OCR Interpretation


The penny press. (Cincinnati [Ohio]) 1859-1860, November 01, 1859, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85025750/1859-11-01/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE PRESS.
ANDY V. FBANCI8C0. JOHN D. CALDWELL
1DIT0U AKD FBraiBTnaS.
OIYICl, 11 VIST FOtTETH-BTMET.
TDEHDAY NOVEMBER 1
The City Marshal Question.
The people of thii city, whose votes wero
given to the offioer now performing the func
tions of the City Marshal, would have dropped
their ballot outside of the box if they bad even
eusplcioned that the city or the county would
thereby lave to pay the expense and few in
curred in the support of City Marshal at the
rates heretofore paid. The people do not now
intend, if possible, by any devloe,to be sub
jected to suoh an expensive luxury. The eity
authorities, we hope, will not leave a stone ur
tamed" to so settle this vexed question of Mar'
sh&lshlp, as to settle itcertalnly. The by-play
now going on in the Courts will not settle the
question for the city. The contest now Is be
tween Joan 6. Giito andBxHJ. Roamsox, with
which tax-payers are not speoially Interested.
The oconrrenoe of Judge Gnouon having
been counsel for Mr. Qa.no, caused him to
withdraw from the sittings here, yesterday, in
the District Court of this County, and Eon. C.
P. Soorr, of the Supreme Court, presidod,
Judges Casts, Mallok and Dickson, also, on
the Benoh. The aaie was' ably argued, but
only, u we think, on a collateral issue, whioh,
however it be deolded, will not deoide the
question, "Shall the City Treasury pay the old
fees to the City Marshal?" That, perhaps, can
only be settled, on a suit by Mr. Qiao, or by
Mr. Bobinios, against the City, Come on,
then, with your dlreot suits, gentlemen, and
then this vexed question may be settled.
The Judges having taken the subjeot under
consideration, at noon, yesterday, were for the
remainder of the day at Chambers examining
the question, they poisibly may give their do
oision this morning.
Big Doings and Great Men.
The New York Eerald urges most vehe
mently that their. 8. Marshals should bo or
dered immediately to arrest Siward, Wilson,
Qbbci.it, Gibeitt Sxitb, Giddikos, Governor
Cbabs, uid such men, as conspirators before
the faot, with old Biowh, and that the fed
eral Courts shall try them for treason against
the United Bt&tes; also, that Congress, on the
first day of meeting, shall kick the traitors
from the pure halls of the National Legisla
ture. We believe that friend Bails?, late of the
Fret South, Newport, Ky., has not been nmdo
sufficiently famous, and should therefore be
brought before the ffnited States Court as ac
cessory after the fact, in exciting a serious
insurrection in all ranks both in Newport,
Ky., and on this side. The talk now is Bai-
let who is Bailit?
Some declare that this fabulous Bailbt is
preparing to attack the Arsenal at Newport
capture the two hundred soldiers stationed in
the Barracks, have their uniforms all colored
with yellow oohre, and send them up tht Liok
icg River in a flat-boat driven by ealorlo
power, bound for Falmouth. That some Buck
eye has purchased the Kentucky Central Rail
road, and that all the Barraok arms and
Bailit'b life guard are to be sent np the line
of the Covington and Lexington Railroad to
iipread war, devastation, plunder, carnage and
all moh extra baggago, among the people in
the blue-grass region. We hope President
Boer will order the arrest of old Bailbt.
Everybody talks about Bailbt. Five thou
sand copies of his paper, if offered in our
streets, would go off like hot eakes. The New
York Erald must Include Bailbt in his list
of magnates.
The Executors of the McMicken Fund.
The State law requires executors to file their
feooounts in the Probate Court, within eighteen
moaths after receiving their letters testament
ary. Messrs. Fbbkxaic G. Cabt, William
Cross and W. Id. F. Hbwson, Executors
of C. McMiokbb, deceased, entered upon their
iutied on the 30th of April, 1858 and the
eighteen months limit of the law having ex
pired on applioatlo to the Probate Court
yesterday afternoon, thirty days further time
were granted them to compute their report
and file their aoeounts.
These gentlemen have surrendered to the
ciiy nil of the red estate, and will continue In
the trust of the perbonal property, how long,
to are vot able to say.
A Painful Life, but a Peaceful Death.
As the sun went down yesterday, the spirit
left, the long suffering body of the wife of Rev.
