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The penny press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1859-1860, October 19, 1859, Image 2

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THE PRESS.
ANDY W. FBANOISCO. JOHN D.OALDWBLL.
IDITOSJ All MSFBIDTOIS.
WEDNESDAY..
OCTOBER 19
News From the Insurrection.
Ia the telegraph's oolumns, on first and
second page, will be found full partloulari
of the Insurrection at Urpr' Ferry.
Quick Time.
Yesterday morning we received, ftt Adams's
Express, Haw Orlsans pipers of the 16th Inst,
and the Galveston (Teiai) Jftwt of the 11th.
Twenty year ago that wonld bo called
tolerably quick time.
The Chicago and Cincinnati Railroad.
Tho Chloago SWltnte says that the Iroa for
this road bai been shipped from New York for
that olty, where It will arrive In a few days.
The traok at tbe north end of the road li about
ready for the Iron. The Kankakee and Eel
River bridge! are nearly finished, and the
bridge aorosi tbe Wabash, at Logansport, will
be nnUhed In time for the Iron. We now oon
fldently expeot to tee the iroa going1 down next
month.
Broderick's Will.
The Baa Prsnoiseo eorreapondent of the New
York Timet atatei that Mr. Bbodmios left a
property variously eatlmated from $100,000 to
$200,000. Dt hit wUI he save $15,000 to tbe
ProtesUnt and Catbolle Orphan Asylums of
San FraneUoo, the amount to be equally
divided. A legaoy of $10,000 wai left to the
Hon. J. C. HoKiBiav, and the remainder of
Mr. Bbodiiick's estate it bequeathed to the
widow or bli late friend, Jixcs Estill, who
waa left In very moderate circumstance! at the
death of her husband.
"During last week a family of five
brothers congregated in Saratoga, whose
united ages wnoa there were three hundred
and seventy-two year and six month.
They were the sons of Jamet Webster, of
Litchfield, Conn., who lived to the age of 92
years. Their names and respective ages are:
James Webster, aged T7j Russel Webster,
aged 78; Jarvis Webster, need 74; Lyman
Webater, aged 73; Chester Webster, aged 08.
Russell Webster ia the father of Mrs. Wil
liam Carpenter, of Saratoga, at whoso house
the gathering took place. They have been
one unbroken band of brothers for over sixty
eight years, though this waa the seoood time
in fifty years they have all met togethor.
All have been widowers, and two remain so
yet They are all professors of religion, and
ill TWntiaL Church. On the
evening before parting, as they believed,
"never to meet again on earth, they held
religious eervices, in which expressions of
affection were freely mingled with praise and
thanksgiving to God for his care and protec
tion of them all, and during which they ex
horted each other to meet again in heaven.
The scene is described as Intensely affecting
and interesting. .
Tri Lati SaifAToa. A friend of the late
D. C. Broderick informs us that no will has
been found making any disposition of bis
large property. Although his regular habits
of business would indicate that he would
make tuoh a provision, it may be that he did
not do so. lie thought much more, it is said,
of the defeat in the State of the principles of
his party than of matters immediately con
nected with his private business. We are
told tbst at times when he was prostrated on
his bed, from which he was never to rise,
hia miad ran in a kind of partial delirium
upon scenes connected with the eleotion and
the high position to which be had attained.
Once he exclaimed, evidently referring to
hit efforts in behalf of the Central Overland
Mail ro He : "Oh I the ingratitude of the peo-
?le of Flacerville ; I tried to make it a point;
strove to give it importance." And again,
alluding to hit position, he would say ; "The
poor boy reaohed it honorably ; I deceived no
man." These exclamations serve to indicate,
oetter than any set phrase or labored vindi
cation can do, the true character of the de
ceased Senator, and his devotion to the best
Sacramento (Cal)
Union, 20th.
Wovts'a Divotiok A Stkanoi Sgenb
fen years ago two young men In Mentor, Lake
County, got into an affray while under the In
fluenee of liquor. A. stabbed B. with a knife.
The wound waa a dangerous one, and for sev
eral weeks the merest thread bound B. to earth.
A. was arrested, tried and senteneed to the
penitentiary at Columbus for ten years. B.
recovered in the course of time, and made
every effort to seoure A.'i pardon, bat was un
successful. The young men had been warm
frienda up to the night of the affray. They
were farmers and near neighbors, and both
were married. This morning when A. arrived,
he found, awaiting hint at the depot, hit wife,
who, through all tbe dreary years of his igno
minious absence, had been as true as steel.
A. had not seen his wife since be received bis
sentence. Their meeting was affecting in the
extreme. Oar informant, who knows the par
ties well, says he never taw to touching a
teens, and never expeott to tee its like again.
The two farmers met each other with great
cordiality, and resolved that the demon drink
Cleveland Plaindealer.
