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Fremont journal. (Fremont, Sandusky County [Ohio]) 1853-1866, February 03, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85026050/1865-02-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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A ttOWfEyS AND COUNSELLORS AT LAW Mil
A attend U Local Busines in Sandusky and adjoin-
ot CI... Soldi' Back Pay, Bounty nod H-n.t. n
. ii.niptH attended to. . ,
.is'l-lijs Front, comer room, en-staira, Tyler Bluet,
rt frsuukt. obum '
..II. W. WlXSIiOW, .
4 TTOENEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW, will at
JK tend t Professional Business in Hnndu&ky and ad
mielnf counties. Special attention given to ptowinog
Soldier'. Pay, Bounty, and Pensions.
Ukfick Second Story Tyler' Block.
FREMONT, OHIO.
K. P. BCCKLAJiD. HOM.K KVKKETT.
UtCKLA.U At I3VEKETT,
Attoraeysand Counsellors at Law.andSolicitnrs in Chan-
eery, will attend tu professional busmen and Land
- Xioik-t ia Sandusky an adjoining Counties.
jae Second Htory Buckland new Blook, r remoni.
CEOttGE J. SAL.ZMAN,
8URQEON DENTIST.
Room in Page's Building, near the Post Office.
AU oparatwo. ia Dentistry performed promptly, and
Warranted to fiv. satisfaction.
- )..- CLVDF, OHIO.
J. W. FAIL.IXU,
HoMOaAPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND hURUKON.
orrlCK. Buckland'i old Block, aecond H.mr. Ri-
AH-Pikt Trtiet,nrat bouseeast of the old Cat h e-
,ce On ""iTTu. .,ti,.n naid to diseases of the
lie Cnurea. -v. . . .
Throat and Lunra.
Fremont, April, 1864.
Ir. J. W. GROAT,
WotTlXD RESPECTFULLY announce to the citi
t UijiJ , ,a ,i,iitT that he has perman-
seos ."'. ... -,, ..i. for the practice
eotli
n"7 and hone, by a strict attention
ESraof hi. profession, .omenta share
froPidtoSWadthrtrtrnt
Oce and Residence
tmtl rfTschnmy's Cabinet aad Fnrn.ture Store.
Jan 19, 183S. Mtf.
' DEXTISTHY.
J" Z&!an&iZ WARRANTED a, CHEAP
raSkofthesan,.
OFTICR-OMr the Post Office, ;
PREMIUM DENTISTRY,
ii. m. shaw,
13 prepared to do all work in "e Dental .
aianitnaas aad satislaetion to all who may need his rtr
rr to -'from an,1; to.,t, form
t DC complete U for upper and lower jaws. Teeth in
awia. m oiTOt. or old, or silver plaie.
OFFICE in Buckland Block, np-stirs.
Jaa.'l,18S.
!C. B. McCUIsLOCII,
Drucs, Medicine, Dye-Stutik, (ilass, Paints,
OUa, Books, StaUonery, Glass Ware, &c, fcc
No. 3, Buckland Block, F"J
'iS.
BUCKhAN I),
DEALER IN
Drucs. Medicines, Chemicals, PainLs, Oils,
4aSiTsbea. Dre-Stufls, Burninp Fluid, Books, htal.on-
FREMONT. OHK).
Roberts & Sheldon.
y.nuhvetnrer. of Copper, Tin, and Sheet-Iron Ware.and
Infers "stove, Agricultural Implements, Stoves Raps
t upninf YtllEH flDllUUF. -
ntock. No., Fremont, OJiio.
May9,1864.
JUNCTION HOTEL,
. L. PIERCE, PaoraiBTOH, CLYDE, OHIO.
This Hoaa. ha. bee. thoroaghly ZLt "th'eij
- . -.-i. aridom equaled bv hotels in tneee
."Prtora, the traveling publicthat
- .hall be wanting to make their
leenporary Uy with htm both comfortable and agr.
ble
East eideof thee. i- nauruau
October , XWffl.
CROQUAN HOUSE,
FRE3IONT, O.
FRANK N. GURNEY, Rropriktor.
The Caoumaa has been put la order and is now ready
.r imtl 4 1 -
MtieIUt Hons, eoaveywd to and from the Depot
re. of .barge. March , I860.
KESSLER'S HOTEL,
CFerewW, (Ac Vrf Haute.)
Win. KESSLCB, Proprietor,
coRNiR or riKS AND FRONT btrskts,
FREMONT, OHIO.
faaeengers carried to and from th. House free of charge
February 36, 1858.
JOHN BRIGHTWELL,
House and Sign Painter, Gilder,
Graitier and Paper Hanger; Kalsomin
ing done to order, on short notice.
CARRIAGE MAKING.
and added
CARRIAGE
MAKING,
to my
WAGON BUSINESSj
I am now nrepared to please all my old customers ami as
rntJy ooetaVcONSULT THEIR OWN INTEREST,
by calling on me for any thing m my line
From a Truck Wagon to a 300 Carriage.
Those ia want of a tip-top, A No. i, Buggy, Carriage or
Wagon, are requested to call on me before purchasing
elsewhere. -
-- n . All my work is Warranted in .very
L J5 particular, to stand th. knocks.
Shop at the Old Stand opposite the Steam Mill. -
JOHN 1". 1TIOOKE.
rRKMOirr,Juiy2,i8i
CSr WATCHE S & JEWELRY.
IS .till reviving articles in his Une, AE If A TYLE S of
Jewelry, Watches and Clocks,
SPECTACLES, Are, in endless variety.
MaeoBBell's"GOLD PENS,' Warranted Best in market,
gy Call and See, at the POST OFFICE.
MEAT MARKET,
THE UNDERSIGNED respectfully in
form too citiaens of FREMONT and
e icinity 6at they have refl tted and moved
tk filrt Market Stand occunied bv E.
H. Uaderhill, and more lately by A. Travis ft Co., and are
WELL PREPARED toacoommodatetheireostomerswith
th. eaoieast articles in their line. We shall keep
BUT, VIAL, MUTTON, LAMB, CORNED BEEF,
AND SALT PORE,
ftm aH hoar, of the day and th. evening. We in-
. toad to keen, when they can be procured,
qt Every thing bought at our Market will be delivered
. UT vare in th. eorporationre af cryc.JJ
JACOB HORI.ACHER,
rremoat. May 28, 1863. EKNSY BAUMANN.
TUTCITT OF' ALL KINDS. WHITE
JjloU FISH, BASS, PICKEREL,
RED HORSE, CAT FISH and MACK
EREL by the Barrel or half Barrel.
COD FIS-H in qaaatitte. to suit purchasers.-
Call and aee, at HARRIS'.
FARM FOJ SMJEA
About 625 Acres of
a
CHOICE land:
BEING a part of the well known tract
called thCWHTTTAKER RESERVATION," laying
oa the Sandusky rurer, anoui sft miles oeiuw u
of Fremont, Ohio. .
i Aboat400 acre, are improved, and a good snareof it is
a a good state of cultivation, with a good proportion of
bffttOTH lfaTsi-
Th are four orchards oa th. Tract, aad the buildings
are ia good condition. ,...-'
Th. whole will be sold together, or will be cut up in
R. W. B.McLELLAN,
at Fremont, Ohio, or to
A.CHEESEBROLGH. .
at Toledo, Ohio.
Fremont, April 15, 1864.
TUBNTTURE WARE-ROOMS.
J. W. STEVENSON,
DEALS IN AND MANUFACTURES ALL STYLES
Parlor, Dining Room and Kitchen
FURNITURE.
Baa oa band a lot of
elegant
SOFAS and
LOUNGES, .
