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Wichita eagle. (Wichita, Kan.) 1886-1890, September 10, 1886, Image 2

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M. 31. HUBDOCK, Editor.
FRIDAY MORjSTNG, SEPT. 10, 1SSG.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
STATE TICKET.
For Associate Justice
D.5LVALEMTE,
Franklin county.
For Governor
JOHN A. MARTIN'.
Atchison county.
For Lieutenant Governor
A. P. KIDDLE.
Ottawa county.
For Secretary of Stato
KB. ALLEN.
Sedgwick county
For State Treasurer
JAMES W. HAMILTON.
Sumner county.
For Auditor of State
TIMOTHY MCCARTHY.
Pawnee county.
For Attorney General
S. B. BRADFORD.
Osage county.
For Superintendent of Public Instruction
J. H. LAWHEAD,
Bourbon county.
FOU CONGKESSMEN.
First Dtetrict-
HON. E. N. MORRILL.
Brown county.
8econd Distrlctr-
HON. E. H. FUXSTON.
Allen county.
Third District
HON. B. W. PERKINS,
Neo3ha county.
Fourth Districts
HON. TnOMAS RYAN.
Shawnee county.
Fifth District
HON. A. S. -WILSON,
Wosliliigton county.
8lxth District-
IION.E. J. TURNER.
Sheridan county.
Seventh Dfctrict-
HON. S. P.. PETERS.
Harvey county.
JUDICIAI-18th DISTRICT.
For Judge
HON. T. B. WALL.
Sedgwick County.
COUNTY TICKET.
For Probate Judge
E. B. JEWETT.
For Clerk of District Court-
A. B. WRIGIIT.
Tor County Attorney
G. W. C. JONES.
For County Superintendent
D. S. PENCE.
Tor Commissioner Third District
T. H. RANDALL.
For Rcrrcri nt&thc Sid District ,..
liODOLPH nATFIELD.
For RcprcsfntatUo SM Districts-
It. E. LAWRENCE.
For Representative SSth District .
A II. CARPENTER.
Hon. William Jay, of Emporia, has sent
one hundred dollars to the Charleston suf-feier.-J.
The Kansas, Nebraska and Dakota road
promises to have trains running between
Fort Scott and Topeka by Christinas.
The Chicago anarchists refuse to permit
the admission of ministers of the gospel to
their cells, which piece of news will astonish
no one.
The arguments in the government tele
phone suit will begin September 20th, and
the government will be represented by
Messrs. Thurman, Lowery and Chandler.
There is a claim against the street cars of
Leavenworth and the claimant has tied
them up. There is no telling when they
will get the tic off. The men who have to
walk and the women say "oh shawl"
The Salvation army have tackled Topeka,
Leavenworth, Atchison and Lawrence.
The army is under the impression that if it
can subdue the children of sin they will
have the field of Kansas to themselves.
A fiend has been discovered in Milwau
kee. She took contracts for killing in
fants. Her horrible business was to mur
der babies brought to her. This s.he did
for a consideration by thrusting a darning
needle through the heart of the infant.
The gamblers at the St. Joseph fair pur
sued the ccn tenor of their ways until the
last day of the exhibition. They were
then arrested and fined one dollar each.
This left them a net profit of $1,500, less
the above fine. St. Joseph should be
named the Gambler's Paradise.
The Ft. Scott Monitor has discovered
one man who thinks "Wichita's boom too
great to last. "We don't doubt that such an
individual has been discovered. But on
the other hand, we can muster ten thousand
men in an hour who not only think the
other way but who also think that the
Monitors man must either be a crank or a
fogy.
The ticket nominated by the Sedgwick
count' Republican convention at Wichita
Saturday appears to inert v ith a warm re
ception among the Republicans throughout
the count'. The ticket is a good one and
should receive the united support of all
true-blue Republicans irrespective of little
petty grievances, or side issues. Support
the nominees and give the independents or
soreheads the go by. Sedgwick Pauta
graph. The new York Sun takes the same view
of our diplomatic system as Senator Plumb
does., that it is useless, and ought, there
fore, to Ihj abolished. "When thought am
be transmitted by electricity and v riling
can be conveyed across the Atlantic ocean
in six days, what use is there in having an
expensive government agent at the court of
St. James? The same illustration may be
used in case of any other court or country.
The great capitals of the earth are now
within reach of one another.
It is indeed gratifying to learn from the
secretary of the state board of agriculture
that the month of August has witnessed an
improvement in the Kansas corn crop. It
is new regarded as very probable that the
grandest state in the union will produce a
small matter of 140,000,000 bushels of this
staple product. And yet some people are
cruel enough to say that there is a possi
bility of the election of the Democratic
state ticket this vear. Oh! no. Good for
tune still smiles upon us, and any rumor of
its desertion is foundationlcss. Common
wealth.