Tbiiriho 8tbib8. At the Maine State Fair,
a boy of fifteen years, from tbe town of Wood
stock, had a pair of three year-old steers
whioh obeyed him at an obedient boy will bis
parents. By a motion of his hand they would
go forward, halt, and return, go to the right or
left, kneel down, and perform other things
much to the surprise of some older farmers who
are in the habit of putting tbe brad through
the hide. At the New-York State Fair, there
was a perfect Rarey of an ox-tamer, who prac
tices breaking steers for farmers, who never
treat them inhumanely, but he soon has them
nnder perfect control, and at bldable as well
trained children.
. fSfHt, Rarey has reoently completed the
instruction of bis first batch of English cavalry
rough riders, twenty in number. He pauses
at this point, in order that hit system may be
fairly tested for a few months' experience of
these men in their own regiments. Some re
markable cases of cure of rooted habits of
vice in troop horses have been effected by Mr.
Rarey among them, one of a trooper who
would not allow tbe farrier to shoe him without
the fiercest resistance, rendering extraordinary
precautions necessary during the operation.
Two days' lessons from Mr. Rarey effectually
oared the horse of this vice, and he now atands
to be shod ae quietly as the most docile charger
In the service.
A Cow Wobth Hivino. Lewis Ailing, of
Twinsburg, Summit County, Ohio, exhibited a
cow at the Union Fair In that township,
several year old, which gave, from the 1st to
tbe 16th of June, six hundred and twenty-nine
and one-half pounds of milk, which made
twenty-nine pounds of well -worked butter.
She was fed on grass alone, and nc toe was
used for cooling the milk. Her weight it
one thousand three hundred and thirty
rounds. Mr. Ailing alto states, September
5, that this cow gave then from thirty -four to
thirty-five pounds of milk per day. She took
the first premium as the best tingle miloh eow
at tbe Union Fair.
- Msr" A firm in Boston have just made two
pairs of thoet for slave in one of the Southern
States, whieh are elphantine in their propor
tions. Th dimensions of each shoe is sixteen
and qaarter Inches in ' length, tlx inches
trots tbe ball of the foot, and seventeen inches
tarooad tbe instep. That darkey will require a
one-aero field to torn round in. .
LATEST BY TELEGRAPH
The Insurrection at Harper's
Ferry.
FURTHER PARTICULARS.
WASHINGTON, Tuesday, October 18—P. M.
The Seoretary of War has telegraphed to
Col. Lee that Mr. Ould, the District-Attorney
for thit DiBtrlot, will proceed forthwith to Har
per's Ferry to take charge of the legal prooeed
inga against the prisoners and bring them to
trial. A train is now getting ready to convey
horses and men from here to pursue the rioters
Into any State or locality where they may have
tied. This is by order of the President, at the
of Gov. Wise.
BALTIMORE, October 18.
The Directors ef the Pennsylvania
and families left Marliniburg this morning for
Baltimore. Travel is now resumed and trains
are running regularly.
An eye-witness, who has returned from
Harper's Ferry desoribes the tcenes there as
follows : "The first attack wat made by a de
tachment of the Charleston Guards, who
crossed tho Potomae river above Harper's Fer
ry and reaohed the building where the insur
gents were posted by the oanal on the Mary
land side. Smart firing occurred and the riot
ers were driven from the bridge. One man
was killed here and another arrested.
The latter ran oat and tried to escape by
swimming the river. A doten shots were fired
after him and he partially fell, but rose again
and threw his guu away. He drew his pistols,
both of whioh he snapped. He then drew his
bowie-knife and cut all the heavy aeontre
stents from his body and plunged Into the
river. One of the soldiers was about ten feet
behind him. The mn turned round, threw
up his hands, and oried out, "don't shoot."
Che soldier fired and the man fell into the
eater with his faoe blown away. His eoat
skirts were cut from his person and in the
pockets was found a Captains commission to
"Coptain F. H. Leemsn, from the Provisional
Government of the United States." The com
mission was dated October J 5, 1859, and signed
by A. W. Brown, Commander-in-Chief of the
Army of tbe Provisional Government of the
United States. , .
A party of five insurgents, armed with Minnie
rifles, and posted in the rifle armory, was ex
pelled by the Charleston Qiards. Tney all
ran for the river, and one, who wat unable to
swim, waa drowned. Tbt other four awam out
to the rockt in the middle of the Shenandoah
and fired upon the oitlteni and troops as
sembled upon both banks. This drew upon
them the muskets of between two and three
hundred men, and not less than four hundred
shots were fired at them from Harper's Ferry,
about two hundred yards distance, one was
shot dead.
The second, a negro, attempted to jump
over the dam, bat fell shot and waa not teen
afterward. The third badly wounded, and
remaining, was taken unharmed. The white
insurgent, wounded and captured, died in a
r minntai In the arms of our informant.
rr. was shot through the breast, arm and
stomach. He declared there were oniy nine'
whites enuaiod in this insurrection.
For nearly an hour a running and random
firing was kept np by tbe troops against ins
rioters. Several were shot down, while many
managed to limp away wounded.
