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The Findlay Jeffersonian. (Findlay, Hancock County, Ohio) 1870-1881, January 05, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026034/1872-01-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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f Will
.
G. DE WOLFE CO., Proprietors.
y0L. XVIII-XO XXXIV.
ie
Faith that Bight makes Might, and in that Faith let
FINDLAY, HANCOCK COUNTY, OHIOrRIDAY MORNING,
u to the end dare to do our
Duty as we understand if.
JANUARY 5, 1872.
Abraham Limcolh.
WHOLE JOIMBIiIU3
f1L w rr
vv
A. S . ft. 1
FV
l .. m. . r . nnr,
. y oum . j-w ahj j
X. -
-m0 ' rtnnl
r..n.,n fVfnth fni,
s ITuree monuis
, JOB PRINTING.
if vl n r. inad e 1 ance add t Uons to onrestabtliih-
la tne .hw!. of auuenalof tbeUvwt
JOB PRINTING.
Id inn ihu ot nuaeruUof tbetaaest
...i. havinn em Dior ed ecparieneed and
areful workmen, w arc nrepared to execute
ZrZn for vrerjn -let y of PuuJt a Fakct
io Pur-mvo with neataeaa and dispatcli
TM addition of Uteam Power to or uatlisb-
nestasorda as fm mtobip"
onntjyoffloetveway wi ww l"""
wora tjaii witg fM uu uwwi
. Pastor. Services every Babbatn ai
Vat, A. M., and o'clock, P. M. 4b
W U o'clock, A. M. Prayer
k P. M.,Tt)unday evemnt. Oor-
k and streeia.
L Q,Pa3tr. tie rvloe every tiabuaUi
tk. A. M and 7 o'clock, P. At.
.JoT i o'clock, P. M. Prayer Meet
k XUonxlay eveniu. Umadway,
LrasHmk -
r Episcopal chvbcu. Rev.
thtUi at lui o clock, A. M., ana 2 o ciock, r-.
M. Aaubatii bcliool X O'clock, P. M. Prayer
kleeung 7 o dock Tuuraday evening, ban
daalr.y itueat, west of Main street.
i NO 1183. LUTHKRAJt CHURCH, Rev.
f. a. ilooix-r Pastor, bervlces every naooain
iat lU- o'clock, A. , and 7 o'clock, P. M.
iiuuaui bcooui a( o cjoca, a. m. rmyer
t7oclock runrHaay eveuina. vraw-
jRSTMJiE.V IN CHRIST, Kev.T.
. Harbaugn
. benncesevery sauoain
1 O'CIOCK, tr. Jit., BUB-
rayer Met-
1 .i.l, TI,I.1I .KUU1S
Crawford and West su
CHURCH Ot UUV,mn Btreel,wt4f "Ain.
i ur a u n Putfitr HerWICeSon
babbatu at 1W4 o'clock, A. M.. and
P. M. babbalbrliool at SJ4 P. M. r
meetinc every TUurs day evening
o'clock.
r. MICHAEL'S CATHOLICCHURCH.RIBT.
I. R. YoUHOPastor. Kvery other saotMun.
L'irwi ni.yuut SA'dnck. A. M-. Hieh Mi
IU. A. M Catechism at P.M. ServlceSiln
tnnliah. tiermau and French. Massevwrj
- morning at 8 o'clock, A. M. West endNw
Main-Cross strseu
tlEB.UA NL VTHEBAN .BLJokn'M)CHURCH,
Rev. M. Boerkie, Pastor, cervices every
.i iwr KaliimLh ai 10 o'clock. A. U. Sabbath
Ku-innl mi. o'clock. A. M. Singing Society at
1 o'clock Friday veiling. Corner of We
and Front streets.
ENGLISH REFORMED (. PauTt) CHURCH,
Hev. Joslab May, Pastor. Services every
other Sabbath at 10 o'clock, A. M. iuastend
of Main-Cross street.
HERMAN REFORMED CHURCH. Rev. J. G
KalU, Pastor. Services every other Sabbath
at o'clock. A. M. Sabbath School at t
o'clock, A. M. Prayer Meeting at 7 o'clock
Wednesday venlng. Jum ena 01 juam-
Cress street.
EVANGELICAL C URCH. Rev. E. B'
Croase, Pastor. Services eveiy Sabbath at
lutt o'clock, A. M- and 7 o'clock, P. M.
Prayer meeting Wednesday evening. San'
dusky street east of Main.
Benevolent.
F1XDLA T COUNCIL, NO. SO R. B. Jf.
Uegular Con vocation second Monday In each
uioutn. a. r . visaos. x. i. u. .
Hyatt, Recorder. m
F1NDLA T CHAPTER, NO. 68, R. A. it.
Regular Convocation, First Monday In each
month. William AkokbsOK, H. P- D. B.
BkAKDSLKT, Secretary.
yiNDLA 7 LODGE, NO. 227, F. A. M
Regular Communication First and Third
Wednesdays In each month. M. B. Pattek-
Boa W M,U. J. DeWou k, Secretary.
BLANCL ARD LODGE, NO.
, 403. F. A. M.
ljrnur f WMnniunication Seconi
mnd and FourthJ
Wedp-sidays in each month. Jawes Wil
aoK.W. M, F. W. Fumis. Secretary.
GOLDEN RULE ENCAMPMENT, NO. 92.
i. O. O. F. Stated meetings on the second
and fourth Fridays ol aacn month, 7 o'clock,
p. M, in Odd Fellows' Hail. E- B. How-XLI-,
v and J. A. Pittsfobd, Scribe.
SANCOCE LODGE, NO. 7S, I. O. O. F.
xiatortreetings every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock, P. M-, in Odd Fellow's HalL J. P.
Bickblhacft,. N. G, D. C FiSHBB, Sec'y.
M
VV
in
the
la
Departure and Arrival of Mails at the
Findlay Post Office.
DEFAKTUKK.
Qir Bra-teh C. H. G a. m
FnmoHl Brunch U E. L. BB IHU p. n.
AUUI V A liti.
Caret Brmtek CH.AC BB- 7:80 p. M.
KlAVi-Brvtek U K.L.RR-- 110 a.m.
UKI-AKri-IUi.
afm. F,.n.i is AMrs and Bowttng
tine luesday, Tuu.sday and aatorday.at
8 -v. m. . .. . .. . .
V Blatchara, Iloucttown oaa nwutg urcr
" Tuesday and Saturday, at 1 p. m.
ArUgu, WUiuuutownoHd Jari:-Taesday
aud Saturday, at 1 p. in. .
Cit.ari.aiv, Uami oad Bo.-Taesday
and Friday, at ( p. in. . . . .,
Oak Bulge, UUowa, Koamoke, Brtmore aid GU-
Aoa Tuesday and Friday, at 7 a. m.
ttetUa tiuutieg ami PauiUUm Friday,
MctaUM tla9! Osster-Wednesday and
Saturday, at 1 p- u
II
I
In
, officb bocks.
Open at 7 a. m. and close at p. m. -
Person, noldlnx boxes most pay rent on the
same within the first ten dayso leach oQartr.
(quarters commence Jan, April, i uly and Oct.
Persons taking papers through the office
must pay the postage in advance, or they will
bediscouUnued. l ue following are tlis quar
terly rates of postage: Papers published Sev
an limes a week, 33 cents; times, cents;
4 time., 15 cents ; twice a week, U) cents ; once
week. cents; monthly, over 4 ounces,
ounce, and less,
1
in
the
LOTT. P. M.
Business Directory.
Crws f Hrvrm Ubms lawcrtcw la this
DepsrUnral sac paper at hi. Dvllara
PerAVtfsiana.
Business Directory. Attorneys at Law.
F.W. FJ
PySIClAN fcUii(iliOX7 OJFICE
Block, over Crysial roni
f.n!.-. Hardin Street, 3d
house EaijV irKi.vterian Church.
BiBSD,
TTOENET AT
LAW COLLECTION
A Aut. bffico In Cariin's Bloclppo-
eitethi Court House. Special atutnuou gi
en toUection in t-.wn Vod county- Loan
negotiated on lavoraiHe term-.
100.20,1671-
JAMES A. BSPE,
TTOKNEY AT LAW.
-office over W- L. Davis A Co. s Store. Main
BUeet, Findlay, Ohio. apr.14. .1)
BKKKT BBOWH. - .T.DU-
BBOWBTADCKS.
. rmsvEYS AT LAW. Findlay, O. Wll!
A Viwavs be In attendance at their omce,
orld WWU? Corner," hrst door South of
Court House, and will give prompt per
l"? r.j.ll.rZ, .ii legal business eutrasied
lUBW i .-. w B
to their care.
H. AKDEBSOS. G- IEDLTO
ixnrisM A PENDLETON,
IRNEYS AT LAW. Prompnd rej
f ul aueuuou ; -. - ProUaL9
d'TeuendJningCQB
OveSu&r?'
. Entrance from new
. .'.. sr. IfEKET.
. rtriti vEY ANDOOCNSELLOR AT LAW
Co""- h,l Rast of the Court
House, I
wriya."-.mad by
l M.tu "-. , K Rrown
in nwia iismwj ,
m Burket-
mav 7.
BOESMMBArU.
.uirn BRO-U
r . AVING formed "TS'lfVSZ
lay, Ghh
: m. nctBDKLEY,
.x , . and' Claim Agent
, .?H,lTlanStit.and U.S.Couru.
$m prw!Uoe law laStWi
VT. - f - . . x .
, inlXUaWU W
hiacare. ".tlking depositions, ottice
A Jufctioe
Pr? BioctOorner
couna. Mrlm -,ndly. onio.