Giobqb T. Flahdbbs, of this oity. Long
years of afih'otion, that no pen can give idea
of, havo terminated in death. We remember
the patient suh'erer as a joyous, spirited girl
whoa in the bey- day of youth. The wise dis
pensation of Prot idenoe inflicted upon her a
disease whioh, whih' la racKed the body, de
veloped, to a remarkable degree, the power of
Christian endurance and resignation. The
stroke of death has eleva ted the martyr to a
renovated being above.
The Argument for Brown.
The argument offered for Bbowh by his
counsel Is, that treason is a oricue that the
prisoner oouli not commit agsinut Virginia,
bcoaue he was not a citisen. Els aots were
unlawful, but were not treasonable. If suoh a
crime was committed by him, it was against the
United StateB.
The srgament cf Humtbb for the prosecu
tion has been concluded. No further particu
lars reached us of the trial. '
Marine Disaster.
Halifax dates of yesterday relate to the loss
at sea of the Steamer Golden date, of Boston.
The crew were all drowned, except threo, who
arrived at that port.
Deatb or as Avbrican in Pabis. The
Paris correspondent of tho Courier det Etat
trM, writing October 12, says: .
"I have just heard of the sudden death of
31 r. (ieorge May, brother of the gallant Copt.
Mty, who was married only a few months sinoo
to Miss Lissie Palmer, of New York, and who
came to pus the honny moon at Paris. I had
fc them yesterday both well, and expeoted to
diuo with them this evening. Mr. May's life
'win suddenly out short by the rupture of an
aseqritm."
9k decree has been issued whereby eal
.ilo, fowls and eggs are permitted to be im
ported into the island of Havana for the pe
riod of four months longer, under the reduced
rate of duties stated in the decree cf 7th
April last The port of Betabano Is declared
a port of entry for cattle, fowls and eggs the
object of this measure, doubtless, being to en
able Mexico and ether South American conn
trine to compete with the United States in tup
plying the island with beef oattle.
LATEST BY TELEGRAPH
Trial of the Virginia Insurrectionists.
CHARLESTOWN, VA., October 31.
The Court met at nine o'clock this morning.
The prisoner was brought in and the trial pro
ceeded without delay. Brown looks better
than heretofore, and his health is evidently im
proving. Us laid on the bed as usual. The
Court-bouse and its approaches were densely
crowded. Mr. Griswold opened for the de
fense, taking np the several charges of the in
dictment, replying to the points made in the
opening argument of the prosecution, lie al
luded to the peculiar circumstances surround
ing the present ease, and hoped the jury would
give it a oaltn and dispassionate attention, di
recting, as far as possible, their minds (rout all
prejudice and disregarding outside influences.
Let the prisoner bava an impartial trial under
the laws of Virginia, and let him be acquitted
or eonvioted according to these laws and the
evidence given in the caso.
With regard to theoharge of treason brought
against the prisoner, Mr. Griswold argued that
Brown could not be guilty of treason, as he
was cot a citizen of this Commonwealth, and
none bat a oitiien of this Commonwealth oould
oommit treason; never havingswors allegiance
to Virginia, he could not be a rebel against her
authority.
He was also charged with levying war
against the State, but the evidence given did
not support the charge. There vras a great
difference betweenlevying war and resisting
authority by men who aro congregated together
to perpetrate crime, and have their rnles and
regulations; wiien they are assailed they dofend
themselves to the utmost, sacrificing their own
and intending to sacrifice the lives of others;
but that is resisting, not levying, war. He
would not shrink from the admission, and the
prisoners had openly admitted it, that theie
men came for the purpose of running away
slaves; that was a crime under the laws of
Virginia for whioh the prisoner was amendable
for punishment to the extent of these laws in
carrying out that purpose.
lie temporarily took possession of the Arsenal
at Harper's Ferry, while these atempts were
maae to arrest mm. Mr. unsworn had no
attempt to make about that, but it was resist
ing these attempts that this blood was shed
and the lives taken, aud not in levying war
against the Commonwealth of Virginia. It
was in resisting that vraiou was claimed to be
the legal authority of Virgina, reeking to ar
rest these men assembled in violation of law.
Such things have often happened. Jails have
been broken open and men taken thence aud
executed in defiance of law, after being ac
quitted by a jury of their oountrymea, and the
power or tno eneriir trampled under foot; nei
ther does it oonstituto the levying of war if
murder ensued, beoause the commission of the
offense nf shedding blood may not have been
contemplated.
