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Title:
The Emporia weekly news. : (Emporia, Kan.) 1881-1889
Place of publication:
Emporia, Kan.
Geographic coverage:
  • Emporia, Lyon, Kansas  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
News Co.
Dates of publication:
1881-1889
Description:
  • Vol. 24, no. 24 (June 16, 1881)-v. 32, no. 51 (Dec. 19, 1889).
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Emporia (Kan.)--Newspapers.
  • Kansas--Emporia.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204306
  • Kansas--Lyon County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01216932
  • Lyon County (Kan.)--Newspapers.
Notes:
  • Also published in a daily edition called: Emporia daily news, Nov. 1, 1878-Feb. 5, 1887; Evening news (Emporia, Kan.) Feb. 7, 1887-Dec. 21, 1889.
  • Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.
LCCN:
sn 85030221
OCLC:
11942770
ISSN:
2329-4019
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The Emporia weekly news. June 16, 1881, Image 1

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The Emporia News and The Emporia Weekly News

The Emporia News began on August 13, 1859, as a weekly in Emporia, Kansas Territory,with Jacob Stotler at the helm. It continued the Free-State themes of its predecessor, the Kansas News.  While claiming independent political views, the News went on to support the Republican Party.  It also promoted the commercial interests of the territory, the state, and the town of Emporia, acting as the organ of the local Chamber of Commerce.

Having entered the newspaper business at the age of 17 when he was hired as Preston B. Plumb’s foreman at the Xenia News in Ohio,Jacob Stotler, remained in charge after Plumb departed for the Kansas Territory in 1856. He later followed Plumb to work for the Kansas News.  On July 31, 1858, Stotler became an editor and proprietor of the paper. When Plumb announced his departure on January 22, 1859, Stotler took over as chief editor of the News.

After acquiring the remaining interest in the paper that year, Stotler changed its title to the Emporia New. On June 16, 1881, the newspaper was renamed the Emporia Weekly News.  Except for two brief periods, Stotler served as either an editor or proprietor of the paper.  During his initial absence, P.B. Plumb and Dudley Randall took over editing and printing duties.  When Stotler returned to the paper in May of 1860, Randall remained and Plumb left for Ohio to study law.  Stotler left the News again on September 24, 1864, but returned the following year.  

During the week of October 16, 1871, the Emporia News absorbed the Emporia Tribune.  Stotler sold his interest to A.B. Newcomb and announced his final departure in the September 4, 1884 issue.  The Weekly News consolidated with the Emporia Democrat and became the Weekly News Democrat on December 26, 1889.  Stotler held numerous public offices during his tenure with the News; he was Speaker of the House in 1865 and a member of the legislature afterward. Yet Stotler devoted most of his energy to his role as editor of the News.  In 1890, the newspaper and its plant were sold to Stotler’s political and editorial rival, Charles V. Eskridge of the Emporia Weekly Republican

The Emporia News contained legal notices and real estate transfers and reported on local news from towns such as Americus, Fremont, Neosho Rapids, Plymouth, Ivy, Agnes City, Eagle Creek, and Hartford, Kansas.  On Feb 2, 1861, the News published an initial report of Kansas’ admission into union.  The paper covered both national and state events during the turbulent years of the war,   including Quantrill’s Raid on Lawrence, Kansas, and General Order No. 11 calling for the evacuation of three Missouri border counties.

Provided by: Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS