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People's voice. (Wellington, Kan.) 1890-1917, April 01, 1892, Image 5

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Let as write yonr lusnrance. WE MiKEREAL ESTATE LOANS AT LOW BATES. Snu i cdL MftU.
PEOPLE'S VOICE.
LOCAL PICK-UPS.
AL G. Field & CoV minstrels to
night. The Lotus Glee Club tomorrow
night.
See that your neighbor is taking the
Voice, especially if he is a People's
party man.
Advertise your business if you want
he trade of the people. Try the
Voice.
Sasher & Kirk, the Wellington car
riage manufacturers, are preparing for
a big business this season.
Our correspondents seem to be too
busy to send us items this week. The
busy season has opened up at last.
Oxford has come forward with an in
tention. B. F. Shoup has invented a
machine for ventilating offices and
store rooms.
The Lotus Glee Club, the fifth attrac
tion of the Wellington Lecture Course,
at the High School auditorium, tomor
row night.
Adams, the slayer of Captain Couch
in Oklahoma about two years ago, has
been sentenced to seven years in the
penitentiary. " "
There was a general all around shift
ing of Methodist preachers at the late
conference. Very few of them were
returned to their former charges.
Virginia R. Muntz, wife of Phillip
Muntz, of Conway Springs, was ad
judged insane "on Thursday last, and
taken to the state asylum at Topeka.
Mrs. May Kvjir, who resides near
Hunnewell has applied for a divorce
from Kobert Keir, who, she claims,
abandoned her and her children about
one year ago.
Spring work on the farm has com
menced in dead earnest. The recent
wintry weather has thrown the farmers
back with their oats sowing. Oats
sown before the blizzard are pretty
badly bit.
Eld. Stephenson, editor of the Prim
iitve Christian at Mulvane, called at
this office last Friday. He says the
new paper is getting lots of sub
scribers. Money to loan at lowest rates. Call
on or address C. W. Smitii,
"Wellington, Kansas.
The name Harvey Avenue might be
very appropriately changed to Hay
market street, as there is hardly a day
that several loads of hay are not stand
ing for sale on the street south of
Latta's store.
A diploma examination of Sumner
county pupils was held in the first
ward school building last Saturday.
The examining committee consisted of
W. M. Massey, chairman; Geo. II. Dur
ham and 0. II. Atterbury. '
Robert Sea, an employe of this office,
who has been confined to the house by
sickness for the past two f months, is
still unable to resume work in the of
fice and is in a very weak condition.
We want a good boy to take his place
in the office.
The A. 0. U. W., gave a supper and
social to members in their hall last
Tuesday evening. Quite a delegation
was here from Oxford, and other points
in the county were well represented.
A grand time was had and an elegant
supper was served.
Garden and Field
seeds at Hubbard's
feed store. 30-3t
The People's party club of Wellington
township and Citizen's Alliance will
meet together in Liberty Hall, Welling
ton, Friday evening, April 1, at 8 p. m,
Everybody invited. A. G. Forney, of
Belle Tlaine, will address the people on
the subject of finance.
Frank Snyder was granted a permit
to sell liquor the ensuing year, on
Thursday of last week. As we heard a
man say on the street the other day,
the Good Saint himself could not get
intoxicants of any kind from Frank
without signing up and getting it in
the legal way.
AL G. Field & Co's Minstrels will
appear in Wood's opera house tonight.
This is said to be one of the best min
strel shows in the United States and it
is a little strange how Wellington hap
pened to get a date for a show of this
class. They generally go to the large
towns only.
Haltiwanger's Cherry and Wahoo
Tonic, the great liver, kidney and blood
purifier, $1 per bottle.
A. G. Haltiwaxger, under opera
house.
For fine finished photographs go to
E. B. Snell at Wellington or Belle
Plaine, For cabinet size $2.00 a dozen,
For thirty days I will give a life
size crayon 14x17 on every dozen
photographs providing you buy the
frame and glass for 175. Gallery in
Belle Plaine open Thursdays, Fridays
The American girl is not slow to
grasp a chance. Some time ago the
Ladies' Home Journal organized a
free education system for girls and the
magazine is now educating some forty
odd girls at Vassar and Wellesley col
leges and at the Boston Conservatory
of Music, all of the expenses of the
girls being paid by the Journal.
