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Weekly journal-miner. (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, January 15, 1913, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1913-01-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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WEEKLY JOURNAL-MINER, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JANUARY 15, 1913.
BUDGET OF NEWS INCREASED POWER SHATTERED MIND WEEK'S GUESTS GENERAL REVIVAL EHRENBERG IS A
FROM STATE FOR CLIMAX AND BODY YIELD AT THE HOT OF MINING IN LIVELY PLACE
CAPITAL MINE TD DISEASE SPRINGS CHERRY RIGHT NOW
Electors to Meet Monday
And Certify Election
Returns
News Bureau of the Journal-Miner,
Room 203, N. B. A. Bldg.
PHOENIX, Jan. 9. In Superior
Court this morning Judge Phillips
issued an order requiring State Au
ditor Callaghan to make answer on
or before the 20th day of January, in
the now famous State Automobile
Mandamum suit.
On Monday, January 13th, the
presidential electors will meet in the
Supreme Court Chamber and certi
fy the Arizona election returns. That
same night W. T. Webb, one of the
electors will leave for Washington,
D. C, with a copy of the certifi
cate. Governor Hunt today recognized
a request from the Governor of Ne
vada for the extradition of Riley
Woten, an escaped convict from the
Nevada State's prison at Carson.
Woten is now in the custody of of
ficers at Kingman, Arizona, and J.
P. Donnelley, Captain of the Ne
vada mounted police, will take the
prisoner back to prison. Donnelley,
by the way, figured prominently in
newspaper stories some few months
ago as the man who exterminated
the "Shoshone Mike" gang which
operated in Nevada.
State Treasurer David Johnson
today received his first blanks from
clerks of the various county's Sup
erior Courts required to be filed un
der the State Inheritance Tax law
enacted by the last legislature. Un
Jer the law notice must be given
the State Treasurer of the probate
of the estate of the value of over
$500. The first estate proceedings
reported was from Maricopa Coun
ty and was concerning the estate of
Tom Cavanaugh, a well known pio
neer. Just the amount of the in
heritance tax this estate will have
to pay to the state is not known for
the reason that the appraisment has
as yet not been made.
Governor Hunt today named Gus
Becker of Springerville a delegate to
the Federal Aid Convention of the
American Auto Association which
is to be held in Washington begin
ning March 6th. Other delegates to
the convention are G. P. Bullard,
Attorney General, Del Potter, a
good roads enthusiast, and Lamar
Cobb, State Engineer.
Chief Justice, Alfred Franklin, of
the Arizona Supreme Court, is ill at
his home in this city. The attend
ing physician denies that the illness
is serious.
HE RECOMMENDS
MANY MEASURES
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Jan. 9.
"Unless progressive legislation is
enacted, the people, some day, will
open up the cu!-de-sac even though
he opening may lead representative
government over a precipice into
pure socialism or paternalism," said
Governor Mashall in his message to
the Indiana legislature today.
"Representative government does
not mean that present-day condit
ions cannot be remedied. Upon the
contrary, progressive legislation may
be enacted with no disturbance to
the checks and balances of our sys
tem of government."
Governor Marshall suggests among
other things that a Panama-Pacific
exposition commission with women
representation thereon be appointed.
He recommends the enactment of an
inheritance tax law.
Legislation to prohibit stock wat
ering and to protect the unwary
against investing their money in that
which is not property but mere
promise, in those schemes which are
ordinarily known to the business
world as "blue sky."
Immediate enactment of a work
man's compulsory compensation act.
Anti-loan shark legislation.
That" trust companies be treated
the same as banks and that people
be protected against panics.
Stringent housing laws.
Establishment of a state penal,
fai-hl for male prisoners.
Strengthening of laws against sale
and use of Cocaine and opium.
Revocation of liquor licenses upon
third conviction of their holders.
Ratification of proposed amend
ment for popular election of senators
(From Saturday's Daily.)
Arrivals yesterday from the Com
mercial camp in Copper Basin re
port the two large boilers as having
steam up, and the new cage in oper
ation at the main working shaft.
The cross-cut west will be extended,
and the further accumulation of
water in large volume will be hand
led by the increased power install
ed. Development goes ahead without
interruption from the Garbino hill
zone, where drifting south from the
winze continues to give shipping ore
and where mineralogical determina
tions are attractive for the making
of a heavy producer. Shipping to
Skull Valley is maintained at over
a carload per day, and the general
outlook for the property to main
tain its high rating as a copper pro
ducer was never so flattering.
IS
ACTIVE
(From Saturday's Daily.)
