OCR Interpretation


Weekly journal-miner. (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, November 20, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1912-11-20/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

M8
J
WEEKLY JOURNAL-MINKR. WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
1
YOUNG CHUNG ISjONLY MUZZLED
GUILTY SAYS
THE JURY
(From Saturday N Dally)
The celebrated Chinese roliliery
case nf llir state against Young
Chung ('.line t att cnil last evening
in tin Superior Court after a three
days' trial the jury rendering ' ver
dict of utility. Hail was fixed in the
Mint of $JlXX) The case will he ap
pealed if a new trial is denied.
The issue was stulihornly fought
from beginning to end, not so much
on account of tlir sunt involved,
only $50, hut the drawing of the
line closer hetween the two factions
interested, one of which stood by
the prosecuting witness and the oth
cr bneked the defendant. In short,
it was said to he a "long" dispute,
and the ultimate outcome is predict
cd to end in a combat between the
belligerent member. Whether or
not the traditional "hatchet men" ap
pear on the scene, remains to be
.seen, but the general supposition is
that trouble will lie forthcoming
sooner or later, and of serious con
sequence Following the verdict m the Chin
ese ease Judge Smith dismissed the
trial jurors, there being no more
jurv cases for this term of court.
The case of C. H. Gcnung vs. the
S. F. I. & P Railway Company
was dismissed on motion of I1.
S. Clark, attorney for plaintiff, and
both sides were ordered to pay their
own costs. Mr. denting brought
a suit for damages for several thou
sand dollars against the company,
on the alleged ground of being
ejected from a train on the A. & I
railroad after leaving Wickcnburg
A stay of execution was granted
until December 10, 1912. in the
case of Kauerlich vs. DcSolt, in
which the former obtained judgment
against the latter for SvU damages
The parties to this action reside in
Jerome.
The following new cases fur the
week were docketed:
John Stewart vs. Nellie Stewart.
H. V. fugles vs. Cornelia Hugh
e.
Daniel H. Herring v.. United Ver
de Conner Co.
Carrie H. I'orterficld vs. William
T. I'orterficld.
1'. H. Clark vs. Verde King Cop
ner Co.
George F. Howers vs. F. E.
Small.
Hlack Rock Milling Company vs.
Sam F. Powell and the Preseott Na
tional Hank.
FIGHT WILL BE ON
IN EARNEST RIGHT SOON.
pFrom Thursday's Dally.)
Sam It. Hraduer's resignation as
a member of the lower house of the
legislature from Cochise county is
in the hands of doveruor Hunt
"I have more business now than
I can attend to," Mr. Hradner said.
"Since the adjournment of (lie first
session of the legislature I have
been apopiutcd secertary of the live
stock sanitary hoard, and at its last
meeting the Arizona Cattle Growers'
association insisted that I accept the
secretaryship of that organization.
While 1 expect to he relieved of the
latter position in January, I have as
much work as one man can do with
out sitting in the legislature. It is
with extreme regret that I will hand
my resignation to Governor Hunt,
but I have thought the matter over
very carefully and see no alterna
tlvc."
This decision of Hradner still fur
ther muddles the ipiestion that has
arisen regarding the speakership of
the house at the special session to be
called bv Governor Hunt early next
year. Hradner was speaker of the
bouse during the first session, early
this year, several members aspire
to the speakership during the special
session and now that he is out of
it, the various aspirants will begin
work in earnest, and political wise
acres expect to see a situation more
complicated at the opening of the
special session than it was at the
commencement of the first session,
The resignation of Mr, Hradner
may mean a special election in Co
chise county. No other provision for
filling the places of legislators who
die or resign is made.
BANKER PLEASED WITH
COUNTRY AN.D MINE
(From Friday's Dally.)
Associated with the trip to this
section of J. S. Maxcy, the banker
of Gardiner, Maine, the resumption
of the old Mutton mine on Mimic
haha Plat is under consideration, an
examination of which was recently
made by this visitor.
Mr. laxcy is one of the princi
pal shareholders, and immediately
after his return home the board of
directors will be convened, when a
plan of action will he decided upon.