VJI
try
-jT.il'Os'ixnd"
Business Directory. Attorneys at Law. Bankers.
CITLlES'a BisK.
A-UHUN8 .OUBMM
. --.i-v Cnk-in
' rAKXEB CABLIK.
..ml denoslts. .
joH A. MEE-S, Cashier.
. Kraru BAKIC
, M HENDERSON J&&Z?.
iunuprinc cm nkiurbu
.nit piuxhasers, and da a ge-erai oa
I aess. rrrTTZ
llc skravtLft OD xuV 7 - tn
.onH-Vneil1-toiPU-
it Wilsonind Isaac Davis
Cigars and Tobacco.
Smoking iwjw", -ru.t. suei
bmoklng I
aoustanuy
rbind. Ko. 75, Maw Dtreeu
Boots and Shoes.
SSSHSSS
shortest not ice. Itepulrii.E ie-.it ly aud prompt-
ly done. Wor warranted. Miop ou liain-
CrowKU.'WoKtorMNiii. i fnoltf
i . i
JOUXEWIXa T.H.11EDKK
KW1.VU ni:iU Ji.
TAEALEKS IX IK-KiT ANU feilOES. HaU
m fcwiiig's Lluc Miuu Street,
Fiudlay.uuio.
Dentists.
DR. . A. BOhtXBEilU,
DENTAL SUROEOX. Particularatteutli
Fivvu in the treatment ol natural teeth
wtu Mlwi aril h rold-ioil. tiu-Ioil and silver.
HatiKfiu-tion euarauteed in all cabes. Odice
over Welsh's tjUoe fctore. Main Street Findlay
Ohio. ,
nPRRATIVE AND MECHANICAL DEN'
II tiiii, Cromley's Block. All. operaUous
pertaining to the profession, careiuliy
and
kklUfuily performed. Residence, Ao:
ilardiu Street.
West
UK. S. UBU,
fi rBOFiv riVKTisT h&rir.rnracticedtwen'
O tv-tive vea in Findlay aud vicinity, will
insert tMdli in all the ditlereui stvlea. diseas
ed Teeth and Uums treated Inascientinc man
ner. Teelli extracted without ia:n. umm
Henderson's Block, over Hancock Bank.
S.cl.1. Kl'l:H A I'O,
TAEALERS IN DRUGS. Stationery. School
I J Books, etc PrescriuiioiiB accurately coni'
pounded at all hours day or night. Perfectly
uro XTOgs euarauteeu. iOrner jiain auu
lain Crass Streets.
Dentists. Dry Goods.
J. J. WUUXEK .
TEALER3 In Staple and Fancy Dry Uoods,
MJ urucertea. Booutand huoes.llalsandCaiJ
eux, ett, Nos. hi and tvi, Main Street, Fiudlu,
vuio.
I. a. BALLKXTIKK. W. S. POST
pvEAiFJSS IN FOREIGN and Domestic Dry
Xf Goods, Millinery Goods, Yankee Notions,
Street.
BiRSEr, svTDtR l CO.
mm umiuh- fiiriiiiiiitiy r.O. d J. iaiu
rpHE GREAT ZASH HOUSE, 'Old White
A. wnwr, oy Lvun nouse. a compieie ury
Goods Store, Clothing Store, Boot aud Shoe
Store, Hat aud Cap Store, Millinery Store, Fur
Store, Carpet Store. The place where close
buyers buy. Follow the crowd. .
PAITtKNoai I.M)t.kliP
TVEALER8 IN DRYGOODS.MilllneryGoods'
AJ Ladies' and Gent's Furs, Clothing, Car
pets, Hats, caps, etc, jsoa. i and s Alain su.
r inuiay , uuio.
Dentists. Dry Goods. Groceries.
D. CXIXE BOSS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS
In Grocereis. Flour. Fish and a General
variety in the Grocery and Provision line.
Good prices paid for Butter, Eggs, and Coun
try froduce generally, tast siae oi Main bu,
first door north of Goit House Block. Findlay,
Ohio. A pril 15, "70-tf.l
ISAAC DAVIS. UEXai B UBEsIT
DAVIS A GREEN,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS
and Commission Merchants and Dealers
in Flour, Salt, Fish, Wooden and Willow Ware
&C, Ac, Corner of Main and Saudusky Streets.
I DAVIS. i. W. DAVIS. M. I DETWILEit
JtAVIS BROS. A
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS
and dealers in Flour. Provisions. Wooden'
Notions and general variety. Goods at Whole
sale, ai leveianu auu iuituu firitxa.
and 23, Main street.
oi
Hotels.
MABVIX HOlsE.
1" 'IV.. . Ik Ml n.1 Jf'.Ult I "41. 1. J.J.I. a
first-class house in every particular.
Wm. Marvin Co. Proprietors, also, dealers
Branates, wines, Liquors, cigars, Bourbon
anq Bye w niskies, i.tc
AMERICAN llOLSE,
SHENXINGER, Proprietor. Corner Main
aud Mai u-Cro .Streets, Findlay, Ohio.
The central location of this House makes it
tuost desirable place to slop at in Findlay.
The tables are always supplied with the bett
the markei. iiood stables and hostlers.
fers
nros
their
snop
Hardware.
BCTlIItl TFA t OKY,
DE.MERSin Afrricnltnml Itnj.l..-meni,IroD
Nails. Glass, sash.. Putty, Bent Work, Cut
Rubber and Leather, Belting aud a full
siocKoibueu uoous. o. tvj, ca ing s jtuocK,
Main street.
Hardware. Physicians and Surgeons.
CHAS OESTERLIK. W. X. DETWILEB
OESTEBI.IX A METWII.EK,
TTOMrEPATHIC PHYSICIAN SUR-
GEONS. omee and Residence Main Sf
opposite the "Goit House." Findlay Ohio.
E-TBIHIS MILLER,
PHYSICIANS & SURGEDN8. Surgical and
Chronic cases desiring to consult l'r. En-
trikin will find him in the office on Wednes
days and Saturdays from 10 o'clock a. m. to t
o'clock p. m. Dr Miller can be consulted on
Tuesdays and Fridays at same hours. Office
room formerly occupied by Dr. En trikin.
ARSON HUBD. H. D. BALLARD
HI BD ABA LLABD,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.havingfor
med a partnership to practice Medicine and
Surgery will promptly attend loan calls, ui
oce over Frey A Ettinger's Drug Store.
I N
L
up
he
r
be
As
4
Millinery.
MRS.A.f. LINDSAY,
NVITES THE ATTENTION OF THE LA-
dies to her fresh and desirable slock of Mil
linery Goods, Hats, Bonnets aud Trimmings:
fact, a general assortment ot Ladies' Eur
nisning Goods of Uie latest styles, bought ai
late decline, and will be sold at correction
ding prices. Lannert's Block, East side .Mu:d
Street, Findlay, Ohio. April 5, lO-tfj
S
MISS JULIA A. PARKER,
ESIREStocall attention to her stork ol
MiUinerv Goods. Hats. Bonnetsand Trim.
Diinga, which she is receiving at W. 11. & J. J
Wheel it's Store. Main Street, Findlay, Ohio.
lowas
son
f
jl
I
Old
Produce Merchants.
W.8.OSB0BH. L.A. BALDWI3
OaBOBX A BALDWIN,
ENERAL PRODUCE M ERCH ANTS, Deal-
Cm 111 DUllCI, SS, JL ii..,.- c,uc cvun.
Dried Fruits, Beeswax, Pelts, Hides and Couu
Produce of all deacriptlons.
To
Special Notices.
Maniood : How Lost, How Restored.
Inst ntiltlii.liMl a niv edition o1
Ir. ;alvereii cirurir
Essay on the ratltcai cure ( with
out uiedicinelofSi'EKMAOKKHoxA
r ,ul Weakness, involuntary Seminal
Loassfca, IKfuTENCY, ueuui mi "J"1
IncaDacity. Imiiediineuls to Marriage, etc;
also, CoksumitioS, r'ru-nir and r its, in
duced by aelf-iudulgence or sexual extrava-
w-price, In a sealed envelope, only 6 cents.
The celebrated author, in this admirable
cav. cluarlv demonstrates Irom a thirty
years' successful practice, that the al-rmiug
consequences ol lyelf-abuse may be radically
cured without thj dangerous useol luterual
medicine or tlLe application of Hie knife;
wiintiiiff out aXiirwle.kf cure at once simple.
certain, aud, edectuai, by means of which
ftertfr nn mailer what his Condition
may be, may cure himself cheaply, privately,
aa-This Lecture should be in tbe bandsol
every youth and every man in tue lauu.
tinder seal. In a nlain envelope, to any
on receipt of six cents, or two
finVCulverwell's -Marriage Guide,"
pricei' ceuVS- Address the Publishers,
CHAS. J.U kU6 S lAl-i
41 -y 127 Bowery. New York P. O. Box 4.586.
XO THE SUFFERING.
The Rev. William H.Norton, while residing
in Brazil as a Missionary, discovered in that
Und of medicines, a remedy for Coksump
Tiox. &CBOFCXA, SOKE THBOAT, COIGHS,
nuia ASTHMA. ASD NEBVOCS WEAKSESS.
This remedy has cured mysell after all oilier
medicines had failed.
Wishing to benefit the sullerlng, I will seuu
the recipe for preparing and using this renie
ds lo all who desire It FREE OF CHAEGe.
Please send an envelope, nu
and address on it. Address,
Rev. WILLIAM H. NORTON,
670 Broadway, New Vork City.
nol9-ly.