A DESERVED COMl'WMKNT.
From the Commonwealth.
iTrm U V, Lsiwrencc has been unani
mousiy renominated for representative
from "the Eighty-third district, which is
composed of a part of Sedgwick county.
3ir. Lawrence made an excellent member
during his recent term, and as a compli
ment to him the rcnominatiou was well de
served. The people could not have done
better for themselves than to return Mr.
Lawrence, a fact of which ther seem. to be
certain as he was unanimously selected.
ii will romW nvcrv RcDUblican vote in
his district and will be elected beyond a
doubt.
Written for the Eagle.
CLEAN HANDS.
BY UNA.
Passing some children engaged in play,
Out on a green lawn, one bright spring
day,
I stopped to nrJtico the little group
As they played a gamo called "catch the
hoop."
A wee, fair maiden, with sunny curls,
The very smallest of all the girls
Just missed the hoop; it was ratherhigh
For her to catch as it went by.
ITer partner, who across the lawn stod,
At once came up in an angry mood,
And w ith taunting words that stung. I know,
She struck the little maiden a blow.
The play broke up; my little maiden fair,
With the eyes so blue and sunny hair,
Stood, for a moment, with hands clinched
tight,
With lijis compressed, and coloi lees, quite.
"O Lettie, say! why don't you strike backf
"If she struck me, I'd hit her a whack!"'
Sue's awful mean, so she is, I say,
To strike poor Lettie, and spoil our play.
Tho girls all joined in with words like these,
But Lettie spoke up! "Don't say so, please;
If I should strike back, or say things mean,
My hands and lips would not be clean."
To Lettie I said, "Come, take a ride.
And while you are sitting by my side,
Please tell me what it is you mean
By saying yur hands would not be clean.'"
"Come see.ray mama; she'll tell you why
To keep my hands clean I always try;
So at Lettie's home I made a call
And her good mamma explained it all.
"When Lettie, a babe, on my breast,
Her hands to my lips I often pressed;
Soon she had learned to raise them herself,
To be petted and kissed dear little elf.
As Lettie grew from her baby days,
I tried to teach her in many ways,
That 'striking back' or saying things mean
Makes little girls' hands and lips unclean.
My Lettie enjoys no greater blLss
Than to know she earns her goodnight kiss ;
So that is the reason why today,
Not an angry word should Lettie say.
She is growing up fast; but even yet,
I kiss the hands of my little pet,
As when her sleepy sentence was this:
'Yean harmies, mamma, tor 'oo to tiss!' "
HUMAN RIGHTS.
2ftnc out of every ten of the speakers
who harrangue gatherings of laboring men
are themselves loafers, or political dema
gogues. They talk about labor creating
all the wealth.leaving their hearers to infer
that labor of hands is meant. Much is
said about rights. It is well to have a
knowledge of one's rights of any sort, but
they are something like the constituion
w hich does not execute itself. It is also an
excellent thing to have respect for the
rights of others a highly charitable course
when the others do not know their own
rights a truly prudent course when the
others do know both their rights and the
method of maintaining them. Any stump
speaker can deliver himself of a quantity of
platitudes about rights, but he is the wise
man who, in harmony with existing cir
cumstances, knows how to go to work to
get them.
INTEMPERANCE.
To the Editor of the Eagle
I do not mean to say the habit of intem
perance is ever formed without temptation,
or even may be persisted in without what
may be thought to be an excuse. The
temptation is gradual and the habit is
formed insensibly. It is an established
custom for men to drink when they labor.
A poor man is taught to think a glass of
beer necessary for his strength, and then
another is required for some other cause,
and before he is aware of it a certain stimu
lant has become essential for his constitu
tion; if he tries to amend he is pressed with
the necessity, and in a manner is compellad
to maintain the vice, though he would give
the world to renounce it, but alas! too late;
and when we are asked is there sin in all
this? Is there not rather a call for com
passion than for censure? So it is in the
case of every sin. When we
reflect on the circumstances of every trial
and temptation. The case of the drunkard
is not in this respect different from that of
other criminals. Indeed may we not go
farther and say that there are some circum
stances which brings a singular aggravation
to this crime when we consider the great
persuasion by which some men arc led. Is
there not sin in all this? When we reflect
on the misery it occasions must there not
be a singular guilt in that deadness of
mind which allows one to bring upon him
self without malice or evil intention? How
completely must the good affections be
shaken and the moral sense destroyed when
this brutalizing enjoyment has become
more desirable to a man ' than all the rich
pleasures which flow from Iris-home, friend
ship, health and reputation. Ah! the
drunkard's fortune is a dilapidated home,
a broken-hearted wife, starving little ones,
poverty and disgrace, and finally finds a
drunkard's "rave. Does not reason take
up the languairc of scripture and sav: "A
drunkard cannot inherit the kingdom of
God. Lina L. M.