CENTER and
CARD TABLES,
WASH STANDS,
wood or marble top
" SECRETARIES,
BOOK CASES,
Rureaas,WnatNoU
Cupboards,
4
r i ir j .. m s
I I -
Quartettes, Otto
mans, Foot aad
Music Stool., ia
Rosewood, Ma-
fcefony or Blaek
walaat. Mahocoav '
PARLOR CHAIRS,
and ROCKERS of
different
striae aad patterns
All kinds of Can. aad Wood seat Chairs wit h Rnrke
He also keep, a stock of Eastern Furnitnre, which he iu
tends to inn esse ss th. demand requires.
la aoanoetioa be has a
COFFIX ROOM,
where are kept ail aisesand styles of Co Sins from splen
did to plain. Be keeps a good Hearse for the convev
ane. of the dead.
It will be the aim of the proprietor of this Kstabiish
aaeat to maintain the well-known reputation of his work
ry At the old stand 3d Building oa Crofhan rtreet
Ireawat,Jaa.le,le.
21 I
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t
r
1
f
US
ESTABLISHED 1829. VOL. XXXVI.
El
FREMONT, SANDUSKY COUNTY, OHIO, FEBRUARY 3, 1865.
ifil
NEW SERIES, VOL. XIII, IVO. 5.
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C. W. PAGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Insurance, Real Kstate and General Collating Agent for
all kind of War and Patent Claims.
CLYDK, - Sandusky county, Ohio.
S. II. TAYLOBj
Homeopathic Physician and Scrgkok.
OFFICE In Valletta's Block, m J. W. Bowlna
Grocery aad Crockery Store.
Fremont, April 8, 1864.
JOHN YOTJNKMAN,
DULIl I
Foreign and American Marble!
Oroghan Htreet, one door west of the Tyler Brie Block,
Fremont, Ohio.
MONUMENTS, MANTIJE-PIECES,
and all kinds of Marble work executed ia th. neat,
east, and most tasteful manner. ..." . .
Orders are respectfully solicited, aad all work warraatea
to satisfy.
Fremont, January, 1881.
T11E BELLVUE FOINDEM
IS STILL IN OPERATION !
manufacturing the celebrated CURTIS IRON
BEAM l'LOW, which is not surpassed by aoy cast
Plowinade. LONG'S IMPROVED, all sites. CENTER
LEVER, or Pittsburg Plow, which for lightness of draft
cannot be beat. PLOW POINTS of nearly every kind in
aae. STEEL PLOWS of the celebrated Lagonda manu
facture, which drew the Bret premium at th. Huron eoun
ty (1861) Fair, as a Prairie Plow.
Wheat Drills
Warranted superioTto any in use. Dinner Bells. 16 and
34 irallon Kettles. Cider Mill Screws. Coal Grates, a
aiee article. Straw Cutters. Boo Cutlers. Corn Plant
ers, kc., c. Also, a lew tons superior Smiths' Goal.
Job Work
Such as Finishing, Screw Cutting, Ac, fcc, done to order,
ry All work WARRANTED and done opon honer.Q
Having had 25 years experience in the business, 1 feel
oufldent of giving SATISFACTION.
Terms Cash or Ready pay
Price to Knit the times.
Plows and Points,
For sale bv CanBeld ft Brother, Fromoot; D. M. Day, El
more, and Mr. Groves, Castalia.
J. HASKELL.
Bellevue, Ohio, Nov. I, 16n3. 42yl
Atlantic k Great Western Railwaj.
summer ArraugemeuU
Two through Express Trains between Cleveland and New
York. Takes etiect May 10, 1864.
New HorU. TltroHifli Liue.
i Leave Cleveland, at
1 Arrive Leavitthburgh
' MeadTille at
?,50 aa
and
9,10 Pat
11,30 AM
1,40 ru
2t ra
6,18 ra
lu,44 AB
10,62 pa
1,00 II
'2,85 aa
4,44 a
9,46 ra
Cory at
Salmanoa at
n New York at
L,NewYorkat T 00Aa 6,00 t
Arnve Cleveland at 6.00 aa 6,30 ra
Sundays ezcepted. fSaturdayi excepted.
Mala Line.
Kastaaro-lave Akron. MaU, at ,7,4,,
Arrive MeadviUe, " at li,60 r
Salamanca " . at 8,00 ra
Westward Leave Salamanca " at 6,60 AM
Arrive MeadviUe " at 10,18 AM
Akron " at 3,36 ra
Eastward Iave Gallon (Aeootn.) at 8,80 AM
Arrive Mansfield " at 10,06 am
" Akron " at 4,30 ra
Westward Leave Akron (Aecom.) at 10,06 AM
Arrive Mansfield at 4,60 ra
Gallion " . at 6,06
Franklin Branch.
Lrave MeadviUe at 8,10 AM and 3,10 ra
Arrive Franklin at 10,16 - 6,26 ra
Leave " at 7,30 " 6,80 ra
Arrive Meadville at 9,50 " " T,4 ra
?taboniug Dtvialon.
Leave Cleveland at 7,1 Aa and 8,60 ra
Arrive Youngstown at 10,36 " " 7,20 ra
Leave " at 6,46 " " 1,45 ra
Arrive Cleveland st . 10,20 " 6,00 ra
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen'l Ticket Ag't. Cleveland, O.
H. F. SWEETSEB, Gen'l Supt.
MeadviUe, Pa. Ma 13, 1864,
Furniture Ware Rooms.
C. W. TSCHUMY,
TAKKS pleasure in announcing that he has enlarge
ani improved his Furniture Manufactory and War.
Bonne Rooms, situated on the corner of
Front and Garrison Streets,
Directly opposite T. CLapp's Store, where he is prepared
to supply all in want of Furnitnre with as good an arti
cle, and as CHEAP as any other establishment in San
dusky county. His stock consists of
Bureaus, Tables, ijtands, Cltuirt, Bedstead,
PARLOR FURNITURE, and in fact every article of Fur
niture requisite to house keeping. Ail descriptions of
Furnitnre manufactured to order and WARRANTED.
Call at my Ware Rooms.
UNDERTAKING.
I have just built a splendid HEARSE, and am prepared
to accompany Funerals, furnishing COFFINS, fcc, in my
line. COFFINS always on hand, or made to order im
mediately, In have also on hand
Fisk's Patent Metallic Burial Cases,
Made of Imperishable materials, enameled inside and oat
to preveut rust, and the exterior has a fin. Rosewood
finish. When properly cemented the remains of the de
ceased are free from irruption of water or the depreda
tions of vermin, and may without offensive odor be kept
as loug as desired, thus obviating the necessity ol hasty
burials. I have them of all sues.
Fremont, Jan. 1864. fi. W. XSCHUMY.
J.P.WOODfeCO.,
Having purchahod the todt ol Groceries of D. Daily,
in Daily's Brick Block,
OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE,
Have uiauie lartze additions to their awi Unent, anl will
at all time hava on hand a general and
GOOD ASSOIITMENT OF
FAMILY GROCERIES
ooii.ibliiig in part of
SUGARS,
COFFEE,
TOBACCOS,
NUTS,
wines,';
CANDIES,
TEAS,
SPICES,
CIGARS,
RAISINS,
LIQUORS,
FISH, &C, kC.
Which they will sell at the LOWEST CASH PRICES.
They will also buy all kinds of
Vavmcv's Produce,
fuch ik
; 13 UTTER, EGGS,' POTATOES,
, APPLES, POULTRY,
! ALL KINDS DRIED FRUIT, AC, AO,
For which tlifjr will p.ij the highest pricw.
CASH IN HAND.
S5T Please call and see us,
And we will warrant you good bargains and satisfaction,
i at all times.
J. P. WOOD ti CO.,
FREMONT, O, Dec. 2, 1864. .
VALUABLE OUT-LOTS
FOR SALE.
ritH E subscriber offers for sale in lot from three to ten
seres or upwards, to suit purchasers,
Valuable and Desirable .Lota,
on the Farm formerly known as the Jxacs MoouPass,
half a-mile north of the corporation line. Said land i
X irK, Dry aud Rojaium;, with yriCK, Warm Soil, and is
well calculated for Bru.ui.vo SiTas, Garixiu, Grapi
and Fan Culture. Lying on the Port Clinton Road,
and the Road to tiie Birchard Farm. Application can be
made to me at uiy residence on said farm
TUADDECS BALL. .