During the firing the women and children
ran shrieking in evory direction, bnt when they
learned that the soldiers were their protectors,
tbey took courage and did good service in the
way of preparing refreshments and attending
the wounded. Our informant who was on the
hill, when the firing was going on, says that
all tho terrible scenes of a battle passed in
reality beneath bis eyes. Soldiers oould be
seen pursuing singly and In oonplot, and the
crack of the musket and rifle was generally
followed by one or more of the Insurgents
biting the dust. Tbe dead lay in the streets
where tbey leu. ine wounaea were eareu
for.
The following fragments of a letter was
found In Caps. Drown 't pocket. It occupies a
Dane of fine note paper, straw tinted, and is
written in pencil, evidently by a person of
oduoation. It is witboul date, xne ireigm
alluded to was doubtless the sort usually carried
on the Underground Railroad:
"Capt. Bbowh Dear Sir: I have been dis
appointed at not seeing you here ere this to
take charge of your freight. They have been
here now lor two weeks, and, as I have had
to superintend the providing for them, it
has imposed on me no small lasx Desiaes, ana
if not soon taken on, some of them will have
to go back to Missouri. I wish to know, defi
nitely, what you propose doing. They can
not be kept here much longer without risk to
themselves, and if any of them conclude to
go back to tbe State, it will be a bad termi
nation to your enterprise," No signature.
The following interesting narrative of the
events is gleaned from the report of the ed
itor of the American, who accompanied the
trooDS from this citv and returned this even
ing. The principal originator of the short
but bloody existence of this insurrection, was
undoubtedly Capt. John Brown, whose con
nection with the scenes of violence in the
border warfare of Kansas then made his
name familiarly notorious to the whole
country.
Captain Brown't wonnds oonsist of a (Word
cut in the forehead and a bayonet wound In
the kidneys. Another of the rioters killed
waa named Stewart Taylor. J. C. Anderson,
a ringleader, who stopped conduotor Phelps,
yesterday, was killed during the first attack by
the Virginians, Anderson was a fine looking
man, with a flowing white beard.
Some of the Maryland Volunteers are in
pursuit of Captain Cook's party. A body of
forty men, mounted, left thit afternoon for
Harper's Ferry to pursue the rioters.
Ic is reported that many of them have es
caped and are secreted in the mountains.
A negro named Green, who was conspicuous
In tbe fugitive slave riot at Harrisburg some
years ago, was among tbe insurgents.
Bro n made his first appearance in the vi
cinity of Harper's Ferry more than a year ago,
accompanied by his two sons, the whole party
assuming the name of Smith.
He inquired about land in tbe violnity, and
made inveatigationt about the probability of
finding ore, and for sometime boarded at Sandy
Point, a mile east of the Ferry. After the
absence ef some months be reappeared in the
vicinity and rented or leased a farm on the
Maryland side, four miles from the Ferry.
They bought a large number ef pioks and
spades, and this confirmed the belief that they
intended to mine for ore. Tbey were seen fre
quently in and about Harper's Ferry, but no
suspioion seems to have existed that Bill Smith
was Captain Brown, or that be intended embarking
in any .movement so desperate or extraordinary;
yet tbe development of the plot
leaves no doubt that his visits to the Ferry, and
bis lease of the farm were all parts of his pre
paration for the insurrection, which be sup
posed would be successful in exterminating
slavery in Maryland and Western Virginia.
Brown's chief aid was John E. Cook, a
comparatively young man, who hat resided
in and near the Ferry for some years. He
was first employed in tending a lock on the
canal, afterward taught a school on the Maryland
side of tbe river, and after a brief resi
dence in Kansas, where, it is supposed, he
became aoquainted with Brown, returned to
tbe Ferry and married there. He was re
garded as a man of some intelligence, known
to be anti-slavery, but not so violent in the
expression of his opinions as to excite any
suspicions. These two men, with Brown's
two sons, were the only white men connected
with the insurrection that had been seen previously
about the Ferry. All were brought
by Brown from a distance, and nearly all had
been with him in Kansas.
Tbe first actlvelmovement In the Insurrec
tion waa made about half-past ten Sunday
night. W. M. Williamson, the watchman on
the Harper's Ferry bridge, while walking
across toward tbe Maryland tide, was seised
by a number of men who said that he was
their prisoner and must some with them. He
rscognlsed Brown and Cook among the men,
and knowing them, he treated the matter as a
joke; bat enforcing silence, tbey eondacted
him to the Armory, which he found already in
their possession. He was retained until after
daylight and then discharged. The watchman
who wat to relieve Williamson at midnight,
found the bridge-lights all out and was imme
diately seised. Supposing it an attempt at
robbery, he broke away and hit pursuers
stumbling ever, he escaped.