It is said there was an organized Govern
ment; a pamphlet Is referred to as evidence of
that fact, but it does not necessarily follow that
the overthrow of the Commonwealth of Vir
ginia was contemplated by anything that ap
peared In that book; the most harmless organ
isation in the country have beon oreated with
all the outside forms and machinery of gov
ernment. In debating sooietles governments
have been established, Congrcps elected and
laws discussed, and any one reading the bullo
tin of theso associations and knowing nothing
about them, would suppose them miniature
governments organized within (he limits of the
existing government. No matter what names,
what officers they may have, that of itself is not
sufficient. Bands of robbers or denperadoes
have their rules and regulations, their oflioew,
and presoribe doath as the punishment for a
violation of their laws, but that doeB not imply
that they contemplate overthrow of the legiti
mate government.
It is only an association or government to
control themselves in their intercourse with
each other. He further argued that the jury
could not find Brown guilty of treason unless
they find him guilty of associating with oth
ers to organize a government to subvert and
overthrow the government of Virginia; but if
the pamphlet proves anything, it shows that
an attempt was made to organize a govern
ment in opposition to the United States, and
not Virginia, for all the tools used, all tho
officers appointed, have reforence to a gov
ernment like that of the United States, but
it was vague, unmeaning language, which
really proves nothing at all. However,
there was a clause in it which must be taken,
for it was all in evidence.
He reforred to the distinct and positive state
ment that it contemplated no overthrow
of the State Government, but simply the
amendment and repeal of obnoxious laws in a
Constitutional manner. The learned attorney
who opened the case seemed to oooupy the
ground entirely, cot even giving over the evi
dence wherein the treason was proved. He
said the prisoner was guilty of giving aid and
comfort to the enemies of the Commonwealth,
and that was the only epooiuoation he made,
charging the defendant with treason. Ho was
surprisod to bear that Government burst forth
In suoh a sublime apostrophe to freedom in
terms and language, and with aotioo of suoh
surprising eloquence; that no one be told that,
he recoived inspiration in the land that urns
the ashes of Patrick Henry. He alluded to his
distinguished associate forthe prosecution who
had brought into his remarks the dishevelled
tresses of frightened beauty.
He proceeded to oonsidor the eharge of con
spiring with slaves. He said there was a mani
fest distinction betweon theeffortto run off slaves
or start slaveB, and conspiring to induce them
to rebel. Rebellion and insurrection was ris
ing up, not to run away, although freedom
might be the ultimato object, but rising op
against the masters, against the whites, against
the State it contemplates riot, rapine, mur
der, arson, and all the crimes which follow in
surrection. And more especially servile Insurrection, the
question was as to the subject and intention
Has any man testified aught going to show
that Brown or any one witb him said or did
one thing to induce any slaves to rise in re
bellion, or perpetrate out of which rebellion
grows. The slaves were taken possession of
for a temporary purpose, end placed in the
arsenal. Colonel Washington, who knew more
about it than any other witness, testified that
not a slave took part in the matter, except
Phil, who, at the suggestion of the prisoner,
attempted to drill a port hole, and that was not
done for the purpose of ineurreotion and re
bellion, but for protection. True, they were
engaged in an unlawful aot, but not the aot
obarged; they are amendable to punishment,
but not as indicted; they are punishable in
some way, but not as charged.
There's is not a capital offense.
He here proceeded to consider the Court
oharging murder in the first degree. This was
a crime involving premeditated murder, but he
argued that no suoh material had been shown.
First Haywood was killed; how it happened
nobody knows; it was done in the dark, whether
by aooident or intention docs not appear in the
evidence, or by whom. Perhaps these men aro
guilty of that killing in seme form, but it is
not proved to be murder in the first degree, the
result of deliberate premeditated malioo. He
could only say as Brown said to him, "Why
should we shoot a uejrro? That was not our
object." He did not justify those men in slay
ing them or resisting the authority of the coun
try , but he said thoy wero protecting themsolves
from arrest; guns wero fired in all directions,
and they fired, or intended to fire, only on
nrmed men. Without excusing that conduct
for one moment, he would remark to refute tho
idea of premeditated malice, that thoy had not
the time for thought and reflection which the
law contemplates. Not that he would say that
these men should be allowed to sin against the
Commonwealth of Virgin!, and perpetrate
innse crimes ana gounwnipt ot justice, but
eharge and oonviot them ncoording to the law.
Virginia has laws and Institutions Btifliolent
to her protection. Sho has thrown over the
lives of her citiiens every safeguard she deems
necessary and essential; has made laws neces
sary to the protection of her Droriertv and the
punishment of those who deprive their owners
of it. It is the boast of our institutions that
no man can be punished beyond what the law
requires, and if the law is not severe enough,
within the Legislature rests the proper remedy.
