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The penny press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1859-1860, September 24, 1859, Image 1

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THE PENNY PRESS,
In printed and published dallr,(Bundaysexoepte.l,)br
FRANCISCO & CALDWEIX,
At No. 14 Weit Fourth Street,
Mid delivered to snbsoribera In CINCINNATI, COT.
1NOTOM rail NBWPOBT.aad hi erirroundlng cities.
Vlllac and towns, at
SIX CENTS A. WEEK,
payable to the carrier.
PRICE OF MAILING,
mail Cosies, t ctf.j On Month, o ots.; Tuns
Months, l oo; on Yar, U 00.
AMUSEMENTS.
"Wood's Theater
OOENIB SIXTH TUB B CINCINNATI.
Jbn A. Eluleb, Ja..rJls Lease and Msnegor,
A GREAT BILL FOB TO-NIGHT.
, THIS (Saturday) EVENING, Saptambar 21, will
Mpraanud,for the first time in several years, the
interesting pW entitled
THE CARPEHTEK OF BOTJKN.
DeSaubigne .. Mr. Haim.
A"?"'1'8 - Mr. Head.
Sj.k'n: - - Mr.Adama.
,,r,J11tar Mr. Fisher.
je'"-ij - Mr. Ellsler.
Madame Trander Mrs. Gilbert.
Dances and Bong Marshall Children.
To conclude with the amustn farce or
t J.,IK,AND 0DT PLACE.
Letty, Paddv O'Rourke, M'lle Adelaide, M'lle Fran
n.u li-n,,5, frai ,JBU Jaonr Denhani.
Piinctilioue Etiquette .....Mr. Fisher.
On Moiidaiy evening, Mr. JAMES ANDEKSON, the
celebrated Tragedian, will mako his Brat appearance,
m some years, in Sliaksrieare's auhllme tragedy of
"Hamlet," in which character he in without a su
perior. "Doors open at 7; Curtain rises at 7M o'clock.
Pick or ADMimoK--Drea Circle and Parquette,
Wcenta; Uallery, 2jceu(n.
Mo free Hat.
PIKE'S OPERA -HOUSE.
Hbas. M. BiaaAS... ;, Managor.
BENEFIT .
And Positively the last NIglit of
THE GREAT BI02TDIN!
The manaseiuent lulte great plonsiire in nmiounc
lag that the famous Horn. BLUMDIN, whou recant
wonderful explo ta bnve engaged a much r thepub
lic attention, will nppoar for the last time, this
SATURDAY EVENING, SEPT. 34,
In. a, series of h',j unparalleled feats, anioni; which ha
will eaecii e niwn a tight-ropo bia celiihratod Basket
Dance, Milt Feat, (nerer before Mtnmpttd Ly any
other peraon.1 Grand Evolutions, Sonimersnultint!
backward ajS forward evur burning candles; tlm
womlBrltil C flulr Feat, and ovolntlons without the aid
or the po o during which he will porform the world
reuowri.d VIo in Foat, Flag Feat, Tour tie Ohapean,
.ii wnlcl' " graceful MADAME' BLONDIN
will appear upon the rope, and execute a number or
beautiful evolutions. To conclude with
TWO GRAND ASCENSIONS,
iir,i?thS.MrTme'j!!tofth,8,llKto ,he furthest
Iia.lt of the Oppor Gallerrof the Auditoi :iuni. Bur
tng the Ascension Moni. BtON DIN wllli poat many
of the w.Hiderlul feats receutly performed over the
boiling ermsm of Niagara, among which will be that
n(ll'ng a wheelbarrow UD lle cord, and
afterward actually carry a gentleman upon his
treme liirrht oftho grand Auditorium ol r.ha Thea
ter, precisely after tlm msnn.r in which 1 he fame
thrilling feat was performed by him over the boiling
H.tnJfl..!!' d'""untingnd romom itingliia
living bureau when in irtway up.
,hh"p?for,-nmnce,.or ""veaing I commai ice with
the popular furceof
MISCHIEF MAKING,
hi which
Mr. and Mrs. Darrj Chapman,
Will sustain the prinolpal characters.
..PjIics r A,M!n--?nrnrt Cirole, Pi ranell
and Balcony, AO i cents; Children, under 10 yea ts, half
price; Gallery, 36 cants.
it J-P. HE'ftllEKT, Treasurer.
0. JJ. INSTITUTE.
Seventeenth Exhibition.
The largest display of the
INDUSTRIAL AND FINE ARTS
Ererbiklla tlieU'ost,
Will Remain Open a few Days Longer.
Come and see the wondoj.fiil
Steam Organ, or Calliope,
In operation afternno'A and evening.
DANCING ACADEMV.
MTIOHL IIALL. m
MR. AND MRS. SHANK PRESEI IT
their compliments to the Indies nnd gentlem en
of Oincinuati, and rospec. fully announce to tin m
ib"utj!r7DS;1Jlruf.'u??theiuti''f their professl on
n HATCKDAY, October I.
LESSONS FOR GENTLEMEN.
It waa formerly the ctMtom to join a class; at tn.1
expiration of twelve weeks the. quarter ternilna ted ;
all leseons missed by the pupi I were lost to h Im. Iu
order to meet tho convenience of gentlemen w hoi
btisiness or social ewingeineiits often intorfore ivith
thelrpunctual attondance, onr arrnngement is, that
tickets are pnrphaaed, ono or which, is dolivore d at
each lesson, and can be used during the whole ae. isou
of seven month.,
ar Cliculara may lie h ad at their Academy.
IseplildtWeJSatl
SMITH & NIXON'S HALL:
Grand Vocal and Instrumental
C O NaEET.
MISS GEOKG1N A PAltJE
Announeea to her frior-de an.d the. -pnbllo generally,
hat Her flrst Concert, incc her it turn from Gh
South, will take place aa above, on
Thursday Evening,
29111.
