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Fremont weekly freeman. (Fremont, Sandusky County, Ohio) 1850-1853, September 21, 1850, Image 1

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FREEMAN
VOLUME II.
FREMONT, SANDUSKY COUNTY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1850.
NUMBER
F REM ON'
WEEKLY
I
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5
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FREMONT FREEMAN:
. J. S. FOUKETEditor and Publisher.
tTh Freeman, ia snbliahad everv Satnrdsv mom.
tn OSes In Buekland's Brick Buildiuir third
. n . a i . .1.
jiery, inraaQiiOiDaaHj county, unio.
!- TERMS -
Single mail subscribers, per year, SI 50
Clubs of ten and upwards, to one address I 371
-ti r c n .. -
Tow aubacribara will be charred 1 75. Tha dif
ference in the terms between the price on papers
" delivered in town and those sent by mail, a occa-
nmni oy ma expensa oi carrying.
When the money is not paid in advance, at above
Specified. Two Dollar will be charred if amid with
in the year, if not paid until after the expiration of
tne year, J wo Uollars and I my cent will be charg
ed. Tbse terms will be strictly adhered to.
How to STor k PirxR. First see that yon have
paid for it up to the time yon wish it to stop; notify
the Past Master of yeur desire, and ask him to no
tify the publisher, ander his frank, ( ha is author
bed t- do) of your wish to discontinue. , . .
RATES OF ADVERTISING. . -Que
square 1 3 lines first insertion .......$0 50
- io . each additional insertion....... H5
- Do Three months. 3 00
- ' Do Sis months........ 3 50
- Do : One year.. .i... 500
Two squares Six mouths........ .... ...... 6 00
Do - Oue year............. .10 00
Half colnmn One year.... 18 00
' One column One year.... .... 30 00
Business Oirectorg.
FREMONT FREEMAN
'job PBiarTiyQ office;
-. We are .now prepared to execute to order, in i
treat and expeditions manner, and upon the fairest
terms; almost all descriptions of
JOB PRINTING;
SUCH AS
Bojisxss Cabos.
Bill Hxads, ',.
Bills or Laoivq.
ClKCDLIRS,
i CATALOGUES,' '
Buow Bills,
Josnezs' Blasls, -aVawvxbs'
Blasks,
CSRTtriCATSS, -
Drafts,
Bills,
Bask Chicks,
Law Casks,
AiAsmsrs,
Ball Tickets, etc, etc.
We would say to those of our friends who are in
want of such work, you need not go abroad to get
ft dona, when it can be done just as good at home.
SONS OF TEMPERANCE,
; Fort Stefbeksos Ditoior, No. 432. Stated
"nestings, every Tuesday evening at the Division
Koom in the old Northern exchange.
. : i. o. o. f.
Crook as 1-oixil. Ha. 77, meets at the Odd Fel
lows Hall, in Bu&kland's Brick Building, every
.Saturday evening. : " '
. . . ROBERTS. HUBBARD fe CO., :
1 l, ... ' a. 1 MASOrACTOKERSOF.
Copper j Tin ? and Sheet-iron Ware,
- ,:, A okalers ik ' -'
Stares, Wool, Hides, Sheep-pelts, Rigs,
Old Copper, Old Stoves, &c, &o. :
ALSO, ALL SORTS Or GEHUISK TAKKKK KOTIOKS
Pease's Brick Block, So. 1.
TT- - FREMONT, OHIO. . 32
STEPHEN BCCK1AND fc CO.,
" ' - ' .'- DBALKK3 IN 1 -.-
Dregs, Medicines, Paints, Dye-Stuffs,
Books, Stat ionaay, &c.t
, , .FREMOKT, OHIO. . -
EDWARD F. DICKINSSOBT, -'
Attorney and Counsellor at taws
'- - EEEMONT,OHIO. : - v
Office-One aoor sooth of A. B. Taylor's store, up
T lairs. - Aug. 31, 1850.
. IIACPII P. BCCKIiAlVO! :
Attorney and Counsellor at Iaw,
And Solicitor ia Chancery, will attend to profess
ional Business in Sandusky and adjoining counties.
Offiea-Sscond story of Buekland's Block. .
FREMONT, OHIO.
JOHN Ia. GREENE,
ATTORNEY -AT L AW, ;
And Prosecuting Attorney, for Sandusky county,
will attend to all professional business entrusted to
iis ears, with promptness and fidelity.
V Office Id the second story of Buekland's Block.
FREMONT, OHIO.
CHESTER EDGEBTOJVt
Attorney and Counsellor at law,
" And Solicitor ia Chancery, will carefully attend
. :o all professional basiness left in bis charge. H
Twill also attend to the collection of claims &c, in
' this and adjoining counties. ,
Office Second story Buekland's Block.
. FREMOMT, OHIO. 1
.--- - B. J. BAKTLETT,
: Attorney and. Counsellor at Law,
Will give hi undivided attention to professional
business in Sandusky, and the adjoining counties.
Office Over Oppenheimer's Store.
- FREMONT, OHIO. 1
. . ,. 1R. M DANA,
- . PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
TT1ENDERH his professional services to the citi
. , X xens of Fremont and adjacent conntry. .
Office One door north of E. Leppelman's Jew
' airy Store, where he will cheerfully attend to any
'calls, sxcept when absent en professional duty.
l June 24, 1850. . - - - ; ' -
; IjA Q RAWSONt
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
' Office North side of the Turnpike, nearly oppo
site the Post Office, , -.