The next appearance of the Insurrectionist!
wat at the house of Colonel Lewis Washing
ton, a large farmer and slave-owner, living
about four miles from the Ferry. A party,
headed by Cook, proceeded there, roused Col
onel Washington, and told him he was their
prisoner. Tbey also seised the tlavea near the
house, and took away a carriage and horse and
a large wagon wltb two horses. When Colonel
Washington saw Cook he immediately recog
nised him as a man who bad called upon bim
months previous, to whom be bad exhibited
some valuable arms In his possession, inoluding
an antique aword presented by Frederiok the
Great to George Washington, and a pair ef
pistols presented by Lafayette to Washington,
both being heir-looms In the family. Before
leaving, Cook wanted Uolorel Washington to
make a trial of skill ot shouting, and exhibited
considerable certainty as a marksman.
When be made his visit on Sunday night, he
alluded to his previous visit and the oourtesy
with whioh he had been treated, and regretted
the necessity whioh made It his duty to arrest
Colonel Washington. He, however, took ad
vantage of tbe knowledge he obtained by his
former visit to carry off all the valuable collec
tion of arms whioh Colonel Washington did not
reobtaln till after the final defeat of the insur
rection. From Colonel Washington's tbe party pro
ceeded with him as a prisoner In hit own oar
rlage, and twelve of hit negroes in tbe wagon,
to the house of Mr. Allatadt, another large
farmer on the tame road. Mr. Allstadt and
his ton, a lad sixteen years of age, were taken
prisoners, and all the negroes within reaoh be
ing forced to join the movement.
They returned to the Armory at the Ferry.
All these movements seem to have been made
without exciting the slightest alarm in the
town, nor did the detention of Capt. Phlpps's
train at tbe upper end of the town attract
attention. It wat not until the town was
thoroughly waked np and found the bridges
guarded by armed men, and a gnard stationed
at all the avenuet, that the people found they
tyre prisoners.
A panic appears to have immediately en
sued, and the number of the Insurrectionists at
once Increased from fifty, which wat probably
their greatest force, including ths slaves who
were forced to join, to from fire to six hun
dred. In tbe meantime a number of work
men, knowing nothing of what had ooauned,
entered the Armory and were suooossiroly
taken prisoners, until they had at one time
not lesa than aixty men confined In the Ar
mory. Among these thus entrapped were Armested
Ball, chief draughtsman of the Armory, Benj.
Mills, master of the Armory, and J. L.P. Dnn
gerfield, paymaster's clerk. These three
gentlemen were imprisoned in tbe engine
house, which afterwards became the chief
fortress of the insurgei ts, and were not re
leased until the final assault.
The workmen were imprisoned in a large
building further down the yard, and were
rescued by a brilliant Zouave dash made by
the railroad company's men, who came down
from Martlnsburg.
This was tbe condition of affairs at day
light, about which time Captain Cook with
two white men, and accompanied by thirty
slaves, and taking with them Colonel Wash
ington's large wagon, went over the bridge
and struck up the mountain on tne road to
ward Pennsylvania.
WASHINGTON, October 18.
Six companies of Virginia military, num
bering three hundred rank and file, arrived
here this evening, en routt for Harper's Ferry,
but their orders have been countermanded,
and they return home to-night. They made
a fine appearance, and were provided with
au tne appliances ot a campaign.
Arrival of the Overland Mail.
ST. LOUIS, October 18.
Ths Overland California Mail, with dates to
the 28th nit., reached here last night. The
Pacific Railroad Convention adopted resolu
tions favoring tbe Central ronle, and appointed
committees to mature plant to be recommended
to the Legislature and Congress, and then ad
journed to meet at Sacramento In January.
Judge Terry has been placed under $10,000
bonds.
The schooner Lewis Perry arrived from the
Amoor River with Russian-Asia advioes to
August 12th. A small steamer capable of as
cending tbe Amoor river 2,000 miles bad been
launched at Nicolauaki by a company of Amer
icans, who have the privilege of navigating the
river. The Russian offioials ihow tbe greatest
favor to American enterprises and encourage
immigration of Amerioan meohanioa. The
bark Milita was lost In Amoor river June 22d,
The vessel and cargo waa insured at Boston.
The Saoramento correspondent of the San
Franolsco Bulletin says that a project is on foot
among the Republicans, to exclude Soottand
Burch, Congressmen eleot, from the Eonse of
Representative, on the ground that the Cali
fornia Legislature neglected to district the
State as required by Congress, or to oomply
with tbe Constitution, whioh says "that Repre
sentatives shall be elcoted every two years."
Nearly the whole town of Monte Christ sat
destoyed by fire on tbe 10th nit. Loss $9,000.
Another large fire occurred at - Diamond
Springs, Involving a loss of $40,000.
Upwards of sixty Pitt River Indians have
been killed by a party of citisens from Pitt
River valley. The eitlsens design to keep
volunteers in the field till the Indiana are ex
terminated. Buainest was dull and quotations nominal.
Later from Buenos Ayres.
NEW YORK, October 18.
An arrival furnishes Buenos Ayrea advices
to the 28th of August. The previous report
of the appearance of the Argentine Squadron
off Buenae Ayres, and an exchange of shots
with a Buenos Ayrean steamer is confirmed.