WEDLOCK.
Tm Eabis or Civil. Socik-rr.-Essays for
Young Men on the honor and happiness of
Marriage, and the evils and dangers of Celib
acy, wlUh sanitary help for the attainment of
man'stnie position in lue. oeni mt.iuwjura
nvelopes. .Address, iiuwahu -.-o '-i
TION. Box P. Philadelphia, Pa. inoy
KEW BOOK every aae kbonld pas-
FIRST HELP IN ACCIDENTS AND
IN SICKNESS.
...i i- t- ,1,. .lTim of Mfiilical Assist
u.,i.iiil wiili the approval ol the
best Medical Authority.
Tbe following are some of Its sunjeciK.
Ritea. Bleeding, Bioken Bones, Bri
lurnsT Choking, Cholera, t ola, touiusions.
Scalds. sruall-pox.tiralus, SudocaUou, Sun
stroke, eic etc
This volume, wnneu ..r " i
cians. has besu prelartd for the press by tbe
auditors oi
GOODHEAXTH MONTHLY MAG
ZINE, 12mo., MS res, jrl.h 21 Illustrations.-
postpaid, on "VxXNi'ER MOORE,
Pttbluher, Motion.
THE
I he
and
ol
the
the
p
0
no26
Northwestern Ohio
NflPRfllllCPHnni
llUIIIBIIILUUllUULl
r A A.
The Second Term of this flourishing Instltu-
tion.
"ILL (PEN
Monday, Nov. 27, 1871,
AND WILL
Continns SIXTEEN WEEKS
It is the object of the Institution to provide
the best means of obtaining a thorough and
practM-al education lor all who wish to attend.
Neither pMns nor expense have been spared
to make the Institution all that parentscould
wisn as a uiuce tor the education ol tneircuil-
dren. Tim curriculum embraces, beside the
common oraucues,
Greek. Latin,
German, French,
jigiier Mathematics,
Natural Sciences.
.book Keeping,
and Penmanship:
No extra change for an v branch advertised
In the curriculum.
TL 11 ION fror common branches. 60c ner
wees; ior mgner, wjc
Good board can be obtained at from t2 2S to
t! 75 per week. Room rent from 2ic to 60c per
weeis.
A Normal class will be formed each term
for the special instruction of those deuring to
learn.
A Normal Term of six weeks fa intended for
those who cannot be in attendance A full
term at any season of the year..
Particular attention will Ike irlven U the
Theory and Practice of Teaching during the
.iimix session.
St asic tsaght In all Its departments.
CALENDAR FOB 1871-2.
Winter term begins Nov. 27.
njiriug term begins.
March 2H.
Normal term begins..
June Is.
r or luriuer tniormallun send for catalogui
II. S. LEHR,
ie.
B.F. NEIfZ,
Oct. 11, l!71-flin.
j. u. rAnn.
NEW GROCERY!
AT
BENTON EEDGE.
APAMSiCO. would sav to theeltlwns
j. ol Benton and viciuity lhatthev haveea-
ihlisbed a Family Gr--cery In their midst,
nd will keep Flour. Fisb. Salt, and all kinds
uioceries. wuicii will be sold at
They will pay Findlay prices, In CASH, for
Produce of all kinds. I
Cash paid for Hides and Pelts.
May U, lg;o-tf.
T3. 1. Ttolinsoii,
General Collecting Agent.
OFFICE With Shafer Bros- Wheeler's Block,
FUSULA-Y, OHIO,
attend to all business entrusted to
his care, and nitikejpromptrelurns. I
bv uenniMdon to W. 11. A J. J. Wheel
Whiteley A Blackford, J. S. Patterson, Shafer
li. Drown, u. tj. r isner ana many oth
ers. A Ino-M-tf.l
EE3M0VAL !
WE would inform our old customers and
as mauy new ones as may favor us with
patronage, that we have removed our
to
Hyatt's IV ew liuilding
Where they will be accommodated at all
with the best of Fresh Meats, at the
Market Prices. Thankful for past
isvors, we irua, oy lair aeaiing, to merit an
increase ui patronage.
A. Al. 1'. AtAKU.
April 29, 1B70-U.
Meat Market
FORMS HIS FRIENDS AND THE PCB-
lie In general that he hascomDletelv fitted I
his room, north of Davis . Green's, where I
will constantly keep the various kinds oil
Kh,-ll M EATS at as Low Prices as they can
had elsewhere. I
he buys non but the best stock, bis cos-1
tomers may be certain of obtainingllrst-class I
meats. Idecio. Its.
To tlie 3?nllic.
Fashionable Tailor.
:
DAM SOURS would Inform the public!
that he is still engaged in "giving
who may choose to honor him wit
flu
with their I
Particularattention paid tocuttlng.and neat I
taslr tits warranted in all cases. Terms as I
elsewhere. Give me a call. Hender-I
s Block, up-idalrs. second door from the J
enrnrr. ntt.
Weod-Sawing Machines, and
Horse Powers.
AM NOW M ANVFACTURING HORSE
POWERS, aoaptl to the running ol I
iifr.ri, .'1,1. i.,', uuu Ajiu inbuunui
SAWS, and idi.t r purposes requiring similar I
power. Call and see me before purchasing!
elsewhere, at the "Jackson Foundry," near I
WTarehou
3s-tf.l JESSE WOLF
AGENTS WANTED
EYERYWHERE,
tell the mott popular mrk ever brf,rt inlro- I
duced lo me A menca ruouc.
THE GREAT CONFLAGRATION.
CHICAGO,
Its past, pbesekt, axd future.
ORIGIN, PROGRESS A"D RESULTS
O THE UKhAT CrllCAUU UiS-
FLAGBATION.
graphic scenes, Incidents, and details of
disaster. Lists of the principal Baukers,
Manufacturers, and Merchants who are loos
en. A complete picture of Chicago before
after the lire. The Trade and Commerce
Chicago. Details of its Municipal Atlairs,
tlie Great r 1 res ol t lie V oriu.
The statistics ot the r ire Department, wun
.1. scrim ion of the Wonderful Water Works.
Description of the Sewerage.paving and build
ing mate-rials. The extraordinary marvel ol
River running up stream. The dumber,
location und modeof operating the Grain El
evators. History and description o the fa
mous Stock Yards. 1 he number oi itaiiroaus,
I Jike Trade and Comiaarce.
r rom personal observations oy
GUSORGrK P.TJITON".
(Peregrine Pickle,
Literary Editor Chicago Tribune,
AKD
JAMES W. 6HEAHAN,
Editor of Chicago Tribune.
A book of 350 Danes. Illustrated by the best
artists, and will be worthy of the confidence
..tali.
Price in extra Cloth and Gilt. FiaO. Will be
in liv mail, ou receint of mice.
t his wora can oniy ue ociaiuea iiinii 1 11c
Publishers or from their regular authorized
agents, as it is sold exclusively by subscrip
tion, ana cailiioi oeooiaiueu inuu any uoua
stores ill the United Stales. Address
UNION PUBLISHING CO..
(niwlj lui Twenty-second St., Chicago,
To Teachers-
ruHK Board of School Examiners or HancotE
county will meet at the New Union School
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Saturday, March 4th,
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November 4tn,
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Geo. F. P EN IlLETOS,)
Jhhs Bo Wat ak, I Examiners
- i -. ...
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MILTON BRADLEY A CO Pn Wishers.
2t-4w. iSprlDgneld, Mas
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ic
a. a-
P.
for
he
his
to
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in
ble
I
I sold
I
-The
HUMPHREYS'
Homeopathic Specifics,
A FAJtiLT Medicine Chest ita Jamily tie
Icexsug. lau must have something to give lor
a cold, lor a neauacue, uiarraea, rueumavi.iu
neuralgia, toothache. croup, whooping-cough
I or other of the hundred ills that are sure to
come. Forwarned is forearmed. You have
it in a ease or HUMKMKfclB' uuafcurAinIC
SPECIFICS. Simple so you make no
I mistake ; ready so you need not wait ; safe
so you may act fearlessly ; efficient so you
mav feel confident. Medicines that cure but
I do not kill : they save, but do not destroy.
Price In
No. Cures Hoxes.
I
Fevers. Congestion. lnflamatlnng
S
3
4
6
6
7
8
9
Wrnsa,Worm Fever, Worm Colic
Cry lag. Colic, or Teething of In-
Diarrhea, of Children or Adulls
Itvsentery, Griping, Bilious colic
'Ulera-.Mrbas,Voinlttng
lants.
4'oughs. Culds,Brunchitl" 26
Nenralla-au Toothache. Fareache 2a
Headarbe.HIrk Ueada'he, Vertigo 26
Uyspepsla, Bilious bloinach.. 26
Mupre ssed.or irregular Periods 26
Whiles, too Profuse Periods 26
Crwsip.Cougn.Dimcult Breathing. 2o
10
11
12
13
KrnputM,sall Rheum, Erysipe
las . 25
15
ltt
R enuaallsm. Rheumatic Pains 25
rnwua Ague, t.niiis, rever.
Agues . 50
tr les.Bllnd or Bleeding... 50
17
IS
l fattaalmynd Sore or Weak
riyes ..
s-alarrbAcuteorChrouie, Influ
50
1
20
21
" H booplog-t'augh VioleiitCoughs 50
Aslhnia.Oppressed llreallilng...... 60
Ear Discharges, Impaired Hearing 5U
euza
22
23
21
25
26
Nerorala.Euhuxed Glands.Swell-
iegs 50
. Ocaeral Debility .Physical Weak
ness ,n 50
" Dropsy and Scanty Secretions.. 60
- Hea-Mckaess Sickness from lUd-
Ing 60
" Kldaey Disease, Gravel 60
27
28
" Biervoaa Debility, involuntarv.