Fremont, 0., Dec 1, 18o4. Bmo
ML, M
To Wliom it May Concern.
I. DOTV, PbotograpU Artit,
RESPECTFULLY announces to the JJhblic Uiat he is
now sole proprietor of the well known Photograph
Rooms in th. '
Third Story of the 2"ew Bucklaud Block,
Opposite the t'roshku House,
and that he has recently re-fitted and re-furnished them
in the most beautiful manner, and that he is now prepar
ed to make
Photograplus, Aiidtfotyptit, Electrotypes,
Melletiotypwi, mul ail Picture
Pertaining to th. art, in the latest and best improved
style. 1 have relitted aud re modeled tlie light, and now
have the BEST LIGHT in the county for Ukiug good pic
tures. For taking pictures of Oiiilurru this liRut can
not be surpassed. 1 hare had 12 years experience in the
business, and flatter myself that loan giv peifect satin
faction. I respectfully solicit a sh.re r public patron
aee. Prices as LOW as any other Artist.
Fremont, December 90, 1864. 3mo -
T o Arms To Anns
RAID O.V FREMONT.
BlyODGETT At CO have taken possession of
th. room, formerly occupied by M. W. . FITCH,
Niius' Block, over the Bank of Fremont,
have firmly and permanently established themselves,
have planted their Batteries of unrivaled Cameras com
manded by the
Best Operator in the Male of Ohio,
and are now ready for action, and the onset of the public.
This establishment is being re-modeled, re-arrauged, re
fitted and re-furnished, and it ia th. intention to make a
Uallerjr worthy of Fremont,
or any other place, and Picture, taken here will be our
passed by none, and will be furnished of every variety
from the smallest miniature to the size of life, costing
from a few cents to hundreusof dollars, all finished in the
B EST ST YL S of th. art. It wil 1 be unnecessary to urge
you to sustain by your patronage such an institution in
your midst. Pictures of DECEASED PERSONS copied
and enlarged to any desired aire and colored in Oil or
Water Coiors, or finished in India Ink. Nothing more
appropriate for
Holiday Presents,
than these beautiful Pictures taken at
BLODGETT & CO'S GALLERY,
fj Frames and Photogrash Albums for sale.
Fremont, Dec. 23, 1864.
New Photograph Rooms
IN FREMONT.
I TAKE PLEASURE in announcing to my old aoiuidn
tauces, (and every body else,) that I have titled np a
New Suit of Photograph Rooms,
Iu lr. St. Clair's Ulotk, Fremont,' Onto.
MY RECEPTION ROOMS,
are commodious and well furnished with Oil Paintings,
Photograio, &C. My OPERATING ROOM was construct
ed expressly for my use, with a light modeled alter the
very best in the country.
My Camei-as .
are the oelebrated V01GHTLANDER & SOHNS manuiac
ture the very best. My Picture will speak lor them
selves. Picture got up of every SIZE and STYLE.
I hope every body with his Wile and Babys will call
and see for themselves. Xff Don't forget the Rooms
Over the l'lidadelpeia Store, Lr. St. Clair't block,
Opposite the Post Ottice.
A. !. WILUS.
Fremunt, Dec 23, 1864. ..
Wauled Inimedialcly.
400,000
Oak Spokes,
For which the highest price in CASH,
will be paid, on delivery. .
F. L NORTON & SON.
Fremont, 0., Dee. 9, 1864.
ANY AMOUNT OF
$ot Tiuibcv, ,
For making Staves and Heading,
At our Stave Factory, .
' Near the Depot,
Over $5 a cord will be paid.
JUNE h EDGERTON,
Fremont, Dee. 2, 1864. 3mo
GOVERNMENT LOAN.
The 1st National Bank of Fremont,
1 authorized by Government
To Receive Subscriptions to the New
7-30 U.S. Loan!
Interest payable SEMI-ANNUALLY; and principal in
three years, or may be converted into 5-20 Bonds,
principal and Interest payable in Gold, at the option of
the holder.
Is also Designated Depository and Fi
uancial Agent of the United States.
A. H. MILLER, Cashier.
Fremont, Jan. 13, 1866.
ROOK BINDER!
Th. subscriber respectfully
announces to his old custom
ers and the public generally,
that he has returned to spend
the Rummer in this place, and
carry on the Book Binding
bnsiuess, where he is ready to
bind Music, Magazines, and
re-bind old books, Ac, in a neat and substantial style.
-y All work warranted. Call and examine my work.
Room in the west end of th. Skntinkl Office, 3d story
of Buckland Block. J. P- MoARDLK.
Fremont, Feb. 1864.
Sewing Machine Agency.
I have obtained the Agencies of the
Grbver te Baker Sewing Machine Coinji.
and the
1
M. Singer Sewing Machine Company,
For the sale of their Celebrated Machines.
Samples of their Family Machines, and those for Manu
facturing purpose, always on hand at
H. LESHER'S SHOE STORE.
Fremont,'0. Sept. IB, 1864. bmo
A. P. SCHEIjIjEII,
Confectioner aud Family Grocer.
A good supply of Family Groceries of every de
scription, always kept on hand at low prices.
- Superior Candy.
Also, Mawfacturer of Confectionery, which I will
sell at wholesale and retail.
St. Clair' Block. (16) FREMONT, O.
Notice to Teachers.
TXAMiNATIONS will be held at the Central Union
B J ll'H'I XUUU1U VU W.VUIU.J, ICU. 1 '! lllj JlaiHIJ "fill,
Isth, April 1st, loth, 29th, May ISta, 27th, June 10ta
Each candidate must provide himself or herself vith
paper and pencil, and leave with th. Examine ra.
velope and postage stamp.
Especial attention is also called to the anv,.,Mi
from the 7tb section of the New School J Xeh anT
ends th. 45th section to lead aa follow
"As Vendition of examination, erh male applicant
for a oertiheate shall pay the Board f Examiners a fee of
ntty cent, and each female applicant a fee of thirty-hre
eenU; and all the money reeled by the Examiners, on
aid lee, shall be paid oyer quarterly to the County
ttwurer." K. BUSHNELL,
H. E. CLARKE,
F. M. G1NN,
Fremont, Jan. -27, 18od. 4yl ' Examiners.
Hotel tor' Sale.
MANY person having grtcnbacla ami are afraid
of the Government bursting, can dispose of some
them by calling on me, and BUYING MY rROl'
KK1 1, on the corner of Front and Garrison Streets; Fre
mont. ItisaGOOD LOCATION FOR A TAVERN", or
aoy kind of business. I will sell the whole or in two
parts. 1 will take a GOOD and WELL IMPROVED
r A KM in exenange, tr not too far Irom market,
chaser must come before the middle of March,
ther particular enquire on the premises, of
The pur-
For fur-
C. N. DEAL.
Fremont, Jan. 27, 1865. 4w4
SILVKR
sun
PLuVTW WAIVE,.
-4 FINK assortment jnst received, of the latest styles
XA. ana patterns.
Such as
Cake Baskets, Castors,
Syrup Cups, ' Goblets,
Spoon Cups, Tea Pots,
Cream Pitchers, Cups,
Brentifirst Castors,
Butter Dishes,
Sugar Baskets,
Coffee Ufus,
Nwpkin Rings,
lea Sets, fco,
These article are plated an best Whit. Metal, and all
WAKSAifTBD a inch.
Misses Sets of from three to live pieces,
plated on genuine Alabata. ,
Plain and Tipp'd Spoons, :
Tea, Coffee and Table Spoons,
Salt and Mustard Spoons, ' . ,
Desert, Medium and Table Fork
Putter, Pie, Fish and Fruit Kraives,
3T Call and see for yourselves.
Cy Poet Office Building.