It is stated that $3,000,000 worth of
property was destroyed in Charleston by
the earthquake.
AMOS A. LAWRENCE.
The memorial services in honor of Amos
A. Lawrence, was held in the hall of the
State University. Addresses were deliv
ered by Governor Robinson, Chancellor
Lippincott and Rev. Dr. Cordley. Dr.
Cordley, the last speaker, said in substance:
"It is fitting that the memory of Amos
A. Lawrence should be thus honored in
Lawrence. The spirit which settled Kan
sas was unsuppressible. The leaders were
courageous and energetic. Among
those none was greater than Amos
A. Lawrence. lfe was treasurer
of the Emigrant Aid Society, whose
object was to assist worthy men to come to
Kansas and make permanent homes. To
this society the name of Amos A. Law
rence wasa tower of strength. Largely
because he was treasurer, the society "was
successful. He was a member of the Epis
copal church, but his spirit was broad and
his sympathy went out to all denomina
tions. When the congregation of Ply
mouth church was weak" and poor, Amos
A. Lawrence contributed $1,000 to the
erection of a house ot worship. In con
nection vvith his sift to the university,
his oulv idea was to have a first
class Institution of learning. To
him Lawrence is really indebted for the
University. And so he fostered all good
things. From his surrounding he might
have been most conservative, but he "re
sisted the temptations which were about
him and was radical in the cause of free
dom. To such men as Amos A. Lawrence
memorials of stone or marble are unneces
sary. So long as the city of Lawrence
stands on the shores of the Merrimac, so
long as the city of Lawrence stands on the
shores of the Kaw, so long as the Lawrence
University stands at Appleton, Wisconsin,
so long as the names of good men are hon
ored Amos A. Lawrence will be loved and
remembered.
A STOUT WITH A MOKAT-
From Mr. Blaine's Speech at South Paris, Me.
The Republican .party has stood steadily
against great odds, in the teeth of great
opposition, and has made great contests in
support of a protective tariff. It has en
countered obloquy, it has encountered every
form of hostility, and thus far it has tri
umphed in its tariff policy. Let me tell
you one incident, and I think it is a very
striking one. As lately as 18J0 that was
nine years before wc had specie payments,
and gold was somewhere from 2o to SO
cents premium, if I remember correctly
the railroad mania wa3 at fever heat;
we were building in all dhections,
money was plenty, we were importing
rails, and the older railroads of the east,
such as the Vandcrbilt roads of New York
and the Boston and Albany, and the roads
west of Boston were beginning to put steel
rails down. They paid for those steel rails
from $73 to 85 in England. They paid
the duty, and then they had to add the pre
mium on gold, and by the time they cot it
reduced to greenbacks it cost all ot $100 a
ton to put steel rails down, while it cost
just 100 times as much per mile. In the
teeth of that high price, staring everybody
in the face, theliepublican p:srty had the
nerve, the foresight and courage to put 28
a ton gold duty on that. Do you not re
member how all the free traders in the
world, how all the free traeers in this coun
try, denounced the Republicans as lunatics,
protection gone mad, violating every prin
cipal of economy, gone, as the Scots say,
"absolutely clean daft." Well, it went on.
Twenty-eight dollars a ton gold. Thirty
per cent premium made 8.40. So that
the duty in our own currency was between
.$36and$37a ton. I remember myself
that it did look a little hazardous. I was a
little afraid of it, but I supported it with
the rest of my party. What is the result?
The Democrats said: "You are going to
put a price on steel rails where no railroad
can afford to buy them," and then they be
ean all their talk about duty being added
to the cost and going to be paid by the
consumer. This very last year, this win
ter, steel rails of American manufacture
were laid down in this country that cost
27.50 at the mill, only half a dollar more
for the ton than the duty we
put on them in 1870. That was
only sixteen years ago, and prac
tically we were not making any steel rails
at all then. There was a little of the ex
periment at the Cambria iron works in
Pennsylvania and a little in Troy, N. Y.
Under the stimulus of the duty eight, ten,
twelve, thirteen great establishments were
built, and in a little while were turning out
a larger amount than the combined works
of England and Belgium today. (Cries of
"Good!" and applause.) If there were a
genuine free trader present he w ould get
up and say: "Yes, that is true. You did
sell these rails at 28.50, but you
did not state that they are selling
them in England at 19 and 20."