Discharges, and Seminal Emission 1 00
" More Mouth, Canker , 60
" I' rlnaryi Weakness, WettingBed. 60
" Painful Periods. Hysteria 60
Mntleriac atCiiange of Lite 1 (10
Ulplheria Ulcerated Sore Throat 60
t.piieMiy RpasmiMsu Vitus nance I ou
Pi ice In vials, large size...Joc. and 1 00
FAMILY CHESTS. In Morocco, with 35
large 3 dram vials, containing the above
and Book of Direction ooiniletel 10 00
20 " " " 0 00
HOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
SECT BY MAIL OK EXPRESS JTREE, ON RECK I IT
orraica.
Address
.HUMPHREYS SPECIFIC
HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE CO..
Office and Depot, No. 5oi Broadway N. Y.
PONDS' EXTRACT
rare Piles. Jfffl ralgia. Toothache.
Bleeding-of I he Lssn, Momiteb,. Nase
ar other Ortsas, Bnras, Bralsea, La use
I
Taraat, aareEyea blois, t wras, rieers.
fa, sprsiss, Kaeauiatisnt. aare
Price. ox., sue.: pints, fl : Quarts, 11.75.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
Jane 16 lbTl. 1 y.
For sale by
"W. Ii. Miller & Co., Druggists,
Findlay, Ohio.
t'ti flnv nArwtn nptvuiMnar ainv Uailiiiiiia itila
tthow oue-tUird as many Uvlnu. urmautint
M AEV. M IHAK O T MlM AD1,B miCU JBiA "
Rem buy
buy : ui a furtlr rewardof lluo lor
aayease
sofChronicorlnflammatory Rheuma-I
aud Rheumatism of the Kidneys if wtUnut
l. ncuiaiBla. AVIirjUIliatlU AKUO. Btl. a. I
. fl I ru lirlu K liumnuT In . 01 , I.l .1 ia I
ihtK,h.e.um."1l!.e?Zup,iK'd ,"",1rw''
tree from injurious Drugs. It Is not a yuack
jneuiciue,ouiiuescieni.incprescnpionuijos.
Pitler. M. D Prolessorof Toxiivilovv and I
Chemistry, graduate of the celebrated L'ul-
WKilw i.f l'.i,.llv.tla A Ik lrj .line n- I
tire professional life has beendevoted special
ly to this disease. Thispreparation undersol-
emn oath Is conscientiously believed to be the
only positive, reliablespecilicever discovered.
The prool that no other speciflc ever exists is
fouDd In everv community in nelsons alflicted
many years past end still sutlering. if I
,.h,tirifl,lm riir. ml 1 ,iu.ill. tiiri ri.l I
Ihistpould not txo, a lact that must be uni
versally admitted. The oft decelvetl sugerer
msy wisely ask, what security or evidence has
that Dr. Filler's RheumaticSyrup wiil cure
case. The protection ottered to patients
gainst imposition is in a legally slgued con
tract which will be forwarded without charge
any sufferer sending by letter a description
ainctious; this guarantee win state tue ex
act number of bottles warranted to cure, and
case ol taiiure the money paid will be re
turned to the patient. No other remedy lias
ever been ottered on snch liberal and honora
terms. Medical advice, with certificates
from prominent Physicians, Clergymen, etc
who nave been cured after all other treat-
ments failed, sent bv letter, gratia. Afflicted
cordially Invited lo write for advice to the
principal omce.zs noutn rounn street, i-uiia-
delphla. Pa. Dr. Fitter's Rheuniatlcbyrupts
by Druggists.
W. L. MILLER CO..
Jane 16, 71-ly Sola Agents, Findlay, Ohio.
0BADAL1S
The ingredients that
COMPOSE ROSADAI.IS are
published on every; scLage, there
fore it is not a secrut pieparalion,
consentient ly
PHTSICI1X8 PRESCRIBE IT
It is a certain cure for Scrofula,
Syphilis in all its forma, Rheuma
tism, Skin Discaies, Liver Com
plaint and all diseases of tke
Blood.
CITS ECTTLE CF EOSAB
will do more good than ten bottles
of tlie Syrups of Sarsaparili-.
THE UNDERSIGNED PHYSICIANS
liavb used RosadUs in their practice
fur the past three years and fnely
ondorse il as a reliable Al'eretive
and Blood Purifier.
DR. T. C. PUGH, of BalUmaa.
DR. T.J. BOY KIN. "
DR.R. W.CABB.
DR. F. 0. DANNELLY,
DM. J. S. SPARKS, of Nfcholurille,
Ky.
DR. . I McCASTHA, Columbia,
8. C.
DR. A. B. NOBLES, Edgecomb, N. C.
USED AUD EKDOESED BY
J. B. FRENCH k SONS, Fall Eivcr,
Mast.
P. W. S.MTTIf, lacksna, Mich.
A. F. tVHF.l IUUt.Luna, Ulua.
B. HA1.L. Lima, Ohio.
CRAVEN A CO., GordonsviUe, Va.
SAM'L. G. McFADDEN, Murlrecs-
boro, Teiin.
Our scacs will not allow of any ex.
tended remarks la relation to tbo
virtuesof Rosadalis. Tcthe llediral
Profession we ruaraatae s Fluid Ex
tract superior to any tbey have ever
used in tne n-eatmenc or aisrasca
niood; and to tbeatiiirted wc say try
Uosacialis, and you will be restored
to hcallh.
ria:ljli is sold br all Drunrista.
priue 61-iO per battle. Addnss
13. CLEKEOTS C3.
DAiTiuecc, 4 a.
1871 ly-
A Complete Piclorial History of the
Times."
Beet, i'heapea and mast eaeeesa.
fal Family Paper ia Ike I alea."
Harper's Weekly.
SPLEKDIDLT 1LLVSTBATED.
Notica of the Pretu
Tlie model newspaperofoarconntry. Com-
i . . . in aii ii,a rienarttnenls of an American
family Paper. Harper Weekly has earned for
itseit a rigiu i" ii who, j uum v v.. . ...
" V V MiMUllI POMt.
n'l... ki ..,,1,1 ir.it inn nfita clasa In America.
and so far ahead of all other weekly journals
as not to permit of any comparison ueiweeu
it aud anv oi tueirnumuer. niuuiummn.
. ih.'flnMl aollections of reading matter
that are Drinted. It Illustrations are
. , J.. . I .. H.pnl.llMl llV
the chief arluts ol lue Biuiiur.-".
Harrier ueemy u me - ' 1 ...
est ing illustrated newspaper. Nor does Its
value deiiend on Its Illustrations alone. Its
reading uiatter la of a higher order ol literary
merit-varied, instructive, entertaining and
unexceptionable. N. Y. Sun,
SUBSCRIPTIONS. 1872.
TERMS:
niiptt'i Weekly. one year Mi 00
. . . ... Lui .ml mMft i n t J-r.
An extra copy of either the Jfaootrne, Week
he suuolied gratis lor every
Ciubof mi Buibe at U W In one re
nut la ace; or, si a cumo i -
"".Tri. Homer' Maaaxine. Weekly,
and Boaer. to one address lor one year. UO ty
or. two ot Harper s riwi
j k..n..Mr 7 ML
Back nnmoers emu mi ""i'i""--;
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neatcldlh binding, win oe sein, oy ";
ErJTr lor 171) each. A complete
ceinrofcash at tne rare of to 2a per volume.
. r , VTTT-...n of the nurchaser.
-" r. Vnlnmae aon I nil PA.
-' - '-- . jj-.. U'lu i, Mnu
1 he l-iaiage j- - -
lage
ilrli I
a vear. which i"" i " -
loslomce.
Address
HARPER BROTHERS, N. Y.
Great Western Gun Works.
va.a... nnaUa aad Single Barrel.
jtsi. " .
ahntonns: Revolvers: Ammunition:
(tnortlng Goods, Rifle Barrels , Locks,Monnt
lnOulsterials.e. Send for a Price List.
Atfdress J . H. Johnston, Or4 Western Guu
Adr,-oiimiihneia Street, PlUbnrgh Pa.
"iT irmi carbines Biflea and Revolve
bought or traded for.
Bot-tmor
R
2-V
j-,
1
I-3treet,
Special Notices. Poetical.
THE OLD BOSTON-ROCKER.
BY JOSEPHINE POLLARD.
How slight are the things that awaken
Our thought of the dajs that are o'er!
How slender the thread we have taken.
To guide oh by memory's shore !
Where the billows are tenderly bringing,
The shells of old joys to our leet.
And the sea Is forevermor singing.
The echoes of songs that were sweet !
In the old Boston-rocker I ntstle.
As cozy as cozy can be.
And sail in a fairy-like vessel.
Afar on a Lethean sea.
The scenes of the past become clearer.
Asscenes oi tne present aeian.
And my loved ones draw nearer and nearer,
Aud joy has control of my heart.
The many glad songs, and the folly.
The frolic, and full I recall :'
For everv one had lo be jolly.
Who visited Liberty Hall.
No matter what threatened the morrow.
No matter how cloudy the day.
We gave the cold-shoulder to sorrow.
Aud iaugneu 111 iorcuouiug away.
Old chair! If these relics, that ever
The heart's dearest treasures outlast, '
Had keeeh. It would lie thy. indeavor
To tell us a tale of the past!
Bat round thee are niem'rlesso precious "T"
Entwlned. their sweet bliss lo imiairl.