Mr. Maxcy made the trip to the
camp from tHs city in an automo
bile, and his impressions of the
country from a scenic standpoint
were pronounced. He is a strong
advocate of having the state high
way continued on the route as sur
veyed, and stated that it will bring
hundreds of eastern tourists to this
section, as welt will it stimulate min
ing investments in the Hradshaw
region. Investors nowadays, he says
want agreeable transportation facili
ties and the unto is the popular me
thod of coineyauee. With a coun
try as attractive as he passed over,
ami with a climate unexcelled, he
prophcries a climate of eastern tour
1st that will be of incolculahle bene
fit commercially as well as socially
On his return in the Spring he will
bring hi far, a(l xevural friends
will accompany him to see tin; most
beautiful country in the southwest.
DOGS CAN RIDE
N
TRAIN
Railroads Adopt Rules
As to the Carrying
Of Canines
(Fnxn Saturday's Daily.)
If you are a dog you cannot ride
on trains after January 1 without a
mtu.zle. 1 his has nothing to do
with the election of Wilson, the high
cost of living or the Balkan war.
The Transcontinental Passenger as
sociation has tint the ban on unmuz
zled pups and baggage agents will
be instructed not to accept any but
the securely muzzled varieties after
that date.
A muzzle is not the only thing
necessary to admit a canine to the
baggage ear of an overland train.
He must have a properly fitting dog
collar of the newest pattern, a leash
to fasten him to the permanent scen
ery, or be crated along with the
chickens, ducks and porkers who arc
shipped in the express cars. Even
then dog Spot is not allowed to
travel free with a haggagc tag
around his neck. He must he paid
for at the regular excess baggage
rates for gross weight. The mini
mum charge for each dog will be
100 pounds of excess baggage be
tween the given points ami no dog
valued at more than 5-5 will be
toted by the railroads.
E
That the Bagdad Mining Company
is preparing to operate on the most
gigantic scale ever known in the
history of that undertaking is nidi
cated by the number of men being
employed and the extensive line of
development that is being laid out,
was the report made yesterday by
arrivals from the Santa Maria coun
try.
Seventy-live miners arc now cm
ployed and churn drilling has start
ed. The additional machines are be
ing repaired and early next week
they will he placed in commission,
The most important work, however,
it is reported, will be the driving of
the mam tunnel into the mountain
a distance of about 3,000 feet more
than what was performed by the
former management. I his exploita
tioii will be the most noteworthy
for the present of any work that has
heeu decided upon, as it will cross
cut innumerable deposits of copper
that were determined in churn drill
operations previously. Supplier arc
going into the camp, and the indi
cations support the carrying out of
n i"y'tcm of extensive development
and on a basis that will be perma
nent,
CLARKDALE VERY
LIVELY TOWN AT PRESENT
(Prom Friday's Daily.)
Arrivals yesterday from the new
Verde Valley town of Clarkdale,
state that lively tunes arc in evi
deuce. Hundreds of men are at
work on the new smelter, buildings
arc going up for the United Verde
company, the tunnel railroad grad
ing is under headway, and business
locators arc preparing to come in,
with realty deals being closed that
indicate a thrifty community. It is
predicted that by the first of the
year there will he over 1,000 labor
ers employed and that the new town
will be active for the next two years
in one industry and another,
MANY ACCIDENTS
RESULT PROM AUTOS
NEW YORK, Nov. H In view
of the latest statistics, New York
ers are more, likely to ( pray to be
delivered from automobile accidents
than from famine and pestilence,
since according to figures just col
lected no less than 13H persons have
been killed and 952 injured in this
city since the first of the year by
the gasoline juggernauts. These fig
ures have already doubled last year's
record. Of all kinds of accidents
in the city whether from trains,
trolley car, wagons or boats, the
recklessly driven automobile has ac
counted for more than all other
causes.
PLEASED VISITOR.