Brown knew that he was committing an offense
of slave property, he has repeatedly confessed
it and is willing to abide the consequenoes;
indict him for that offense but don't oonviot
him of an offense he never dreamed of com
mitting. Nothing in tho circumstances of the case
demands such a course of procedure public
safety does cot require him to be punished
contrary to the law. Jf Brown could be en
gaged five months in prosecuting suoh an
enterprise, and only gather throughout the
United States twenty-one meni black and
white, when there was nothing in the world
to oppose him, how in heaven's name can it
be supposed, that with him and all his com
panions struck down, the South aroused,
everybody on the alert watching enterprises
of this kind, that thero is the remotest dan
gerthat another scheme akin to his will be
started.
It was hardly necessary to make these re
marks. The duty of the jury is to be blind
to all outside prejudices. The physical cour
age of those who supported this insurrection
hes been highly commended, but the moral
courage is superior. That which can resist
prejudice and passion, let simple justice be
meted out to the prisoner. He asked no
more. He called on the jury to preserve the
sanctity of their oaths intact. Honor untar
nished and the reputation, of the Common
wealth for justice, magnanimity and chivalry
will be unstained.
Mr. Griswold closed by saying on behalf
of bis client that ho had no exception to take
to a particle of the evidence given on trial,
but, deemed it a wonder, under tho circum
stances, that truth should even be as fully
developed as it haB boon. He bore honora
ble testimony especially to Captain Linn,
who voluntarily came from another State for
the simple purpose of doing justice.
Mr. Chilton Bpoke of the embarrassment
with which he undertook the case. He in
tended to do his duty faithfully, and had
come to deal with the prisoner, Captain
Brown, not as tbe leader of this foray, but
simply as a prisoner under charge of viola
tion of law. If that law did not warrant his
conviction, he should endoavor to make that
appear to the jury; still, he would say he had
no sympathy with the prisoner. His birth
and residence until within a few years had
been in Virginia, in connection with the in
stitution of slavery, although now a resident
of the District of Columbia.
He had returned to his native State to spend
the remainder of his days, and mingle his dust
with her soil no other motive operated on him
than disinterested duty faithfully; he regretted
the excitement respecting the ease; he was
glad to hear tho Judge say on Saturday that
he desired to try this case precisely like others;
he desired, the whole State and the whole
South desired the trial should be fair; it had
been fair. Circumstances bad interrupted its
progress; counsel were here without proper
preparation, but indulgence had been granted
Aud tbey should do the best they oould under
the circumstances. Ho could not complain of
the excitement, for it was natural; he hoped it
would not interfere with the course of justice,
or cost a stain of dishonor on the State; the
jury had sworn they were unbiased; he pre
sumed they would firmly discharge their oaths
in bringing in a verdict. Hecould not under
stand from the opening of the prosecution on
what ground these charges against the pris
oner were attempted to be sustained.
From Washington.
WASHINGTON, October 31.
of Senate,
were passed requesting the President to cause
the heads of the Departments to submit their
estimates for expenses of the Government to
tho noxt Congress, upon a basis not exceeding
$50,000,000 annually, exclusively of the public
debt and interest thereon, provided the same
can he done without injury to the public service.
Estimates are in course of preparation in ac
cordance with the spirit of this resolution and
with a view to striot economy, but it is not at
all probable that the expenditures will be re
stricted to sueh narrow limit. Reliable ad
vices state that the Government of Nioaragua
has every disposition to make with ns a satis
factory trausit arrangement, and that the only
obstacle to this is the Belly contract, whioh,
however, has already failed in some particu
lars. No action has been taken by the Gov
ernment regarding the aiders and abettors of
the Harper's Ferry oonspirators already cap
tured. Should sufficient evidence against them
be obtained, it is supposed tbe requisition for
their surrender will be made by Gov. Wise, as
in the cases of Cook and Hszlett.
From Baltimore.
BALTIMORE, October 31.
Acting Mayor MoPhail, who was shot yes
terday afternoon at the Police Telegraph
Office, by Hanna, reporter for the Sun, is very
seriously injured. It is feared his femoral
trtery iB wounded. He is somewhat easier
this morning. He exonerates Hanna from all
direct blame. It appears that Hanna and
the operator, Haroourt, had some words. Tbe
former drew a pistol and Haroourt grasped it,
and in the struggle it exploded with the result
as staled. Mr. MoPhail says the pistol was in
the bands of Haroourt when the shot was
fired.