Frao.t, 0,Da,18i. ' Z,-
1
.
,
FIRST PREMIUM
COOK STOVE.
T
HE time has arrived when almost everybody wants
A. FIBST CLASS
cooic stottEt
Therefore we are happy to announce that we have secured
the sale of the
AMERICAN,
which ha taken the PREMIUM OVER ALL OTHER
STOVES at the New York State Fair for the years 1862
and 1863.
Economy is Wealth,
which will be fully demonntrted by BUYING AN
AMERICAN HOT AIR
aua PACKAMi aco.HBAar.lXi
C00KINST0VE.
AS it will bake, broil and roast better than any other
Stove, with a saving of 26 per cent in fuel, and a very
large percentage in convenience.
They have the following advantages:
1st. Thev are constructed with a view of great dura
bility; all the plates exposed to the fire are made of an
extra thickness.
2d. The flues are lined with non-conducting cement,
therebv applying the heat directly to the oven, and the
oven can be heated and kept in baking order with less fu
el than any other Stove.
3d. They have a hot air draft, which not only makes
the fuel burn freely, ami last longer, but adds to the
heating and baking facilities.
4lh. They consume all the games f nim the fuel, there
by adding largely to the amount of heat obtained from
the amount of fuel used. '
6lh. The Stove is made, mounted and finished In the
most superior manner. The oven is large and well-von-tilated.
The Stove is convenient in form, ami made for
use: to adopt th. language of some who have ue1 this
Stove, "It will do more work with less fuel than any oth
er Stove."
Also,
A grest variety of other
Cooking,
Parlor,
Hall,
Box,
- Sii-Plates,
$neef-lron, and
elf-Regulating
STOVES-
Together with a full and complete assortment of
HARDWARE,
Tin,
Sheet-Iron, and
Copper Ware,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
Agents for
FAIRBANKS' SCALES,
Also agents for th.
BEST CUT NAILS
IN THE COUNTRY.
Our Tin Shop, 1
Is in complete running order, prepared to do yeur
work with neatness and despatch. ;
ry Don't fail to come and sea us in our NEW QUAR
TERS, OPPOSITE THB POST OFFICE, before purchas
ing elsewhere. . .. ..--..... -
ROBERTS & SHELDON,
FREMONT, OHIO.
November 30, 18d8.
WHOJLESAJLE ai.i
LIQUOR HOUSE
AND
Family Grocery Store.
A J. HARRIS, hat, enlarge.! his
CONFECTIONERY SHOP, and increased
hfs facilities for
manulHCUiring every oewnpii""
He can nil any order from 100 lbs. to lOOO lbs. of
CANDIES in from one to twenty-four hours' notice, anrt
warrant it to be unsurpassed by that of any manufacturer
either east or west. He uses only the 6rst ji.aiity of
White Sugar in making hi Confectionery.
CANDIES, in Rolls, or Lumps,
CANDIES, of all flavors,
CANDY TOYS, of all kinds,
CANDY MOTTOES,
CANDIES manufactured to order, in
any style the purchaser may desire.
BUY your CANDIES of HARRIS.
BUY your CANDIES of HARRIS.
JCS-BUY CANDIES of KARRIS.
One Door North of Bucklan.d's Drug Store.
One Door North af Buckla-jd's Drug Store.
Oa. Door North of Backhand's Drug Store.
A FULL STOCK OF
Fresh Family Groceries,
always kept ou hand, which will be
Sold at the Lowest Market Prices.
You can always find
Coffee, Teas, Sugars, Spices, Nuts,
Raisins, Fruits (in season,)
Fish, Butter, Eggs, Poultry, &.c&e
Freeh No. 1, OYSTERS, .
And a thousand other articles whichloannot enumerate.
It is universally admitted that to get GOOD Groceries,
and CHEAP Groceries, you should
BUY Groceries of HARRIS.
BUY Groceries of HARRIS.
BUY Groceries of HARRIS.
BUY Groceries of HARRIS.
HARRIS keeps good Groceries.
HARRIS has all kinds of Groceries.
HARRIS sells Groceries Cheap.
One Door North of BucklaniPs Drug Store.
On. Door North of Buckland' Drug Store.
On Door North of Buckland' Drug Store.
FREMONT, OHIO.
FREMONT. OHIO.
FREMONT, OHIO.
JTSr CALL and see HARRIS.
xT CALL and see HARRIS'. " -CALL
and see II A KRIS", -liefor.-e
you sell your FUR!
Before you buy your GROCERIES I
Before you buy your CANDIES !
"no Door North of Buckland's Drug Store.
One Door North of Buckland's Drugstore. , ,
0n , Door North of Buckland' Drug Store.
FREMONT, (OHIO-.
FREMONT, OHIO.
FREMONT, OHIO.
FREMONT, Feb. 13, 1883.
'Photographic AYmu.s.
1 TOST RECFrVKD. a few dozens more ol
few dozen more of fhr.se n
tl Pliotograpble Albnma,
of the latest styles, best manufacture and ve ry ei, jp.
Also, a few hundred nice
PHOTOGRAPHS,
a choice collection. Call aud examine for yourselves, a
th. Post Office Building. .
H. J. ZIMMERMAN.
Frsment, Jan. SO, 1884.
j
;
i
i
j
i
fa
DR. WISH ART'S
TAR CORDIAL.
IS THE BEST REMEDY FOR THROAT AND LUNG
.DISEASES!
It ia the vital principle of the ptue tree obtain
ed by a pecular process in the distillation of the
tar, by -which its highest medical properties are
retained. '""
It is the otiiy safe and reliable remedy which
has ever been prepared from the juice of the
pine tree.
It invigorates the digestive organs and rc-
stores the appetite.
It strengthens the debilitated system.
It purifies and enriches the blood, and expels
from the system the corruption which scrofula
breeds.,- .... - . s,- v
- It dissolves the mucus orphl gm Iiichslops
the air passaet- h the lunjr. -
Its healing principles nut upon the irritated
surface of the lungs aud throat, penetrating to
each diseased part, relieving pain ami subduing
inflammation.
It is the result of years of study ami experi
ment, and it is offered to the afflicted with the
positive assurance of its power to cure the
following diseases, if the patient has not too
long delayeda resort to the means of cure: Con-
sumption of the Lungs, Coughs, Sore Throat and
Hreast. iironcfulis, Asthma. V hooping Uough
Diphtheria, and is also an excellent remedy for
Diseases of the Ivtdneys and reniale Com
plaints.
Have you a cough? Have you a nore throat?
Have you any ol the premonitory symptoms ol
that most fatal disease, Consumption? Those
who should be warned by these symptoms gen
erally think light of them until it is too late.
From this faet, perhaps, more than any other,
arises the sad prevelence and fatality of a dis
ease which sweeps to the grave at least one-sixth
of death's victims. Consumption has destroyed
more ol the human tamily than any other diS'
ease, aim the nest physicians tor many years
have despaired of a cure, or a remadv that would
heal the lungs, but for more than two hundred
years the whole medical world has been lmpreS'
sed that there was a mysterous power aud effi
ciency in the Pine Tree Tar to heal the lunffs:
therefore, they have recommended the use of Tar
Water, which in many cases had a good enect;
out, how to combine tlie medical properties so
as to heal the lungs, has ever been a mystery
until it was discovered by Dr. h. 12. C WIS
HAUT, of Philadelphia, the proprietor of
WISHAIiT'S PINE TItEE COltDlAL.
It is now recommended aud prescribed in the
practice of a large number of the most intelli
gent and able physicians.
THE TAR CORDIAL WHEN TAKEN WITH
DU. WISH ART'S DYSPEPSIA PILLS,
IS AN UNFAILING CURE DYSPEPSIA.