(IFtimii Thursday's Dally,)
II. G Wcisbrod, manager of the
dry goods firm of Copper, Coatcs &
Casey, of l.os Auglese, is in the city
on a business and pleasure trip, ac
companied by the Arizona represen
tative, Chan. I. PUhon. Mr. Wcix
brod expresses himself as astounded
ow-r the climate of this section, and
which he pronounces as peerless,
notwithstanding that l.os Angeles
makes the boast of being unrivalled
in this attraction. He is also im
pressed with the business outlook
and pronounces Prescott as one of
the ideal little cities that has won
his lastinn admiration,
WORKING BAGDAD
N GIGANTIC
SCAl
R TO iNCREASElUNLUCKYNUMBERlCHEERS AND TEARS
ITS SHIPMFNT
OF ORE
(Prom Saturday's Daily.)
That the Commercial Mining
Company of Copper Hasin contem
plate increasing its shipments of
ore in the near future is indicated
by the building of another ore bin to
held at least 100 tons, J. II. Morris
on leaving today with a force of
carpenters for the camp.
Underground conditions at the
works arc reported as more attrac
tive than at any time since produc
tion has been started u in fact
some of the miners state that the
basis of shipment now going on can
be maintained from the ore bodies
exposed for at least two years
ahead. Every point being operated
is indicative of a bonanza property
being in evidence, and during the
next few mouths this belief will be
verified with the method of exploi
tatit'M being carried out.
It is also r?::ortcd that the long
cross cut that is being driven from
the bottom of 4.H0-foot shaft, is en
countering the best mineral indica
tions yet determined. George C.
RufTucr continues hauling sixty
tons of ore per dav to the railroad
station at Skull Valley for shipment
to Douglas and llaydcn smelters
This output is said to average a
higher percentage in cornier than is
taken from an' mine in the state
FOR HORDE OF
TAX EATERS
PHOENIX, Nov. IS. -At a meet
ing of the state hoard of control
this morning, the subject of an ad
ditiou to the State Capitol was taken
up and discussed. The subject has
been giving the hoard much trouble
ou account of a scarcity of space
for the state officers.
At the present time there arc
many state officers who arc using
the two legislative rooms for office
purposes. Resides the legislative
halls, the committee rooms arc in
use. When the State legislature
meets the problem will be one of
where to put the state officers.
When the State Capitol was built
the west cud was so constructed
that an addition might be built. It
is proposed that when the addition
is made it will be made on the
west. So far, the board lias only op
ened the subject. It will have plans
drawn and estimates of the cost of
construction made and these with
other data in reference to the new
addition will be placed before the
State legislature in order to secure
an appropriation.
POUNDER APPEAL TO
REASON IS A SUICIDE.
GIRARD, an., Nov. 12. J. A.
Waylaud, the founder of the Appeal
to Reason, a socialist paper here, shot
and killed himscjf yesterday in his
home. He was unconscious when
found by his housekeeper shortly
after midnight, and died a few min
utes later. He had fired the bullet
into his mouth, muffling the report
with bed clothes. Hetween the leaves
of a book lying ou his bed was the
following note: "The struggle, under
the competitive system, is not quite
worth the effort. Let it pass."
Waylaud was to have appeared in
the federal court at Ft. Scott Tucsdty
to answer a charge of circulating de
famatory matter through the mail.
He has been despondent ever since
the death of his wife in an automo
bile accident a year ago.
RAILROADS MUST SHOW
COST OP OPERATION.
PHOENIX, Nov. 13 An order
calling on the Santa Pc, Southern
Pacific and El Paso & Southwestern
railways companies to furnish figures
showing what proportions of their
operating expenses in Arizona arc
chargeable to interstate business and
to interstate traffic, will be issued
soon by the corporation commis
sion. Tlic issuance of this order was dis
cussed even before the Santa Fe and
Grand Canyon companies filed an
action in the federal court yesterday,
the object of which is to have the
three-cent fare law declared violative
of the Arizona constitution and (he
fourteenth amendment of the national
constitution. After the action was
brought it was decided that work on
the order should he continued immediately.
NEED MORE ROOM
ON WRONG SIDE
OF LINE
Twenty-three Killed Or
Hurt by Mexican
Revolution
WASHINGTON, Nov. lS.-Twen-
ty three persons at least were kill
ed or wounded on the American side
of the line during the Madero revo
lution last year. This fact was de
veloped by the Special Army Hoard,
headed by Colonel Kcrnan which
has just returned from an inspection
trip to HI Paso and Douglas where
most of the trouble occurred. A
report will be mado to Congress,
EL PASO, Nov. 15. Pour Mcxi
can soldiers are held by United Stat
es troops at Hachita, X. M., subject
to orders of the War Department.