The newly elected Coanoil have been called
together to ohoose a President, who will be
come acting Mayor during the indisposition of
Mayor Swan. The Counoil meets this after
noon. Politioal excitement is waxing warm about
the State election, whioh is to be held on
Wednesday.
From California.
ST. LOUIS, October 31.
The to the 10th
inet. has arrived. The news is unimportant.
Business was extremely dull.
About half of the town of Auburn, Placer
County, was burnt on the 9th inet. , Loss
$50,000.
Two hundred hostile Indians . were cap
tured at the head waters of the Feather
River and placed in the Mendocine' Reservation.
Fire at Deer Island.
BOSTON, October 31.
The barn and oarpenter shop attached to the
City Institution at Deer Island, was burnt last
night. - The fire is supposed to have been the
work of an incendiary.
River News.
LOUISVILLE, October 31—P. M.
inch in the canal.
DIED.
FLANDEBS On tbe 31st ult., Harriet Theresa,
wife of Bov. G. T. Plunders, aud daughter of JohUD
Bpaulding, Em., of ZanesvlUe, Ohio, In lbs 3Stb
yenr of ber ago.
The funeral will be attended to-morrow ( Wednes
day ) at hi First Universallst Church, Plum-street,
at 10 o'clock.
MORTON Edward Morton, son of John K, and
Mhitt Morton, nied 2 years, S months and 17 days.
The I'nncriil will take place from the residence No.
2M VIno-strcet, ou Wednesday afternoon at two
o'clock f. M.
Dixon's Sugar-coated Fills.
Purely Vegetable nnd Pleasant to Usei
VBr Admitted to be the Host Family Fill in use,
Prepared only by . ' .
GEO. M. DIXON, Druggist,
anft-ciu (Junior of Viftb and Main-streets.
SPECIAL. NOTICES.
MASONIC STATED MEET.
IKfl of Miami I.ociirn Mo. 4r,. V. unit
and J
A Allisons, will lie hold THIS (TuesdiwL
nvnniNu at j o hock. Ail nreinron in
good standing are Invited to attend. Uy order
oi mo w, ju.
nolo JOHN O, PARR, Secretary.
ftrjW-IHRDICAI. M3CTCRES-CIN-
lta7 OINNVJI OOTjLEQB of medicine
AMJ HUnOKltY. Tho regular courso of Lsotnrm
will commence in tliia institution on TUESDAY
MOIIMNO, at tt o'clock. Profesnur T. A. tttmnir
will deliver the General Introductory rame day, No.
rember I, ntlS o'clock P.M. Ladies and gnntlemtn
am lurited to intend. Introductory will Its delivered
in the Aniphlthoftternf tho College, sonth-westcoruer
of Weatoru-rowand Iionsrworfh-strest. -
A. H. BAKLtt, M. D President.
October Jl.lSM. . ocSlb
SPECIAL NOTICES.
ajcosk MK. E. Y. BOBBINS WIIX
S!lr"0I.oors ot J Ltnre 'Jo?-
menus ai j uwuiv
x iiikim f a r.E.
uuiveriial favorite with those jwrsong wno are
troubled With ehupped hands.
AMANDINE. We cballeoge a comparison or
Oor mMi riltf knr broup bt lo this arket. We
always havo a fresh article on band.
rnr n ('REAM OF RfJHBS 1JPSAijE,
a-5nJlanSy pViJaring these 'articles and can
forntab a freSh .upplj .5l7AIlMKBt Agent.
Mautactutr and Imiorltr of i-erfumerr.
west J qurui.airaq"
mi.iu saw soap. DO
r vour bands and face coroitoftce ehaeplng s
iuter approaches? More tuafl ,., yi
the soap you me. Then try .om. other kind, you
way possibly find an article mm. jf ----smooth
during the coldest weather W .select or
lock with especial reference to this quality, anu n
I, now largeraai fitffi&i;
Manufacturer aud Importer of PorfiimnjV '
oc) No. 3 west ronrtn-aireei.