Yes, I do state it, but I state the other
thinir, that they never would have sold
them in England for 19 or 20 if they
had not forced them down by the com
petition. Applause. And we would
have been paying 50 or 00 if England
could have had the monopoly of our
makers during the whole of this time. I
do not propose to take up the tariff in de
tail and go through the thousand and one
articles, but I satisfy myself with the
point of strongest accusation with the Dem
ocrats, for the steel rail duty has been the
one which they have held up everywhere as
protection gone mad, as Isaiddcforc. Well,
if that is madness, commend me to insanity.
Rapturous applause. You know when
they said that Grant got drunk in the
Vicksburg campaign, Lincoln sent down
for some of the same kind of whisky that
he might give it to the others. Laughter and
applause. So, if they say this is insanity,
let us communicate it to every other indus
trial form in this country. We can stand it.
svpruiu'jvjTgi:.
From the Kansas Cldef.
A good deal has been said about Judge
David Martin having been promised the
appointment to one of the new supreme
judgeships when the constitutional amend
ment is adopted, and that his liquor decis
ions are shaped that way. No doubt Judge
Martin has his full share of human nature,
but we don't believe such stuff. We think he
is conscientious. Besides he is not a fool, to
shape his legal opinions for the purpose of
securing something that is not in existence,
and may never be. What is more, his lo
cation is against him for that position. The
chief justice resides at Atchison, and it
would be crowding the thing a little too
much to place anoUier there. Public opin
ion amounts to something, and Gov. Mar
tin will be apt to consult it, to a reasona
ble degree.
W. H. STERNBERG,
Contractorand Builder
Office and Shop 349 Main St.
FIRST CLASS WORK at LOWEST PRICES. Esti
mates f urnLshed on short notice. WICIHTA. KAN.
ISRAEL BROS.,
Druggist and Groeers
First Block west of Trfimont House
J. P. ALLEN,
DRTTGraiST
Everything Kept in a First-Class
Drugstore.
Wichita, Kan.
WICHITA
Corner of Emporli Vrcnuc an William Street.
south of Douglas Avenue-
Director: CATHERINE RUSSELL.
OLIVER BROS,
Lumber Dealers
Wichita, Kansas.
-TARDS AT-
Wichita, MayfielcL Wellington,
Harper, Attica, Garden Plain,
Anthony, Arkansas City, An
dale and Haven.
Conservatory of Music
REAL ESTATE !
G. W. BARTHOLOMEW,
Wichita, - Kansas..
WICHITA CRACKER COMPANY
-MANUFACTURERS OF-
FINE CRACKERS and PURE CANDIES.
Jobbers in Fruits, Nuts, Etc., Etc.
Agents for "Good Faith", "Scout" and "Success" brands of Cigars
GOODS SOLD TO DE VLERS ON'LY MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.
Wichita City Roller
ESTABLISHED 1874.
-Manufacture tho Follow
IMPERIAL, Roller Patent; WHITE ROSE, Extra Fancy;
X. L C. R., Fancy.
These brands hare boon on the market east, west, north and south for ten years and they h ire won an
enviable reputation wherever Introduced. To try them b to stay w 1th them. We are al waj s In the market
for heat at highest cash price.
OLIVER, IMBODEN & CO.
FRANCIS TIERNAN & CO.,
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS OF
Water and Gas Works
PARTICULAR ATTENTION GIVEN TO CITIES IN KANSAS.
O
FFICE X-W COR. 5TO and MARKET STS. ST.
3TH and MARKET STS, ST. LOUIS. VWirUITA lAM
OFFICE J V COR MAIN and DOUGLAS AVEXUE. W lUM II A, KAN.
Correspondence Solicited.
C, O. DAVIDSOX. President. R. S. CATES, Examiner. II. W. OILMAN, Vice ITcs . Xashua. X. H
The Davidson Loan Company
PAID-UP CAPITAL, 60,000.
Money Always on Hand to Loan on Improved Farm and City Property.
Have Loaned More Money in Southern Kansas than any Company in the
State.
OFFICE WITH CmZEXS BAXTC. Xorthwert )
Corner Main Street and Douglas Avenue, j
B. D. ALLEX. Xotary Public
ALLEN, GRAHAM I CO.,
(Snccrawnrs to Wichita Land and Loan Company.)
Negotiate Loans, Sell Lands, Place Insur
ance and Make Collections.
TAXES PAID FOR NON-RESIDENTSzz:
IZTZCORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED
pvOOH 1-OVEP. ISRAEL BP.OS, gBWTOM ICHITA, KAS.