The men lied across the line after
a Federal rout by rebels under Colo
nia Fernandez.
AT LAST OUT
OF JAIL
CHICAGO, Nov. 15. Jack John
sou enjoyed his first hours of free
dom since his incarceration in the
county jail a week ago. His fain
ily and immediate friends rejoiced
with him over his release though
he still must face the charge of
violating the Mann act.
OIL LANDS CASE
E
T
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. Title
to Southern California oil lauds, val-
ucsd at the stupendous figure of 500
million dollars is said to depend on
the outcome of the legal controversy
opened before the Supreme Court
today. Edmund Hurke tiled a print
ed argument in favor of his claim
to a portion of the laud in contro
versy, scathingly arraigning the
Southern Pacific which is fighting
for the property. The case will be
argued orally on January (3th.
POUNDER OP DISPATCH
MURDERED AT CLIFTON.
CLIFTON, Nov. 1.1, Franklin H.
Dorr, founder of the Dnuulas Dallv
Dispatch was shot and killed by
William Allender at the close of the
performance last night of the moving
picture theatre that Dorr recently
purchased. Allender used a shotgun
and with the second barrel killed
John Harroue, ;i saloonkeeper. Two
.Mexicans were-wounded, one fatally.
After the shooting Allender barri
caded himself in his carpenter shop,
which was surrounded by officers
and armed citizens who shot into the
building, After being wounded sev
eral times and seeing escape was im
possible, Allender. blew off the top
of his head with a revolver.
Financial differences caused the
murder. Allender was the former
owner of the theatre, Dorr until
recently was a law partner of United
States Attorney Morrison of Hlsbrc.
Mr. Dorr was formerly a resident
of this city, where he nracticcd law.
He arrived from the cast shortly
alter ncing admitted to llie bar, and
when the mining boom in the south
ern part of the state occurred he
was among the first to locate at
Warren, later going to Douglas,
where lie was a journalist and nrac
ticcd his profession, He was a vig
orous writer, and as an attorney at
tained high rating. While a resident
of this city Mr. Dorr made many
strong friends, his genial disposition
and his conscientious regard in a
professional sense winning the ad
miration of all. His many friends
here will regret to learn of the sad
fate that has overtaken him. He
was a native of Ohio, and aged about
liny years.
CHOOSE NEW ORLEANS.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. The
United Daughters of the Confeder
acy voted unanimously to hold their
next annual convention in New Or
leans,
JACK JOHNSON
0i
uvlkjuhl waujt
Two Girls and Five
Feet Under Ground Saved After
14 Hours Work.
Ily Associated Press.
FRISCO. (Utah), Nov. 15. Two
girls and five men were lifted from
a cure of the Horn Silver mine to
day while sixty miners anil the men,
women and children of the town of
Frisco cheered and sobbed with joy.
For fourteen hours tiic little party
was held imprisoned three hundred
feet below the surface by a cavc-m,
while rescuing miners toiled in fif
teen minute shifts to save them. The
EXTRA SESSION
FOR TARIFF
Wilson Will Convene
Congress Middle Part
Of April
! j j i j
J By Associated Press. J4
J. NEW YORK, Nov. 15.
1 Woodrow Wilson, president-
J-.elect, announced tonight that
J immediately after his inagura-
4 tion he would call an extra- 4
J ordinary session of Congress J
to convene not later than April 4
J 15, for the purpose of revising !
I the tariff.
j j j j j j j j j.
Wilson will sail tomorrow for
Hermuda and return December 16.
Regarding his decision he said: "I
shall do this not only because I
think the pledges of the party ought
to be redeemed as promptly as pos
sible, but also because I know it to
be the interest of business that all
uncertainty be removed as soon as
possible."