OFFICE OF THE PASSEtf-
nun da i . t 1 1 a ia
OOiUPANT OF CitiCIN-
K a il, 8. w . corner oi i mm
anu HaCe-SlreeU, r.nn.r. i-t- r
15, 1849. This road it now open. Cara will start,
at Intervals of ten minutes, from 5:30 A. M. un
til midnight, running eastward on Third-street
from Wood to Lawrence-street, and westward on
Fourth-street to Smith, and on Fifth-street to
Wood. Citizens will please bear in mind that tbe
cars will invariably cross intersecting streeta before
stopping for passengers.
ocivt? JAMK3 ,T. KOBBTNS. President.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS
DELAND,
GOSSAGE &
CUTLER,
CHEAP DK GOODS.
We have in store s complete assortment in ever;
department.
Our Dress Silks and Robes
Are offered at uncommonly
XiCXW PRICES !
CLOAK Al Ml HI I, ROOM
We have many decided novelties, which we offer at
BARGAINS.
A VARIED ASSORTMENT OF
Wool Dress Stuffs, &c.
In Printed and Flala Herlnoes aud Delaines; De
laine and Cashmere Bobes for Ladies and Misse';
Paris Velvets; Volours Poplins; Printed Flannels
and Cashmeres, for Dressing Gowns; Wool Plaids,
Ac
MOURNING GOODS.
In Alpacas, Bombazines, Delaines, Merlnoes, Cbal
lies, Berages, Harets, Crapes, Gloves, Handkerchiefs,
Collars, Sets, Vails, Ao.
ALBO
HOSIERY; GLOVES; HOOP SKIRTS; Shetland
Wool OPERA BOOBS; Vails; Nubies; Armlets; Leg
gins; Brocbe BHAWL BORDERS; Ladies', Gents'
and Children's Winter UNDERWEAR at cost;
OLOTHS, CASSIMERES and VESTING3 selling
very low; BF.D BLAKKKTS; SKIRTING FLAN
NELS. 200 Pieces Rich Dress Silks,
From Auction, selling from 75c. to SI U per yard.
DELAND, GOSSAGE & CUTLER,
74 West Foiirtli-slreet.
OPPOSITE PIKE'S OPKBA-HOTJ8K.
nol-TTbASJ
CONSOLIDATION
or
Fire and Marine Insurance Agencies
-OI THB
OF HAKTFORD, CONN.
Offioes: Nos. 171 Vina and 40 Main-streets,
CINCINNATI.
Cash Capital 91,00(1,000 OO
Annetii 8,030,43 811
THE UNDERSIGNED RESPECTFULLY
inform their friends and patrons that they bave
tbis day enteied Into partnership, under tho namo
and style of CARTER & LINDSKF, as tlie Tire and
Marine insurance Agents of the JEtna Insurace
Company, of Hartford, Conn., and have therefore
consolidated their separate Agencies, For the con
venience of their customers and otbers, tbey con
tinue both offices, No. 171 Vine and No. 10 Main
street, whore tbey will be pleased to bear from their
friends, and trust that tbepatronage that has hitherto
been so liberally bestowed to each will not diminish
by tbe union thus formed.
CARTER & LINDSEY,
JAMES H. CARTER, 1 . '
HENRY K. LINDBEY. Agent"..
Cincinnati, Novembor 1, 1849. ' nolam
PHILADELPHIA
Dining and Coffee Saloon,
NO. 81X FIFTH-STREET, SOUTH BIDE,
(Near the cornor of Vine,)
C. L. VICKEBS, Proprietor.
Oysters and Game served in all styles. Meals at all
bonis. nolcra
FRESH TABLE BUTTER.
T AKGB RECEIPTS DAILY, BY EX
JLA PRESS, at Wholesale and Retail.
JOSHPH G. NOTJR8E,
Duller Merchant,
nolo 16 West Fourth-street, cor. Elm.
SPECTACLES,
THB BEST ARTICLE FOR THE IM
PROVEMENT of the Sight in this market
Bcciiratoly fitted to tbe condition of the eyes, and
warranted to snit.
Colleges and schools furnished with Apparatus at
Eastern prices. HUMIY WARB, Optician,
Ho. 7 West Fourth-strcet,
oc31t Opposite the Penny Press Offlre.
NOTICE TO BUILDERS. PROPOSALS
will be received et tbe office of I Rogers,
Son A Co., No. let) Vine-street, until the 2lth of No
vember, Inet., at 2 o'clock, for building the new
Commercial Uospittl, on tbe site of tho present
building, bonmled by Western-row, Twelfth-street
and Miami Canal.
Bids to be received for the whole job, and not in
parts. All bids to be made to conform to the plans,
specifications and torms of bids; all of which may be
pen at the olllce oi Isaiah Rogers, Son A Co., 160
VUio-street. ,
No bid will bo received unless they conform to and
are made on the printed forms; also, tho bidders to
lame the price they will allow for tho old materials
now on the ground.