Not only I hey rest, and refresh us.
But whisper aiise to me uearu
Thine arms are outstretched to embrace me,
When wearv. I seek tliv reitose.
On the breast of a lather they place me,
Oh. Time, may thy touch but make stronger
This relic of Liberty Hall :
For this homethat enshrines it no longer
And soon are forgotten my woes.
Will scarcely seem home-like at all 1
BY JOSEPHINE POLLARD. Miscellaneous.
[From the New York Times.]
GEN. GRANT AND HIS ACCUSERS.
A few da) a ago the Biooklyn
Eoale liroucbt loselLer into one
article the afeuealions epaiDst Gen.
Giaut nLich tie Sun, tbe World, and
other l apeia Litierly rpposed to tbe
PrcfcidcLt, ate ccr-Btanily repeating,
The l'refcidt Did dcfarmeit end it
may save mittonstiucf.on to say
here that in tbe it marks we have to
make about them, we do not in any
way refer to tbe Lagle, which simply
repeats charges without inventing
them have echoed their complaints
so ollen mat at last tuey proDaniy
almost believe in their justice. To
prevent ctbeis lallling into the same
error, we unncricoK to reply to lue
Eagli article as fcou as wc had
time to icquue into the facts We
now proceed to do to.
The Eagle eajc, "Grant went into
cilice poor, and is notoriously a mil
lionaire already ; and be cannot have
made bis million cut :of bis official
salary. OT hl8
legitima'.e receipts in
P"" 1""
vl:.. . . it T ..A . M.,
duty of the President Ot the United
Stales was to answer every question
. . . . ;
addressed to bim about bis private
circumstances, and empty his pocket-
. , ., n ..:.:- tn Bhrar lin
BOOK tO tVery lbU0r 10 BUOW UO
much moneV he hail fcbout him, the
-
dignity of Hie cilice would not be
much increased and, pernap", tne
people would not consult their own
interests bv fcutiecting their chief
tinner In such ill ll (
Tbe I'resi
. e
dent considers bis own eel'-respect,
and we believe lie also ccneuleis the
wishes of tbe j crple, by nevei r ply
ing to any attack made npon turn
We have no authority to speak for
bim but careful inquirines have
assured us that outside of bis cllloial
salary, bis income dots not exe'ed
six thousand dollars a year, ills
piinciiial property 18 his (arm of BIX
i i e.
or ttveu uuiiurrii ncicu, near ciw
Louis, part of which was inherited
by Aire. Grant. Tbe remainder was
bought by Gen. Grant from the other
heire, cut of the cne hucdrtu thous
and dollars civen to him by the citi
zens of New Yotk before ho became
President, line of the charges
against the President ia that this St
Louis farm was a present to him.
The rest of the ore hundred thousand
dollars referred to was used in pay
ing cfl tbe mortgage on his house lo
Washington, now owned by
Gen. Sherman, and in purchasing and
furnishing bis house at Hong Branch,
which he is charged with receiving
as a present from Mr. Murphy that
being anothf r of the numberless lab
rlcations set afloat by the Sun about
the President, and repeated eagerly
by journals opposed to him. Aota
dullar't worth of property hat been
given to Gen. Grant since he lecame
frestdent.
During the war the President
saved something out of his pay as
Major-General, we are half ashamed
to refer to such matters, but since
the La nle asks for tbe facts, V. msy
as well have them all, and with the
money so saved be bought a part
interest in some Chicago lots, which 1
have appreciated in value, but hith-
erto have yielded no income, lie
also bought a small amount of horse-
railroad stock, which he still owns,
and which pays a moderate dividend.
He was civen, while a General in the
Army, a houee ia Philadelphia, which
he rents for about two thousand dol
lars a year.
Another statement of the Eagle ia
that "the Sum. has printed repeatedly,
uncontradicted from any quarter, a
list of twenty-five or more relatives
whom Grant has appointed to oince
under himself.' We hope that tbe
day will come when honorable jour
nalists will be ashamed to assert that
anything is true of Geo. Grant be
cause the Sun says it is true. The
list in qnesfion ha been '""tra
dieted ; it is false in every p&r.icular;
and we will print it at the close of
this article, with comments iwhich
prove it to be false The Prea jlejit'a
relatives who do bold office were
chiefly appointed by bis predecessors.
Was he b jund to turn tliem out when
he came into cffiie himielf ? U it to
be the rule of public life that wl.en a
man accepts a responsible positi m he
ia to benin bv thrusting his kin roll
out of any cfllces they may happen to
hold, and giving op an tne property
he may possess ? Do the people ex
nect this?
A third bttttmeLt ia that Gen.
Grant received twenty-five thousand
dollars stcck in tbe Seneca Stone
Company, as a gilt, and then appoint
ed Mr. Cooke, the President of that
nnmnanv. Territorial Governor in
r j .... i. i .: .l.
Waahinoton. "inereuy euunuuua mo
nf the stock of Messrs. Cooke,
i,.t Jr. Co." This is a toiai mis
representation of a very simple trans-
aotinr.. auoniy . "E""-
lion of tbe Seneca btone uompsny m
iK7 near v a year Deiore uen.
Grant was nominated President, be
..a invited bv Jur. ii. u. tvooa-e ana
nthfirs to take twetty thousand dol
i.ra wnrth of stock as an inveimeru.
He thought well oi h, ana sureiy no
one will deny that he was free to in
vest his money in any enterprise be
choose; be bad as much right to use
his money at bis own ciscreuoo as
anv other citizen. He invested ten
thousand dollars in the purchase of
the stoc k, and it hat newer pauinim a
cent. Ue has been anxious for a long
time to sell this stock ; perhaps some
of the accusers would like to buy it
Got. Cooke was appointed last Feb
ruary stock bought in 1867; Cooke
appointed 1871 and that appoint
ment bad about as much to do with
Seneca Stone ss it bad with the ce
Dosits of the cost-tertiary period
The charge that President Grant
quarrels with Sumner and is friendly
with JNye, :, ana that he absents
l-class
in
is
a
of
by
of
.irtetll frcm Washington during
Summer, we leave people to form
tbeir own cpinicts about. The ac
cuHHtic n ibat eomebedy very near to
the rrteulf ntitl pertcn was engaged
in the ''gold gambling affair ot Fiek
and Gould, ia utterly refnted by Jay
Gould's own evidence, es published
in the ctllcial report of the investiga
tion, by tho Foity fiist Congress
The Prtsident himself gave the order
to sell gold on the infamous "Black
Friday" that order which brought
the conspiracy to an end. The only
man who ever attempted to drsg
den. irant s name into tbe trans
actienwas James Fitk, Jr. a nolo
ricus thiif end swindler. Is there
any rcf pectabe man cr women in this
country who would suffer Lis or her
estimation of a friend's character to
be lcwercd by anything James Fisk
Jr., m ght Bay ? And yet the 1 reel
dent ot tho United States is to be
condemned by paitr papers, on the
evidence of a man who has commit
ted tfto worst kind ol c flenses against
the law, and who, to the eternal dis
grace of the Judges who administer
nil at law, is still revelling In bis
stolen wealth, instead of breaking
etoce in Sing sing.
As to the objections ot Gen. Grant'i
course on public -flairs, we do not
profess to answer thtm now; we
merely repeat cur own opinion, that
in the main his policy is a sound.
wise, and beneficial one. A man of
Inurer private life than Gen. Grant
Inever occupied the Presidential chair,
Is it just is it worthy of the i'resi
dent's position, or of this great na
tion that be should be called to
account at any moment by every dis
appointed cfiice-seeker who chooses
to invent a new slander against him t
We bare replied to these charges
because, by constant repetition, they
might have imposed npon credulous
mmds. Tbe more thoroughly tbey
are sifted, the more shamelully false
and malicious they will appear. We
believe that the majority of the peo
pie look upon these calumnies with
indignation. They have made tbons
anda of friends for the President
among that quiet and thoughtful
of the community which rarely
busies itself actively in pc litics, but
which admires pluck and silence in
public men, which hates to see injus
tice done, and which despises the
cowards who try t undermine i
public reputation by defaming pri
vate character. Whatever njected
clfice-seekers, like the calumniators
of the Sun, may do or say, the great
majority of the American people are
lovers of fair play ; they detest slan
derers and liars; and they will honor
Gen. Grant all the more because he
goes on steadfastly doing their work,
in disregard or the insults ana taunts
of men who hate bim becauso he will
not yield to their demands.
We now eubjon the so called list
of '-the President a relatives," pub
lished almost daily by the Sun. It
will still be published, doubtlese, not
withstanding the proofs given below
its falsity. But at any rate, the
man who does so publish it will stand
self convicted before the public as a
professional and wantm libeller:
I. Jesse Hoot Grant, President's
father, Paslmaster at Covington, Ky.
Appointed to office by Johnson;
ret lined by Grant
il. Ktv. J. ol. Cramer. President's
brother-in law, Minister to Denmaik.
Appointed onsul to Leipsic, bv
Johnson ; transferred to Denmark by
irant. Is a Uetdodist minuter, a
thorough linguist, a most competent
man, and waa highly recommended.
III. Brevet Brig. Gen. F. T. Dent,
President's brother-in-law, one of the
military secretaries at the Executive
Mansion.
Army appointment; holds no po
sition c( emolument at hands of
President. ,
IV. George W. Dent, President's
brother-in law. Appraiser of Customs,
San Francisco.
Was strongly recommended by
California Delegation.
V. John Dent, President s brother
law, exclusive Indian trader for
New Mexico under the Indian Bu
reau ; place worth $100,000 a year.
