST SECOND ST.,
CINCINNATI.
josEra pullan, formerly of Fallen, Hatfield ft Brown
wh, a. WILLIAMSON. Nir22-AUW
E. . PULLAN. 010. BiTPIBU. T.S.1B0WN. a.SXINNUT
PULLAN, HATFIELD & BROWN,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND AGENTS FOB
CINCINNATI STEAM SUGAR REFINERY
Kg. 55 Columbia (or Second) atreet
W Refined Sugars and SIrnps always on hand.
mr2S-AO
THOS. H. WEASNER,
d eai.es in all vindb or
BUILDING LUMBER, IATH,
SHINOLKS, ETO ETC.,
371 Plnm Street, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Jy28.cm
F. M. MOORE,
AHOHITEOT,
N. E. CORNER THIRD oV RACE 8T8., '
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
Orders promptly attended to.
ml7.
B. KITTREDGE & CO.
134 MAIN STREET, CINCINNATI, 0.
KITREDGE & FOLSOM,
59 St. Charles street. New Orleans, La.,
Importers of Gnnsxt Sporting Apparatun,
AND DEALERS IN OVN POWDER.
JOHN P. HARRISON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, and Commissioner
for Ohio and other States. Office, Honth-eaat
comer Tilth aud Madison-streets, CovingtoD, Ken
tucky, eulfi-am -
FOB STENCIL MAEKIN Q PLATES
GO TO
JH.UL. laPCyWEH-S,
l'J6 Walnut at , bet. Third and Fourth sits.,
(Next door to the Masonic Temple.)
ana-amt
JEWELRY.
IB. P. EL IAS'
New Wholesale
WATCH & JEWELRY HOLSE
16 West Fourth Street,
Where can tie hid every article appertaining to the
Business at a much less price, for GASH, than
has ever before been offered In this market.
GIVE USA CALL
And see for yonraelvee. - apl4
WM. WHITAKER
JEWELER,
No. 64X N. E. Cor. Fifth and Lodge streets, betwe
Walnut and Vine, Cincinnati.
A good assortment of SI LViiB and PLATED WABI,
tiPKCTACLS, etc., kept constantly on hand.
Special attention siven to Cleaning and Repairing
Wstchna and Jewelry. ; my 10
BEGGS fc SMITH, No. 6 West 4th St.
ARE NOW RECEIVING ADDITIONS TO
their lane assortment of Watches, Jewelry,
Silverware and Diamonds.
ALSO !
A fine assortment of Plated Tea Sets and Cntlory'
and Opera Glasses. 224
D. DE FOREST,
Book Hinder aud Paper Ruler.
Third story Times Building, will do all work in hi
line with neatness and dispatch. jy24-ly
DENTAL CARDS.
DR. M. ROGERS.
DENTIST,
OF LONG EXTEKIENCE IN THIS CITY, .
Office, No. 84, Seventh-street,
THIRD DOOB WEST OF VINE,
anis-amt CIN OIN NATJ.
J. TAFT, 7
(Successor to Knowlton A Taft.j
DENTIST,
No. 58 West Fourth St., bet. Walnut fe Vine
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
je24-cm
S. k HAMLIN,
H. a. SUITE.
Drs. HAMLEN 4 SMITH,
DENTISTS,
Wo. 3 Weat SV'it St.
SB. S. WARDLE,
D 23 N T I S T
Office No. 138 West Fourth street,
CINCINNATI, OHIO
H. S. WINSLOW,
DENTIST.
KO. 151 SYCABOBE STREET, BElOW FIFTH,
jy29-cm " Cincinnati.
MEDICAL CARDS.
MEDICAL. ;
DR. J. WILSON'S Office, 58 West Fourth
itreot, where ho may be consulted dally for all
Female Complaints, Inflammation of tho Cervix,
Prolaiiana Utereii, all displacements of the Womb,
Spinal and Central affections, and other organic ills
eases common to females. Tbe Iloctor'e long expe
rience and rucont discovery in the treatment if th
above diseases, can not fail to give entire satisfaction.
The Doctor is aaent foraEuropcau Kenmln monthly
Pill; price 1 aud two stamps. anlfi-jm
K, S. NEWTON, ifl. D.
i .!.- i. -i
Office, 90 West Seventh Street,,;
I IT Will Till AID 1ACE,
SOS
O. E. NEWTON, M. D.
Omca-Ne. DO West Seventh street, between ?ln
and Baoe. BuisinobNo. M Seventh, street)
ween Walnut ana Vine, Orrici HoDHt-7t'.Uo a

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