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Wichita eagle. (Wichita, Kan.) 1886-1890, September 10, 1886, Image 6

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lac awicfctta as Hatflle : gfcidas SKoraitifl, geptomxfaa; 10, 1886
$
OUR TREASURES.
Tidd," I said, solemnly, fe thought strikes
mo."
"To srrcar eternal friandship? Better not,
old man: wo should quarrel beforo the week
was out."
"Don't bo frivolous. "We're not playing 'Box
and Cos.' This is serious. V hat do you say
to taking a house?"
"A -whatr shouted Tidd, as if I had sug
gested our taking a railway station.
"A house a house of our own, wharo land
ladies would cease from troubling and fho
cold meat Lo at rest; have done, once for all,
with these abominable furnished apartments.
What say youf
He didn't say anything, but looked at nicin
speechless amazement The idea was too largo
for him to take in all at once. I saw that he
would have to swallow it gradually, as the
boa constrictor docs his prey. I proceeded to
lubricate it for him.
"Why shouldn't we? "We've stood tho in
conveniences and tho extortions of lodgings
long enough. "Why shouldn't we rent a houso
for ourselves? "We can afford it; indeed, in
the long run, I believe we should save money
by it"'
Tidd already looked a shade less astonished.
I could sec that he was beginning to like tho
idea, and beforo wo parted wo had agreed
that it should becomo an accomplished fact.
"Wo would take a house. We shook hands
upon it; and when Timpcrlcy Browne and
Thomson Tidd shook hands upon a thing, it
was as good as done.
Tidd and I are both bachelors; not old
bachelors, by any means, but confirmed bach
elors. Tidd is an architect, with a taste for
music and dry sherry. lama tea broker,
with an office in Mincing lane. Wc had al
ways lived in apartments, sometimes apart,
but more often together; We had endured
every possiblo variety of landlady and every
conceivable species of "cat," from the feline
who would use my Rowland's Macassar and
my favorite hair brush to the "torn" who bor
rowed my diamond shirt studs and smoked
my best cigars. "Wo had tried chambers in
what is facetiously termed an inn, but wo
found that Scylla tho "laundress"' was, if pos
sible, worse than Charybdis tho landlady.
Tho last straw in that case, I remember, was
finding Mrs. Gloogo (her very name was
an outrage on humanity) wearing my
dress boots. I tried a boarding house
for a short time, but I havo an un
fortunate tendency to inako myself
agreeable, and among tho boarders thero was
a widow, also with a tendency to make herself
agreeable, and , well, I won't go into de
tails. Suffice it to say that I never had such
a narrow escape in my life, and I'll take good
care I never run such a risk again. No more
boarding houses for vie.
I pass over tho details of our houso hunting
and houso furnishing. Wo wero fortunate
enough to securo a houso in -which tho pro
prietor had himself resided, and which conse
quently possessed a variety of exceptional at
tractions a conservator', a bath room, hot
water laid on everywhere, and last, but not
least, a peculiarly admirable kitchen range,
somebody or other s patent, and known as tho
"Treasure."' Wo engaged a cook, who was to
do for us generally, and who was also war
ranted to bo a treasure, and Tidd and I re
joiced in anticipation over the rcchercho little
dinners which wo should be ablo to give our
bachelor friends. Toller, of tho stock ex
change, and Tracy of tho probate depart
ment. Hithcitosuch hospitalities had been
exchanged at our respective clubs. Ours
was tho Mogcera, and theirs was the
Polypodium; and the Polypodium had, as a
rule, rather the best of it. Now, wo flattered
ourselves, it would bo all tho other way.
"We'll make 'em turn green with envy, Tidd,
my boy,'' I said one evening when wo -wero
talking over tho matter. It wasn't a Chris
tian way of looking at it. I feel that now,
and I suppose what happened was what old
ladies call a judgment; but I really don't
think it deserves such an awful retribution.
Tho furniture was in at last, tho carpets wero
down, and tho curtains wero up (it wasn't
quite so easy as it sounds, but it was done),
and wo came homo at 0 o'clock ono awful
Wednesday to partako of our first dinnar in
our own house. "Wo met on tho doorstep,
both in the best of spirits. Tidd was hum
ming "La donna o mobile," and I had bought
a new hat in honor of tho occasion. "Wc each
produced a new latchkey, but Tidd got his
out iint, and had the honor of opening the
door. "Wo hung tip our hats in our new hall,
and thence proceeded to our new lavatory,
wherowc washed our hands with much so
lemnity. We then took up our positions, ono
on each side of tho fire, in our now drawing
room, and waited tho announcement of din
ner. Wo had arranged a tasty littlo menu,
consisting of a pair of soles, a duck and an
apricot tart; and dinner was fixed for a quar
ter past six. Thero wero just five minutes to
wait. Tho fivo minutes passed, and an
other five after that, and another, and
another, and yet dinner was not announced.
Tidd anil I began to look at one another
anxiously. "It won't do to hurry her," I
said. "Of courso sho will ha. Uy havo got
things into going order for tho first day or
two." Tidd admitted tho justico of my re
mark; and wo waited another twenty minutes
or .so. "I say, this is beyond n joke," said
Tidd. "Hadn't we better go into tho dining
room. Perhaps bho has served dinner, and is
waiting for us.'
Wo moved to the dining room accordingly.
Tho cloth ? laid in tho first stylo of art;
but thero was no further sign of dinner, and
after waiting another ten minutes I timidly
rang the bolL It produced no result, ad
Tidd and I began to look at each other in dis
may. "Perhaps Trotter" (our new cook) "is taken
ill," suggested Tidd. "Hadn't you better go
down and see?''
"Hadn't you better go down and see," I
retorted. "You don't supposo I'm going to
beard a new cook in her own kitchen."
"It was you who suggested taking tho
house," baitl Tidd, viciously.
I looked at him mora in sorrow than in
anger.
"Tidd," 1 said with emotion, "&hall tho
friendship of years bo imperiled by the un
punctuality of a menial at 10 a year?"
Never! Let us havo ono glass of this old
Madeira, and then wo will toss which of us
Ehall go down and beard her in her den."
Tid grasied my hand, and tho rupture was
averted. Wo hail a glass of tho Madeira
(two glasses, to be strictly accurate), and
then, with tho solemnity befitting tho occa
sion, Tidd threw up a copper. "Woman," I
eaid at a venture. But with the uncertainty
proverbially affected by the sex, woman was
undermost; and I had to undertake tho
dreaded pilgrimago to the lower regions. I
advanced cautiously to tho kitchen stairs and
called timidly over tho balusters, "Trotter!"
There was no direct answer, but I heard a
confused murmur below, liko somebody cry
ing and swearing at tha same time. I have
heard people weep, and I have heard people
Bwear, but never till now the two together;
end I began to fear that cur faithful Trotter
must bo very unwell indeed. I groped my
way down o stairs and broke my shins carer
a pail at the bottom. As coon as the pain
had subsided a little I opened the door of tho
kitchen and found our two-legged treasure in
tears, with a huge smut on her cos2 and one
cdo of her Lair down, apostrophizing our
other tr&iKUV, tho wonderful store, in lan
guage which sho certainly never learned at a
Sunday school.
"What is tho matter, Trottcrr I said,
mildly, "and why havo you not served din
ner p
"'Causo it ain't cooked," was tho reply,
"and never likely to be, with this bloomin' old
tater-can of a rtove. There's your ducks, and
therc'j vour so'.es. and there's your apercct-
tart, and 1 hopo you like 'em!" Ss she
spoko she pulled out each article and
thrust it under my nose. They wero admir
ably arranged for cooking, but had noap
pearanco of having ever been near a fire.
"Possibly," I suggested, "Trotter, you don't
quite understand tho stove."
"Mavbo not, and I don't want to," retorted
our infuriated domestic. "If you think you
can do better, you're welcome to try. I've
liad my whack ! I'd sell tho dratted thing for
old iron, if I had my way."
"Trotter," I said with all the dignity that I
could command, "this is a very expensive
stove, a most expensive stove" (I didn't know
whether it was or not, but I felt it was wise
to say so), "and is warranted to cook a dinner
for fifteen persons. My landlord told mo so,
and ho is a most respectable man."
"Then the landlord had better come and
cook tho dinner hisself ," retorted Trotter.