A. Montevideo letter states that a forgery
of sixty million bonds had been discovered
there, and the forger arrested. Hs proved
to be tbe Captain of Spanish vessel plying
between that port and Rio.
The discovery served to unsettle bnsinesa
and create a great run on the banking-bonso
of Senor Mana.
M. Henderson, tbe British charge d' affairs
to Paraguay, had demanded his passports in
eonsequence of tbe Cornstad affair not having
been satisfactorily settled.
From Boston.
BOSTON, October 18.
The hearing of the case of Wm. Harris, col
ored cook of the bark Said Bin Sultan, who Is
charged with the minder of Capt. Edwards,
the same, has been postponed till Saturday,
Harris hails from Baltimore.
The injunction on the People's Five Cents
Saving Bank hat been continued, and receiv
ers are appointed.
From Jamaica.
NEW ORLEANS, October 18.
An arrival furnishes Jamaica dates to the
1st Inst. Tbe Legislature will meet on the 1st
of November.
The Island was In a healthy condition. ,'Tbt
late disturbances were over.
The Demerara authorities were endeavoring
to Indues white immigration from the Barbados.
Fire at Columbus.
COLUMBUS, October 18—Midnight.
The pattern shop and a part of the sheds of
tne uoiumnot juaeuine Manufacturing Com
pany was destroyed by fire to-night, Including
a large amount of patterns. Tbe main build
ing and the sheds en the north aids were saved.
Loss unknown.
River News.
PITTSUURG, October 18—P. M.
- ary.
Weather clear and cool.
Massachusetts Election.
CHICAGO, October 18.
Taui.tn lumntlsi heard from stive 2.716
Republican msjorlty. Seven oountiet yet to
hear from gave 846 Republican majority in
1867. Tbe St Paul Tunes of the 16th tayt
that the Republicans stand Ssnate 7; House
60.
Trail of the Fillibusters.
NEW ORLEANS, October 19.
The examination of Colonel
Captain Maury, and other fllllbasters oonneoted
with the recent expedition, bat been com
mented. No important evidence has yet been
elicited.
Iowa Election.
CHICAGO, October 18.
rv.lv-a.w.n .wiimftaa in Trtwa fri VA
wr,m ft A on itil DnHsA 1 osa Tha same
counties in 1867 gave Lowe 2,269 majority.
r . i r a i i i 1-
rurty-iuur cuuuuue are yv w uowuvm
The Abrilt Medical asserts that
Insomnia, or want of rest at night, may be
eared by sugar candy. It appears that augar,
under its orystalieed form, Is a decided
hynoptio, and much superior to most other
remedies of the kind, If we consider its perfeot
Innocence. To nae it, put five or six pieces of
sugar oandy, of the site of a baiel-nut, Into
your mouth on going to bed, and by the time
tney are ball melted away, us aesirta eneoi
will have been wrodnaed. Tbe sleep whioh it
causes, Is not like the artificial one produoed
by other drugs, but it It as benenoiai and
Invigorating in its effeott upon the system at
natural repose in faot, it is a sweet sleepy.
It states, however, that sugar candy is only
effectual against common insomnia, and would
be powerless if that affection were canted by
any other complaint.
MARRIED
GOTWALD-KINQ.-In Springfield, Ohio, en the
lllb, by the Rev. T. Flndky.suwlated by tbe Bev. Dr.
Bprecher, tha Bev. Luthur A. Gotwald to Mist Mary
a. AIDS-
DIED.
lUL&nA.ai,"Ai (no reaiuenoa ui mm ujuumr, m
Fairmount, on Monday morning. October 17, la
Christ inn hope, 11 o well Igleturt, in tht twentieth
Dixon's Blackberry Carminative,
i IirB, EAST ARB BFFBOTUAL CUES, FOB.
Summer Complaint, Diarrhea, Flux, &e.
SJ Twenty-fire cents per bottle."Vt
GEO. M. DIXON, Druggist,
auM-cm Corner of Fifth and Main-street.
SPECIAL. NOTICES.
CHAPPED HANDS, FACE,
ic-PALMER'SMLYOERIHE LOTION Is
entirely free from all unpleasant odor, and as it pos-si-eies
remarkable healing properties, It la the almost
universal favorite with fhosa parsons who are
troubld with chapped hands. oolt
AM AN DINE. WE CHAL
LENGE teominrlinit flfonr ftrtlrln'wfth
aoy. brought to. tbl market. We always have a
fresh article on hand.
ool
COLD CREAM OF ROSES LIP
SALVE.- Constantly preparing this article
furnish a frosh supply at any time.
bULON rALHKK, Agent,
Hannfacturer and Importer of Perfumery, Xo. SA
West Fourth-street. oclt
OFFICE OF THE PASSEN
GER railroad company or oik-
r ITT o TO ...u.1kl.J A D .