... . , . FREMONT, OHIO. - 14
... PIERRE BEAUGBANDs
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
--: Respectfully tenders his professional services to
the citiaeus of Fremont and vicinity.
Office One door north of E. W. Cook's Store.
. JPORTAGE COUNTY
Jlatnal Fire Insnrance Company.
R. F. BUCK&AND, Agent .
. FREMONT, OHIO. ;
POST OFFICE HOURS
" The regular Post" Office hoors, until forther no
tice will be as follows:
; From 7 to 12 A. M. and from 1 to 8 P. M.
; Sundays from 8 to 9 A M, and from 4 to 5 P M.
- 1-. L j - . : W. M. STARK, P. M.
.- Farms toilet!
SEVERAL FA RMS. near Fremont, and conve
nient to the Turnpike. ET TO RENT. .!
" - Some of these have Eighty to Ninety acres clear
ad thereon, with comfortable Homes, Barns &0.
Enquire of SAML. CRO WELL,
' General Land Agent. ,
' Mnskalnnge, March 2, 1850 5I-S
A. F. & F. TANBEKCOOK:
, , MERCHANTS AND DEALERS
.In all kinds of Produce;
: At tae Old Stand '' I
TSonnerjy occupied by Dickenson & V. Doren.
- EREMONT, OHIO. , I
' DccembertS. 1849-
TIIIE choicest Lienors an Wines for Medicinal
X sjnd Mecbanical pnrposes for sale at - .
' Bcckumd's.
floe tra,
From the O. S. Journal.
DECLINE. .
B7 MARY LINCOLN CLINTON.
The Autumn days have come again
The mournful Autumn days
And summer birds in brighter skies
Are warbling tweeter lays.
The forrest walks are lonely now,
Each note of joy ia hushed,
And the old trees' faded robes are heaped -
W herd erst the streamlet gushed.
Farewell to summer's golden hours,
Andsummer birds farewell!
. Tour sunshine and your melody
Have chained me like a spell.
But welcome to thee. Autumn time
- Your north wind sweepeth drear,
' But it hath music in its voice
My heart keeps still to hear.
I love its wild and plaintive strain
I love thee. Autumn time
I'm happier in thy saddened hoar .
. Than ia the summer's prime.
The summer of my life has fled
Those wild and halcyon days
And faintly through the gathering clouds
Their wanning sunlight plays:
The golden dreams of girlhood's hoars,
' With girlhood's hours have flown,
And the siren voice that held me there
' Hath lost its music tone. .
Farewell to girlhood's golden hours,
And girlhood's dreams farewell!
The beauty of yonr sunny time
Will haunt me like a spell. .
illiacellantous.
SIRS. SCRUGGINS
MOVES AMONG THE "UPPER TEN," AND IS INVIT
ED TO A "BORRT."
'I s'pose, Mrs. Jones.' said Mrs. Scrugorins,
tbe other evening, 'you Learn as how an old
bach'ler uncle of mine died off not long ago,
and lett me all bis ettecks. 1 was very sorry
to hear that he'd died; but then it was acon
solin' thing to one with grateful affliction, and
there s notbin makes people reverence the
memory of them thats cone, so much as the
idea that they have left you somethin' to re
member 'em by. 1 never seed my uncle but
wunst, and tben be didn't take much notice of
me and I don't blame him now when I cum
to think what a wild, sausy minx I was in my
younger days. But he must have been a
dear good soul, or he wouln t have thought of
his niece way out bere in bent Louis, and left
her all his effecks. I intend to have a grave
stone built to his memory, and on it I'll have
writ : reeled m memorv of her uncle by his
incurable and unconsolable and affectionate
niece." ... .
Well, arter people heard I had some prop
erty, it's wonderful how excessive popular I
got all of a suddent Feminnines as didn't
descend to hardly bow to me in the street, all
at wunst tbey knew me so well! and shook
bands so fnendiy, and wanted to know where
I'd kep myself, and what I'd been doin,' and
why I had't called to see them for such a dread
ful long time; and all on 'em declared they
thought i was livin' in tbe country, or they d
have called and been right social. . Mr. Skink
le in less than a week after the news was herd.
told me that three middle aged bach'lers in
straightened carenmstances, and four widder
ers, with num'rous families had 'plied to him
for to be introduced. . Tbe 'tother night I went
to the concert tor sent John's uburcb, and as
Mr. bkmkle and me- walked up to'ards the1
frunt I heard 'em whisperio' as I walked long
"That's the rich widder; that's Mrs, Scrug
gins;' and sum of the lords made pourty loud
sclamations ol 'wbat a bne Jigger !' 'how ex
cessively graceful she walks!' and sich like.
In course 2 believed everthing they sed was
all humbug; but Mr. Skinkle sed he'd no
doubt but that sum on 'em was in earnest
'cause they was lookin' at me through gold
specs. . It's strange wonderful strange bow
different a person is treated when they're poor !
and when they'rs' rich. Even Mr. Skinkle has
got more perliter, and I believe the man's
afeard I'll bite bim, he keeps at sich a very
respectable distance; and wben 1 want any
thing done he's in sich a terrificial hurry to be
of sarvice that two to one he dont do it right.
or spiles all in tryin' to do it too welL the
'tother evenin' ses 1 to him, 'Mr. Skinkle will
you jiststep up stairs and bring I "Sartainly
ses he, and away he went ; and arter he'd got
up stairs, be bad to come down again, oes
he ; 'What as it Mrs. Scruggins, you'd be
pleased to have ?' 'Fiddlestick ses I, and
would you b'lieve it the man went up stairs in
my bedroom to hunt up a fiddlestick ! I gave
him A piece of my mind when he cum down.