I took no notice of tho interruption- ' 'You
havo probably been accustomed to the old
fashioned open ranges, Trotter, and of course
j'ou can't be expected to understand off-hand
all the ins and outs of a high-class affair liko
this. So don't distress yourself ; but put on
your bonnet (you had better wash your face
first, by tho way), and fetch a pound of ham
and beef from tho cookshop round tho corner.
Mr. Tidd and I will make shift with that for
this one evening; and to-morrow I will get
Mr. Jawker to come and explain matters to
us, and then you will get on liko a house on
fire."
You ain't likely to havo any house on fire
with that stove," replid Trotter, shaking her
head at it maliciously, as though tl at summed
up tho measure of its iniquities. But my
calmness had its efTcct upon her, and about
8 o'clock Tidd and I sat down, in place of tho
luxurious banquet wo had anticipated, to a
plate of ham and beef from the cook shop.
Trotter was with difficulty dissuaded from
packing up her boxes and departing at once,
but finally agreed to wait tho result of tho
visit of our landlord, to whom I sent a press
ing letter tho samo evening.
Tho next morning Mr. Jawker arrived.
Ho was a littlo man with a big head, and a
figure which was presumptive evidence of tho
satisfactory performance of tho kitchen range
wherever ho resided, and I began to be more
hopeful. Ho carried under his arm an oblong
parcel, dono up in brown paper.
"A little difficulty with tho Treasure,' eh!"
ho said, carefully depositing his hat on the
dresser, and teaming affectionately on tho
stove through his spectacles. "Ah, well, we'll
soon set that right. Finest range in London!
I've brought you tho dripping pan."
"Tho what?"' I inquired. I had heard of
dripping pans, but I hadn't tho faintest idea
what they were. Tidd, arrayed in a flowery
dressing gown and a magnificently em
broidered smoking cap, tried to look if as ho
knew, but it was a failure. Meanwhile Mr.
Jawker had besun to untio his parcel.
"The dripping pan! why, of course, tho tin
affair that you put under tho meat. Sarah
here" ("which my name is Mary Hann,"
haughtily interjected Trotter) "knows all
about it; but this dripping pan is a patent,
made specially to go with tho 'Treasure.' It's
a size too largo for our present range, so I
don't mind making you a present of it. Look
here, dodgy arrangement underneath to hold
water. "Without water, and ventilator shut,
oven only bakes. With water, and ventilator
open, oven roasts. Joint dono to a turn,
delicious brown gravy in it, beautiful!" And
Mr. Jawker smacked his lips lovingly at tho
recollection. "Finest stovo in London, I
assure you. Only wish I'd got it in my new
diggings. The range thero isn't a patch upon
this one."
"No doubt tho stove is an excellent one,
Mr. Jawker, I replied. "But we can't get it
to cook at all."
"Not cook at all !'' ejaculated Mr.
Jawker. "The 'Treasure' range not cook!
Why it'd cook it'd cook your grand
mother." "I havo no desire to put it to that test," I
replied, with dignity. "I shall bo quite con
tent if it will cook a leg of mutton. But it
won't even bum."
"Not burn! The Treasure range not burn!
Come, that's a good one. Give me a handful
of wood and some coals, and we'll soon see if
it won't bum."
Tho coals and wood wero produced, and
Mr. Jawker, turning back his shirt cuffs, pro
ceeded to lay and light tho fire. I don't pro
fess to understand that sort of thing myself,
but it struck mo that Mr. Jawker was not
particularly expert, and I caught Trotter's
eyo resting upon him with a gazo of malig
nant satisfaction. I said to myself: "Tho firo
won't bum," and it didn't. It smoked liko a
miniature volcano, but burn it wouldn't.
I really felt for Jawker. no poked and, ho
prodded; ho opened first ono valvo and then
another; then he shut them, and finally
knelt in front of tho firo and blew till tho
smuts fell "thick as leaves in Vallombrosa''
over his face and shirt front, and ho looked
like ono of thoso black and white dogs that
run after carriages; but all without avail
Tidd, with Ins hands in his dressing gown
pockets, began unconsciously to whistle
"Cease, rudo Boreas," but suddenly remem
bering himself, tried to change it into ,La
donna o mobile," with scarcely satisfactory
effect I caught his eye, and I saw that ho
had como to the samo conclusion as myself,
viz., that Jawker didn't know a bit more
how to mako tho stovo burn than wo did.