Ex-Postmaster-General James has
written an article on "The Ocean Pos
tal Service" for the April Century.
Mr. James advocates a letter rate of
two cents an ounce for ocean postage,
and a reduction in the rate on inter
national money orders. He thinks the
reform more needed than that of a
lower rate of postage on domestic letters.
Remember the People's Party Club
of Wellington township will meet to
night in Liberty Hall. This hall is
the old Methodist church, just back of
the Arlington hotel, which Dr. Smith
purchased a short time ago and has
had painted on the south side in big
letters the words "Liberty Hall." It
makes a splendid place for public
meetings and will accommodate a large
audience.
J. J. Zimmerman, who lately pur
chased the grocery store of Marshall &
Stultz, two doors west of the postoflice,
has filled the store with new goods,
consisting of groceries of .ill kind3,
staple and fancy. Mr. Zimmerman
has started out with a good trade and
it is constantly increasing. lie is very
well known to the farmers, having
been in business here before. He is a
good groceryman and a fair dealer
with all.
Money to loan at lowest rates. Call
on or address C. W. Smith,
Wellington, Kansas.
Fred and Bertha Chapman, son and
daughter of Probate Judge Chap
man, returned Saturday evening from
Great Bend, where they have been at
tending school the past season. They
are very much in love with that insti
tution of learning. Prof. Hairy Win
sor, a former Sumner county boy, and
one who has honored the county by his
attainments, is a member of the fac
ulty.
The Daily Mail gave the street
loungers a severe roasting for cursing
and swearing on the main business
corners of the city a few days ago. It
was the proper thing and we hope Bro.
Bohanna will continue to call attention
to this until an example is made of
some one. There is a crowd that
stands on the street corners here where
ladies are continually passing, and
this same crowd of low-bred loungers
use the most disgusting and obscene
language in tones that can sometimes
be heard a block away.
Haltiwanger's Corn Cure, best in the
world. Warranted to cure or money
refunded. A.G. Haltiwaxger.
The executive committee of the F.
A.& I. U. have made the appointment
of the 23d of April for S. M. Scott,
state lecturer, in Wellington, so Bro.
Fish has been informed. He has writ
ten Secretary French to get the date
changed to the date of the county
meeting if possible, for the greater
convenience of the farmers to attend.
Bro. Scott is having immense crowds
of listeners at all his meetings and lie
isjuniformly accredited with being
masterly and instructive. His subjects
are of the first importance. In any
event as to date, his audience should
be large, a general turnout. ext issue
will give positive date.
Bulk Garden seeds
at T. B. Hubbard's,
under voice office.
The stockholders of the Alliance Ex
change met last Saturday in the Alli
ance hall. The report of the managers
at this meeting showed to the stock
holders that that the Exchange is now
in better shape to do a successful busi
ness than ever before. Since adopting
the Roachdale system, or the Johnson
county plan of co-operative dealing,
the Evchang6 has done a larger and
better business than heretofore and
the business is increasing all the time,
The Roachdale system has proved very
satisfactory to both stockholders and
customers wherever it has been tried
M. F. Deck came down from Anues
Thursday with three prisoners, who
were arrested at that place Tuesday
for stealing from Joseph Saxtona
I idies' gold watch and chain, two gold
finger rings, one razor and other small
er articles. They gave their names aa
George Rogers, of Ohio, Ben Patch of
Topeka and Wm. II. May, of Minneap
olis, Minn. They will have their pre
liminary trial before Justice Gilmore
Monday.
Money to loan at lowest rates. Call
on or address C. W. Smitii,
Wellington, Kansas.
Alien Land Owners.
Ed. Voice: My attention has been
lately called to an article in the Penn
sylvania Farmer, of Meadville, Penn
sylvania, commenting upon the above
named subject, and as the land ques
tion is one of the great issues before
the people, I thought it might be well
to give some facts in regard to alien
ownership of land in this country, as
they may benefit many readers of the
Voice, who otherwise might ,not see
them. And again, as the land ques
tion is one of our great issues, it may
be well for us to keep posted on these
matters, so that when attacked by the
old parties, we may be able to refute
them by plain facts.