'It hadn't been more'n ten days arter peo
ple got wind of my bein' a woman of proper
ty, afore I'd receipted a half a dozen inverta
Uons to drop in at Missus so-and-so's, or to cum
and spend a quiet evenin' at Missus sich-a-one's.
Then, last week, I got a billet-dux from
Mrs. Wholesale Drygood, invitin' me and my
friend Mr. Skinkle to a sorry, at their house.
1 didn't care much about mixin' in kumpany,
but I'd heard people talk so much about sor
ties that I made up my mind to go, and so I
told Mr. Skinkle to make the preparation, and
to have a carriage in waiting- at tbe door at 8
o'clock precisely. Well, when 8 o'clock cum,
I was all ready and waitin' very anxious to get
off. Purty soon Mr. Skinkle and the carriage
cum along, and I was never so 'stonished in
my lite to see bow tbe dear man was dressed
up. He'd bought himself a new hat, and a
new kra vat, which was wound round and round
his neck, so tight that his face was rite red,
and I told him that I thought he must be in a
chokin' kondishin. He wore a standin' collar,
too, one side of which proped up his ear, while
'tother hid itself away under his kravat. He
bought a pair of white kid gloves, which was
too small, and one on em had busted open.
Mr. Skinkle sed he knowe'd thy were too small
when he'd got 'em, but tben tbe store-keeper
had given his assurance that they'd stretch.
'And so they did stretch,' said Mr. Skinkle,
'clear open.' Well.arter kunsid'rable fixin' up,
we at last got started, and when we arrived at
Mrs. Drygood's house, the kumpany had just
begun cumin'. Mrs. Drygood was very glad
to see me she sed, and consid'nn' I'd never
seen her but wunst afore, she was wonderful
affectionate. Arter I tuk off my things we
went into the parlor. The fust person I was
introduced to was a Mrs. Broker, one of the
most fashionable feminines of Sent Louis, Mrs.
Drygood sed. I thought I bad seed people
witii affected manners afore, but Mrs. Broker
beat 'em alL She kept her eyes about half
shet, so that people might ' see how long her
eye-lashes was; and she was always a smilin'.
so they could see her teeth and obsarve her
dimples! Then she had a lack-a-Iaisy way of
talkin' a die-away tone of vojee, jist for all
like a long sentence was too much for her
Mrs. Screwgws V ses she.
'Scruggins, ma'am,'- ses L "
'Ah ! I beg your pardon,' ses she ; 'but, Mrs.
Smuggins, are you partial to sorrie ?'
1 told her this was the first sorry I'd ever
been to.
'Ah, indeed !' ses she ; and then shether
eyes and laughed jist enough to show her teeth.
While I was lookin' round takin' obseava
tions, Mrs. Drygoods cum tu'ards me with a
young feminine, who was the greatest curios
ity I bad ever seed. She was very tall and
very slim, and her waist comprised into a won
derful small circumference. Her face was
dreadfully white and pale, and there wasn't
any more spression in it than there is in a
brick fence. She looked like she didn't care
nuthin' for her. Her name was Miss Gold
smith, and Mrs. Drygoods sed she was one of
the fust families of V irginny. one was ortul
perli te; but Mr. Skinkle sed, afterwards, that
he thought she was payin her respects to my
fortin not to me.
Mrs. Screwgins,' ses Mrs. Broker,' 'are you
acquainted with Miss Goldsmith's brother,
Hector?'
'No, ses I, 'I ain't
Weil, then, I'll introduce him to you;' and
with that Mrs. Broker riz up very slow from
her seat, and minced across the parlor, and
then cum back agin, followed by a thing with
enugh feair on his upper lip and head togeth
er, to make a shuck mattress. But what 'ston
ished me more than ennything was, the jew
elry he had about him. He had a gold watch,
a gold chain, a gold quizzical glass with a gold
chain, four studs with green sets in his shirt
buzzom, and three large gold rings on his tin
ger.' Mrs. fcimuggins ses Mrs. Broker.
Mrs. Scruggins, ma'am,' ses I.
'Excuse me,' ses she; 'but Mrs. Skuggins,
allow me to introduct to you Mr. Hector Gold
smith.'
I am very happy in fowming the acquaint
ance of Mrs. Sehwuggins I am indeed a-
hem !' ses Mr. Hector; and with that he bowed
two or thee times, and flourished his silk hand-
kercheif around at a great rate. Mr. Hector
was periite to me; be was vewy pawtial to
widows,' he sed, 'mowe pawticulaw to them as
was hansum.' I could hardly keep from lamn
in the man's face ; and I was orful glad when
a young feminine, in pink sack, with corkscrew
curls enm, skippm' up to Mr. Hector.
'Oh ! Mr. Goldsmith,' ses she, 'where have
you been V tome, we want you over yon
der; and away she went followed by Mr. Jtlec
tor.
'How exceedingly tasty Mr. Goldsmith does
dress, says Mrs. Broker.
'Mrs. Scruggins,' ses Mr. bknnkle to me in
a very excited whisper, 'Mrs. Scruggins,' do
you see that feminine with the .changing silk
gown, and all that fine lace round her neck ?
-well it wasn't more n a montb ago since ber
husband made 'signment, and now jist look
now she dresses.
'Mr. Skrinkle,' ses I, 'what is a signment?