October 15, im This road ia now opon. Cars will
start, at intervals often minutes, from 8:30 A.M.
unlit mldiight, running eastward on Third-arreet
from Wood to Lawrnnco street, and ye,tward on
Fourth-atreet to Smith, and on Fifth-etriet to
Wood. Cltljens will please bear in mind that the
cars will invariably crosi Intersecting streets before
etoppiug for pasingtrs.
ccl-tf JAME8 J. BOBBINB, President.
9gBp NOTICE TO TAX PAYERS
BBSs? The re-valuatlon of real estate, aa returned
Cy ins District Asemeors, is now open for examina
tion, at the County Auditor's olRce, to which atten
tion Is directed. If any complaint la to be made, the
same should be In writing, and previous to the fonrth
Monday in October, WW, after which no complaint
will be reoelvod.
By order of tbe Board of Equalisation,
HOW ABO MATTHEWS,
separ-tt Auditor.
fl-?E5THAT DR. K) BACK'S SCAN.
POST DINAVIAN Blood Fills and Blood Puri
fier are a positive cure for Dyapepsia is proved by
numerous uatimonlals in the Doctors jxusesslon,
which can be examined at his office, So. 6 East
Fourth-street, by auy one at auy time. ool-am
KENNEDY'S MEDICAL DIS
COVERY il acknowledged hr the mnit em.
Ineut physicians, and by the moat careful drurgiets
mrougnoui me united siaiee, 10 Deiaemneieuectu&i
blood-purifler ever known, and to have relieved more
suffering, and effected more permanent ouren, than
any preparation known to the profession,. Scrofula,
BHltKheum, Erysipelas, Hoald-heail, scaly eruptions
of whatsoever nature, are cured by a few bottles, and
the system roatored to full strength and vigor. Full
and explicit direct lona for the cure of ulcerated aore
legs, and other corrupt and running ulcere, la given in
the pamphlet with eaoh bottle. For sale by JOHN D.
PAKt, SUIRB, ECKSTEIN 4 ,00., and OKOROE
M.DIXON. Price 81. aepl9-ay
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
DELANO,
GOSSAOE &
CUYLER,
mwmmm
Are offering a tuperb assortment of Winter floods
AT VERY LOW PRICES.
ONE HUNDRED PIECES
DRESS SILKS,
Extra qualltv, at (To. andtl per yard;
Cheap line Black Bilks juitrtealved J
Blob Silks aad Bob for evening wear.
Winter Cloaks, Winter Shawls
trlpsd Raglans and Shawls j
targe assortment of Dloth Cloaks ;
mbreldered Velvet Ulouks ;
3,000
Winter Shawl., stall prises;
ffenta' Traveling Shawls.
Winter Dress Goods
French and English Printed and Plain Mtrlneee;
Elegant Cashmere and Ueleine Robes;
Printed Cashmere for DrailngOowna;
laser and All-wool Plaida for Children.
SHETLAND WOOLOPEEA HOODS.
Tails, Shawls and Sublet.
WINTER UNDERWEAR
For Ladles, dents and Children, selling at cost
toolose.
bed-blanketTand flannels.
Super. Bed Blankets, very cheap :
Red and White Flannels, all widths and prices ;
OPJCBA YLANNIL, iaalloolors.
A lot of CAMBRIC BANDS, Flannelnga and
Bet at Bargains.
Broche Shawl Borders.
Fresh Lot, jnst In.
TEN CASEF CALICOES,
. Good tualltv, at SM cents ;
Buper. Delalnee, at UH cents.
ALSO-Kld Gauntlets ; Hosiery I the Gem Hoop
shirt; extra quality Kid Qlotee, reduced to 7 cents,
In black, white and colors; Cloths, Uasalnterei and
Testing; which will be sold at uncommonly
LOW PRICES.
DELA.ND, G0SSAGE & CUTLEB,
74 West Fourth-street.
: OPPOSITI PIKX'I OPIBA-HOCBB.
toeiT-Jst WW
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
mm & wiiws
Vtjrej-f rV. . mJl
Sewing Machines!
REMOVED TO
PIKE'S OPERA-HOUSE,
No. 77 FOUBTH-STREET,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Tha unparalleled aale of these Machines
has again compelled oar company to lu
cre cue their facilities for manufacturing,
and we now employ ONB THOUSAND
BANDS and make two hundred machines
per day and with the advantage of seven
rears' experience and a lnrge capital, are
prepared to fiirnl.h, In great perfection, a
machine universally acknowledged to be
the lending! Family Machine In the country.
In the West we have Just taken the First
Premium at the
STATE FAIRS
Ohio,
Indiana,
Illinois and
Missouri,
AND AlBO AT THB
NATIONAL FAIRS
AT ST. LOUIS AND CHICAGO,
Where wt received, besides ths Tlrat Premium, a
ONI-HUNDBID-DOIiLAB 8ILTIB PITOHBB,
aa the best family Mr.chlns.
In addition t sno ' testimony, we refer to tht
forty thousand fatnll nd manufacturers to whom
we bars sold, and tc V following wall-known per
sons of this city, no tja onr Machines t
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mrs.
Mr..