It is well known that for years it has
been the custom of the representatives
of the people in the United States con
gress to make large grants of land, not
only to home corporations, but to leg
islate in such a manner that aliens.
foreigners, might get possession of
large tracts of the public domain,
which the ninth article of the platform
adopted at St. Louis, February 22,
holds to be the heritage of the people.
Here it is:
"The land, including all the natural
resources of wealth, is the heritage of
the people and should not be monopo
lized for speculative purposes and alien
ownership of land should be prohibited.
Ail land now held by railroads and
other corporations in excess of their
actual needs and all lands now held by
aliens should be reclaimed by the gov
ernment and held for actual settle
ment.
But what are the facts in the case?
Laws have been passed creating cor
porations. Large tracts of land have
been given them gratuitously. Char
ters have been granted to railroads
built by foreign capital and laws have
been passed year after year by which
foreigners have been enabled to gain
large possessions on American soil,
until today thousands of American
born citizens are not able to procure a
home. In the name of justice we ask,
is this right? Many of them own
thousands of acres, which, through
agents, they are renting to poor ten
ants, from whom they exact the last
penny they can get for rent; and upon
which lands they will not erect com
fortable houses, that the poor tenant,
his wife and little one may be sheltered
from the howling blasts of winter,
while they are lords and nobles, living
in splendor and fattening upon the ill
gotten gain they have stolen from the
poor tenant.
Do not think the picture overdrawn,
dear reader. It is only too true. Lit
tle do those who are not well informed
on this point know of the suffering
and destitution to be found in our land.
I propose giving some figures which
will show the facts as they exist.
Over 20,000,000 acres in our United
states are owned by men holding high
official positions in foreign govern
ments; 60,000,000 are owned by rail
roads, controlled by foreign capital,
while private citizens of European
countries own 70,000,000 more; 150,000,-
000 acres, making an area four times as
large as the state of Pennsylvania, an
empire in itself and yet all under con
trol of a foreign power and foreign
capital. Large quantities of it are in
cultivation in the Mississippi valley
and much in the gulf states.
The men who cultivate it are some of
them foreigners and tenant farmers(
but very many of them are citizens of
American birth and paying tribute to
lords and dukes, many of them, in
many instances, lords and dukes of the
British empire. Is it any wonder that
Ave howl at this state of affairs?
Suppose we allow 5,000,000 acres a3
all necessary for the actual necessities
of railroads and corporations, or to be
fair we will say 10,000,000. Then out
of the 150,000,000 acres held by foreign
ers, we would have 140,000,000 left for
home for American citizens. Now
suppose Uncle Sam gave .every man
150 acres; this would give homes to
875,000 men. Or suppose every man to
get 80 acres: this would give homes to
1,750,000 men. But we will give every
man 160 acres and this will do away
with many homeless families. We
hold this to be right, that Americans
should own American soil. It is one
of our great' cardinal principles and
one for which we will fight to the bit
ter end. Many of the great corpora
tions created by our laws have sold
out to foreign capitalists, until today
foreign capital virtually controls many
of the great industries of our country.
These things cannot always be so. We
will be free. D. T. Rose.
COUNTY WRITERS.
CO KB I V,
C. I. Long, of Medicine Lodge, pased
throngh here a few days ago. The band
boys with other citizens met him at the
depot. In his two minute epeecb be said
he supposed the crowd was composed of
democrats and republicans. He may find
out, as Prince Hal did, that there is so
other faction in the Big Seventh. Were
he a wise as Prince Hal, he might not
consult his own wishes, but the interest of
his family, (if he has any), and friends
and refuse to be a candidate for congress
in the Big Seventh. C. I. should remem
ber that our Jerry may be "in it" and if he
is we don't believe be can be beaten by any
one who wears Socks.
BELLE PLAINE
Mibcb 31 Mr. Burns, pastor of the
Methodis church, unloaded his household
goods today.
Alex Knott went to Kansas City Wednes
day with two cars of cattle and hogs.
Mrs. Meece'e sister, of Kiowa, is visiting
her.
The wind Tuesday did some little dam
age in our town in the way of everturning
haystacks, sheds, tearing off shingles,
making it disagreeable walking, ete.
Uncle Tom Cornwell has not been well
for some time. He is going away to se a
doctor, yn or thi Bois.
MAYFICLD.