Ma. Wisuart: 1 wish to add my testimony
to the hundreds you receive to the healing prop
erties of your Pine Tree Tar Cordial. For fif
teen year a sufferer, ten years of that time I
have slept only in my chair, not beinp; able to
lie down for fear of suffocation. I have employ
ed seven of the best physicians in Philadelphia,
who all pronounced my case incurable. 1 was
taken to the College, where the Faculty having
done what they could, declared my disease an
incurable case ot Asthma and Chronic Dyspep
sia, in its last stage, and that my lungs were
uuwuir kuuc r uiumg out; ui your circulars,
my wife procured from your store a bottle of
your Cordial. Perseveringly I used seven
bottles, and a box and a half of your Dyspep
sia Pills, when I felt that my disease had
wholly given way,' and the Cordial had giv
es me new vigor and strength. I continued
to improve, and for the past three months I have
been able to sleep in my bed as soundly as I
ever did. I am now well, and have gained
twenty-five pounds in my weight. I am able
to work and provide for my family. I send
you this true and faithful statement for the ben
efit ot the suflering. r neuda, call aud see me,
near Oxford Church Post Office, Twenty-third
ward, fhuadelphia. ' " ' Isaac Hkllerman.
WISHART'S PINE TREE TAR CORDIAL.
GREAT REMEDY FOR CONSUMPTION!
.;. Rkabing, Pa., April 19, 1864.
' Da. Wishart Bear Sir: One year ago the
Examining Surgeon of this, district tola me I
had Consumption of the Lungs, and that I could
not becured; and judging from all my symptoms
at that time, l myse.lt supposed this to be true.
I was for more than one year troubled with a
hacking cough, which gradually grew so bad
that I could not have a severe fit of coughing
without spitting up blood in large quantities.
For mouths I could not work at anything,
nml was obliged to keep my beiKniostoi the
time. While iu this condition 1 was in jr.
Jiowbotham s store, in this city, and lie seeing
how low I was, recommended me to. try your
Pine Tree Tar Cordial. He said lie had sold
great deal of it, aud that, as it had cured so mauy
others, he believed it would do some good. .
houirht a bottle and commenced using it. iu
verv short time I saw that I was getting better
very fast, and after taking several bottles I was
entirely restored to health, so that I could work
everv day at my business, which is very heavy
work, in an iron foundry. When I commenced
to use your Pine Tree lar Cordial, my weight
was only one hundred aud thirty-five pounds:
since the use of it I have weighed on au average
one huudred and fifty-five. 1 shall be glad to
have you publish this, as 1 believe i should not
have been living at this time if I had not used
your great medicine, and I wish all who suffer
to receive iw uciibul.
Very truly yours,
Capt. SamuklHa&nkr.
No. 334 S. Eight street, Reading, Pa.
COUGHS OF LONG" STANDING CURED!
We received the following from Utica.N. Y.:
Dk. Wisbakt Dear Sir: I take pleasure in infonn
inryou through thi source, that your Pin. Tree Tar
.i4;.i hicli was recommended for my daughter by
ir J A. Hall, of this city, has cured her of a cough
mcire than five months standing. I had thought her be
yond cure, and had emnloyeti th. best medical aid with
out any benefit. I can cheerfully recommend it to th.
rublfc a safe and sure remedy for those similarly af
it. t as 1 know of many other cases besides that of my
mcLeti, i i !,. ai.tll4;n.Mi,.)ifl
dauirh ter, tna' " "- s a
6 Yours, respectfully,
Johw V. Parker, Daguerrean Artist,
No. 126 Ueneee street, Utica, N. Y,
I have uaed I'r. Wishart's Pine Tree Tar Cor
dial in my tamily, and eniMij recommend it Ma valu
able and safe medicine for Colds, Coughs, and to thoe.
predispose to Consumption. DRJ. A. kootbs.
. To. 100 Genessee street, Utica, N. Y.
iwkai.i.IRLKCURE FOR BRONCHITIS,
Air Warrl saVS'.
- v,. i h.i Rrnni-.hitis. Innammation
oftbeLunes. Shortness of Breath, and Palpitation
the Heart in their worst form, lhaa been treatea
several of the mast eminent physician Philadelphia,
but they could not stop the rapid course of my '
--j i uIa j.inl ,f ever lieine restored to health.
. . -., 1 . on ihe verie of the grave. Your Pine Tree Tar
.s hrhlv recommended to me by a Hiend
tried it, and ail thankful to say that, after using lour
largeand one small bottle, I was restored to lwrfect
health. You can give reference to my house, No. 968
v ,1. ,trt or at lr.v office of Receiver of Taxes,
fiom8 a! St.. to 2 P. a., corner of Chestnut and Sixth
streets.
ASTHMA AND COUGH CURED.
Tho Vin. free Tar Cordial gives instanta
....- relief in cases of Asthma and Whoopiug
Couch, It often cures whooping before it runs
half its course, as it acts at once ou the phlegm
j and expels them from the throat,
and the sufferer is relieved. In case of Asthma,
nr Wiahart a Liysnepsia riiis wim iucv,ui-
l!a1 as they have never been known to fail
cure that disease.
DR. WISHART'S PINE : TREE TAR
CORDIAL will positively wire the following
.l:.,- n.w.un,, mt ion. if not beyond the pow-
r of medicine: Inflammation of the Lungs,
-i....,n.l,t. Cro Threat; ami Breast, Bronchitis.
Asthma, and au unfailing remedy for female
.'onmlailltH.
The above are -fff ow-ame-jig the thousands
whom this great remedy nassaven irom uu uu
timely erave.
We have thousands of letters from Physicians
and Druggists who have prescribed and sold
Tar Cordial, saying that they have never used
r oi,Ll a medicine which irave such universal
satisfaction. -
. .
.... REMEMBER THAT
The Tar Cordial, when taken in connection with
Dr. Wishart's Dyspepsia Pills, is an infallable
cure for Dyspepsia.
BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS!
The genuine has the name of the proprietor
i . . ki. lmfil. All others
fanaa JMIM) ue w.?
are spurious iniiwiuou. -'.
- DR. L. C. WISHART,
'
- No. 10, Noaia Skconw-st., Philaou-i-uia,
j Sold by Druggists everywhere, at 'wholesale
i by all Philadelphia and New York Waolesafc
jdruggiita. . y
A LITTLE WHILE.
A little while to walk this wearv road:
A little way to bear this weary load,
Then all our earthly pilgrimage shall cease,
And all shall wear the crown in perfect peace.
A little while to love with earthly love,
And then we share the "fulness" from above;
A little time of darkness and of doubt.
Then the bright home whose light shall ne'er
go out.
A little toil and sadness here below.
A little time to watch and plant and sow ;
Then Jesus calls his laborers away
Where everlasting joy and gladness stay.
A little time of wind and storm aud rain.
And the shinine heaven we shall gain;
A little time to toss on life's rough sea,
Then in that peaceful home our rest shall be.
A little while ! Oh Saviour ! make us strong,
To bear that little, though it oft seems long;
Guide thou our way with thine own loving hand,
Till we shall enter in the Promised Land .'
i
BOY LOST.
a
He had black eyes with long lashes, red
cheeks, and hair almost black and curly. He
wore a crimson plaid jacket, with full trowsers
buttoned on; had a habit of whistling, and liked
to ask questions; was accompanied by a small
black dog. It is a long while now since he dis
appeared. I have a pleasant house and much
company. My guests say, "Ah! it is pleasant
to be here. Everything has such an orderly,
put-away look nothing about underfoot no
dirt." But my eyes are aching for the sight of
whi tilings aud cut paper ou the floor; of tum-hled-downcard
houses; of wooden sheep and
cattle; of pop-guns, bows and arrows, whips,
tops, go-carls, blocks and trumpery. 1 want to
see crumbles on the carpet, and paste spilt on
the kitchen table. I want to see the chairs and
the tables turned the wrong way about. 1
want to see candy making and corn-popping,
aud to find jack-knives aud fish-hooks among
my muslins. Yet these things used to fret me
once. They say, "how quiet you are here!