Was not appointed by President ;
holds no office under Indian Bureau ;
profits of place grossly exagerated.
VI. Alexander htiarpe, President's
brother-in-law. Marshal of the Dis
trict of Columbia.
Mrs. Grant's brother-in-law ; a first-
class man, and capital appointment;
a member of the President a official
household, and the duties are of such
character that from lime immemo
rial the place has been filled by a
relative or near friend of the Presi
dent. VII. James F. Casey, President's
bro'her-in law, Collector or the Port
New Orleans, and electioneering
agent for the renomination of Grant
means ot United states soldiers
and Gatling guns.
Ia not President's brother-in-law,
but Mrs. Grant's; Las proven an ex
callent collector: carried out many
reforms, principally in taking control
Cus.om-bouse out ol hands oi pol
iticians. VIII. James Loncstreet, Presi
dent's wife's cousin, Surveyor of the
Port ot Is ew Orleans.
Ie n relation whatsoeaer to either
Preeident or hit wife.
JX. Silas Hudson, Presidents
usin, Minister to Guatemala.
Was strongly recommended by
his friends in Iowa ; President haa
hut slight acnuaintance with bim.
X. N. A. Patton, President s wiie s
cousin, uonecior oi tne i on ui
vesten. .
Xo relation. The President does
not even know bim.
XI. Orlando H. Ross, President's
cousin, clerk In the Third Auditor's
Office, Washington.
Waa a eallant soldier; President
never knew cf his appointment until
he met llosa on the street, who told
him of it, and not on bis recommen
dation. XII. Mr. addison Dent, Presidents
wile's third cousin, clerk iu the Reg
ister's Office, Treasury Departnent,
Washington.
JVo relation whatever.
XIII. George B. Johnson, Presi
dent's third cousin. Assessor ot in
ternal Revenue. Third District of
Ohio.
Xo relation whatever.
XIV. B. L- Winans. President's
consul's nusbana. lOBimauier ui
. a . Tl A A
Newport, Ky.
A relaltcn whatever.
XV. A. W. Casey, President's
brother in-law's brother, Appraiser
6f Customs. New Orleans.
li no relation either of the rresi-
dent or Collector Casey tt .New
Orleans. -President does not know
bim.
XVI. Peter Casey, President's
brother in law's brother, Postmaster
o Vicksburg, Mass. -
"Mr. Grant' brother in law's broth
er was a loyal Southerner. Aot ap
pointed as the President's choice.
v WIL S. T.Lambert. M- D., Pres
econd cousin. Receiver of
the Public Moneys in Oregon ; said
h. a defaulter, but retained in
r.flice. - ' i . - -
No such person in office in Oregon
now or atany other time,
XVIII. Ber W. Oarke, Presi
of
the
in
a
ing
and
And
was
to
tl.e
a
for
for
are
as
and
277,
the
is
by
to
in
B.
ing
of
B.
a
as
dent's cousin, Supervisor of Internal
Kevenue for Southern Ohio.
Xo relation; a as formerly a mem
ber of Jongi ess from Ohio.
XIX C. A. Ford, President's
cousin, Assessor of Internal Reve
uup. Si Rouis
Xp relatiun whatever; i Collector ;
not Asttttor. of Internal Revenue,
Mr. Delano ears be is a first class
efficer ; "if there ever was an honest
man. be is one.'
XX. Dr. E. H. Grant, President's
tbird cousin, Clerk in the Internal
Revenue Bureau, Washington.
Xo relation
XXI. E. C. David, President's
wife's cdbsin's husband, Special
Agent at the Post office Department
tn Illinois and Iowa.
Xo relation: President does not
know bim.
XXII. Charles F. Baldwin, Presi
dent's cousin's husband, Mail Agent
in Kentucky.
Ao relation; President does not
know him.
XXIII. John J. Grant, President's
second cousin, Assessor of Internal
Revenue Twelfth District of New
Yoik.
it relation: President does sot
know him.
XXIV. Alexander Sharne. Jr.
President's nephew, Cadet at Annap
olis.
Mr. Grant' not the President's
nephew.
XXV. Frederick Dent Grant,
President s sen, S.-cnnd Lieutenant
Fourth Cavalry : gone to Europe on
an illegal leave of absence granted
him by bis father.
Appointed to West Point by John
son ; is not on leave of absence, but
is op duty on staff of the General of
tbe Army.
Our readers may now see for them
selves the wilful dishonesty with
which this list hss been prepared by
tbe Sun. What are they to think of
any fresh charges against the Presi
dent which may proceed from the
same quarter ?
a
COULDN'T UNDERSTAND IT.
Tbe Hartford Courant in the
following, implies the manhood pro
duced relatively by the unaltered sys
tem of European snobbery and that
the nnlrammeled freedom ot Ame-
ica :
"Dump; the Grand Duke Alexin'
walk through the Bridgeport cartridge
factory the other day, he pointed to
several workiogmc-n aud inquired ot
uov. Jewell. "Are these men what
yon call the commoa people ?" The
Governor replied that they were
fair specimen of the working classes in
this country. "But do yon mean to
say tbat these get into ofhcial poai
tion r further asked the imperial
scion "Perhaps not any of these
men,' rejoined Governor Jewell
but men ot their class do ; they are
educated men most ot them that is,
they can all probably read and write,
and most of them take and read the
newspapers." "Do you know of any
cases where such men hive actually
been elected to office ?' sV queried
curious Alexis. '-0, Vlainly,''
e Governor said, "I, myself, worked
tbe shop as a tanner till 1 was
twenty years of age ;" and the an
nonnceraeut seemed to puzzle the
Duke a good deal. Here waa lhe Gov
ernor of a State, as well dressed and
well appearing as himsalf, who had
actually worked in a shop, and this
man was welcoming bim in behalf ot
hundred thousand voters; it was
more ot an enigma than the boy had
ciphered on previously ; but as he
goes through the country he will as
certain, npon inquiring, that very
many of the public men here have
come direct from the workshop. In
Massachusetts, where he is now visit
Gov. Claffin was a shoemaker ;
Senator Wilson was a cobbler also,
Gen. Banks was a machanist.
when he learns that Gen. Grant
a tanner, and has worked his way
the presidency, an office more ex
altnd than that held by the Czar ot all
Russiaa, he will be still more sur
prised Brains can't raise to par in
Europe."
or
tbe
and
to
ly
the
he
at
still
up
ted
or,
vice,
ing
t
uaa
was
soon
his
with
hold
and
Health and Morals of London.
"Country folks,'' the London Spec
tator remarks, "believe London to be
sink of malaria and iniquity.' As
tbe first, it is "one of the health
iest tewns on the world, and, but
one or two districts, might be the
healthiest in England." So, too, in
regard to criminality, contrary to the
general belief, figures show that its
habitual and unsuspected criminals
as 1 in 784, while in such towns
Bath, Leamington, Scarborough,
Ramstage the proportion is 1 in
and, in what are classed as ag
ricultural towns, it is 1 in 433. In
eastern, midland, and southern
counties, the number of criminals is
usually twicr, and occasionally four
times as great as in London. Tbe
rural villages are usually consid
ered tbe homes of ideal purity and
piety, yet in comparison with them,
London is twice as innocent, twice as
healthy, and about 400 times as char
itable. This superiority in alms
giving seems to indicate a corre
sponding extent of paupjrism, but
benevolence, it is to be remembered,
more thoroughly systemized in
London, while in the country there
may be a great deal of want and suf
fering with very inadequate relief.
were
saw
was
ran
few
to
and,
pulp,
vent
the
him,
held
to
ers,
and,
did
Lris
to
was
It appears that the ancients were
no means deficent in tbe art of
dentistry, but on tbe contrary it seems
be one of tbe oldest of arts. Cas-
selius was a dentist in the reign of the
Roman tnnnsvirs, and gold was nsed
filling the teeth. But nearly 500
C. gold was thus nsed, and gold
wire was employed to bold artificial
teeth in position, and it does not seem
then to have been a new art, A frag
ment of the tenth of the Roman tables.
B. O, has reference to prevent
the burial of any gold with the dead
except mat bound around the teeth.
Herodotus declares that the Egyp
tians bsd a knowledge of the diseases
the teeth and their treatment 2800
C. In Martial, Casselius is men
tioned as either filling or extracting
teeth, but he specified that he would
not polish false teeth with powder.
These facts cover a period of six
hundred years.
with
pay
tbe
ly
er-bird"
by
he
is
of
In the North Georgia Conference,
while the question of the insanity of
member of the Conference was
recently being considered, one
preacher stated that tbe case was not
clearly one of mental unsoundness,
tbe accused could at any time
preach an hour and a half to two
hours. The Bishop shook bis head
and remarked, "That's a bad symp
tom." is
OrsTSRs have recently become so
desr in France tbat snails bave be
come a common substitute, and it is
reckoned tbat some &0,000 to 70,000
are daily consumed in Paris, being
sold at front twelve to fifteen cents
(American) a dczen. We do not
bear of their having yet come to this
in England, but oysters there are ex
tremely dear, the beds having tn
many places become exhausted, -....
- . ' . . :
SAGACITY OF THE ELEPHANT.
WONDERFUL EFFECT OF A LITTLE
KINDNESS.
The memory of Young tbe trag iian
written by his son, contained tbe suo-
joined story:
In July. IS 10, the largest elephant
ever seen in Englind was advertised
as "jast arrived.' As soaa as Henry
Hariis.the manager of Covent Garden
Theatre, heard ol it, he determined, if
possible, to obtain u for it struck him
that if it were to bs introduced in tbe
new pantomime of "Harlequin Pos
menata," which he was a bim to pro
duce at great coat, it would add great
ly to the attractions.