But ho was far too artful to say so.
"Wants cleaning," ho said, as ho got up and
dusted the knees of his trousers with his
pockethandkerchief. "Flue's choked with
soot, that's what's tho matter. I tell you
what, I'll send you my builder, Bigsby. Ho
knows all about tho 'Treasure;' lie's repaired
it lots of times; I'll tell him to como and clean
it thoroughly, and just start it for you. Every
thing depends on a good start. "When you'vo
once mado a start you'll bo all right, depend
upon it.' "Whereupon ho made a start him
self, and departed.
Tidd and I dined out that day. Trotter
mado shift, I believe, to fry somo eggs and
bacon m the back kitchen, which, fortunately,
did not possess a high-class range.
The next day tho builder arrived; a cautious
man, w ho wouldn't commit himself to any
thing. To our various suggestions as to tho
cause of the non-success of the stove he merely
replied that he shouldn't wonder, but he
"know cd it was a rare good stove." He ac
cordingly took it carefully to pieces, and sub
sequently put it carefully together again, ex
tracting hi the process, and distributing about
tho premises, soot enough, as it appeared to
me, to load a barge. His only remark during
tho process, intended apparently to bo con
solatory, was that soot was "raro good stuff
for killin' carywigs." On my putting it to
him where on earth wo wore to get earwigs
enough to consume all that soot, ho scratched
his head and candidly confessed that ho didn't
know. Having completed the demolition and
reconstruction of the stove, he smiled (a pre
mature smile), and, having laid tho fire, pro
ceeded to light it That is to say, he lighted
tho paper and tho wood, but there the matter
ended; the coals might have been cabbages,
for any inflammability they appeared to pes
6CSA Our "Treasure" persistently declined to
bo wooed from its chaste coldness. It did not
nnoke qcito so much as before, but a far as
heat was concerned (I don't say dirt) yoa
might have sat upon it without inconvenience.
. - . -0 ..w rv..
ance of opening and shutting valves that Mr.
Jawker had done, but v, ith the same result,
or rather absence of result, and finally sug
gested that there must be something "bust in
side," and that "the man as mado it" had
bettor como and look at it
We reported tho result to Mr. Jawker, and
again Tidd and I dined out (a cut off tho joint
at an eating house). Mr. Jaw ker promised to
eend tho maker of the "Treasure," and after
tho lapse of a day or two he came. On ex
amination, however, ho said that the range
was seriously out of repair, and among other
things that we had (with the best intentions,
I am sure) knocked a hole through between
the firo box and tho main flue, and thereby
destroyed tho whole draught of tho apparatus.
He estimated that tho "Treasure" could bo
nut in order for a matter of 4 or .":
but oven then, h? added (with a gianco
at the scullery), that it would want some
body with a head on their shoulders to
handle it, and that where there wasn't a
missus in tho family (with a gianco at me)
the best of ranges didn't have a fair chance.
I told him I would think it over (meaning
the repairs), and let him know. I talked the
matter over with Tidd, and as tho result of
our deliberations I sent Mr. Jawker a letter
accompanied by way of postscript by a few
touching lines, entitled "An Ode to a Treas
ure." That fetched him. I thought it would.
He said rather than havo any more of my
poetry he'd go halves with as in a new range.