PALACE GARDEN & VARIETIES.
MONDAY, SEPTF JMBEK 19.
EXTRA ATTRACTTftN f '
Dti 9RR NOVELTIES t
NEW FEATC7iEj,.
30 T AI.EKTED JPERFORMERH.
Captairt Mentar'i Cornet Band, i
M CISICAL TABLEAUX.
0PEBATIO HUBLKSQUES.
TIME CHANGED.
Vr.eBBdo Concerts, from, 7 aatll o'vlock, in tlta
arden.
'v.lety entertainment, from 8 nntil 11 e'aloc, in
tke. oaert galoon.
Admlaalon Ten CeutB.
,- ; leeDMl
UTTS'S PANORAMA
the
Nw, TeaUtment nnd the Land of Faleatino
Will DoexuiottiMievery evening lor ( -a weens ai
TBTj MK1.ODK0N UAL t,
ommnncing THIS EVENING, tfep'u-mber 23, and
n 'Wednesday and cUtnrdny stterlicx tis.
Tickets 2i ennts; Olilldien under twelve years Un.
Elberal arrangements made wi th m it .oola. eeuiw t
LARGEST MULFJ 1AYUIG
THE UNDERSIGNED ""(VILI. EXHIBIT
at all the Copntt Fairs 'n Omo and Indiana,
the largest Mule known In the worW,
lO llunrla ITlah-Weic 1,8115 Vounds,
. Five Yearn old. . ,
Was raised by Dr. M'Caan, of Fayette County. Ky.
Will be exhibited by OJCO. W. WHIST.
. . fanJO-itml
J. T. DROVO E 6c CO..
MANUFACTURERS OF JEnVELRY,
new wholesale estahlisdiment, (.7 West Third
street, between Walnut and Vine, ( rm Ho. 4, up
stair.,) Uineinuatl. Factory at Providence, Blioile
Islaad, New aryus reoeiraa weekly. . sepiwnn-
DRSJ. EHRMAN & W. C, LEECH.
nOMCEOPAT HI LSTS.
firilOl NO, 4(1 SIC VK NTH". 8TESKT
tlfflce houri Irem A.il., 1 to 3,8 u47le,f. M
)jm - 'i- - -
VOL. 2. NO. 30.
CINCINNATI, SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1859.
1 J c
PRICE ONE CENT.
Arrivals of Trains.
Ii"AKLm 1 3iNcitNiTi-9:40 a. it ; S.SJ r. u.;
Cincinnati, Hamiltow ibd Dation-T:IJ i. .:10:4T
a. H.j 6:40 p.m.; 10:10 ?. m.
Littli MiAm-7;30 A. M.I 1:30 P.M.; 7:18 P.M.; 10:40
Habiitta AsmOraotiiHATi 10: a. m.j 9:1S p, m.
Ohio and llississirpi-7:lo A. .; 2:00 r. .; lfl-l m
OoviMaroa and Lexinoton 10:20 a. m.; 7:0 f. m.
Departures of Trains.
lifbiAHAPOLU Alio Cincinnati-S:J0 a. .; 12:00 M.j
6:00 P. M.
Cincinnati, Hamilton; and Batton Indianapolis
and Cleveland, 6:00 a. m.; Sandusky Mail, 8:00 A. a.;
Sandusky,4:30 p. Accommodation, 6:on p.m.
Littl JttiAMi-Cleveland and Pittsbug, 6:00 A. K.i
Cleveland, Pittsburg and Bellalr,8.aOA.M.:Ccliim'
bin Accommodation, 4M0 p, Cleveland, Pitta,
burg nnd Dell.ir, 1 1;3 p. m.
Ohio anb Mississippi-Kt. louls, 9:00 A. H.i Lonls.
ville,3:00p.M.;St. Louis, s-.m p. m.
PiTTiBuaa, CouuiiBua and Cincinnati (Stenbenville
(Short Lino) East Front-atroet Depot-:00 A. M.s
8:0OA.M.; 1 1:S0 p.m. .-.,
OLiviLANn.CoiDMBm ahd Oincinnati Kast Trout
street-:00 a. m.; 8,M a. m.; 11:30 p. m.
OlUCINNATI AND MARIETTA 6: li A. M.J 3:30 P. M.
Oe.vtbal Ouio-From JEaat Front-street Depct-8-M
a.m.; 11:30 p. m.
OovmoTON amp Lxxinoton 9:2 A. M.; 2:30 p. M,
LAW OF NEWSPAPERS.
FiRST.-Suliscrlberswhodo notsive express notice
to the contrary, are considered ns wUhing to con
tlnue their subscriptions to the paper,
Second. If salscribors order the discontinuance
of their periodicals, iho publisher may continue to
send them uolil airearafii s nro paid,
TuiiiD.-Ifsnl)Sci'iborsneKli!ct.rri-l"iie to twke their
periodicals rromtheotlicc to which they are directed,
thuy are held responsible till they have settled tho
hilland oidorcd them discontinued.
FooBTH.-If subscribers remove to other places
without informing the publishers, and thepaeersara
sent to the former direction, they are held nanon
HlblB. Firiil.-Tlie Courts havo decided that refusing to
take porindlcnls from the offlco, or 'emovliiir sml
leaving them uncnlled for, is i-biua PACiKevitleiu'cof
intentional fraud.
NEWS AND GOSSIP.
jSP-Unolo Sam Howksn, a St. louia pio
neer, nearly forty years ago, anil now a Tike's
Peak pioneer, writes an entertaining letter to
the St. Louis Democrat about hi trip to Den
ver City. OoiDg out he met hundreds of re
turning miners, and be thus picture) the hap
piest man among tho lot:
"Of all those we met, I saw but one really
happy man, and he was the happiest man that
I have seen since I loft St. Louia. Ha was
riding on his horse, laughing and highly
pleased, with his violin in hand, playing the
"Arkansas Traveler," and, on inquiry, he
said he was going home to see Katy and the
baby."