E. PHILLU'S.
PHILLIPS - & - CRffl - Real - Estate.
POSTOFFICE DO! Xo. :
JOHN C HALL & CO.
GENERAL
INSURANCE :: AGENTS
218 DOUGLAS AVJhlNUE, WICHITA. KAN.
Only tte tat owgyalMi fin . Lo-e dimA mad jM tj J7!. f4
THE LATEST IS
CAPITAL -:- HILL -:- ADDITION,
Situated between Second street and Central avenue. There are only
eight lots, containing about two and a half acres each. This tract
is as fine as any on the Hill just east of the city. For prices and
terms call at my office.
"Vacant Lots in every part of the city, and dont forget we can
give you some fine bargains.
BUSINESS -:- PROPERTY.
We have three lots on Water street.
We have twenty-five lots on Main street.
We have several on Market street.
We have twelve lots on Lawrence avenue.
We have six lots on Topeka avenue.
We have six lots on Emporia avenue and several on Fourth ave
nue. These are all close to Douglas avenue, and if you want a bar
gain in Business Lots do not fail to see me and get prices.
We have twelve lots on Douglas avenua
RESIDENCE -:- PROPERTY.
In endless profusion in every part of the city.
ACRE PROPERTY: We have a number of fine pieces of land in
tracts of from five to forty acres. We have several of these tracts
at such prices that a fine profit could be realized at once.
FARMS AND STOCK RANCHES
Of every descriptionTall over Kansas. Ranches of from one thous
and to three thousand acres fine land, and farms at from $10 per
-acre up. Come and see me and be convinced.
STRANGERS .'. ALWAYS .'. WELCOME.
Correspondence promptly attended to. Money invested lor
non-residents when desired. Please remember that I have no other
business but Real Estate. If yon want Real Estate come and see
me or write.
Mi and Elevator.
INCOIU'OR VTED 1S7S.
Ing Celebrated Brands -
LOCIS.
WICHITA, KANSAS.
G. VT. GRAKAK.
ILJ CRAJ.E
Main 149St., WICHITA. Kan.
REAL
F. W.
(SUCCELSOR TO
Merchant Tailor.
Keeps on hand Fne Goods of the latest styles. The largest stock in the
city. Satisfaction guaranteed. No trouble to show goods. Call and see me
F. W. SWAB, 1st door N of County Building.
X. F. X1EDFRLAXDFH, Prwldiiit. V W. KIRKAVOOD, Lend Ksnmlntr. M. V I KVY, Twumrer
A. W. OLIVEK. Vice President. J. C HL'TAN.fcrrtrj
Kansas loan and Investment Ca
Capital, $100,000.
Money Always on Hand to Loan on Farm and City Property
Office In Wichita National Bank Building, Wichita, Kan.
S. D. PALLBTT,
DEALER IX
Northern I Southern Pine Lumber.
LATH, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS.
OKKCK and IVIirTE PISE YARD Wait Km! of Vnuglna Arruw VAlPUITA WAW
YELLOW PLNF YAKD Acrc tb-KtrerL VV n I I M, rMPl.
A N N E S S (A New Town),
Located on the Leroy & Western Railroad, an extension or the-
Atchison, Topeka & Tanta Pe Railroad, in Erie township,
Sedgwick county, Kansas, owned oy the Ar-
' kansas Valley Town Company.
PRICES LOW AND TERMS EASY. TWELVE MILES FROM ANY
Railroad Town, in a well settled and
improved farming community, insuring good support
from the start. Call on or write me at once and secure choice o I lots.
G. A. HATFIELD, General Agent, Wichita, Kan.
HOTGHKINS & WHEELER,
Real Estate & Exchange Brokers,.
SOLE AGENTS FOR
ROSENTHAL'S ADDITION.
ThiB Addition is located in tho north part of th city, bitrer
Fairvibw and Arkansas Aveiue ad in in the hiffht part of
cicy. 7 offer Special Inducxnate for the next 30 days.
No. 201. S-B CORNER DOUQLA9 AVENUH AND MAR&BT 8T.
Comanche, Comanche County, Kansas.
A new city on the Clmmarron, at its Junction with Slg Bluf r and
Cavalry creeks, offers more inducements to the investor than any
other new town platted in Kansas this year. Only three miles from
the great natural salt deposit; a fine water power at the foot or
Cavalry Valley, with its hundreds of fine farms, many under culti
vation. A chance to get in now on the ground floor. No lote given
away. Many brick and Trame buildings golag up. Write for roll
particulars to the
OOMAHCEI TOWN COMPAJTT,
ESTATE !
SWAB,
F. STtCKMAX)
M9W

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