John Harlan is in the city from
his Snow Flake mines in Lynx
Creek district, where he has re
sumed development. He gives a
good report of the showing made,
and states that there was a general
movement toward performing annual
assessment work that had never be
fore prevailed among individual own
ers throuhout that gold belt. Many
mines are showing up attractively,
and shipping to Humboldt will fol
low in the near future.
MINOR JUSTIFIED
IN SHOOTING MEXICAN
(From ThurwUy'i BUy)
After three days of an examina
tion into the shooting of a Mexican
at P. & E. Junction Christmas night
by J. H. Minor, section foreman of
the S. F. P. & P. railway, Judge
Chas. H. McLane, exonerated the
accused, and he was given his free
dom. There were over a dozen witness
es present at the time, among whom
were several white women and the
wives of Mexican employes. All
testified that their lives were threat
ened by the Mexican, who was arm
ed with a Ianre knife, and was In
an ugly mood. Several appealed to
mt. Almor to protect them, and the
latter secured his Winchester and
shot the man down. It is the gen
eral belief of those at the station
that had not Mr. Minor acted
promptly and with determination,
there was the possibiliy of serious
trouble occurring in which some of
the men dr women would have been
the victims of the wrath of the man
shot.
The dismissal of the case was au
thorized by County Attorney O'Sul
Iivan and his associate, J. H. Mor
gan. The wounded Mexican is recover
ing at the county hospital, although
the soft nosed bullet passed into his
body at the side o fhis back, and
ftriking a bone split making two
ugly wounds at the exit in front
r his body.
PLIGHT TROTH AT
BEGINNING OF NEW YEAR
(yrom Wednesday' Daily.)
At the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Hawke on South Monte
zuma street a very pretty and po
pular wedding was solemnized Sun
day afternoon when their charming
daughter, Miss Myrtle Hawke was
united to H. Barnett, Judge Chas.
H. McLane officiating. The ring
ceremony was used. The event at
tracted a large number of friends
of the happy couple, and after the
knot was tied, a splendid repast was
served the guests by the parents
of the bride. Mrs. Barnett is very
much endeared to many friends, and
her husband is well known in Je--
rome as n frttffai and industrious
man. They will make that cltv their
future home, and arc followed oh
their journey through life by the
felicitations of a host of friends.
"
Unadvcrtised thl TltTH i)TA mnlA
sometimes. Journal-Minn want tAm
LYNX
AN
ffl
will sell them quickly.
(From Saturday's Daily.)
After only one day's illness at the
county hospital, Charles F. Schaffer
succumbed yesterday afternoon.
In addition to his mental faculties
being deranged, his physical ills as
sumed that gravity Thursday that it
was deemed advisable to remove
him from the county jail, for treat
ment, but his shattered frame failed
to respond and death came as a re
lief to his earthly cares.
Among his effects was found a
letter from his aged mother at
Hartford, Kansas, where a daughter
and son, with his sister, also reside.
The deceased had been a resident of
this county for about four years,
and was well known at Mayer. He
bore a good name, but through ad
versity his mental faculties were
deranged, and later commenced the
physical decline that resulted in his
passing away. The body is at Ruff
ner's awaiting advices from relatives.
is
(From Saturday's Daily;
Arrivals from the southern part
of the state yesterday reported that
Wickenburg was experiencing the
novelty of being snowed under, three
inches of the "beautiful" being re
corded at eight o'clock in the morn
ing. Flakes also fell as far south
as Hot Springs Junction, while rain
prevailed in Phoenix. Rangemen
were pleased at the coming of mois
ture, and with warm weather fine
grazing will be available.
NEEDS NOT PAY
BIG BILL FOR SUPPLIES
(From Thursdays iJiilyj
Judge F. O. Smith yesterday
handed down his decision in the
celebrated case of T. W. Otis vs,
The Ohio Mines Company. Involved
was the collection of an account
running for many years. The de
fendant company was awarded a
verdict.
Judge Smith in his decision says:
"It appeared from the evidence that
T. W. Otis had furnished certain
supplies to John S. Jones, as an in
dividual, while he was operating
mines in the Chaparral district be
fore the creation of the Jessie Mines
Company. After the organization of
the Jessie Mines Company, accord
ing to the evidence, Jones caused
a resolution of the board of direc
tors to be passed by the directors
oi me company, assuming the in
debtedness of about $5,000, due from
Jones to Otis. A few years ago the
Ohio Mines Company succeeded the
Jessie Mines Company, and took
over the Jessie holdings. They
agreed to pay only the legitimate
debts of the Jessie, and when the
suit was instituted by Otis they de
fended the same on the ground that
the Jessie Company did not owe the
debt incurred, and that the note had
been procured by fraud and was
void." John H. Price, the attorney
of Cleveland, Ohio, represented the
Ohio Mines Company.