HPS' It is proposed to introduce a reform in
the British navy, making retirement obliga
tory at a oertain age, and thus scoure the ad
vancement of younger men to posts which their
age and physical strength qualify them to Gil.
Of one hundred Admirals at present on the ac
tive list, thirty-nine are between the agea of
seventy and eighty-seven, and only fourteen
are employed. Of three hundred and fifty
eight Captains, thlrty-ono are about the age
of sixty; ninety are employed, and one hundred
and eighty have never served a II oat in their
present rank.
8 An aged lady, seventy-six years of age,
na'med Catharine Henri, who reoeived severe
injuries about the breast in tho late railroad
aooiJent near this oity, is now lying at the
Exchange Hotel, near the depot, in a very
precarious condition, and It is thought he
oan not possibly live but a few days. She
resides with her grand-children, about four
miles east of this oity, and was returning home
when the accident occurred. Her injuries,
added to tba infirmaties of age, will doubtless
hasten the termination of her long life. CWnm
bu Statesman, 2'Ad imt.
23r Mr. Ward, the United States Minister
to China, was presented to the Imperial Cora
Lilssionor on the 2d of June. Ho was attended
by Messrs. W. W. Ward, Seoretary of Lega
tion; S. "Wells Williams, Interpreter of Lega
tion; W. A. P. Martin, and W. Atohiason, In
torp retors, and Oeorge W. Head and James L.
Lurioun attachees. The party went into the
city of Shanghae in sedan chairs, carried by
liveried Celestials, and escorted by the marines
from the 7lii'tann and Mtirisippi, with a very
good band of music.
A man who, in a state of Intoxication,
laid down on the track of the Ohio snd Missis
sippi Railroad, was run over by a train and
killed, on Tuesday evening last, at Dunham's
Station. Hit face was completely out off not
a feature remaining by which to estublieh his
identity. Mr. Oeorge Reynolds, Coroner of
Jackson County, held an inquest upon the
body, rnilianapolit Sentinel of Thurtdai.
Wo learn that experiments eio being
made in the Eastern citios on a new kind of
rail adapted for city passenger railways,
which will lessen the cost of construction one
biilf. The rail is wade out of cast motul, in
stoad of wrought iron, and it is alleged that
the now rail will answer every purpose of tho
former, at half the cost.
ptTk novelty was introduaed at the Hen
drioks County Fair, lost weok, whioh attracted
more attention than anything elc. This was
a bull race. A bull, harnessed to n light
draught vehiole, was driven around the race
traok In a brisk trot, to the great delight of
thousands of spectators. The race was the
cause of much fun.
jjES Tho North Carolina Chrulia it Advocate
states that five missionaries from the South
ern Methodist Church will sail for Japan in
November, including Rev. M, L. Wood, of
the North Carolina Conference; Rev. Mr.
Stewart, of the Tennessee Conference, and two
ministers from the Memphis Conference.
r3The agricultural department of the
Patent-office will have one hundred thousand
of v igoroua tea plants ready for gratuitous dis
tribution, within three or four months. It is
expected that American grown tea will enter
the mart'ot within five years.
gy The French marriage makers (says a
letter from Paris) have found a wife for that
disconsolate young widower, the King of Por
tugal. His Majesty, they assort, has been
counselled to demand the hand of ueen Vic
toria's second daughter.
"Captain Hunnigton, of the schooner
Cwueto, whioh arrived at Cleveland a few
(.'aj since, from Marquette, reports the forma
tion of ioe an inch and a quarter thiokat Onto
nagon, a few days ago. Pretty oarly, that.
J52T The suspension of building in London
for one month will occasion a loss of jt.lSfljOOO
to the public the average earnings by the
men being is. Id. per tley.
3Washington Irving, after a Hfi devoted
unceasingly to literary duties, is now for the
first time resting from his labors, anil will no
more assume the pen of the author.
rjr Commodore Stewart has resumed bis
command at the Philadelphia N.vy-yrd. The
old veteran wss warmly welcomed by all those
connected with the yard.
dST The clergy of Springfiold, Ohio, have
united in publishing a remonBtranoe against the
holdbg of lotteries at church and charitable
fairs.
aS-Mrs. Stowe is in England, preparing her
last work, "The Minister's Wooing," for publi
cation. ffifr" The Cleveland and Buffalo line of
steamers have been taken off the route for
this season. , -.-
United States Grand Lodge of Independent
Order Odd-Fellows.
We give from the Baltimore papers the
further proceedings of this general grand body.
SECOND DAY.
The Lodge atsemllsd again at nine o'clock
A. M., yesterday. After prayer by the Grand
Chaplain, the hearing of soveral reports con
cerning the credentials of members, and the
transaction of other unimportant business,
Representative Veitch, of Missouri, moved the
following resolution :
"Jletolved, That the Committee on the state
of the Order be directed to report upon the ex
pedienoy of employing a Orand Lecturer to
visit all the Grand Lodges and Grand Encamp
ments in the jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge,
and instruct the same in the work of the
Order; the expenses f such Grand Lecturer to
be defrayed by the Grand Bodies visited, res
pectively." ,
Rep. Mason, of Kentucky, moved to lay the
resolution on the table, whioh waB recolved in
the negative.
The question roourring on the adoption of
the resolution, it was resolved in the affirma
tive. Rep. Hunt, of Texas, moved the following
resolutions :
"Revived, That Iheper diem for this session
of the Grand Lodge of the United States be
three dollars.