The Monitor-Press comet ont in fnll
blast this week and claims to bars the
largest circulation of any paper in the
county. If thii be true, it can be easily
explained. A great rnsny Alliance men
ii the county take this paper, hot yon
don't see any republican takioe the
Voicx. The? cannot stand i.lain facta
and the troth and of course do not sap
port papers that publish the same; some
are really afraid to read a reform paper
for fear of being convinced of right. If
one didn't know who was editing the Mon
itor, they would think some small boy was
doing the work, so sil'y is its slang.
e understand Threlfall Hamill are
intending to enlarge their store in the
near future. Their present room is not
large enough, their trade increasing con
tinually.
In eighteen hundred and eighty-eight
The republican majority surprised the
state;
In eighteen hundred and eighty-nine
The eighty-one thousand didn't decline.
But in eighteen hundred and ninety,
I be year of political reform,
The republicans got mighty cranky,
cor the farmers changed their uniform.
In that year, the fifth of November.
The Peoples party stuck out their
shingle;
And say, republicans, do yon remember
It caused the defeat of John J. loyalist
Then came Mas?ey, Stotler, Campbell and
Hallowell;
By Kansas republicans you know their
size;
All hollowed and roared and yelled,
The Peoples party ain't naturalized.
ANOTHER COBBE8PONDENT.
We happened to be in a town a few days
ago and heard a merchant say, "I can't
understand why it is that people go far to
trade at Msyfleld." Well, that is a secret
of our own and if they watch they may
catch on.
John Ervin and A. A. Threlfall have re
turned from the Arapahoe and Cheyenne
country. They are not very favorably im
pressed with it.
B. V. Cobean lost a very fine four-year
old horse by it getting its hind feet over
the halter strap and smothering to death.
3. H. Parker is preparing his hot beds
for sweet potatoes and other plants.
John Magill has bought the old school
honse in Mayfied and is repairing it for a
dwelling.
William Magill has bought the lots of
the old lumber yard of 0. B. Shaw A Co.
There is inquiry every day for houses and
the price of lots in Mayfield.
Wellington Markets.
Corcectcd to April 1.
Wheat soft, 5570c; hard 65G2c.
Cokn-3032c.
Oats-2730c.
IIay-S3.50 34-00 per ton.
Cattle beef $2.50S3.00; steers, $3.00
4.00; stockers, ?2.2ii&2.75.
IIO(;s-?3.75&ROO.
CincKEX.s-spring, $2.252.40 per doz;
liens, oc per w.
BuTTEit good, 25c.
Eggs-Hc
PoTATOES-5oc.
ArrLE.s-83cSl.00 per bushel.
Cabbage-Ic per lb.
CATTLE!
CATTLE!
I will be at the Alliance store in Wellington, Saturday, April
9; Mayfield, Monday, the nth; Milan, Tuesday, the nth:
Perth, Wednesday, the. 13th; Corbin, Thursday, the 14th
and at Caldwell, Friday, April 15
For the purpose of making op a herd of cattle and horses to take to Barber county to
graize this season. My terms are 21 cents per head for cattle and 85 cents per
nsau ior norses. i nave a one horse, yt Percneron Norman, Clyde and
Morgan, which I will take along. I will pay for all stock that strays from me.'
I will get mail at the above named places on the day I am there. VI jf regular address
will be at Wellington. If yon write to me please give yonr location and I will
come to see yon. Will start with the herd about the 20th of April.
W. B, TYLER.
I CARRY THE FOLLOWING RECOMMEND:
Wellinotos, Kansas, March 26, 1892
TO ALL WHOM IT MA i" COXCERX:
The bearer of "this Utter, II'. B. Tyler, is known tome to be a careful
and judicious handler of stock, having handled cattle for me the last tzvo years. He is an
honest, fair dealer and has given me gocxl satisfaction. J. T. S TUIiM,
County Treasurer.
DAVIS & CO.
BOOK SELLERS,
Books,
Books,
Books.
Books.
Books,
The man or woman tcho dots not
MISS EVA
-AT
fate )hna
WELLINGTON, KANSAS.
Maies as fine pictures as you can secure in any
does not give perfect satisfaction. Call and see display of picturesover Curtis' hardware store.
THE BEST STUDIO IN SUMNER COUNTY.
Look Out for lie Ship!