I told him Pd just as soon he paid for tho
whole; but he said ho wouldn't bo out
done by mo in generosity. He'd stick to
"halves." Accordingly on the advice
of Trotter, I arranged to havo one
of the good old-fashioned open ranges,
with "no nonsenso about it" The
cautious Bigsby came with two or three at
tendant sprites, and after a week or there
abouts of general upset, and a pervading
atmosphere of grit throughout our mansion,
the range was fixed and Bigsby, with business-like
promptitude, sent us in his bill for
our half, amounting to 3 10s. Again a
pleasing vista of nic little dinners loomed
rosy beforo us and wo paid his demand with
out a murmur. "We had bivouacked during
tho week where wo could, "anywhere, any
where, out of tho grit," as I pathetically ob
served to Tidd, but now wo fondly hoped our
troubles were over, and again wo camo home
to dinner full of joyful anticipation. "We
had ordered ox tail soup, a leg of lamb with
green peas and cauliflower, and a dish of
macaroni cheese. I cannot say that tho din
ner was a complete success. Tho soup would
have been very nico if it hadn't been quito so
salt, and I havo no doubt that tho lamb
would have been very nico also if it hadn't
been quito so underdone, but I think three
slugs in ono cauliflower more than a fair
average. Wo might havo made shift with
tho peas, but thoy were so hard that wo were
obliged to swallow them whole liko pills, and
after '-taking" a dozen or two in this manner
wo found tho operation too tedious and
abandoned the attempt Tidd ventured on a
joke about 'peaso do resistance." It was a
gallant attempt and I tried to smile, but
the effort was too great, and I very nearly
burst into tears instead "Wo ultimately dined
off the jacaroni cheese. "We both agreed,
when Trotter was out of tho room, that some
thing ought to bo said to her, but wo could
not agree as to who should say it, and thero
was a something in her eyo which indicated
that criticism would not be well received.
Ultimately wo decided to say nothing at all
just as present, encouraging each other by
tho reflection that tho now stovo might not
have got properly aired, or that there might
be somo other sufficient reason for her
failure, and that it mightn't occur again.
The next day things wero a triflo better; tho
next they wero not quito so well, and thus
tho fortunes of our dinners fluctuated, till
about a week after tho inauguration of tho
now range, on our returning homo as usual
at G o'clock, wo found no cloth laid in tho
dining room, nor was there any sound of any
ono moving below. Pursuing our researches,
with caution, down to the kitchen, wo found
tho firo out and no signs either of dinner or
of Trotter. Finally hearing a subdued sound
of lamentation, wo traced it to tho larder,
and there found our inestimablo Trotter sit
ting on tho floor, with ono arm embracing tho
bread pan and weeping freely. On endeavor
ing to ascertain the causo of her grief, wo
could only elicit that sho was "a poro orphan,
and everybody was agin her." As sho had
told me, on applying for tho situation, that
sho had lost her parents at tho ago of 5, her
orphaned condition soemed hardly an ado
quate explanation of her present grief. I
found on subsequent examination that I had
left tho sideboard open, and that tho gin bot
tle (filled tho previous morning) was empty;
but Trotter assured me, with such a flood of
tears and so many pious ejaculations, that sho
hadn't tasted anything stronger than cough
mixturo tho who's blessed day, that we really
didn't liko to contradict her. However, this
last straw, I won't say "broke tho camels'
backs," but decided tho camels that they
wouldn't allow their backs to be broken. "We
paid Trotter a month's wages tho next morn
ing and sent her packing, and did not discover
till somo days after that sho had taken a se
lection of our new silver spoons to remember
us by.
Wc advertised at once for a now servant,
and meantime endured an interregnum of
charwoman, taking it by turns to get up in
tho morning and let her in, and picking up
our meals, like tho sparrows, when and where
we could. What we havo undergone In con
sequence of our advertisement nobody knows.
"We had advertised for a respectablo woman
between 30 and 40, but the ma j ority of thoso
who applied wero either pert damsels of 17 or
thereabouts, or elderly ladies ranging from GO
upwards. The lame, the halt and tho blind
(or nearly) presented themselves. A last,
however, a young woman has pre
sented herself who seems to answer
requirements. Sho wears her hair in
what is vulgarly termed a "bang," and only
claims to be eight and twenty, "all told," but
sho comes of a highly respectablo family (be
ing second cousin to our butterman's first
wife), and her character is all that could bo
desired. Indeed, her lato mistress gave such
a glowing account of her that my only won
der was how sho could ever bring herself to
part with her. She concluded by saying that
Jemima would bo a treasure to us. Tho as
sociations of tho word were so painful that I
felt half inclined to say in that case I wouldn't
trouble her, but I reflected on tho long array
of juvenilo and elderly incapables who had
passed in review before me, and I thought
better of it She is coming to-morrow.
She has come, Sho has just arrived and
has taken a survey of her dominions. Her
first words on entering the kitchen were,
"Lor, if you ain't got one o' them nasty old
fashioned open ranges; which I've always
been accustomed to a kitchener. I'm sure I
shan't be able to cook with that old thing."