"Jlnnlvcd, That the mileage for members for
this session be rated at five cents per mile, and
that the siine be calculated from the nearest
mail route, unless it may appear to the com
mittee on mileage, and. per diem, that there is
a nearer traveled route, in whioh case the
traveled route takes precedence.
"Haolved, That the Grand Lodore will ad
journ sine die on Saturday, the 21 th inst., at
nan past tnree o clocc r. M,
Rep. E. C. Robinson, of Virginia, oallod for
a division of the question, and the question
being on the first resolution
Rep. Conley, of Georgia, moved to amend
by striking out "three dollars" and insert
"two and a half dollars;" which was resolved
in the negative.
The question recurring on the first resolu
tion, it was resolved in the affirmative.
The second resolution was then considered.
Rep. Veitoh, of Missouri, moved to strike
out "five cents," and insert "four cents."
Rep. Garwood, of California, moved to
amend further by striking out "five" and in
serting "two eonts."
The question being cn tho motion to strike
out, it was resolved in the negative.
The question marring on the second reso
lution of Rep. Hunt, of Texas, it was resolved
in the affirmative.
The question reoarring on the third resolu
tion of Rep. Hunt, of Texas, it was adopted.
Rep. Marsh, of Illinois, submitted the fol
lowing resolution, which was adopted:
"Heiolved, That the Legislative Committee
he requested to isquiro as to the expediency of
a law prohibiting benefits to members of Sub
ordinate Lodges, after the removal of their
permanent residence for the space of ono year;
or of compelling members of Subordinate
Lodges and Encampments, who permanently
remove from the vicinity of the body to which
tbey belong, to withdraw from said body, and
to report thereon a resolution for the consider
ation of this R. W. Grand Lodge."
The legislative! committee to whom re
ferred the subject relative to declaring vacant
the seat of a Grand Representative, reported
that one principal purpose to be subserved by
the office of Urand Representative is the com
munication of the annual pass-word to the
Executive of his respective jurisdiction, and
that a Grand Representative who should will
fully neglect to return to his jurisdiction before
the commencement of the year, during whioh
tho annual pass-word was to ntn, and thus
leave his Grand Body without tiie means of
receiving it, by a direot channel, would render
himself justly liable to the discipline of the
Grand Body whioh he represented. In order
to sanction this prinoiple to extend its opera
tion to both olsases of Grand Bodies, to pro
vide a specifio penalty for the offense, and at
the same time to proteot the rights of Grand
Representatives whose apparent neglect may
not be willful, we have amended the resolution,
and recommend its adoption in the following
form:
"Raohed, That a State, District, or Terri
torial Grand Lodge or Grand Encampment, has
a right to declare tho seat of a Grand Repre
sentative vacant who does not return to his
jurisdiction on or before the first day of Janu
ary following the annual session of this K. W.
Grand Lodge, at which he shall represent such
State, District, or Territorial Grand Body,
unloss be shall be prevented by sickness or un
avoidable accident, of which the Grand Body
he represents shall bo the judge."
The committee to whom was referred the
following resolution, offered by Rep. Garwood,
of California, pursuant to instructions of the
Grand Lodge of California, namoly:
"JRtsolved, That all laws and resolutions of
this Grand Lodge relating to the payment to
Grand Representatives for the per diom and
mileogo, be, and the same is hereby repealed
and abolished."
Would respectfully report, that although the
proposition, coming from a jurisdiction whioh
derives so large a benefit from the existing
system of per diem and mileage, is highly
honorable to the jurisdiction, and notwith
standing that a difference ef opinion en the
subject matter of the resolution exists among
the members of your committee, still, in view
of the decisive vote on the subject which has
this day been taken in this R. W. Grand Body,
we are of opinion that it is inexpedient to at
tempt to legislate further in that regard at the
present session.
Beautiful Allegory.
Mr. Crittenden, of Kentucky, was at one
time engaged in defending a man who had
been indicted for a capital offenBe. Aftoran
eleborate and powerful defense he closed his
effort by the following striking and beautiful
allegory:
When God in his oternal eounsel conneived
the thought of man's creation, he called to
him the three ministers who wait constantly
upon the throne Justice, Truth and Mercy
aud thus addressed them: "Shall we make
man?" Then snid Justice, "O, God, make
him not, for ho will trample upon-lhy laws."
Truth made an answer also, "O, God, make
him not, for he will pollute the sanctuaries."
But Mercy, dropping down upon her knees,
and looking up through her tours, exclaimed,
"O, God, make him I will watch over him
with my caro through all the dark paths
which he may have to tread." Then God
made man, and said to him, "O, man, thnu
art the child of Mercy, go and deal with thy
brother."
The jury, when he had finished, were
drowned in tears, nnd ngninnt evidence, and
what munt have been their own conviction,
brought in a verdict of not guilty.
Iii.lt gfls op Rsv. Joskhh Carprr. We un
derstand that on Sunday evening the Rev.
Joseph Carper, at present one of the oldest
ministers in the country connected with the
M. E. Church, who a few hours previous had
officiated at the burial service of the late Rev.
Jacob Young, another old pioneer in the eause
ef Methodism, was taken extremely ill and
continues in that condition, his life almost de
spaired of, at the parsonage on Town-street,
Cap. City
Fact.
[Special Correspondence of the Penny Press.]
Letter from Boston.
BOSTON, September 20, 1859.
Editors Pbmnv Vryss: Everything in
Boston of a publio nature, that can be, is done
on the anniversary of the settlement ol the
city, so of course the inauguration of Web
ster's statue was appointed for that day, the
17th of September, and all Yunkee land was
on tho alert to hear Mr. Everett's oration.