Ah! one here may settle his brains, and be at
peace." . But my ears are aching lor the patter
ing of little feet; for a hearty shout, a shrill
whistle, a gay tra la la; for the crack of little
whips; for the noise of drums, fifes and tin
trumpets. Yet these things made me nervous
once.
They say, ''Ah! you have leisure nothing to
disturb you. What heaps of sewiug you have
time for!" But 1 long to be disturbed. I want
to be asked for a bit of string or an old news
paper; for a cent to buy a slate-pencil or pea
nuts. I want to be coaxed for a piece of new
cloth for jibs and mainsails, aud then to hem
the same, x want to maxe utile nags ami u;igs
to hold marbles. 1 want to be followed by lit
tle feet all over the house; teased for a bit of
dough tor a little cake, or to bake a pie in a sau
cer. Yet these things used to fidget me once.
Thev say; "Ah! you are not tied at home.
How delightful to be always at liberty for con
certs, lectures aud parties! No confinement for
you." But I want confinement. 1 want to lis
ten to the school-bell ol mornings, to give me
last hasty wash and brush, and then to watch
from the window nimble feet bounding away to
school. 1 want frequent rents to mend, aud to
replace lost buttons. 1 want to obliterate mud
stains, molasses stains aud paints of all colors.
1 Want to oe sitting oy a iitue biu tn-Diura
when weary little feet are at rest, aud prattliug
voices are hushed, that mothers may sing their
lullabvs. and tell over the oft-repeated stories.
They don't know their happiness then, those
mothers: I don't. All these things I called con
finement once.
A manly figure stands before me now. He is
taller than L has thick whiskers wears, a frock
coat, a bosomed shirt and a cravat. He has just
come from college. He brings Latin and Greek
in his countenance; and busts ot the oiU phuos-
rthers for the sitttner room. He calls me mo
ther, but I am rather unwilling to own him.
He avers that he ia my boy; and says he can
Drove it. He brings his little boat to show me
the red stripe on the sail (it was the end of the
piece) aud the name on the stern. Lucy Lowe,
a little e-irl of our neighbor, who because of her
long euris ana pretty rouuuiace, was mecuoseu
tavonte ot my boy. I ne cum were long since
cut off. and she has grown to a tall, handsome
girl. How his face reddens as he shows me the
name ol the boat; un: I see it au as piam aa
if it were a written book. My little boy is lost
and my big boy will soon be. Oh. I wish he
were a little tired boy in a long white night
gown. Ivinc in his crib with me sitting by, hold
ing his baud in mine, pusmng me curis oaca
from his forehead, watching his eyelids droop,
and listening to bis deep breathing.
. If I only had my little boy again, how pa.
tient I would be! How much 1 would bear,
nd how little I would fret and scold! I can
never have him back again; but there are still
many mothers who have uqf yet lost their UtUe
boys. 1 wonder if they know they are living
their liest days; that now is the time to really
euiov their childreu! I think if I had been
more to my UtUe boy, l uugiit now oe more to
my grown up one. llome Marjaiinc.
A NEW WAR IN INDIA.
Bhootan. People, and its Offences.
of
of
py
1
to
the
P.
The English have another Indian War on their
hands, it is not a mutiny that is to lie sup.
preased this time, but an independent .State,
never under British rule, that is to be conquer
ed and "annexed. lihootan, a poor aud iso
lated state, hitherto exempt from the ravages of
foreign wars, has not only turned the cold shoul
der to an envoy from England who penetrated
its dreary wastes, but actually threatened him,
so that he conceived that his life was in danger,
and hastily retired. For this and other offences
England declares war against Bhootau, and the
Bhooteas are to oe iooteu aowu tue nui oi au-
versitv.
The history ot this country ot ihootan is in
teresting. . the best authorities say it is about
two hundred and fifty miles in length by ninety
five in breadth, with an area of sixty-four thou
sand sa uare miles, and a population of seven
hundred and fifty thousand souls having Ben
gal Proper on the south, Assam to the southeast,
and Thibet to the north. Like the highlands
of Scotland, it is a place of mountain fastnesses
aud wild glens. It people, whom few white
men have seen, are rude barbarians, whose arms
are the bow and arrow and the spear, and who
are of Tartar blood, with broad triangular la.
ces, small oblique eyes and yellow skins. Their
religion is fiuddhist, ot a mortified type, and
the country swarms wiui menuicant priests.
The hills produce good iron; building-stone
abundant; dense virgin forests offer inexhausti
ble supplies of lumber; and a narrow belt
valley laud yields tropical fruits. The town:
are lew, but are commanded oy castellated
strongholds which are said to be formidable,
The rulers are a Deb-Rajah who is the actual
sjivereifii as well as the principal merchant
and a Dharma-Rajah, or nominal king, who has
no civil power, but is invested with a sui-prov
in or number ot divine attributes.
Such is the country and such the people that
the English government has now resolved to add
to its possessions in India. 1 he singular ex
emption from the pains and penalties of war,
dete&t and vassalage, wnicn uie cnooieas uave
hitherto enjoyed,. is explained by the remote
ness of their territory irom tue centres oi rrit
Lsh influence; and the sudden desire of possess
ion is probably attributable to the liritish disin
clination to endure a defiance provided al-
wavsthat the ofteuder is weak
. . . i . fn.
The defiance came aoout in mis way: tne
Rhooteas. being savages, knew no better than
to descend from their mountains, like the Scot
tish cateran of the last century, lor predatory
incursions into the territory ot their neighbors,
and they gathered spoil aud took prisoners.
.... " .J , . .. i 1 V.
Xheagrieved victims, ueiug msMinui uukkuiu
invoked aid from their rulers, and an envoy was
sent up among the hills last summer to recover
the booty, release the captives, and remonstrate
with tlie Bhooteas. He was insulted, albeit
was "the scion of a noble English family, " a
London iourual phrases it; and, his negotiation
failing, w as able to save his life only by
eouiDulsorv sienmg of a treaty for the cession
of the tea-grow-ing region of Assamm toBhoot
an. This was too much for the Governor-General's
patieuee, and ou the 1:2th of November
he Issued a proclamation declaring war against
the Bhooteas. By the latest reports it appears
that the whole territory is to be annexed to Ben
gal; that the people are to lie reduced and their
forts taken (one of these has already fallen;)
anA that when these things have been accom
plished, "there will be a survey of the frontier
lands and adeteruiination olthenew boundary.
Keening rust.. . ,
-'- 'b.". how do'vou'likc my "mustache.' Mith
Laura?" lisped a dandy to a wei ry girl. : "Oh,
very liiuch. It looks like the fua ou the back
of a catterpillar.". '
John, said a Htingy old hunk to his hired man,
as he was taking diuner, do you, know
many pancakes you've eaUm? N.
you've eaten fourteen. Well, said John,
count and I'll eat.
Gen. Sherman's Talk to the People of Georgia.
gia. :
We find in th Savannah Kepublicau of Jau- f
uary 12th, the following plain, practical let ter, i
as to the status and duty of the citizens of)
Or.ro-; a-
Headq'ks Mil. Div. of the Mihs'pi, )
Is the Field, Savasxah, Ga., .
January 8, iy&. , )
X. IP. Em., County, Qa:
Dear Sia: Y'ours of the 3d insU ia received,
and in answer to your enquiries I beg to state: '
I am merely a military commander and can
only act in that capacity; nor can I give any as-
surance or pledges affecting civil matters in the
future. They will be adjusted by Congress
when Georgia is again represented there as of
old. . ..
Georgia is not out of the L nion, and therefore
the talk of "reconstruction!' appears to me in
appropriate. Some of her people have bees
and still remain in a state of revolt; aud as long
as they remain armed and organized, the Uni
ted States must pursue them with armies, aud
deal with them according to military law. But
as soon as they break up their armed organiza
tions and return to their homes, I take it they
will be dealt with by the civil courts. Some of
the rebels in Georgia, in my judgement, deserve
death, because they have committed murder
and other crimes, which are punished with
death by all civilized Governments oa earth.