The security intended to be offered forthe faithful
performance of the oontiact to named In tbe bids.
GK'J. W. RUNYAN,
Chairman Com. of t'onncil of Public Buildings.
Cincinnati, 0.. Hot. 1, 1CMI. noltt
3
A. B. COLVILLE,
3
Benin Manufacturer)
No. 41 East Second-street, between Syi-smoro and
Vroadway, Cincinnati, keeps erory description of
Counter, Platform, Cnttlo, Rnllroad Dejiot,
and TrncU Nonlrnf Trunks, -.
Iron Wnerona, ivc.
Repairing done on tbe shortest notlcs, nol-faa
WIT FOURTH-STREET
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
CHEAT OPENING
-OI-r
NEW GOODS
ON
MONDAY, OCT. 31,
CHAWI1WFS,
No. 112 Fiflh'treet
BUVWEEN VIM B ANI -RACIB-STS.
Tbe FoIUwIob Goods hsavlnst bo most,
ly all beasjlit duriac the piuM week at the
NEW-YORK AUCTION SALES,
ON JBUCH TEllIMHt
That ean not fall tV pleiwe even sho lowest
buyers. , ..
Fancy Silks at t2je., worth Ka. .
Fancy Silks at 76c, worth SI.
Fancy Silka at $1. wdfthjl M.
Elegant Black Silfts,
EXCEEDINGLY LOW
Ottoman Plalde at Ibo., worth 28c.
French Merinocs at 65c worth 67c.
French Merlnoes at 75c., worth Si.
English Merlnoes at T3c wortb.tl.
Wool Plaids at 200., worth 30o.
English Delaines at !HC worth 2c.
English Prints at 10c, wot" Wo.
Wool Flannels at 20c., worth 29c.
ALSO A LABOE STOCK OF
STAPLE DRY GOODS,
AT MAUNFACTUBERS' PRICES.
-ALSO-
In Great Variety,
TO COMPARE FAVORABLY WITH THB ABOVE.
Chas. S. Weatherby,
No. 119 FIFTH-STREET,
BETWEEN VINE AND RACE-STREETS.
' oc3ld
HOOP SKIRTS,
. . AT
Fifty Cents on the Dollar,
AT
cms.' s. weati1Rb.x
No. lia Fifth-street,
BETWEEN VINE AND RACE-STREETS.
lurtldj
Published This Morning.
THE ART OF ELOCUTION,
Exemplified in u Systematic Cotirae
of .Exercises.
' II, N. DAY, A. M.,
AUTHOR OF "ELEMENTS 01? THB
AltT OF HHKTOK10," formerly Professor
of lthMoi'io in "vVi'Btom Reserve Colloge," now
President of "Ohio Fomiile College."
The peculiaritli'B of this work are, that it proposes
to exhibit the principles of the art of reading and
speaking in a strictly systematic ordpr. In connection
with copious exercises for tho exemplification of each
principle by itself. -
Its leading obji-ct is to give an Intelligent and
practical commitnil over all tho functions, of the
voice, nt the same time developing Its power and en
abling it at will to express, by appropriate use of Its
various functions, the thoughts and feelings that
appear in discourse, accurately, gracefully and
eilectively. It ctfecte this object by exhibiting one
after another the different changes of the voico. in
pitch, force, quality and time, iu strict scientific
order, explaining Its natui and Its pecnllar effect ill
dellveiy, and accompanying this exhibition by ex
amples for exercise. It alms to be a true art-science
apnlied to practice.
It is preceded by a practical treaties on Orthoepy
or Pronunciation, embracing; Articulation, or the
doctrine of the elemental aounos of Speech, Syllabi
cation and Accentuation. Tbe txercises in this part
are copious, and are arranged with a view to the
development of power, voluino and mellowness) of
voicej, as well as to a graceful, correct and distinct
pronunciation.
"the author gratefully aoknowledgeahis indebted
ness to Professor Quodrlch and Dr. North, of Yale
College, for valuable hints aud suggostious iu the
preparation and revision of the work."
The work is the fruit of much experience In teach
ing, and of loo and earnest study.
One Vol., 12djo Price!.
Moore, Wilstach, Keys & Co.,
PUBLISHERS,
S3 West Fourth-street
OC31-0 ' CINCINNATI.
Chapped Hands, Face, &c.