Seats were erected in the State-house yard
for tho accommodation of the ladies, (tho
gentlemen on this occasion, we are happy to
say, giving place to them) and tickets of ad
mission, to the amount of five thousand, is
sued. The morning dawned, but alas I the sun re
fused to shine, and a pelting and pitiless
storm ushered in the day, which only in
creased as the hours passed, and that fixed
for the commencement of the ceremonies
drew near. But nothing can damp the ardor
of the Bostonians when anything which is to
honor Boston, or renoct credit upon them
selves, is to take place, so the music hall to
which they were obliged to adjourn, in con
sequence of the weather, was crowded.
The usual amount of drab cloaks and red
scarfs, the Boston feminine uniform, were
present ; in the galleries tho removal of the
picturesque hoods, which protected many of
the bonnets, displayed tho gay fall ribbons,
in striking contrast to the dark mass below;
the red costs of the Governor's guard, with
the blue scarfs, and white kid gloves of the
Marshal's adding to the scene.
Tho statue, about which there has been
such a diversity of opinion, that one party
proposed to melt it down, is, as I supposeyou
know, by Powers, and of bronze, represent
ing Webster in citizen's dress, and is the gift
of a number of gentlemen to the city.
Mr. lelton, the Greek profeaBor at Harvard,
as the organ of these gentlemen presented it
to the city, as represented by the Mayor, who,
in turn, transferred it to the Commonwealth,
that in the person of Governor Banks received
it. The addresses of these gentlemen were fol
lowed by the delivery of Mr. Everett's oration,
the crowning honor of the wholo whioh fully
sustained his reputation, and is thought by
many to have excelled all former efforts.
Doubtless ere this you have read it in the publio
journals, but, nevertheless, I will give you the
opinion of a lady who was present. Professor
Felton's address she pronounced olassie; Mr.
Lincoln's civil; Governor Banks' a mixture,
while Mr. Everett's was grand.
He has been requested to repeat it on Wednes
day at the State-bouse, the seats and deco
rations still remaining there, which were put
up for the occasien of Saturday.
I suppose many Cinoinnatians will be on to
see the (ireai Eastern, whose day of sailing is
again put off, to the disappointment of many,
who left yesterday for Portland, to be In time
for her arrival.
Tba news of the Perria'i safety gladdened
many hearts which had been anxious and
troubled before hor arrival was announced.
Boston may well be proud of her literary
Institutions. Her Publio Library, the corner
stone of whioh was laid September 17, 1855;
was first thrown open to the public September
17, 185R; it is a beautiful building, situated on
Boylston-street, opposite the common. Below
stairs there are reading rooms for ladies and
gentlemen, supplied with all the latest periodi
cals, while in the story above are a series of
alcoves well lined with books. This institution,
as well as others in BoBton, is attended by
females, the head librarian, only, being a gen
tleman. '
I have had no little curiosity to see Ticknor
& Field's and Phillips fc Sampson's stores,
neglected on a former visit, the first-mentioned
being tho hoadquarters of blue and gold liter
ature, and last being the club-room of the
Cambridge Literati, who cater for and pro
nounce upon the Atlantic Monthly and books
and book-makers in general. Tioknor's is
about as unpretending an establishment, In
eutsido appearance, as you will see anywhere,
and brought to my mind the hook-stores of
London, the haunts of old, of half-starved poe ts
and authors.
Phillips & Sampson exists no longer as a
firm, death having dissolved the partnership,
by tho removal of Mr. Sampson some time
since, and Mr. Phillips lately, An assign
ment has been made for the purpose of set
tling their business. The Alatitie Monthly is
said to have yielded them an income of from
ten to twelve thousand dollars a year.
I hear J ohn Seal's expected book, True
Womanhood, muoh talkod of; there seems to be
quite a ouriosity about it among those who
know him.
I have seen tome fine pictures by T. Buch
anan Reed, one of Longfellow, and another of
his three little daughters. That of the past
idealizes his face and makes him look very
different from other portraits. In the one of
his ohildren; the grouping and ooloring is very
striking.
The Boston theatrioal season commences
soon, with Booth, who is a great favorite here,
and draws orowded houses. I hear Mr. Mur
doch's acting very highly spoken of by those
whose praise would be valuable to him, and
who look forward with pleasure to seeing him
WESTERN.
Preserving Fruits without Sugar.
The present mode of preserving fruit with
very little or no sugar has beoomoso prevalent
as to be no longer new to your numerous
readers; but for the benefit of young house
keepers who, wish to know precisoly howjit is
done, I will give you my method of putting up
peaches, in which I have been particularly
tucoessfnl.
I use Spratt's self-sealing glass cans. I put
several of them at a time in pans of cold water,
and place them on a stovo to heat gradually.
Then fill the preserving kettle about one-third
full of water, and perhaps a half pound of su
gar pare and stone the peaches, and put
them, a few at at a time, into the syrup; and
when they are up to the boiling point, put
them into theoans with a spoon, as rapidly as
Eosaible. When full, apply the oover, the wax
aving been softened by the heat of the peaohes,
the air will be completely exoluded. Then re
move from the water to a table as soon as one
is filled, and put a weight as heavy as a flat
iron on eaoh cover, until the wax becomes
eold.
If many are to bo put up, it should employ
the hands of two or three persons, that the
peaches may not lose their flavor or color by
standing. They should bo fully ripe. Tho
yellow peaches are decidedly the best.
This is a much more expeditious way than
cooking in the bottles or cans, and the air is
just ns effectually excluded. The peaches
can be put up whole, if desired, in the same
way. This preserves the flavor of the pit,
and makes them particularly good for pies.
When putting up cherries or other small
fruits, tho bottles are filled with the fruit;
then placed in a large fiat-bottomed kettle or
boiler. Fill tho kettle with cold water as
high as tho necks of tho bottles, and let tho
water boil twenty minutes. Put in the corku
before they are removed from the kettle, and
seal immediately. When fruit is to bo used
for puddings or pies, put it up without sugar;
but when designed for eating upon the table,
the easiest way is to cook them in a preserv
ing kettle, with a small quantity of sugar,
which seems to preserve tho flavor of tho
fruit.