Lars Anderson, Mrs. Beth Evans,
Wm. Beaor, Mrs. Jason Evans,
u. n. enoenoerger, aire, james n. ontitn,
AdamN. Riddle.
Mrs. Wilson K. Nixon.
John h, Btetimus,
Miles Greenwood,
Btunley Matthews,
f. B. Wither,
Jaa. P. Kllbrotb,
Joseph U. Butler,
Cbas. H. WolU,
J. blevln,
Dr. Woodward,
Dr. Comegye,
M'm.Hollew,
Geo. D. Wluchell,
1'hos, W. Bprague,
Mrs. Joseph W. Wayne,
Mrs. . 8. Carpenter,
Mrs. Major SlcOrea,
Mia Judije Headly,
Mtk. Henry U. Loru,
Mie. M. 6. L'Hommedien,
Mi s. Uumael stokes,
irs. Jos Longworth,
Mrs. Key. 1). W. (Jlark.
Mrs. Kev. L. Bwormstedt,
lira. Kev. G. II. Doynton,
Mrs. Rev. G. U. Boliluson,
jura. hsy. nas. jvingsiey,
ALSO, TH1 FOLLOWING TESTIMONIALS:
" The substitution of the rotary movement of the
nook " ror tne reciprooating motion oi tnesnnttie
lathe latest grand improvement on the Sewing Ma
chine, and it ia that which now glres Wheeler at
Wilson's It. Avoided adt antaae over all other ma-
chluei Moreover, for ecei-omy of power, eaae of
management, variety oi adaptation auu apeeo ot exe
cution, It no doubt surpasses all others for family
use," Tim Imuius' ltBroairoar.
"My little daughter, of nine yours, takes ottrma
chlnu (vYIueler & Wllaun's) apart, ulis it and puts it
In place, (lastly and roadliy adjusts Ha parts, and per
foiniBwith it all ordinary work. She can umki her
own dreaie , including hemming, giUhTlr.g and set
ting In tho sleeves. Four monttia una in my family
una uiauu ll a uuue.BiiT hiiu k luxury,
" BEY. UAS. if. BOTSTON."
"We use the Wheeler A Wilson Sewing Machine,
auu van .1(7 ui rrgiru iu it mtu u le Wllttum a rival.
Mo other machine exceeds it In lt adaptation to all
purposea of domestic use." Scisntino AMtaiciN.
"We hare penonally examined the various ma
chines before Ihe puhlin, Willi an anxious desire to
place before our raoVr reliable informal ien. as
the result of xtch examination, we uiiha.-ltatiniily
recommend Wheeler Wilion's bowing Marbinea
as me uiacnipe lor lamuy ute, wieTEBX UuBIS'
tun AnvecATE.
" Wheeler k Wilson's Uaohlns Is. beyond a donbt.
the best for family use extant." CisiciNaan Paios
Ws warrant ths Machines for three years, and In
struct In Its nie free of charge, either at ths house of
ths pnrohaser or at our ofBoe,
No. 77 West Fourth-street,
PIKE'S OPERA-HOUSE.
Wm. Sumner & Co.
fooio-tf
WHO DIAL IN
SCHOOL BOOKS. BLANK BOOKS,
Paper, Fens, Ink, 81ates,
-Ol
Staple Stationery,
-roa
School or Office Use,
Oan supply themselves with ths best, at tbs LOW
EST BATES, by calling noon
Moore, "Wilstach, Keys & Co.,
Wholesale Booksellers and Stationers and Blank
book Manufacturers,
25
"W est Fourtli-st.
oclt-oj
CINCINNATI TROTTING PARK.
Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton
RAILROAD.
A TRAIN OF OARS V, IL1 LEAVE THE
Sixth-street Depot at 3V, o'clock on T VKSOAT.
18lh, WBDMEHDAK, 19thv'ifHUaBIlAT, JOtb, and
rBIDAT, the 21st, for the
TROTTINa PARK.
Betnrnlng, leave the grorjnd at the) oloss of ths Baoss
each day.
fare SO cents out an back.
oclSb D. MoLABlW, Bup't.
JOSEPH FR.OMHERZ,
NO. t0 tfTCAMOBI-BTBEIT,
MANUFACTURES THE WELL-KNOWN
Oarmlno avid Shoemakers Ink. Also, flue
Marking Ink. The Oarmlno la a superior artlcli
and oan be aSi with a steel pea without changing
oolor. All Inks or my manulaotnrs are warranted
Foraaleattirllain-street. ocl7aw
MRS. W. J. ABELL,
Teacher of Piamo-Forte,
AND VOOATJ MUSIC.
KfsUonM N. 83? etxtls.atreet.
loslM'JT
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Chas. S. Weatherby,
No. m FIFTH-BTBEET,
BKTWBBK TINA AND BACB-6TEBBT3,
Is now offering au
IMMENSE STOCK
, . Aor .. .
SILKS,
HOBE3S,
DRESS GOODS!