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. There
is general approval in Democratic
circles tonight over Wilson's decis
ion to call an extra session. The
news cleared the Congressional air
of uncertainty and paved the way for
active work on the part of the De
mocratic managers during the com
ing weeks in preparation for a tariff
session. The Way and Means com
mittee of the House will probably
begin work on the tariff bills early
in January.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 15. Al
though definite news of his condit
ion was refused at his residence, it
was learned here this morning that
Senator Isidor Raynor of Maryland,
who has been seriously ill with neu
ritis, suffered a relapse last night.
His relatives were hurriedly sum
moned to his bedside which led to
the report being sent out tha; the
senator could not live throughout
the night. This morning it was re
ported that he had improved slightly
although his condition is serious.
RANGE GRADING
CONTRACT IS FINISHED
('From Frlany Dully.)
The contract of Hrannen ft Saner
on the military target range at Point
of Rocks has been been finished
and improved conditions have bccii
effected by the filling in of many
large ravines and the leveling off
of the land. I cams can now pass
in and out of the range for the first
time, while riflemen in the future
will be permitted to maneuver to all
points without any trouble or im
pediment in their way whatever.
I us firm is awaiting advices from
Washington to begin work on an
other important contract awarded
them in improving the condition of
the range, which will require an out
lay of over $1,500. The war dinar -
Tn"mn,M 'HV? ,,,''R cl'c'lrl ver
$10,000 on this reserve as a tnrcet
range solely.
Journal-MincrTNuh class Job work
TINKERING
SENATOR RAM
OF MARYLAND
NEAR DEATH
Men Imprisoned 300
girls were the daughters of mie
foreman Ror Alexander, Daisy and
Hazel, aged sixteen and nineteen.
The entombed miners were David
Hanks, Arnold Robinson, James
White, and a Greek miner, whose
name is unknown. While the work
of rescue was in progress those im
prisoned communicated with those
ou the surface by means of an air
pipe. Roll call showed no others
imprisoned.
STRIKERS HOLD
TRAIN
CHARLESTON, Nov. lS.-Strik-iitg
miners attacked a passenger train
on the Chesapeake & Ohio tonight.
They stopped the train and refused
to allow it to proceed because two
carloads of alleged strike-breakers
were attached. Governor Glasscock
ordered a company of militia to the
.scene
TREATY SETTLES
FISHERIES
E
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15. Sec
rclary Knox and Ambassador James
Rrycc of England today formally ex
changed documents ratifying the
treaty signed last July providing for
an adjustment of the North Atlantic
Fisheries controversy. The treaty
prescribes the boundary waters and
provides for the creation of a com
mission to pass on the reasonable
ness of the Canadian fisheries regit
lations.
HELPED TO TAR
L
NORWAI.K, (Ohio), Nov. 15.
A jury found Ernest Welch guilty of
assault and battery. He was charg
ed witli participating in the tarring
f Minnie I.avalley. He was the
first of six men, indicted for "riotous
conspiracy" to be tried.
DEATH RESULTS
PROM KICK OF MULE.
(Prom Thursday's Daily.)
Paul Yiindt, who was kicked by a
mule ou the Copper Basin highway
last Saturday, died at Mercy hospital
last ni.du at 9:30 o'clock. The blow
reached Ins abdomen and was of such
tnrce that he was thrown out of the
sta le. He was brought to the city
anil an operation performed which
revealed internal injuries from which
no hope could be given for his re
co very,
, He bore a splendid name, and w.v
industrious and upright, making
many friends during his two years
residence. A brother is en route
front Mulberry, Indiana, to take
the remains home for burial, which
are at Mans & Co'.s funeral parlors.
1 he deceased was aged 39 years, and
leaves a father, mother, two broth
crs and a small daughter.
BUSINESS VENTURE.
(From Wednesday'! Dally.)
Henry Krcppel, formerly with the
Hrisley Drug Company, has purchas
ed a one-third interest in the Wliccl
ock poultry farm in the foothills
north of this city, and left yester
lay for Phoenix, to make large pur
chases of high-bred fowls. The new
venture is proving remunerative and
the intention is to have the largest
and best fowl farm in the northern
part of the state.
UP PASSENGER
DIM
AND
FEATHER
YOUNG GIR
i
3
J:
j.

xml | txt