This mode of preserving fruit is not only
one of the luxuries of tho age, but is a great
saving of labor and perplexity, when coin
pared with the old method of preserving,
ffswiewce Farmer,
The Value of a Scrap Book.
Every one who takes a valuable paper, whioh
they, in the least degree appreciate, will often
regret to see a number threwn aside for waste
paper, which oontsini tome interesting and
important articles. Yet few can afford the
pace, in any room convenient of access for
filing away a number of papers year after year,
and even when it can be done, the volume it
in a quite inconvenient form for reference.
A good substitute for filing is the nse of
scrap-book. One ef the proper form may be
bought at almost any bookstore, but if yoa do
not wish to inour that expense, a very good one
may be made of folded newspapers, out evenly
at the odge, and stitched into a pasteboard
cover. The best pajte for the purpose it made
of clear starch, and it should be applied to the
sorap, and not to the leaf of the book. The
book Bhould be Inft open au hour or two, to
drjfc but not perfectly, as the leaves are apt to
curl up, unless closed while a little damp.
One who has stiver been accustomed thus to
prepare choice articles can hardly estimate tho
pleasure it affordis one to sit down and turn
over the familiar pages. Here a choice piece
of poetry meets the eye, whioh you remember
you were so glad to nee in the paper, but which
would long since auve been destroyed had it
nt.t been for your scrap-book. There is a
witty anecdote, it does you good to laugh over
yet, though for the twentieth time.. Next is a
valuable reoipo you hud almost forgotten, and
which you havo found just in time to save you
much perplexity. The re is a tweet little story,
the memory of which has cheered and encour
aged you many e, tamo, when almost ready to
despair, under the pwtisure of life's care and
trials.
Indeed, you san hardly take up any paper,
without findinf ; mapy oho ice thoughts worth
perusing. Juet glanoe over the sheet before
yon, and see b ow many valuable items it con
tains, that would bo ol service to you a hun
dred times lit lifo. A ohoice thought is far
more preoiooii than a bit of glittering gold.
That perishes, hat thought is Immortal.
Hoard with oare these precious gems, and Bee
at the oloae of the year what a rich treasury
you have accumulated.
Church Directory.
Dnprlat.-Fl.rat ltoptlstChurcli, Northside Court,
between Mound and (flitter.
w"Jgh Street Baptist Church, East of City Watar
Ninth Streot Baptist Church, Bouth side Ninth,
between Vineand Hco,
r. V61'" "PUst Church, Freeman, near
rotof fifth str.M't.
Welsh Baptist Church, North aide Harrison.
Baker Street lia pilst Clmrch, (colored,) South sido
Burnet between '.Valnn. and fine.
TiTiili i B.tre,t i"1 Church, Uolored.) South aide
Third, between Ks.ce and Kim.
C'bristiriii.-Fi rjt Christian Church, Longworth,
between Western .Bow and John.
.iCoW.re?,!?nn.,-":Fir8t Orthodox Congrega
tional Uliurcn, Nor th side (Seventh, between Woatern
How and John.
f !SlPleW c,lr,Bi. "brlstlan Chnrch, South
went corner Walnu tand Xlghth
n!!t-an V,,,'"rcli'8Jxth'lwtwe'8mithand Mound,
thr st;au ( hurcb,, between T. P. 13 and 14, Fulton
Christian Chiirob , (colored,) North side Harrison.
KrSeiHls.-lirBl. friends (Orthodox,) fifth, be
twoon Weatern Bo wand John.
Eoil'nd John' tU iclc8ite,) Fmh' betweon Weatern
drenof laraol, Scuta. -east cornor Sixth and flroad.
way.
tM&nCrThefDtjS,lkffll,,ren f Je"hurUn'
Polish UougregaMr.ii of the K. K. Adat. larael,
corner Walnut and rifth.
W lai"!i' .oruer ,f SvenU nd Walnut.
.?,Stl,8U,,!t ,hie?P9l.-BAST Cincinnati Dib-TBior.-Wosley
Cuapel, florth side Fifth, between
bycaunre and Broadway.
BeiailKlm Ch"Hlt North m Nlnth. between
and'sTaino3!-8011 8outl",lIe Webster, between Main
tJJcendrie Chapel, (Seventeenth Ward,) Front
West Cincinnati DiiTBtCT.-Morris Chapel, West
aide i Western. Bow, between Fourth aud Fifth.
Christie Chapel, North aide Court, between Mound
and cutter.
Knper t'hapel.WoBt side Elm, North of Flndlay.
Park Street Unupol, Bouth-weet corner Park and
Longworth,
York Street Ohajol, South-wost corner Baymiller
and York.
Kindlay Chapel, South side Clinton, between Cutter
and Linn.
Union Ohapol, North aide Seventh, between Plum
aud Western llow.
Methodist Proteatnnt.-Flrat Methodist Prot
estant Church. Sixth , between Vine and Bace.
Second Methodist Protestant Church, tlm, be
tween Fifteenth nnd Liberty.
Goorgo Street Church, Oeorge, between Cutter and
Linn.
New Jerusalem .-Temple, Longworth, between
huio and Elm. '
PreHbyterian-Oio 8chool. First Presbyterian
Church, efcurtli, bet-ween Wain and Walnut.
Fourth Presbyterian Church, North aide High
street, near Kulton line.
Fifth Presbyterian Church, South-east corner Sev
enth and Elm.
Seventh Presbyterian Church, Woatside Broadway,
between Fourth and Fifth.
Central Presbyterian Church, North-west corner
Burr end Mound.