MERINOES,
8HAWI.B AND
CLOAKS,
Bought at the
NEW YORK AUCTION SALES.
Afier tbe
RUINOUS DECLINE
Foreign Goods.
OBSEEVE THE PRICES.
Bills. Robes at l)S3, worth 04 S.
Silk Bobes at $U, worth $23.
Fancy Silks at 45c, worth tie.
Fancy SIIIm ot Tie, worth $1.
Black 811k at 75c, worth 81.
Fla'd French Merino at OOc, worth 91
French DIerinoea at 63c, worth 8?X.
French Merlnoes at 81s worth s)t 99.
Wool Plaids at 20c, worth 33o.
Ottoman Fluids at 13c, worth 83c
4- 4 bleached Muslin at 9o., worth
5- 4 F. C. Muslin at llo., worth 14o.
Canton Flannels at lOo., worth 12Xo.
Boat Engllah Print at lOo., worth 1H.
American Prints at OMe worth tsMo. '
Russia Crash at Se.
Red Flannels at 20c, worth SSe.
Irish Llnene at 95c, worth STXs. r
Embroideries,
AT HTJGH LI88 THAU TBI COST Or
IMPORTATION.
Citizens and Visitors
Will Sod the ...
CHEAPEST GOODS
Ever brought to tbs West
(HIS. S. TOTDERBi'S,
No. 113 Fifth-street,
BETWEEN VINE AND RACE-STREETS.
Iocl7oj
IMo'W Styles
11 CHILDREN'!!
XX JSl t s ,
Handsomely Trimmed.
J. C. TOWERS & CO.
HATTERS AND FDRRIBRS,
No. 140 Main-street,
oclt One door below Fourth. .
LADD, WEBSTER & CO.'S
LOCK BHTOH
SEWING MACHINES,
80 West Fourth-street,
Between vine and walnut-streets, Cincinnati.
W Send for a Circular. oclt
HEAD QUARTERS
FOB
BOOTS AND SHOES.
fHAVE NOW IN STORE THB IAR(E8T
and best stock of Gentlemen's Shoes for Vlt
near to be found In ths citv. which I am selling: verr
cheap for cash. JOHN H. DETERS,
oclt o. wees aourio-acreet.
Cordial Elixir of Wild
Cherry Bark.
THIS ELIXIR IS SURPASSINQLT
sgreeable to the taste, and contains all the
aotlva principles of the Wild Cherry Bark in a high
state of perfection, combined with several grateful
aromatlcs. Jt Is a most valnabla as well as a pleas
ant medicine, uniting with its tonlo powers the Im
portant property of calming Nervous Irritation and
KxcitabfiUy, and Is a saost effective Btrengtbener
ind Restorative, admirably adapted to the treat
ment of Debility of the Stomacb, Impaired Diges
tion, Weak and Languid Habile, especially of wo
men and children. Lose of Appetite, Ac.
Fr.p.d.ndfor..l.DbrBlJ)IolC8mN400i
oelTo Opposite the PostofBce.
Buckeye File Ointment.
nnHIS OINTMENT IS PREPARED
JB from the Buckeye, or Horse unesinui, oom
blned with other well-known remedies, and never
tails to cure that distressing complalnt-PILSS.
Prepared sold b 0Q . Ml
ool7o Opposite the Poatottce.
Chapped Hands, &o.
o
iDR IMPROVED GLYCERINS L0
' TMN h lilv wrfumed. and free front the
unpleasant odor of Glycerine. .
Freearsd and for sale by
SUIBE, ECKSTEIN A CO.,
oclT-c Opposite the Postofflcs.
Brown's Bronchial Troches.
FOR TEE CURE OP BRONCHITIS,
Hoarsenes. Coughs. Colds, pnbllo speak,
era and singer, will And them luviiluable for clear
in. and atrenstlsening tbe voice. Korsaleby
intanosireiiiw.il jjjej,- SOKBTJCIM A OO.,
olT-o Opposite the Poetoifloe.
Marshmallow Hemostatique
Paste,
OT A MOST DELICIOUS FLAVOR,
highly recommended for Coughs and Colds by
the tnoet distinguished French snd American phy
sicians. For sale Dy
BDIBE, E0K8TEI5 A CO.,
Opposite the PostofBce.
oclTo
NOTICE.-NOTICB IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the subscriber has been appointed and
inallfled as admtnietrator on the estate or Wm.
SU.l H.Dow.11, a.owMd. 8EpB B HoDOW1IiTj
rjinolnnatl. Oct. IS. IMS. ocl7.
IVTOTICE. ALL PERSONS AKJi HJiBll-i-w
BT notified that 1 will pay no debts contiaoud
y Charlotte Bim peon, slier tnis oate.
WM. T. tlHPION.
Ostobsr , IMS.
cone"
LANE sV BODLEY,
MAirtltAOTVggM or
Wood-Working Machinery,
AND CIRCULAR SAW MILLS,
Career Jeks&us Water. ts.ittaolaaa.tM.
aaV-lr

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