Grit is coming in as soon as men are
cured of Bronchitis, Catarrh in the throat,
Hay Fever and Bad Coughs. Beveral cues
been cured already in the county, by Hor
ns' Safe Core. Ask your druggist for it
and don't forget Agents wanted.
Apjij to M. MORRIS,
913 S. Jefferson Ave., Wellington, Kb
J0-lm
A Weekly Devoted to Nation
alism. EDWARD BELLAMY,
"Author of Looking Backward," (Jj(jr;
I -Iso prints the People's Tarty news.
Address,
S2.20 per year I THE NEW NATION",
5 cents per copy. u Winter st, Boston, Mass.
T. ID. IMjller,
PRACTICAL - AUCTIONEER.
WELLINGTON', KANSAS.
Will cry sW in any part of the count v at the
following rates: i, jmt cent, on :invthinir
over .nw. 88 net for $: and under. "
Will funiMi sale hids to my ptrons st half
office with E, May & Co,, or leave orders a
the Monitor office.
I. F. II HUR.EY,
VEIERIMV SI'ItGEOX and FARfllEB
Mi and PoM
Warranted Cured or no Pay
HORSE DENTISTRY
A Specialty.
WELLINGTON, - . KANSAS
J. W. AXBERS0X,
AUCTIONEER.
Udall, Kansas.
w lit attend public sales In any part of the
country
anteed.
lerms reasonable. Satisfaction mar.
fclicacenients can ba mail u t
Voice; office
i, Wellington, Kansas.
L. "W. Johnson
AUCTIONEER.
Attends sales anywhere. Terms
reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed,
Engagement can be made at the Voioi
office, or by writing to me at Perth, Kin,
Lyiuan Naugto,
liifFicatoiiiiicsr,
Wellington Kansas.
Allklndis of leial papers prepared. Spda!
attention jlveo to the preparation of petitions,
Accounts and all sorts of papers lor Probate
'J Canbefniiiidatell to efflee
of tlio Probate Jurfze.
Writ-
' mg
&
read has a "rwky" road to tract!.
LEWALLEN,
TIIE -
Jrf (krij. ::
VVVWvVV
city. No work allowed to leave the gallery If H
Piano and Organ Repairing.
All kinds of niano and nrtran laan
ing and repairing done and warranted
U . LOOSWELl.
You will find every kind of
Meat at our market and we
handle only the
Best Quality
Fresh and
Game, Fish
And everything in our line in
in season.
We will make wholesale pricei
on
I Aft I
in large lots and guarantee it
to be the best quality.
THRELFALL
& HAMILL.
Mayfield, - Kansas.
Dealers la
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and
Shoes, Ready Made Clothing,
Qaeensware Sewing Maohines
Notiens, Lubricating
and Linseed Oils,
Nails, Tinware, etc, eta.
Below we quote you few prices:
10 yrds Lawrence L L BheeMag, yar wide. $1 ee
t sjwoli thread
IS Lead Pencils ...... at
18 pounds Granulated Sugar . - - 1 e
V txiunns lieans for t o
Package Coffne. per pound ... jj
3 fwunds Itaisins for i
I lost Tomatoes per can II
Soda per pound ...... .er
Mixed Candy per pound .... je
And ererythlnR else In oar store in proportion
BTPOTATOES. We hare just reoeired
a ear lot Early Ohio Potatoes fehich we
will sell at 90o per bushel. Also Early
Rose Potatoes at 8So per bushel.
UTIn addition to our low prlcea we
give a discount of S per cent on the dollar
for the rash. A constant supply of coal
and building stone kept on hand. lour
trade solicited.
Threlfall & Hamill.
29-8m-p
VISIT THE-
The Belle Plaine
Alliance Exchange
when in town, where yon will find
all kinds of first-class
3
Seed Potatoes,
Garden Seeds,
(looe and in packets.)
Machine Oil,
of all kinds.
Harness and Coal Oil.
Bring your Eggs and receive
cash or merchandise for same.
Yours truly,
J. W. ALLEH, M'gr.
Belle Plaine, - Kansas
FARMERS !
when visiting Wellington would find it to
their advantage to visit the
as the stooh is entirely
NEW and FRESH.
IN iol EAT
Mie Id
Dm 18
Lynch & Schwinn.

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