Ninth Presbyterian Church, Cutter, between Clin
ton and Betts.
t'reabyterlnn-Niw School. Becond Presbyte
rian Church, bouth side Font tb, brtween Vine and
Bace.
Third Presbyterian Church. South-west corner
Fourth aud Judn.
Eighth Prcsliyterlaa Chunli, Seventh, between
Linn and Baymiller.
Tabernacle Presby tartan Cb. nrch, corner John and
Clark.
1'ioteHtnnt Episcopal. Christ's Cburh,North
aide fourth, bdtween Sycamore and Broadway.
St. Paul's Cbutcla, South aide Fourth, between
Main and Walnut.
St. John's Church, South-east corner Plum and
Seventh.
Trinity Church, comer Pendleton and Liberty.
Church ol the Advent,(nobuildiug,) Walnut Hills.
Church of the Atonement, corner Jtlcamond and
Cutter.
Chnrchof the Ttedomption, Clinton.between West
ern Bow and John.
Komnu (,'atliollc St. Auguetinea, Bank street.
St. 1'oter's (JatUed ml, South-west corner Plum and
Eighth.
St. Francis Xavler'i, West side Sycamore between
Sixth and Seventh.
St, Patrick's, North-east corner Third and Mill.
St. Micliaol'a Wetsideof Millcreek.
Christ's Church, Fulton.
Holy Trinity, South BideFiftb, between Smith and
Park.
St. Mary's, South-east corner Jackson and Thir
teenth. St. Paul's, South-east corner Spring and Abigail.
St. John Baptist, corner Bremen and Green.
St. Joseph, South-east corner Linn and L.-.nrel.
St. Philomeua, North aide Pearl, between Pike and
Butler.
St. Thomas, West Bid Sycamore, between Fifth
and Sixth.
Unitnrltw. First Unitarian Church, Soutb-weat
corner Fourth and lace.
Universalis. First Univsiralist Chnrch, Kat
aide Plum, between fourth and Fifth.
Second UnivereaJlit Church, corner Sixth and
Mound,
Omnibus Stands.
Kast Walnut Hills. From corner Sycamora and
Fifth streets ovory half hour.-
W est Walnut II I ti.s (Lane Seminary.) From No.
1&( Sycamore street every hour.
Wehkbn Jtow aid BaioHToN. From Main and
Fourth streets every ton minutes.
West K.no Line, from corner Fourth and Maiu
to Freemiin nnd Hopkina streets.
Rivkr Ho ao Aiau Sedamsvillr. From corner
Broadway and Posrl,aiid corner Fifth aud Sycamore
afreets very ton minutes.
Fiii.ton, pKsnuroN, and CoLUHBtA. From corner
Brondway and Iiower Jlarkut- every ton minutes.
Thibo Stbeet Imi.-From Newport Ferry to
Fifth etreot Kerry.
Mount Aububm. From corner Main and Fourth
streets every hour.
Vinb Street Him. and CurTOV. From corner
Main and Fourth street every half hour.
Cumminsville. From corner Sixth and Main
Btreeta every half hour.
Covinuton. From cornerFirth and Walnut streets
overy hour.
Post Oi-f ick, Wicsrr.aN Bow and Clinton 8tieet.
From corner Fourth aud Vine every ten minutes.
Sbabon, JIabon, Lebanon, and MoNaeK. -Daily. at
2 P . M. froan lfi'J Walnut atreet.
Harbison. Dally, at8 A. M., and 2 P. M., (Sab
but h exoepted)-from 1(W Walnut strent.
Brook vi lie D&ily, (Sabbath excepted,) at 8 A.
M. from 1W W'aliant street.
Bataviaand Gbdbhetown. Dally, (Sabbath ex
cepted,) at 2.', P. M. from .Broadway and Lower
Market.
Venice and New Lonpon. Dally, (Sabbath ex-
oenuHi, i.ur. ai. ir.nn u,y w aiuu i Bircet.
Monvuumfry -From corner Ninth and Sycamore
Btreeta Dally, (Nnhbath excepted, at iX, P. M.
Avondals. Frwni 171 Walnut street, a, 10, 11, A.M
3.. e.P.aU
KATEiS OF ADVERTISING
Terms Ctsh. . ..
Advertisements not exceeding Cva lines (AjoteJ'
One Insertion SB M
One week - 1 M
Two " 1
On month .n. S t
Larger advertisements Inserted at the loltawia
rates.ior square of ten Unas or least
On Insertion. ...t0 M
lach additional laafUoc at
On week ... 1 74
Two "
Three" - -
MEDICAL CARDS.
IflEDICAJL.
DR. J. WILSON'S Office, 88 Wsst Fourth
street, where be may be consulted daily for all
Female Complaints, Inflammation of tb Cervix,
Prolapans Uteres, all displacements of th Womb,
Spinal aud Cerebral affections, and other organic dU
euosoommon to females. Th Doctor's long expe
rience and recant discovery In the treatment of tba
above dlaeaaes, can not fall to give entire satisfaction.
The Doctor is agent tor a European Female monthly
Pill; price l and two stamps. ul6-3m i
R. 8. NEWTON, Ma D.
Offloe, 90 Weit Seventh Street,
IXTWllI Till AsTD 1AC1.
MS
O. E. NEWTON, M.
Umoi-Ns. 90 Weat Seventh street, between Ttne
and Baoe. Kxbidenob No. 63 Seventh streot, I,
ween Walnnt and Vine. Orrici Houas-7 to
P. M. lto2HP.M.7totP. M.
DENTAL CARDS.
DR. M. ROGERS.
DENTIST,
OF LONQ EXPEBIENCB IN THIS CITY,
Othce, No. 84, Seventh-street,
IHIBD DOOB WEST OP VINR,
anie-amt CINCINNATI.