'Why, you see, ses Mr. bknnkle, 'arter a
marcbant or a tradesman has been in bizziness
a long time, arter he's got in debt to every
body, and arter he 'cumulated a good deal of
property with t'other people's money, wny,
then he nnds out all at wunst, tbat be s in a
failing kondishun, and that it is unpossible for
him to pay his debts; so he turns over all his
property to sum friend to keep for him, and
then makes a "signment of all his bad debts
and old ferniture over to their creditors for
their satisfaction.'
And then,' said I, 'I s'pose he's tried afore
tbe enminus court, and sent to tbe peniten
tiary?' Oh, no,' ses Mr. Skinkle ; 'quite the contrary
for you'll find when a man is a swindler on
a large scale when by a 'stensive opperation
he pockets his thousands people look up to'
him, and say he s a cute opporator in tunas;
but just let a poor man, with a wife and a bouse
ful of children, do ennytbing that has the least
'pearance of wrong, and how horrified every-
krJ. .a mn1 l.nnr nrillin Iiav awi 4rt rnva a lriflr
UVUJ 10, BUU ,J J IT 1111.1 . 1 1 V - WIS. . O B.UA
to help him on bis road down bill.'
While Mr. bkinkle was talkin,' '1 notused
that every body was lookin' at a young femi
nine, who just cum in tbe room, and I heard
Mrs. Broker whisper to a Mrs. Commission,
who was sittin along side of her, that it was a
out raj us thing she never heard of the like
afore. Mr. Hector Goldsmith was over on
t'other side of tbe house, and a lot of young
men and feminines was round him, and they
was whisperin' very fast together, and every
wunst in a while they'd look at . the young
'ooman who just cum in like they was goin' to
eat her. I nidn t notice enny thing very par
ticklar in the "pearance of the young feminine,
they need stare at her so."
'Miss Goldsmith,' ses Mrs. Broker, ain't you
goin? v . i: .y - - : .
'Of course,' ses Miss Goldsmith, 'lookin' as
cold as au icicle ; 'I can't 'sociate with every
body.' ' -
'I'm surprised at Mrs. Drygood for invitin'
sich people, said a little primp tip feminine,
whose name was Mrs. Counsellor.
'And so am I,' sed anuther who sumbody
called Mrs. Attorney Atlaw. " .
'Are you goin' Miss Hardware V sed a fem
inie just behind me.
'To be sure,' sed Mrs. Hardware; we and
Mrs. Cull'ry, and Mrs. Grocer, and Mrs. Dr.
Nostrum and the Misses Drygood, think that
this aint enny place for us.'
'Mrs. Skinkle,' ses I, 'what is the matter ?'
'Why, you see, this ere is a hoetong sorry,
and ther're all miffed 'cause that 'ere young
feminine over yonder was invited.
'Who is she ?' ses I, 'she looks jist as much
like a" lady as any one of 'em.' '
'So she is,' sed Mr. Skinkle, 'and she's well
educated, and smart as the next one ; but then
her husband's nothing but a jurnyman me
chanic' 'Mr. Skinkle,' ses I 'will you order the car
riage!' 'You aint goin too ?' ses Mr. Skinkle.
'Yes,' ses I, putty loud, 'I'm my husband,
who's ded an' gon, was notbin' but a mecha
nic and this is no place for his widder !
'Mr. Skinkle,' sed I, when we'd got safe
home, 'don't you ever ax me to go to a sorry
again.' .
He sed he wouldn't "
3T What a pity doing wrong is so much
pleasanter than doing right One bad sheep
will lead a whole flock astray in less than a
week ; and what is true of sheep is equally
true of people. ' One vixen in a street will turn
the whole neighborhood into scandal pedlers
in less time than you could teach them the al
phabet. . Albany Dutchman.
U. S. Coin. The Post Office Department
has notified tbe post masters,that nothing but
U. S. coin will be received of them on settle
ment with the Department
Balloon Ascension at liancaster
On Friday last Mr. Wise's mammoih bal
loon, "Hercules," was inflated and at 1 1
o'clock the first topical ascension was made
by Mr. Wise, Hery Brown, Artist of Philadel
phia, A. N. Brenneman and Andrew M. Span
gler, editor of the 'Lancaster Gazette.' The
balloon was permitted to raise to as great a
height as the length of the rope would permit
about a thousand feet A fresh breze from
the south-west, accompanied with heavy rain,
commenced just as the party started, render
ing their trip far less pleasant than it would
otherwise have been.
The rain fell in torrents as the party ascend-
ad, rendering lurtuer attempt unpleasant un
. ,. . , ....
tu i o ciock, wnen a number ot ascensions
were made. Two parties of musicians enter
ed the car, and while ascending and descend
ing discoursed delightful music. As rapidly
as circumstances permited, parties were sent
aloft, until 3 o clock, at which time Mr. Wise
and ladv, Miss Elizabeth Denton and Master
Charles Wise, took their places in the basket
and in a few moments made tbe most beauti
ful ascension ever witnessed here. The bal
loon rose majestically amidst the cheers of the
crowd, and floated ia an easterly direction at
a moderate elevation, when Mr. Wise dischar
ged a quantity of ballast which caused it to
rise almost perpendicularly with great rapid
ity, it soon entered tbe clouds and for
brief space, was hidden from the view of the
spectators.
The descent was beautiful beyond descrip
tion and was accomplished in perfect safety
about l miles east of the city.- In 40 min
utes from the time of departure, the Eronaut
and his family were seated in their homestead
again. Cor. FhiL Ledger.
Fire-Proof Cordage.
In a commercial city like New York, the
discovery ot any process which, by improving
machinery, makes life more secure and the
transportation of merchandise less hazardous,
must be regarded with interest and not only
this, but adopted tbe instant its merits shall be
made apparent, such a discovery has, we think
been made, by professor J. H. Johnson, now in
this city en route for Europe. Prof. Johnson
now offers to the test of the commercial inter
ests of the word, specimens of cordage and
wood which are incombustible ; not utterly im
pervious to any and all degrees of heat for any
length of time, but cordage and wood whose
structure will remain as long as the iron that
enters into the composition of ships and fire
proof safes.
1 be terrible wrecks of the Lexington, the
Atlantic, the trrimtnand a thousand other ac
cidents where valuable lives have been wasted
from inefficient because perishable steering
apparatus,and tbe untold losses of papers from
fire when their possessors depended upon 'safes'
admonish every one of tbe value and tbe in
terest it is in the success of such a discovery as
the one now challenging the closest scrutiny.
Measures have been taken to secure the ben
efits of this invention to its author and we
shall attempt to give some idea of the process.
W e may say that tbe vegetable matter,
whether of wood, hemp or cotton, is first sub
mitted to a process which has the same effect
upon it as is produced upon wood in a char
coal pit, by covering it from the atmosphere
while burning.
The process, all know, produces a fuel defi
cient in the most important property necessary
for rapid combustion, yet capable of making a
most intense heat wben burned in a position
where it can absorb the oxygen withheld from
it while burning in the pit This process of
abstracting from vegetable nbre the element
producing combustion so freely, is very simple
and ebeap ;but the inventor does not stop with
simply reducing the elements for combustion,
but, by another and equally beautiful process,
charges the fibre with elements that are utterly
opposed to combustion : a substance as impen
etrable to tare as iron, and at an expense tbat
will allow its aplication as well to the coarsest
cotton bagging as to the; wheel rope upon
which so often depends a thousand lives.
JNo one who has witnessed the ravages of
tare can examine tbis material and notteei tbat
a remedy has been found which, if it cannot
place us in complete control of fire, will enable
us to check its course, when, by fastening up
on tbe dresses of our families and the cordage
of our ships, it may rob us of all we hold
dear. By this process every fathom of cord
age and every yard of fabric from our looms
can be made fire-proof, at a cost so trifling as
to be almost below computation. As a sub
stitute for the iron rudder chains, which are
so inconvenient, and which steamboats refuse
to adopt, this is all that could be wished and
must for that purpose be universally used.
Upon wood, for safes, its effects are almost fa
bulous, and the fact will hardly be credited
that a small turned box, filled with papers,
stood the test of seven hours fire in a safe, the
iron of which was either melted or burned out,
leaving the wood as bright and the papers as
clean as wben they came from the turner's and
printer's hand. N. Y. Express.
Noble Conduct.
On Sunday night, two men, named Clark,
and Gardiner of this city started in a small
schooner from Greenwich, Conn., to come to
New York. During the storm, their vessel
was capsised off Eaton's Neck, L. I. The ac
cident was observed by a large number of
people, but so high ran the sea that none
would trust themselve in the life boat except
ing captain Benjamin Downing, an aged invalid
of 70 years, and his son Franklin, aged 16.
These two went out to the wreck and took
Clark from her, and would have taken Gardi
ner too, had he not trusted himself to four oars
expecting to get ashore, but the wind being
adverse, he drifted further out and was drown
ed. The vessel was wrecked about half a mile
out hut was now one-quarter of a mile further
and a desperate effort was required to work
the life boat ashore against the wind and sea.
Clark was saved, and captain D. and his son
were yesterday hard at work to help him save
something trom the wreck, in which his all
had been embarked and lost fN. Y. Ex.
oi
The Difference. Tbe Locofocos claim to
be the exclusive friends of the poor man, and
accuse the Whigs of being tbe exclusive
friends of the rich. The difference is just
this: The Locofocos love the poor so well
that they would make everybodypoor, just to
gratify their affections ;--The Whigs like the
rich so well that they would make everybody
rich, just for everybody's sake.
... ... - . 401 , -
t3t In Queen's county, Ireland, there are
I only 247 voters. In 1835 there were 2,300.
Commnnicated.
I.ine9, "
On the death of Mrs. Elde Karthner, late of Fremont.
Again, we're oalled a Christian friend to moarn,
Who suddenly from oar embrace was torn.
One, who, where'er in life her lot wasplac'd.
Each station by her piety was graced.
Farewell! thon dear departed, much lov'd one.
Soon didst thon reach the goal thy setting son;
And yet, we humbly trust, thy work was done
Accomplished, whey thy early race was run.
Thy bright example and thy sterling worth.
Thy modest merit rarely found on earth;
Thy innate kindness and thy sincere love,
Frepar'd thee for that blest abode above!
Where we do hope thou from thy grave didst rise.
Escorted to a mansion in the skies.
Thy late companion too where will he find.
A solace for his deeply wounded mind?
And that dear lovely babe, oh! who will share,
A mother's tender love, a mother's care?
Those bereft parents, how support their grief?
In this sffiictive hour, where seek relief? -God
is their hope and He will be their stay;
Hi gave' and hath a right to take away.
May all her friends, her virtues imitate
And Elsie's Christiau graces emulate.
M e, Angust, 1850. - - C.
The Old South Church.
This venerable church, now a hundred and
twenty years old, is undergoing repairs, for
there is nothing, not even Fanuel Hall, or the
great tree in the common, whieh Bostonians,
(and indeed all New Englanders,) are more
careful to preserve, and keep up the historical
association with than "The Old South Church."