I have no doubt sho is right. I have an
awful presentiment that sho w ill not bo able
to cook, but whoso fault, whether that of tho
cook or tho cooldng apparatus, who is to de
cide.' There is only one thing to bo done.
It is a sad termination to tho friendship of
years, but thero is no help for it. Either Tidd
or I must get married, and Til take my davy
I won't
Poor Tidd! Angelo J. Lowis in Louden
Society.
Cost of Elections in Trance.
Somo accounts recently published with ref
erence to the cost of elections in France show
that tho scrutin de liste is an expensivo lux
ury. If London had adopted this principle,
it would have to pay for one single by-electioncaused
through the death or resignation
of a member something like 12,(XX) sup
posing that London is twice as largo as Paris.
If one of the candidates did not receive a
fourth of the number of registered votes, the
process would have to bo repeated, and tho
second ballot would cost as much as the Grst.
The late olection in Paris, caused by tho res
ignation of il. Henri Rochefort, when ho
could not carry his political amnesty
hobby, cost tho town of Paris over G,0X
Under the scrutin do liste, the whole electoral
machinery has to be put in motion for one
election. In 1SS1, under the scrutin d-arron-dissement,
the elections in Paris cost 110,000
francs, or 4.000 francs nor denntv.
Under the new system, when the deputies
ere elected en bloc, the election expenses come
I to 620,000 francs, or 31,000 francs for each
uepuiy. j. ue utpuuta ciewicu tauw iuu lic
principle are in the fortunate or unfortunate
position that they have no constituencies, and
are therefore responsible to no one for their
actions. The electors have discovered this,
for recently, when tho deputies of Paris were
called to a meeting to give an account of their
stewardship, only three or four obeyed th
summons. Foreign Letter.
i
BANK OF WICHITA.
Corner Douglas and Lawrence Avenues.
Authorized Capital, - - $200,0Go
Eaid-Up Capital, - - 76,000
OFFICERS:
ZjU. SLATER. Cashier.
W. L. DUCK, Assistant Cashier.
W. P. BOBINSOX, President.
Directors:
W. P. ROBCfSOK. OUTER DUCK, F.TV. WILSOX. JAMES Q. FISH. Vf. L. DUCK.
Stockholders:
O. D. BARNES. R. H. ROYS, FETLAT ROSS, A. L. HOUCK. W. P. ROBDfSOX.
OLIVER DUCK, JAMES G. FISH, F. W. WILSON. W. L. DUCK.
J. H. SLATER, H. M. DUCK.
Correspondents:
FOURTH NATIONAL BANK, New York. ST. LOUIS NATIONAL RANK. St Loci. Mo.
' BANK OF KANSAS CITY. Kansas City, Mo.
General Banking Business. Respectfully solicit a share of your patronage.
Kansas National Bank
No. 134 MAIN Street.
CAPITAL, PAID UP,
SURPLUS,
Loans Money at Lowest Rates.
Issues Sight Drafts on all Parts of Europe.
Buys and Sells Government and Municipal Bonds. N
Pays Interest on Time DepostU
H. W. LEWIS, President. T. W. JOHNSTON, Cashier.
' l G. E. FRANK, Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS:
.1. L. DYER.
H. W. LEWIS,
SAMUEL HOUCK,
T. W. JOHNSTON,
SOL H. KOHN, President.
A. V.. OLIVER,
WICHITA NATIONAL BANK,
(Successors to Wichita Bank, Organized 1872.)
Paid-up Capital, - - $125,000.
Surplus. - - $25,000.
-DLBECTORS:-
S. H. KOnN. A. W. OLIVER, M. W. LEVY. S. T. TUTTLE. N. F. NIEDERLANDl'
W. R. TUCKER. JOHN DAVIDSON. J. C. RUTAN.
DO A GENERAL BANKING, COLLECTING AND BROKERAGE BUSINESS.
Eastern and Foreign Exchange bought and sold. U. S. Bonds of all de
nominations bought and sold. County, Township and
Municipal Bonds bought.
CITIZENS BANK
Paid-up . Capital,
Stockholders Liability,
largest Paid-Up Capital of any Bank nrthe State of Kansas.
DIRECTORS:
C.R.MILLER. A. R. BITTING. H.G.LEE, S. L. DAVIDSON,
W.E.STANLEY, J.O.DAVIDSON, JOHN T. CARPENTER.