0. BONSAI.L. II. A. SMITH
BO N 3 ALL & SMITH,
DENTISTS,
Ns. 118 West Six th-street,
CINCINNATI. sepl-cm
J. TAPT
(Bnccesaor to Knowlton a Tart.)
DENTIST,
No. 06 West Fourth St., beu Walnnt fc Vine
CINCINNATI, OHIO.
jeM-cm
S. L. SABLES. H. B. SUITS.
Drs. HAUXFN & SMITH,
No. 3 Wet Fourth 8t.
ITS
DE. 8. WARDLE,
DENTIST
Offloe No. lsgWest Fourth street.
OINUINNATL, OHIO
H. S. WINSLOW,
NO. 101 SYOAHOBX STBEET, BELOW FIFTH,
jy2t-cm Cincinnati.
.JEWELRY.
II. P. ELI AS'
New Wholesale
WATCH & JEWELRY HOVSB
16 West Fourtli Street,
Where can be had every article appertaining to the
Business at a mnch less price, for CASH, than
has ever before been offered In this market.
QIVE US A CALL"
And aee for yourselves. apl4
WM. WHITAKER
JEWELER,
No. tiH H. JB. Cot. Fifth and Lodge streets, betwo
Walnnt and Vine. Cincinnati.
Agood assortment of BI LVER and PLATED WAB,
SPKUTACLS, etc., kept constantly on band.
Special attention given to Cleaning and Bepairlng
Watches and Jewelry, raylO
BEGGS k SMITH, No. 6 West 4th St.
A EE NOW RECEIVIN3 ADDITIONS TO
their large assortment of Watches, Jewelry.
Silverware and Diamonds.
-ALSO
A fin assortment of Fisted Tea Bats and Onfinrr
and Opera Olasses. tu
MISCELLANEOUS.
CT. HADDIX,
MERCHANT TAILOR, 280 WAL
NUT-8TKEET, abova Sixth, is receiving a
fresh stock of Cloths, Casslmeres, Vestlugs and
Gums' Fnrnlshlng Goods. lie has engaged the Serv
ian of an experienced and artl.tlc Cutter, whoso
worka will bear testsmony to his skill. All garments
warranted to give aatiafactlon. aepTam
F INE WINES. BRANDIES, Ac JOHN
HATES has on hand an extensive stock of fine
Sherry, Port, Maderia, CIsret, nhampagna cod Ca
tawb. Wines. Also, fine Brandies, Jamaica Bom,
Holland Gin and other Liquors, which he warrants
tine and of the best quality. For sale, National Thea
ter Building, Sycamore-street, sepU
NIGHT SCHOOL,
OniO MERCANTILE COLLEGE, COR
NEB of Fourth and Walnut-streets, Carlisle
Building. The regular evening session of tills insti
tution will commence on JrlUNDaY EVKNlNf,,
Si-pt. 36. Young men who are engaged through the
day have here an opportunity of qualifying them
selves thoroughly iu Double Entry. Book-keeping,
P.minanship and Business Arithmetic. For further
nforuiation, call at the College, or address tbe Prlu
llpnl. Bop2Uaw J. R. (JARJ. All AN.
MRS. J. A. OATH,
LADIES' AND GENTS.
FURNISHING STORE
No. 216 Fifth-street,
Between Elm and Plum, CINCINNATI.
Combs, Hair Oil, Perfumery, Fancy Soaps and No
tions of all kinds.
N. II. Shirts, and all kinds of Furnlahing Good
made to order. au24-aoi
H. CAMPBELL & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF BAR, SHEET
and Boiler Iron, Plow Slabs, Bailrosd Spikes
Etc. Alao, Agents for the aals of Iron too Star Nails
Warorooms So. 1) East Second Street. Cincinnat I
Ohio.
star All ijnds Iron made to order. IM
H. KINGSBURY,
Frofcssor of the Guitar and Flute.
Ladlea and Gentlemen wlshina In
struction on eiiher ef the above in
struments, will receive prompt at-
tentlnn, by leaving their add roes at 1
the Music Stores of V, m. O. Ptars A
Eons; John c'hurcb snd wm. M. peters. suyji-
A. C. STULB, .
ATLANTIC CABLE RESTAURANT AND
WINE AND LAGEB BEEK SALOON, No.
718 Weatern-row, Cincinnati, Ohio.
W My bar is at all times supplied with choio
Liquors and Cigars,
sepQsm
Gas Fixtures,
AT REDUCED PRICES.
WE HAVE ON HAND THE LARGEST
variety and beat selected assortment of Gas '
Fixtures in Cincinnati, conaiatlngof all that Is new
or desirable in the Oaa Fixture line.
We warrant every Fixture we sell to be eqnal, both
In material and finish, to any that is sold in this o
auy other market, and In addition will guarantra
them to retain their color and remain perfect fo'flr
years from the time they are pot up by tu. .
Call, see, aud examine ovrstock,
Mchenry a carbon.
jy 21 -cm 1B2 H ain atreet, near Fourth
FRONT -STBEET FACTORY
AHS ,
LUMBER DEPOT,
No. Ii7 East Front Street, bet. Plka snd Butler-at'a,
South-side.
HAVING FITTED UP THE PREMISES
with the moat Improved kind of machinery, I
am prepared to furnish, at short notice, all kinds ol'
ilousii and Steamboat, Carpenter and Joiner's work.
Snsli, Blinds, Doors, Frames and Moldings, of alt
descriptions. Steamboat Lumber, Weather-board-ng,
Hhinglrs. Siding, Flooring, Ac, kept constantly
on hand, Particular attention paid to planing, rip
ping and scroll sawing. Heavy framing lumber can
bo planed and trued 40 leet long, anu lacues win.
rersona bdoui to Diniu, will irxi. u. w tiieir auvaa-
tagetogiveoiasstl, IfM. JtJ
anASTa
tor.

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