Under this impression and before the
proprietor of Exeter Change had seen
it, he purchased it for 900 guineas.
Mrs. Henry Johnson was to ride it,
and Miss Parker the Columbine, was
to play up tq it.
Young happened to be one morning
at the box dpee adjoining Convent
Garden Theatre, when his ears were
assailed by a stfenge and unusual up
roar within tbe walls.
On asking onaof the carpenters
the cause or it. lie was toid it was
something wrona with the elephant.
he could not exactly tell what.
1 am not aware what might be tbe
nsage nowadays ; but then, whenever
new piece had been announced for
presentation on a given night, and
there was scarcely time for its rehear
sal it would takt place after tbe night's
regular performance was over, and
the audience had been dismissed.
One such there had been before mv
father's curiosity had been aroused.
As it had been arranged that Mrs.
Henry Johnson seated in a howdab on
the elephants back, should pass over
bridge in the center of a numerous
group of followers, it was thought
expedient t hat the un wieldly monster's
tractability should be tested.
On stepping up to the bridge.which
was slight and temporary, the saga
cious brute threw back his fore feet
and refused to budge. It ia well
known that the elephant becanse of
its nnusual bulk will never trust its
weight upon any object which is une
qual to its support. ,
Tbe stage manager, seeing now
resolutely the animal resisted every
attflmnt made to C0tUr. ' "1UC8 Uim
4'- M
.UKUIMCIIUU Uri'IO-a In nnuttn.
proposed that they should aUy the
proceedings till next dav. when he
migbt be in a better mood. It waa
during the repetition oi the experiment
mai istner, having beard the extra
orainary sound?, determined to go
and see if he could ascertain tbe cause
tnem,
Pi.- r. . - i . . i ...
auo urn. aigut mai met bis eyes
kindled his indignation. There stood
huge animal, with downcast eyes
flipping ears, meekly submitting
oiow aiter diow iron, a harn iron
goaa,wnicunewas driving ferocious
intothe nesuy pxt of his neck at
root of his ear. The fl or on which
stood was converted to a pool of
blood.
One or tbe proprietors, impatient
what he regarded as senseless ob
stinsxey, kept urging the driver to
greater extremities, when Cbas.
Young who waa a great lover of ani
mals, expostulated with him ; went
to the poor patient aninima). cat
and carressed him ; and when the
driver was about to wield his istrn-
ment again, with even still more vi"-
he caught him by the wrist aa in a
and stayed bim from further vi
olence.
While an angrv altercation was fro-
on oeiween xoung ana the driver
I a W-v . - . w
CapL Hay or tbe Ashel, who had
brought over Chung in his ship, and
petted mm greatly on tbe voyage
came in and begge I to know what
the matter.
Before a word of explanation
could be given, the much wronged
creature spoke fcr himself, foras
as he perceived the entrance of
patron he waddled np to him and
a look of gentle appeal, caught
of his hand with his proboscis,
plunged it into his bleeding wound,
then thrnst it before his eyes.
lhe gesture seemed to say. as
as if it had beeu enforced by
"See how these cruel men
Chung. Can you approve of it?"
The hearts of the hardest present
sensibly touched by .what they
; and among them that of tbe
gentleman who had been so energetic
promoting us narsn treatment It
under a better impulse that he
out into the street, purchased a
apples at a stall, and offered them
him, Cdung eyed htm askance,took
them, threw them beneath his feet,
when he had crushed them to a
spurned them for him,
x oung.who had gone into the Con
Garden with tbe same crowd as
gentleman who had proceeded
shortly after re-en tered,and also
out to him some fruit, when,
the astonishment of the bystand
the elephant ate every morsel,
after, twined his trunk with
studied gentleness, around Young's
waist, marking by his action that,
though he had resented a wrong he
not forget a kindness.
It was m the year 1814 that Har-
parted with Chung to Cross, the
proprietor of tbe menagerie at Exeter
Change.
One of the purchaser s first act was
send Charles Young a life ticket of
admission to his exhibition : and it
one of his innocent littlle vani
ties.when passing through the Strand
any friend, to drop in on Chung.
him a visit in his den, aad show
intimate relations which existed
between them.
Tbe tragic end of the poor creature
must be within the recollection of
many oi our readers, f rom some
cause unknown, ha went msd ; aad it
123 shots, discharged by a de
tachment of the Guards, to dispatch
bim.
so
its
if
in
er
is
tn
Hebk is an item interesting to orni
thologists : The Bostonians are just
proud ot the sparrows or the Com
mon, but lately an interloping "butch
has invaded that sacred. ter
ritory, and made it his business to
mnrder the sparrows by wholesale.
Last week the cruel bird was spotted
the City Forester and shot, just as
had killed his last sparrow and
taken its head off. The butcher-bird
of tbe size abd general appearance
the mocking bird, but his upper bill
hooked and very sharp. The re
mains are to be stuffed, and the pret
ty sparrows will once more flatter
and chirp without fear.
Ai intoxicated man saw two cars
paaaing him the other evening, with
red and blue lights in tbe front and
rear. Ilia fuddled brain compre
hended colored lights, and he was
heard to say to himself : "Must be
pretty tick sickly here; they are
running drug atores round on
wheels."
Mb. Oaklbt, tbe Governor of the
County Prison at Tsnnton, England,
says that the use of the Australian
meat In that establishment has effect
ed a redaction of one.half in the meat
acennntsnd being ready for use laa
mediately a tin Is opened also saves
fuel. . ; .
INDIAN NAMES.
In some instances it is a special mat
ter of regret that the Indian names ot
places and States do longer snggest
their original meaning. This was oc
casionally simple enough, as in Con
necticut originally written Quo-
naugruuoi which meant in toe Mc
hegan dialect "long river;" and in
Massachusetts in the Katie dialect
Jlasaswsct signifying 'the place of
great bills,' with re erence to the
Blrre Bills, eleven miles to the south
west of Boston, the highest point of
land in the eastern part of the btata
Ul cities thns designated MUinaukie
recalls its original name, meaning
"rich lands," and Sing Sing, tbe At
gonquin word Asineing, "a place of
stones," with all the greater force, as
it is now "the residence of gentle
men," in Artemus V ard's language,
"who spent their, days in poumia
stun '' Other names, however, have
more or less picturesqueness in their
meaning, and are not so easily im
proved by recent changes.. Thus
Chicago represents in its xrenca pro
nunciation very fairly the actual sounds
heard by the hrst rench explorers,
when the Potawatomies, who dwelt
there, called it Shecaugo. "play fal wa
ters. (?) Dahlonega is the softened
jrm ot the laldwneen of the Cnero
kees, which meant "yellow metal, lor
tae Indians were well aware ot the
gold found in the neighborhood, which
made the city in alter years tbe seat
oi Government mint, because of its
position in the very centre of the gold
mine district ot ixortnern ueorgia.
Lake Erie is almost the only remain
der ot the once powerful tribe of
bnes, who lived where tbe state ot
Ohio now is ; the latter name, as giv
en to the river, owes its origin to the
Iroquois, who called it the Oheo,
"beautiful water," by the name in
stinctive admiration which prompted
the French to name it La Belle Riv
iere. It had a lucky escape from
Father Marquette's baptism, who
christened it Onabpukigoa a name
which subsequently shrunk into Oua
bache, and has finally as Wabash been
. . . .. . r . l r, -
given to the last tributary oi tne umo.
It is curious that a kind of stigma
seems to adhere to the name, ioreven
now the good people of Indiana and
the West generally are fond of saying
of a man who has been cneatea, tnai
n has been Wabathed. At one
e "dark and bloody
time, ii in n n , Ohio be
ground" ot Kentuc
came famous among the wb
Indians also felt inclined to call their
beautiful river the Blood River, so
tear 1 ul bad been the scenes or car
nage aud cruelty enacted on ita fair
bai.ks. Une of the youngest States,
Idaho, will deserves ita poetical name,
l-aa-no, the "gem of the mountains,"
and the name oi the river Monoga
hela flows aa smoothly from the lips
with its liquid notes aa the far-famed
rye whiskey distilled on its banks,
which is known all oyer the Union by
the same term, in contra-distinctioa
from Scotch and Irish rivals. On the
other hand, the much-discussed came
of the greatest waterfall on our conti-
ni nt has been stripped of all the poet
ical meanings given it by writers
whose imagination . exceeded, their
knowledge. Xeagara. the original
word, taken from the original Seneca-
Iroquois dialect, haa no connection
with cataracts, but means prosaically,
across tbe neck,' alluding to tbe
course ot the river across the neck or
strip of land that lies between Lakes
trie and Ontario. A similar idea un
derlies the word Milihiian in the
Ottawa dialect, which was originally
given to Mack-'nac, and meant "fen
ces,'' as if the island were lying fence
like before the Upper Lake. At least
says Uev. Mr. 1 lerz, a missionary
among the Ottawas : but Allouez, his
French predecessor, calls it a few
years before, Maehigamhg ; the pres
ent word, Michigan, is evidently an
improvement on .both the former
to
in
ia
of
it
aa
left
of
the
of
is
we
and
has
roll
will
now
sal,
Americanisms, by Rev. Schele
Americanisms, by Rev. Schele De Vere, LL. D.
Fksdbbick Douglass lately lec
tured in New York on San Domingo.
His discourse waa a compactly-wrik-en
essay touching on the obvious mat
ters of interest connected with, the
island, such as its history, ita climate,
people, its products, and its an
nexation. He is a strong Grant man,
and favors Grant'i San Domingo pol
icy. Mr. Douglass tes tinea mat tne
Dominicans want to be aunexed.