Its antique and quaint architecture is not to
be changed, internally or externally : but it is
painted and repaired in some places. The fol
lowing reminiscences, will be found interesting
to tne general reader:
This structure was erected in 1730, and du
ring the century and a fifth which has since
elapsed, it has been memorable for tbe scenes
which have been enacted within its walls.
The public, religious and patriotic meetings
which bave been attended in this bouse, justi
fy tbe remark of Snow, in the history of Bos
ton, that it is Ine "Sanctuary of freedom."
The interior of the edifice remains as it has
been since the Revolution. While the British
troops were quartered in 1775-6, this sacred
temple was desecrated and used as a riding
school by tbe English cavalry.
To prepare it for this unhallowed purpose,
the pulpit pews and western gallery were de
molished the ground floor was covered with
dirt and gravel a bar was placed west of the
Milk street door, for the horses to leap over.
The eastern galleries were suffered to remain
for tbe accommodation of spectators, and spir
ituous liquors were there provided for such as
resorted thither to witness tbe feats of horse
manship. ,
During the winter season, a stove was pla
ced in the church, in which books and pam
phlets from Bev. Mr. Prince's library, which
was kept in the tower of the church were
used for kindlings. After the Revolutionary
war, viz: in 1783, it was solemnly re-dedicated
to the worship of Almighty God, by the Rev.
Joseph Jickley, pastor of the church.
JN. i. Express.
Shoes.
The little town of Haverhill, in Massachu
setts, makes annually 1,200,000 pairs of shoes,
worth 700,00Q. The amount paid tor labor
in manufacturing them is $250,000. A snug
little income to the laboring population of a
small town, besides the profits to the neighbor
ing farmers in the sale of the hides of the ox
en, calves and sheep, and the profits of tan
ners and leather dressers in preparing them
for use.
On which, the Vicksburg Whig says: In
stead of working up the hides in Yicksburg
and vicinity, we send them to Haverhill, and
other places, thousands of miles away, and then
bring them back made into shoes, saddles.
harness, Arc. We have every facility 8nd ma
terial for tanning in our vicinity, cheaper than
it can be had in Massachusetts, and yet we
know of but one small tan yard in tbe county.
Thousands of hides are shipped from bere ev
ery year, and thousands more are left to rot
for the want of a home market
Result in Vermont.
The Burlington Free Press of the 11th gives
tbe following aggregates of the vote for gov
ernor, from 219 of. the 239 towns in the
state :
Governor. Williams,(Whig) 23,734.
Peck,(Free Soil) 17,271.
Roberts,(Loco Foco) 4,082.
Gov. Williams' majority cannot be less than
2000.
The following is the result of the legislative
vote in 230 out of 239 towns. :
Senate. Whig.
Free Soil,
Old Line Loco,
21
1
2
Whig majority over all
House. Whigs,
. Opposition.
12
125
91
Whig majority, 84
Do do in both Houses, 46
The towns to be heard from last year, Whig
4 Loco 4 no choice 1.
The V's and W's. 'Villiam, I vant my vig.
Vich vig, sir?'
'Vy, my vite vig, in tbe vig-box, vitch I vore
last Vednesday vas a veek, ven I vent to the
vidow Vaddle's vedding.'
I am werry much wexed at your wulgar
pronunciation, Mr. Wallentme. You should
say wig not vig. But if you are agoing a wis-
lting, you bad better take your weiwet cap
that you had on at the last meeting of the
westry.'
'Vife, you are always vorrying me vitb your
criticism upon my vords. I am not going a
wisiting as you have it; but I am going to take
a valk along the varves, and around Vashing
ton Square, and perhaps I shall go as far as
tbe Vater Vorks.'
The Whig party holds on to its own
rascals and takes ours too. .
Democratic paper.
Well, if we get all your rascals, we shall
carry the next election by a tremendous ma
jority. O- B- Journal
3T" Mosquetoes have been known to move
men weighing 200 pounds.
S3) . .
Rush county, IntL will furnish 40,.
000 merchantable hogs for market this - fall
and winter.
JC3t The Governor of Kentucky offers a re
ward of $200 far the. arrest of .Bogre, the
murderer of Goins,
Caws of Dt)io.
Published by Authority.
AN ACT
To incorporate certain plaokroad and turnpike com
panies therein named.
Sec. 1. Jie it enacted by the general assembly
of the ttate of Ohio, That Otway Curry, C. S.
Hamilton, P. B. Cole, Charles W. B. Allison,
Bill Welch, Cyprian Lee, of Union county,
Hosea Williams, Sherman Finch, William M.
Warner, of Delaware county, and such other
persons as snail become associated with them
by subscribing to the capital stock of "the Ma
rysville Central Plankroad company,' hereby
incorporated, be, and they are hereby consti
tuted and declared a body politic and corpo
rate, with perpetual succession, by tbe name
and style of "the Marysville and Delaware
Plankroad company," for the purpose of, and
with power, to construct a road of gravel,
stone or plank, or such other materials as the
directors of said corporation mav direct from
Delaware to Marysville, and with power to
construct any or such part of said road as said
company may from time to time deem pru
dent or proper.