But tlie great mass probably will never be no
ticed. 1 think this was the course indicated by
General Washington with reference to the Whis
ky Insurrection, and a like principle seemed to
be recoguized at the time of the Burr conspire
acy.
As to the Union of the rttates under our gov
ernment, we have the high authority of Gener
al Washington, who bade us be jealous and care
ful ot it, aud the still more emphatic word of
Gen. Jackson, I be rederal L niou, it must and
shall be preserved." Certainly Georgians can
not question the authority ot sncu men, and
should not suspect our motives, who are simply
luiinuing ineir commauus. v uerever neces
sary, force has been used to carry out this eud;
and you may rest assured, that the Union will
be preserved, cost what it may. And if you
are sensible men you will conform to this order
of things or else emigrate to some other, coun
try. " There is no other alternative open to the
people of Georgia.
31 y opinion is that no negotiations are neces.
ary, nor commissioners, nor conventions, nor
anything of the kind. Wheuever the people of
Georgia quit rebelling against their government,
and elect members of Congress and Senators,
and these go and take their seats, then the State
of Georgia will have resumed her functious in
the Lmon.
These are merely niv opinions, but in coufirr
matiou of them, as I think, tlie people of Geor
gia may well consider the following words, ro-
7 f .!. 1 ..!. .1 lli C! ...... .
iernng to tue people ui uie rcoeutvun .? utie,
which 1 quote from the recent annual message
of President Lincoln to Congress at its present
session: -
"They can at any moment have peace simply
by laying down their arms aud submitting to
the national authority uuder the L-onaututiou
After so mucli, the Government could not, if it
would, maintain war against them. The loyal
people would not sustain or allow it. llques
tions should remain, we would adjust them by
the peaceful means of legislation, conferance,
courts and votes. Operating only in constitu
tional aud lawful channels, some certain and
other possible questions are and would be be-
vond the Executive power to adjust, as for in
stance, the admission of members into Congress
and whatever might require the appropriation
of money.
The President then alludes to the general par
don and amnesty offered for more than a year
past, upon specineu and most liberal terms, to
all except certain designated classes, even these
being "still within contemplation ot special
clemency, aud adds
"It is still so open to all, out the time may
come probably will come when public duty
shall aemana tnat it oe cioseu, aua mat iu new,
more vigorous measures than heretofore shall
be adopted."
It seems to me that it is tune lor the people
of Georgia to act for themselves, and return, in
time, to their duty to the Government ot their
Fathers. Respectfully your ob t servant,
j
i
W. T. SHERMAN,
Major General.
The End at Hand—An English View.
is
of
-
A
he
"Midwinter." says tlie London badu Jietcs
of January 3, "brings no pause in the shock and
hurry ot war in the American campaign; aud
the same paper adds:
if the .Aorta still remains able to Keep up its
armies to at least their present standard, while
the South cannot reuew its regular forces, nor
rouse the patriotism of its members to further
sacrifices, it is evident that the eud is at length
coming within sight. It must not, indeed, be
looked tor suddeuly. A great aua tried army
like Lee's cannot lie suddenly disposed of by
any opponent less than a Napoleon. Even Hood
may rally a portion oi his lorce, and make a stout
fight still in the strong positions ou the Teuu-
essee. cut, on tne ouier nana, it is impossiuie
not to see in the accounts of the lighting that
now reach us, that a knowledge of their fate
has greatly altered the morale of the contending
forces. There is at ouce a dash and a stubborn
energy in the attacks of the federals which were
not traceable iu their first encounters, while the
southerners, whose wilder manner of life, whose
reckless contempt of death, and whose skul as
shots gave them in the oneuing of the wta dis-
tiuct superiority, now iigin as orave men uo
who are ashamed to yield, but who yet know
that they tight in vain. ' And those who are still
with Hood or Lee are, it must be remembered,
the heartiest who are left. They are those who
doubted not of success, and who shrank not from
the dangers and sufferings necessary to ensure
it. When these begin to doubt the eud must
be approaching. ; .
"But the facts we have beeu reviving not on
ly show us the eud of the war, but they open to
us a happier prospect ot wnicn win oe alter tne
war. The theory advanced by some of our con
temporaries, that the North could never hold the
South, even after the Southern armies are bea
ten from he field, is plainly untenable. The
fiery spirits will be gone, and those who were too
indifferent to fight will certainly not have ener
gy to resist when the fight is over. It ia to be
kept in view that there is after all, no difference
of race, or speech, or law to maintain a feeling
hostility. There is nothing to prevent northern
settlers from amalgamating with southern resi
dents. The negro question behig settled, there
will be nothing to maintain a distinction be
tween the two sections. Engaged iu the same
pursuits, resorting to the same courts, electing
members to the same legislature, there will be
nothing in this case resembling those iu which
a natiou is overrun and deprived of ita rights by
an alien power. Southerners will recover their
rii'hts bv submission, they will stand on a foot.
in? of perfect equality with the victors. We all
know how rapidly, when tlie Highlanders
Scotland had been disarmed, they became among
.. . , , i; .
the most loyal oi weir leiiow suu ecus, i
their case was one ia which there were fuuda
mental distinctions between them and their sub
jugators not be fouud between federals aud Con-
federates, fliououpi mere wui oe an interven
ing period iu which military law must prevail
till perfect order is restored. Those who make
the pretence of acting as guerillies after the reg
ular war is over an excuse of murdering and
plundering, must be repressed by the hrm rules
which in every country, and under.every sys
tem of law, punish individual crime. This will
be an inevitable concomitant of the period
transition from war to legalty.' But when the
foul dream of building up a slave empire is over
there will be nothing left to fight about; aud
people who have nothing to maintain dissen
sion about, and who are in the enjoyment
common rights, common liberties, eoiumou priv
ileges, will speedily unite to put oown mow
whose disorders will be only a common bane."
A WOMAN'S DEED.
the
'.
how
you
The New Albany (Indiana) Letjer of Janu-
ary 17 teg. thi. horrible story: "Wclearnfrom
John S. Begp that a man named Hadlock met
his fate m Hawesvdle, Kentucky, on Saturday
night, under the following circumstances:-
Them a woman ra town who keeps . grog-
shop, and who had been notified by Hadlock
remove by a certain time. On Saturday Had
lock made his appearance at the window of
domicil, which he smashed iu, and notified
that if she did not leave by night he would
and murder her. At night he returned
and discovered the woman and her son sitting
. n , , 1 1
M.S..w
with a mallet and he fell heavily to the earth.
She listened, few minutat-nd hearing him
groan, went outside ana lotina mm lymg
almost dying condition. She called for her
brine- her an axe. The son did o, and
took it from him and deliberately chopped
body np into small pieces and left it for
hogs to devour, oiie went uai ...
and went to bed,
At last accounts sne nau
,11
been arrested, nor was be likely to Oe, as
citizens j i tilled the set.
SPEECH OF ANDREW JOHNSON.
DEATH OF SLAVERY IN TENNESSEE.
' nman uuerty, yon nave discharged your
duty manfully. - .
who w"ulf &ougnt. three or four years
ag" that TenneKseeans would have been per
' nutted to assemble i a this Capitol, for such a
The Nashville Time has the following report
of a speech delivered by Governor Johnson, on
the 14th nit., on the adjournment of the State
Couventiou which abolished Slavery in Ten
nessee: . ; ,, ...