This ia well so far as it goes. And
only the Dominicans were involve d
the issue, their wishes mignt
seem reasonable. Bnt there is another
government almost another people
on tbe same lsjana. adu una
second party to the question la op
posed to annexation, la liaju to
have so voice? Open your hand.
One half of tt is San Domingo, the
other half Hayti. When the whole
hand is outstretched to ua, then and
not till then will it be time to consid
the question ot clasping it Tais
the way tbe San Domingo question
lies in our mind. Mr. Douglass did
not once refer to Hayti as if be were
aware that to state the Haytien ob-
ections would require him to answer
them. And to answer them would
have required another lecture. Mr.
Douglass bad a fair but not large au
dience. His inspiration was not up
ita nsial heieht. except during a.1
few luscious and happy moments
when, breaking away from his man
nscript, be reminded ua of the elo
quent and fiery orator of a dozen
The Golden Age.
Tub necrological record of 1871
contains many names ot world-wide
fame; among them Herschel and
Murchison, Dumas and ,,eivocK,
Auber and Thalberg. This list
prises also tbe bonorea names oi
George TicKnor, the uary Bisters,
Alice and Phebe; Generals Robeit
Anderson, James Totten and Thomas
Rodman, Commodore TatnalL
There have fallen among the clergy
the Rev. Dr. Gannett, Father Taylor,
Bishop Baker and the Kev. Albert
Barnes. Tbe scroll also bears tbe
names of John Slidell, James M.
Mason and Clement L. Vallandig-ham.
Ia California, brandy, which is
said to Lave more body and a smooth
er taste than grape brandy, has been
distilled from the berries of the
msnzanate bush, which is indigenous
to that State, growing nearly every
where along the foothills and in the
the mountains. The bushes tnrive
equally well on the mountains where
the soil is dry, and in the valleys
where there ia- no-moisture, requiring
no labor for the cultivation. .The
berries are about the size of ordinary
garden currents, and after gathering,
mar be kept in sacks for months
without (xuibiting any signs of decay
DuRiiCr the present year 79 vessels
sailed from rrovincetown. Alassacba
setts, for the Grand Banks and other
foreign fishing grounds, and have re
turned witboni the lots of a single
vessel, bringing Into that port 87,790
quintals oteodfia'ia 2,000 quintals of
. a I n i i a at .1 : l
halibut, ana i,oua Darreis tu nan qu
ia 1870 there were 86 vessels, which
brought tn; 86,708 quintals of end,
2.681 quintal of halibut and 1,45
barrels of eiL. There wa a loss
three vessels.
.fSJSSsH x-.
[From Godey's Ladies' Book.]
THE NEW YEAR.
"We take' nt note of tiia4outryrai'r "
us loss." The years- eome ac go
and we mark their commencienXasi
their termination, the ona lcilah2...''i" "Cr:
hard npon the other. Whcinrwejo'-.. c-'
have been immersed in cares acdH:U- f"
ties, or whetherwe have experie.ceil g .
vivid pleasures, or whether the' affle-.; ; T --
has passed so quietly' "that wa Tre. .- v . .;
taken but little notice or its fl"gtt,we "t
have yet gone ones more tbrcugh the, .
round of months, and again te New . -. .
Year comes up to claim its plaeo in. , : -the
coming history of the tlays 'taat. '
are to be. " In the short interval that ; -
comes between Christmas and tit '
New Year we have an opportunity of ' ; . ,
reviewing the past and anticpatiag; . r
the future. . We pause.and locH; back-. " ,
wards and forwards., "Vehx k before - ; .""-,
and pine for what ia not. - ' --'
Perhaps this i3 so, or pcrfiaLS we. v "
rejoice in the attainment of "sorot ob--, -
jectwB have dcsired.'"Tixre are a 5
fewpeopk we.i5 ttr were many .
who can say that tbey haveTeac.ea ;
the summit of their smbilioo. ' 15 wa. ;, ;v
our chance to meet with enc of Uiese 'l .-V "
fortunate people the other Cay, and ; . ,; ' , "
she said : "I am very bapp ; I have '---.;
everUhinsrl wish, for." It deca cne .i .
good to hear now and then of a "pei
son whoee utmost wich has bteav
gratified. We trust ttat among our ,
readers there are some to wucm tue.
Old Year has been tens bountiful.
There are nc doubt others who will ,
have to say of tbe passiug time,
"He gave me a friend, and a true, true iye,
And tha Saw Yea will take them away. i
Let us hope that tn snch cases a ;
these the New Ytar will rot only,
takeaway, but wiiLeiva also: will
rive abundantly, so that ' ft hhz'il I
remembered more for its gilts than
for what it has taken. Let ua all tern
it with anticipations of better things
the time that is to come. We hope t
that the new leaf which is to Hun- -ed
over will make a wonderful differ
ence it the style of the chapter tha
to be written. Of course we are
sure that in many instances it win
not, but the present ia a season of
looking forward with hope, end
confidence, ana we wount nos a-u
pleasant anticipations by any gloomy
forebodings. ,
1
Sxcbetabt RoBiscs destrvca crcd- -
Tor his attempts to suppress we
outrageous practice t "hazing'
atthe'Xaval Academy. "Ilsair-g," '
readers, perhaps, go
practice or "playing
not Know, i
trices cn new etude?
and is frequently carried caliy elder
students wiih a barbarity that our
morning papers woald be justified in
calling "fiendish,' Youcg, tender
bo) s, fresh froui kind parent" sad
happy homes, and already scffiriBg
terribly with "homesickness," are
made the victims of a cruelty we
should think no bureau being could
delight in. They ate smoked ou ot
their rooms.their furniture ia destroy
ed, their beds are soaked, wit'u cold
water, they are tied np ia sacks cud
on doorsteps, and treated to the '
many other indignities the ingenni;ks
their persecutors, cam devisa. At
Naval Academy, ever ainee tha
Secretary has caused the i? is missal
some cf the.ringlea'.Tors, the .out
rage has been continued. ' A basrd '
now investigating tha facta, and
are rejoiced to learn has recom
mended fifteen additional dismissals.
the department haa decided to -dismiss
six of these. Tae Secretary
ordered the dropping from the
the names of these six ; and he
in conclusion. "Let i; ba dis-
tinctly understood that the Academy
be puriSed of this disgraceful
practice and the defiant spirit wbkh
invokva its action, by the dimia-
if nessary, of every cadet, to the
last, who refuses the fullest tbe-
uence to the regulations on the sub-
Perfectly rigar, Mr. Robeson.
cadet who ia an insurable black
and ruffian is unfit for pubic
a I -
service, and it is your duty to turn
turnout
Interesting Paper by Gen. Garfield on
the Census of Ohio
A Washington correspondent of
the Cincinnati Commercial states that :
General Gai field has, at tho tc quest
of the Secretary of State cf Ohio,
prepared a paper upon the results of
the census as tar aa they relate to tba
Siato, which will be emboilivd in tbo
forthcoming report ot tha Secretary.
This paper haa been prepared with
much labor, and contains information .
of considerable value. Among other
facts it la shown that the immigration
from and immigration to Ohio have '
been very nearly equal that is, the
number of persons who Lave come to ;
tbe State from other Sutca and from t
foreign countries, haa been balanced i
by the number born here who have
.a j". . Ha 1
gone to other states ana icrunu -
homes.
Ia thirty-seven counties there baa
been an increase of population ia the ,
last decade; thirty-thiee have' been v
stationary, and in eighteen there J.a. .
been a decrease. The counties that,
have gained are of three classes ; the
seventeen agricultural counties of the
Northwest, which have been largely J.
settled since 1850, have v, creased
89,300; in tha niue i:oa manufac-
turica and iron and co&l miniaj
counties in the Mahonicg Ytlley aud
in the extreme Southern part of the -
State, there uas beeu an kcreeae of ;
53 500. Tb reinaiuing inoreaso b3 .
been in the eleven ctuatka coulalr
ing cities, which have gained I70.C0O.
In all the rest of tbe Mate tae
has been bf-,j0P.
It appears from these figures that
11 the cities are excla.ieJ, and these
counties which bave been newly set
tied, and others where tta develop-;
ment of the iron and coal industries
has caused e rapid increase, tbe po-:-
ulation of Ohio haa become iluiest
stationary, the increase in ten years
having been ineonsiderabla. ...
I I at
Thb French. Minister of War 'ha';
decided that in future white or dap
pled gray horses shall not be employ- .
ed in military service ; the experience
of the late war having proved that
animals of those colors offer an excel
lent mark for the enemy's artilry
White herrsea being regarded by tha
veterinary profession aa lymphatic.
were condemned during the 6 leg a as
unauited tor human consumption.-: "
"Gbbehiasd'8 Jcy mnaataias," .
about which the churches so often..;
sing, are far from being the abodes .
hof heathenism. About half the pop.
ulatlcn of Greenland, belong, to ther -
Lutheran communion, asd the whole-':
country is well supplies wita cau:e .
es, pastors and eateeaiats. f.H9 tat-;
aries of clergymen range' troa f 830 -
to 1,40U, whtcn ts - belter tuan cd-
average m wta country - - .
of
A Lcjipoii sargeoo, Dr.Balmann,
has successfully , applied the masto
lantern to the sto-Jy of diseases of tl
skin. -A transparent phcf.cTHr- .
the skin i taken, aad : t!v--a.sisgic
lantern. .
oxygen light (
ta on s Wbue
tht smallest
wit Vaster ial

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