. Sec. 2. That James L. Johnson, Hiram Hui
kill, Joseph Brown, Cyrus Martin, of Logan
county, and such other persons as shall be
come associated with them by subscribing to
tne capital swck ot tbe "ilelie Centre Plank
road company," hereby incorporated, be, and
they are constituted and declared a body pol
itic and corporate with perpetual succession,
by the name and style of "the Belle Centre
plankroad company," tor the purpose of and
with power to construct a road of gravel, stone,
plank, or such material as the directors of said
corporation may direct from Marysville in
Union county, by way of or near Belle Centre
in Logan county, to such point either in the
county of Allen, Autrlaize or Shelbv. as said
directors may determine, and with power to
construct any or sucn part ot said road as said
company may from time to time deem pru
dent or proper, j '
Sea 3. That Usher P. Leighton, E. O. Spel-
men, Andrew JJodds, J. S. Ballentine, Will
iam Turney of Hardin county, Otway Curry,
C. S. Hamilton, Charles W. B. Allison, Cyp
rian juee, u. tr. vole of union county, . and
such other persons as shall become associated
with them by subscribing to the capital stock
of "the Kenton Central plankroad company,"
hereby incorporated, be, and tbey are hereby
constituted and declared a body politic and
corporate witn perpetual succession, by the
name and style of "the Kenton Central plank
road company," for the purpose of, and with
power to construct a road of gravel, stone,
plank or such other materials as the directors
of said corporation may direct from Marysville
in Union county, by way of Kenton, in Hardin
county, to such point on the Indiana state line,
as said directors may determine, and with
power to construct any or such part of said
road as said company may from time to time
deem prudent or proper.
Sea 4. That Usher P. Leighton, Andrew
Uodds, William Turney, J. S. Ballentme. Eh
jah T. Stevens, Charles W. Stephenson of Har
am county, dames u. uoodman, William Ll.
Hendricks, T.J. Anderson of Marion county,
and such other persons as shall become asso
ciated with them by subscribing to the capita
stock ot "the Marion and Kenton plankroad
company," hereby incorporated, be, and they
are hereby constituted and declared a body
politic and corporate, with perpetual success
ion, by the name and style of 'the Marion and
Kenton plankroad company," for the purpose
of, and with power to construct a road of
gravel, stone, plank, or . such- other materials
as the directors of said corporation may direct
irum juanon in marion county, oy way ot tven
ton in Hardin county, to such point on the In
diana State line as said directors may deter
mine, and, with power to construct any or such
part of said road as said company may from
time to time deem prudent or proper.. :
Sec. 5. That James McDonald, James M.
Glover, James M.. Fuson, Benjamin Gmn,
George Wilson, Houston Crocket Robert
Crocket of Logan county, and such other per
sons as shall become associated with them by
subscribing to the capital stock of "the West
.Liberty Central Plank Koad Company, here
by inrorporated, be and they are hereby con
stituted and declared a body politic and cor
porate, with perpetual succecsion, by the name
and style of "the West Liberty central plank
road company," for the purpose of, and with
the power to construct a road of gravel, stone
plank, or such other material as the direc
tors of said company may direct from such
place or places in Union county, by way of West
Liberty in Logan county, to such point .in
Shelby and Miama county, as said directors
may determine, and with power to construct
any, or such part of said road as said compa
ny may, from time to time, deem prudent or
proper.
Sec. 6. That Isaac S. Gardner, Noah Z.
McColIocb, Andrew Gardner, jr., 'EbenezerZ.
Reed, Anthony Casad, Ezra Bennett Aaron
Hartley, Samuel B. Taylor, Benjamin Stanton,
Walter Sticer, Robert Patterson, William G.
Kennedy, of Logan county, and such other
persons as become associated with them, by
subscribing to the capital stock of "the Belle
fontaine Central Plank Road Company," here
by incorporated, be and they are hereby con
stituted and declared a body politic and corpo
rate.with perpetal succession, by the name and
style of "the Bellefontaine Central Plankroad
Company," for the purpose of, and with the
power to construct a road of gravel, stone,
plank, or such other materials as the directors
of said corporation may direct from such place
or places in Union county, by way of Bellefon
taine in Logan county, to such point on the
Indiana state line, as said directors may deter
mine, and with power -to construct any or such
part of said road as said company may from
time to time, deem prudent or proper.
Sec. 7. That Arnold Harris, Ambrose Spen
cer, A B. Taylor, D. Adams, Christopher
Rhinehart John Topping, Edson T. Stickney,
J.P. Shemaker, Jesse Stem, Geo. Rerosburgb,
and William Raymond, and such other persons
as shall become associated with them by sub
scribing to the capital stock of "the Green Creek
Plank Road Company," hereby incorporated,
be and they are hereby constituted and de
clared a body politic and corporate, with per
petual succession, by the name and style of
"the Green Creek plank road company," for
the purpose of, and with power to construct a
road of gravel, stone, plank, or such other ma
terial as the directors of said Corporation may
direct from Fremont in Sandusky county, by
way of Samuel Works' and John More's mills,
to Republic, in Seneca county, and with power
to construct any or such part of said road as
said company may from time to time . deem
prudent or proper, r
Sea 8. That Robert Patterson, Isaac S.
Gardner, Samuel Harrod, of Logan county,
Henry Nagle, Urah 8- Henshaw, Allen P. De
long, of Hardin county, Hamilton Davison,
James Cunningham, of Allen county, and such
other persons as shall become associated with
them by subscribing to the capital, stock of
'the Bellefontaine, Lima and Spencer Plank
road company," hereby incorporated, he, and
they are hereby constituted and declared s
body politic and corporate, with perpetual suc
cession, by the name and style of the "The
Bellefontaine, Lima and Spencer plank road
company," for the purpose of, and with pow
er to construct a road of gravel, stone, plank.
or such other materials as the directors of said
corporation may direct from Beliefontaioe, in
Logan county, by way of HuntsvUleand Round
Head, to Lima in Allen eounty, and thence
ot Spencer, in said eounty, -: andwith power
to construct any or sucn partot said road as
said company may from time to time deem
prudent or proper. .