AT THIS SEASON OF THE YEAR AL
MOST every person Is more or less troubled
with Uhapiwd Hands and Face, Roughness of the
rikiD, Ac. we would, therefore, invito especial at
tention to the following Remedies, as thsy not only
cure, but prevent, the disease, by keeping tbe skin
in a moist aud healthy condition.
Glycamyl of Hoses,
An entirely new nnd elegant article, which we pre
pare in our own laboratory with tbe utmost care and
of the very finest materials.
Glycerin Lotion. (
Our improved Glycerin lotion is entirely free from
the unpleasant odor of Glycerin; la highly perfumed
with liose, Bitter-almond and Orange-Bower, and la
unsurpassed by any other made.
Glyceriu Camphor Ice,
A most agreeable combination of Glycerin and Cam
phor, which we prepare in a very convenient firm
for the toilot.
ALSO-
COLD CREAM,
GLYCERIN HONEY, .
1 BURNETT'S KALISTON, to.
For sale by SHIRK, EOK8TEIN ft CO.,
ocMo Opposite the Postoflioe.
Aromatic Tincture of Myrrh
A HIOniY EFFICIENT AND BX
OEEDllSGLY pleasant preparation for cleans
ing the teeth, hardening tbe iunie. removing all un
pleasant odors from the breath and Imparting to it a
delightful perfume. ,
Prepared and for snlo by
.. BUIBE, ECKSTEIN A CO.,
OO31-0 Opposite tbe Postofllce.
Irish Moss. -.
Pill BBL8. PRIME IRISH MOSS RE
tj V" OEIVED and fnr s.ile by
tiUIBE, ECKSTEIN ft CO.,
' oc3l-o Opposite the Postofflce,
Havana Cigars.
WE ARB IN RECEIPT OF SEVERAL
additions tn our oxteniire stock of choice
Havana Olgers. Onr vnrioty is so creat that smokers
cmi always be supplied with the genuine Havana to
suit IMBtrtjj. ECKSTEIN A CO..DrWl..., ,
oc3lo Opposite the Postoflioe.
i
NE W ADVERTISEMENTS
REMITTANCES
TO B NG LAND, '
111BT.ANI. 1
, ifMUMVLA
We Issue sight Bills on
BPOO; NER, ATTWOOD k CO., London?
a OYAL BANK OP IRELAND;
NATIONAL BANK OF SCOTLAND
' In sums of l and upwards.
C Exchange on l"rno and Germany.
. JAMES F. MELfflE & CO.,
oc miecX No. 1 West Thlrdntrot.
SCHOOL GF DESIGN
-OfTHK-
' .
Ohio Mechanics' Institute
OPENS
On Tiwsilay Evening, November 1,
A1ND CONTIM'ES I'OTO MONTHS.
1 !
TUESDAY AND FRIDAY EVES INGB,
Mechanical, Architectural &
Artistic Departments.
Mr Tor full informntlob apply at thaofflbstof the
Institute. I ooSlb
Cloaks, ' V:
Shawls,
, Millinery,
Pniss Trinmingis,
' Embroideries,
Iincy filoodft Generally,
AT AS V miCES AS T1XBY CAN BE
BOUGHT IN ANY IlOUSf:, JA8TJ
Oil WEST. ,
MISSES BAIRD
118 West Fcrirth-stroet,
ocJJaw BETWEEN VINK AND RACK.
CLOAKS!
Cloaks! Cloaks!
UNEQTJALED IN STYLB,
TJNIQUALED IN QUALITY,
VNEQUALBD IN CHEAPNESS.
DEW DEOP,
AT'.
10 Dollar.,
12 Dollars,
15 Dollars,
18 Dollars,
30 Dollars,
32 Dollars,
95 Dollar,
. 30 Dollars,
35 Dollar !
, THB '
LA VENICE,
At All the A bore Price.
MILAM WRAPPER,
. At All the Above Prloei.
At All the Above Prices,
at tat
Pioneer Cloak Bazaar
GEORGE LEWI
Opposite the Postoilicei
lo21-am;p
Sewing Macllnes!
. PIKE'S; OPERA-MJSE,
FOURTH-STREET
.'. , Cinciannti, ' Ohio.
i LAN C fc BODLEY,
' VAirvPAomim f
Wood-Working Machinery,
. AND CIRCULAR SAW MILLS,
Corner Jolinlnnl Water! tt. ClaelMatl,Ot
1
-or- ., ' .
' DIRECTLY '
I
Mill 1 VVILSOfS
1 .
REMOVED TCI '

xml | txt