DO A GENERAL BANKING- BUSINESS.
United States, County, Township and Muni
cipal Bonds Bought and Sold.
R. LOMBARD, JR.. President.
J. 1. ALLEN, Vice President.
STATE NATIONAL BANK.
(SUCCESSOR TO
Paid-up Capital,
Surplus,
DIRECTORS.-
B. LOMBARD. Jr., J. P. ALLEN, JOHN B. CAREV. KOS. HARRIS. J. II. ALLEi.
L. D. SKINNER. PETER GETTO. W. V. GREEN. P. V. HEALY.
GEORGE E. SPALTON.
CORRESPONDENTS.
NATIONAL BANK OF THE REPUBLIC. Newr York. NATIONAL BANK OP AMERICA. Chicago
FIRST NATIONAL BANK. Kansa3 City.
B. LOMBARD, SR.. President.
Lombard Mortgage Co.,
IN KANSAS STATE BANK BUILDING.
Money on hand. No delay when security and
and title are good. Rates as low as
the lowest.
CALL AND SEE US.Z)
The'New Boot
The Oldest and Largest House in the City.
ALDRIOti
-
Nos. 138 and 140 Main street.
Wo
IK") ft Q nft hf'1',1
UUll U UllU UVUU!
OLIVER DUCK. Ylce-tVosMent.
$100,000.
aio ooo.
ROBERT E. LAWRENCE.
C. E. FRANK. A. A. HYDE.
M. W. LEVY, Cashier
Vice President.
$200,000
$400,000
I- D. SKINNER. Cashkr.
W. H. LIVINGSTON, Assistant Cashier
KANSAS STATE BANK.)
$100,000
$5,000
BLACKSTONE NATIONAL BANK. Bostoc.
JAMES L. LOMBARD. Vice-President.
GEO. E. SPALTON, Secretary.
and Shoe House.
Locke & Findeiss,
Dealers in
Ladies, Gents and Chlldrens
Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, Slippers,
Ja r Ivol a fall sfid compos" tSc from the fac
tone. ETcryxhla? Hewaai freb- o oW tocfc
Ladles aad Gcnw fin bawl 'made hf pe2al:r.
Call aad st the prices, -which ar; lower tfcaa say tb
.trs to tie marfcet lor ttc ! --
CoR-MAEf AND FIRST STS Ma'.aicTai4.
& HttV W JM ,
-I T I
11 Druggists,
WICHITA, KAN.
a
EAGLE
Town-Site
AJT
WICHITA, KANr
Have for sale, on line of WICHITA & COLORADO RAILROAD
north-west of Wichita, town lots at new towns of
MAIZE, 9 Miles
COLWICH, 14 "
AND AT, E, 20
MTHOPE, 26
HAVEN, 331
Traino are now running regularly on Railroad from Wichita to
Haven.
These towns are in the best portion of
Sedgwick County, Kansas.
Mapa of Towns and Prices can
At Wichita, call on N. F. Niederlander or Koa Harris;
At Maize, call on H. F. Rhodes;
At Oolwich,
rn TT T J-11 J TI7 G 'M'onli-ia
X. civauunii auu . j. oKa,
At
THE "EAGLE CO." HAVE
"Junction Town Company" Addition
to Wichtia.
This Addition is at junction of
nnA-h.lf mil -oreet of Bridge on
desirable lots. Street cars will
Addition with the east side of the
Price List of this Addition
F G. S3CYTH & SONS, Wichita.
N. F. ND3DERLANDBR, '
a icnm- A vrTCRICAN Loan Office.
J J
Company.
from WICHITA
WICHITA
WICHITA
be had a3 hereinafter eet forth
call on Geo. W. Bteenrod;
At Andale, Call on J. W. Dale.
fnr Mt. TTnnft lnt 1.
- r -- - (
Haven, Call on Ash & Charles-
ALSO FOR SALE LOT3 IN
Ft. Scott and W. & C. Railroad
Bi Arkansas river, and are very
be in operation, connecting this
river in 1886.
can be peen by calling on:
KOS HARRIS, Wichita.
P. V. HBALY,
O. 2CARTDION,
Resident on said Addil

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