Set. 9. That Charles Mount Nirorod John
son, Evan B. Jones, Washington Mark, and
Samuel E. Browne, and such other persons as
shall become associated with them by subscrib
ing to the copital stock of "the Section Ten
and Wiltshire plank road company," hereby
incorporated, be, and they are hereby consti
tuted and declared a body politic, and corpo
rate, with perpetual succession, by the name
and style of "the Section Ten and Wiltshire
plank road company," for the purpose of, and.
with power to construct a road of gravel.stone,
plank, or sueh other materials he the directors
of said corporation may direct from Section
Ten, in Van Wert county, to Wiltshire, in said
county, and , with power to construct any or
such part of said road as said company may
from time to time deem prudent or proper.
Sea 10. That William Thomas, Shelly Tay
lor, Thompson Dickson, John Dickson, Robert
Ellis, Richard Dillon, William Smith, John W.
Piper, of Logan county, and. such other jjer
sons as shall become associated with them by
subscribing to the capital stock of "the, West
ville, Logansville and St Johns Plank Road
company," hereby incorporated, be, and they
are hereby constituted and declared a body
politic and corporate, with perpetual succes
sion, by the name and style of "the Westville,
Logansville and St Johns plank road compa
ny," for the purpose and with the power to
construct a road of gravel, stone, plank, or such
other material as the directors of said compa
ny may direct from the town of Westville, in
Champaigne county, by way of Logansville, kt
Logan county, to St Johns, in Auglaize county,
and with power to construct any or such part
of said road as said company may from time
to time deem prudent or proper. 5 ... -.
Sea 11 That James B. W. Haynes, Wil
liam Hamilton, C, S. Hamilton, P. B. Cole, Al
exander McAlister, and A Ganby, of . Union
county, and such other persons as shall be
come associated with them by subscribing to
the capital stock of "the Rich wood plank rood
company," hereby incorporated, be, and they
are hereby constituted' and declared a body
politic and corporate.with perpetual succession,
by the name and style of "the Rrkbwood
plank road company," for' the purpose of and
with power to construct a road of gravel, stone,
plank, or such other materials as the directors
of said company mav direct, from Marysvillev
in Union county, to Rich wood, in said county,
thence to such point in Marion county as said
dirdctors may . determine, and with power to
construct any or such part of said road as said
eompany may from time to time deem pru
dent or proper. ;
Sea 12,. That the persons named ia the
several foregoing sections of this act or any
three of them, shall be commissioners to re-'
ceire subscriptions, and do and perform all
necessary acts to organize said several compa
nies; and tbey are hereby authorized and em
powered to cause books to be opened at such
times and places as a majority of them acting,
shall think proper; to receive subscriptions to
the capital stock of said several companies;
the commissioners may, if they think jifoper,
require ten per centum of the amount of such
subscription to be paid at the time of subscrib
ing, and each subscriber shall be bound from
time to time, to pay such installments on Lis;
her, or their stock, as the directors may re
quire, provided that not more than twenty per
centum shall be required to- be paid at any
onetime. " "V . ' - - -
Sec. 13. That when bne hundred shares shall
be subscribed to the capital stock of ant of
said several companies, the commissioners of
such company shall call a meeting of the sub
scribers, by causing notice of the time and
place of such meeting, to be published for
twenty days preceding the time of holding
such meeting, In one or more newspapers, and
and at sucb time-and place, those present shall
proceed to elect directors, and adopt such by
laws for the government of such corporation
as shall be lawful, and as they shall deem ex
pedient i the stockholders to vote either in per
son or by prosy; each stockholder being enti
tled to one vote for each share of stock he may
hold in said company." i , rt !
Sea 14. That the several companies afore
said, are hereby respectively' authorized and
empowered to nave and receive, purchase and
possess, enjoy and retain - lands, rents, goods,
cbatles and effects of any kind, and to any
amount necessary to carry -into, effect the ob
jects of the several corporations aforesaid, and
the same to use, sell alien and dispose, ot at
pleasure 5 to sue and be sned defend and be
defended in all courts having competent juris
diction ; to have and use a common seal, and
to alter tbe same at . pleasure; to ordain and
establish such rules, regulations and by-laws,
as mav be necessary for the well-being of said
corporation, not inconsistent With tbe const!-
this state ; to locate tbe several roads by each
of said companies, authorized as aforesaid, to
be constructed either upon any other public,
road or highway or elsewhere, and do all oth
er acts necessary or proper to carry into effect
the objects of said several corporations.- ' ',!f)
Sec. 15. The capital stock of each of said
several companies may be extended to fivs
hundred thousand dollars, divided into shares
of twenty -five dollars each, transferable in en
tire shares, in such tnRnner as shall be prescri
bed by the rules and by-laws of said several
companies; provided that no stockholder with
out the consent of the directors shall ba at lib
erty to transfer his stock, after any installment
shall be ordered, Until stteh "Stockholder shall
have paid the amount due , on . his ; stock,, of
such other sum as he may owe to said compa
ny ; and no stockholder who has for'sixty days
after any installment on his stock has been duo
failed to pay the same,shaH be entitled to vote
for directors of any company aforesaid. ' - "r
ifiea 16 .....that. the. affairs i if said several
companies shall be governed by four director!

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