Gentlemen: I came liars to mghttobe'a lis.
tener, with the net ol you, to your nomine for
Governor! -but, ts there seems to be a disap
pointment, I shall try to entertain you for a brief
time. Gentlemen, I cocgratulata tou in the
sincerity of my heart on the successful eonclua.
ion of yonr labors." It is the greatest work of
the age. Ia the great revolution which ia go
iug forward, you have performed your part no-
bly. This I say without flattery; your work
has been well done. In this momentous strug
j gle,' in the development of the great principles
, 1:1 . . , . ,
purpose, wujiout &eing moieaiea, or anven
from its halls? The miehty principles of hn-
man rights and liberty have been pitted against
niononolw and slaverv. Yesterday vou ornka
.the tyrant's rod and set the captive free. Loud
applause.! . les, gentlemen, yesterday you
sounded the deat h knoll of negro aristocracy,
and. performed the funeral obsequies of that
thing called slavery. You have opened the
grave aud let the carcass down, aud all that re
mains ls lor you to seal toe pit on tne 2Vd or
February, the anniversary of the day which
gave birth to the Father of his Country Con
secrate your work on that day. ,
iaA.ICll'ATIOII OK SLACKS AJM WHITES. ' '
1 feel a heartfelt gratitude thnt I have lived
to see it done, and that I have been permitted
to perform my little part in tbis great drama.
The blow has been struck, - and- slavery lies
Jirostrate. An insolent, insincere, ignorant, un
feeling, hypocritical, nefarious, diabolical slave
aristocracy has been tumbled te the ground.
l ney wno never learned that ,
"Worth make, the man, and want of it the fellow,"
who lived on the real or imaginary honors of
buried ancestry, have at least learned that aa
ignorant, corrupt aristocracy must go down.
Y'our sessions have been, on the whole, harmo
nious, notwithstanding some little bickering,
which I think will au pas away with your ad
journment. While you think you have eman
cipated black men, 1 tell you that you have
emancipated more white than black men from
the insolent domination of the slaveholder.
Yes, the time was not kmg ago when you dared
uot speak your sentiments. Even in East Teu
uewtee, where there were only few slaves, and
we always spoke more freely, do you not re-
mem bef tne power which the slaveholder exer
cised? how many of our people were compelled
to live on barren ridges and cultivate the stony
spots, while a few slaveholders owned thousands
of brond acres in the fertile valleys, which they
r.l t j -r. . . r
uuea wiiu iueir Loniumen. x.ven you lelt their
power, and knew the contempt they felt for you.
Because, many years ago, I dared to speak
of these things, I was denounced as an agrarian
and demagogue, who appealed to thepreiudiees
of the people. Thank God, I have lived to see
the day when the people of my State have de
clared themselves free. I must now urge you
to redouble yonr efforts to carry out your work
when you go hence. ' it you consummate it
with the same resolutiou, the foul blot of hu
man slavery wilt be removed from the escutch
eon of tlie State. - -
I shall say nothing of the future condition cf
the negro, "nor of the elective franchise. First,
reorganize; time and experience will regulate
the rest. Let us first get rid of slavery; let there
be no bickering or conflict till we get that out
of the way. This being done, we will take cp
other questions and dispose of them aa they
arise. ' Who could have anticipated three years
ago that we would have progressed thus far?
Let us like wise- men, hold ourselves in readi
ness to manage the new questions which may
arise in the future. There is no need of giving
onrselves trouble prematurely. '
THE NEW STATE.
Gentlemen .of the convention, or primary'
meeting, or assembly of the peeple, whichever
you may choose to. call it you have already
lived to aee a great work done. The news has
gone forth over the land on the wings of light
ning. As I stated the other day that I had got
a despatch from Governor Fletcher, announc
ing that Missouri was free, so I sent back yester
day a message to him that in my own State ov
er five hundred delegates had nnanimoualy
abolished slavery. 1 also sent a message to
Abraham that the death knell of slavery had
been sounded in Tennessee. If we elect a leg
ialature, re-district the State, and elect Senators
and Congressmen, they will certainly be re
ceived at Washington, and the whole trouble of
reconstruction will be at an end. Our State
will be as much a State as ever, having only lost
its distracting element of slavery, and therefore
the stronger for the loss. . ..
THE FUTURE.
of
of
ei
1
This government was created to live in per-
pituity. It was sent on a great mission to the
nations of the earth, which is not yet fulfilled.
It is destined to pass through great trials, to
give evidence that it ia fit tor its work. Its
constitution can be modified, reformed, and
adapted to the progress of the people. There ia
uo provision for its destruction, but for its per
fection. These are charging times and a
changing world, aud mind and matter are under
going continual changes. Two things only
change not, human reason and the sovereignty
ol the people the light ot intellect and the
principle. of free government. These are the
great beacons to mark out the road, along which
the nations of the earth must travel.
: Go home, not a rivals, bnt as friends re
solved to save the State and wipe out slavery.
To do this is enough foroue man to live for. A.
life spent in accomplishing a result like this-i
well spent. Though some for a while may"
sueer. the time will enme when the nation will
be utterly astonished that this great monopoly
has been submitted to so long. Let no man,
then delude himself with the dream, the vague
hope, that he still holds on to slavery; let hini
cut the cord at once, and he will feel a great
deal easier. '
Nor let any man suppose that 1 think that,
any portion of the populace should be turner I
forth as loafers without work. The sooner we
get out of this transition state which is always
the worstthe better for us, the better for tie
negroes. Iu five years from now the labor of
the black man will be more productive than ev
er, for freedom simply means liberty to work
and enjoy the products of one's labor. Let us
try to comprehend the times in which we live,
and the great principles which are at work.
There is a breaking up of old combinations and
men are coming together by their natural affin
ities. - Old parties are disintegrating, and new
ideas thrown out among men of mind form the
basis of new parties. Here is the great contest
of philanthropy, of sound reason, of humanity,
whose foundation is the Christian religion; a
bow of promise, whose base rests upon the ho
rizon, and whose span arches the universe.
In the midst of the darkness which has been
resting on the land for three years a darkness
deeper than that of the dark ages from you,
sitting in the midst of carnage, and of death, has
gone forth a light to illuminate the world and
teach mankind that you can be free. I feel that
God smiles on what you have done, and that it
meets the approbation of the hosts that surround
him. O how it contrasts with the shrieks and
cries and wailings which the institution of
slavery has brought on the land!
Look along the battle fields of Tennessee at
the new made graves witness your country
men perishing in battler see even the Goddess
of Liberty, struggling through desolation, carn
age, and bloodshed, and almost driven from out
borders! Might I not say with the poet: -"O
btoodieirt picture in the book of tim.:
' And yet out of all this gloomy scene, beams
a light to illuminate the world in future years.
As your fellow-citizen who- expects in some f
vour valleys to deposit his bones. I thank Ton
again for the noble work which you have done. "
HOW TO JUDGE A HORSE.
of
a
of
Au exchange gives the following instructions
which wc publish for the benefit of those who
would know how to judge the age of a horse:
About two years old the horse sheds the two
middle teeth of the under jaw; at three years
old he sheds two other teeth, one on each side
of those he thed the year before; at four years
he sheds the two remaining or corner teetn; at
five years the two middle teeth tire full, being
no longer hollow, as the others are, and teeth
will have penetrated the gums; at six years old
the four middle teeth will have become full, the
comer ones only remaining hollow the tusks
are sharp with the sides dinted, at seven years
oiu uie corner iceui aro 'i.u, w e
howevcrXse to wffl EghU
! SSJ on the animal's
gn&nhethei Tbe .late or early foal;
tS. manner in which he has been
, belter, Ac. .
reartH1' rne klDa ' 1
GIVING THEMSELVES UP.
her :
her
1.
'! .
son reCentlv came into JSVavna t ountv, ac
ta she "it-, "
the i cmnDanied by a dozen or fitweu other
the ' rebel soldiers, all of whom took tlie amnesty
not
A
tne-
We learn from meiubors of the Legisla
ture, and others, from the border counties
that large number? of rebel soldiers are
coming in and giving themselves up at the
"lltI-ts itt toi Department-
Lieut. Samuels, brother of Jude Samuels,
I fnMnelv AJ:uUnt orthis State.
Qjth i u,- sav thev are tirwrt nnnntr
I , ,. , . rrt
y ""7?'"6 -o - -

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