TEN CLAIMS IN
CHERRY CREEK ARE SOLD
(From Thuruflay's Dally)
Arthur W. Cobb, of Indianapolis,
Indiana, has sold to the Diadem
Mining Company, a new incorpora
tion, a group of ten mining claims
situated in Cherry Creek district.
the deed being filed for record yes
terday for a nominal consideration.
The sale is an important one, the
forerunner of active operations being
contemplated. Mr. Cobb is a mem
ber of the Diadem Company, of
which there are only three princi
pal stockholders, all residincr in the
above city. Active development is
is to begin on the croup within the
next sixty days, it is reported.
BUYING MEAT.
(From Saturday's Dsiiy.)
Ed- Iladstatc, meat merchant of
Williams, is in the city and will
stock up his market with goat tncat,
following the adage that Variety is
the spice of life. He leaves today
for the Mayer country to make pur
chases of that article of food.
wra
HD
w
SNOW
CASTLE HOT SPRINGS, Jan. 9
Among the guests arriving at Cas
tle Hot Springs for the past week
were: Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Mur
phy, Prescott, Arizona; Mrs. Eloa
Huntington Hooker, New York, N.
Y.; Mrs. E. M. Trimble, Rochester,
N. Y.; Miss Helen Hooker, New
York, N. Y.; Mrs. Arthur Halm,
Phoenix, Arizona; Miss G. W. Halm,
Phoenix; Mrs. B. Balguy, Miss Mar
jorie Balguy, Santa Monica, Cal.;
Mrs. Geo. M. Halm, W. S. Golds
worthy, Phoenix; Mrs. P. M. Ar
thus, Mrs. S. F. Haserot, Cleveland,
Ohio; R. G. Beckett, Globe; John
M. Ross, Bisbee; J. M. Elder, Pres
cott; J. M. Primm, Lima, Ohio;
H. W. Ulmo, Prescott.
BUYS INTEREST
IN CATTLE BUSINESS
(From FMy' DaUy.)
Levi Young and George Day of
Phoenix, yesterday concluded nego
tiations with J. H. Maders for the
purchase of one-half interest in the
tatter's range cattle and horses in
the Mingus Mpuntain section of the
Black Hills, the transaction involv
ing $2,500. The same buyers last
week bought 500 head of cattle from
other parties in the Dewey country,
and stated they would close other
deals in the next two weeks. Mr.
Young is heavily identified with the
sheep railing Industry of the coun
ty, and is transferring his flocks to
a lower elevation for the winter. He
is utilizing the Mingus mountain
country for ranging his Increasing
herds of cattle. He is optimistic
over the future outlook of the cat
tle business, but reticent as to the
sheep end of the range business.
CHICAGO, Jan. 10. Woodrow
Wilson's visit to Chicago tomorrow,
Sunday, will be quiet. He will be
the guest at the home of David B.
Jones and outside of dinner at the
Commercial Club, will accent no in
vitations. Special preparations have
been made for his protection.
Attractive Job Printing I
wm Bring Attractive uraers
See that tlie printed matter tliat goes out of
your office is attractively printed. A stably
letterkead or booklet is a poor introduction to
a prospective customer. J
THE JOURNAL-MINER
TOB DEPARTMENT
HAS THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED
TVT A TT TXT TLTTC OT7 nrTTT AiXT rX2 A 13 TTim M
Your order, large or small, will le executed
according to modern standards of Lign-class
workmanslip. Tlie price will Le no more tnan
you Lave paid for inferior work. Out-of-town
orders receive our most careful attention.
THE JOURNAL-MINER
JOB DEPARTMENT
! Let Us Figure With You?
L. N. Wombacher, operating min
es in Cherry Creek district, while
in the city Friday stated that
there is a general revival of mining
throughout that section, and the in
dications point to the liveliest year
ever known.
The old Majestic is being revived
by M. M. Green, of Chicago, and
this operator is also preparing to
start up the Etta and other proper
ties which he acquired during his
recent trip.
Mr. Wombacher continues devel
opment on his individual interests
and gives a good report of the show
ing made. He also stated that the
close of the year experienced a gen
eral movement among title workers
to get the work done on time. He
anticipates a year of production and
good . returns.
LEAD AND SILVER
VALUES HIGH IN ORE
(From Friday's Daily.)
M. Roland, owner of Little Boy
mine on Minnehaha Flat, brought
to the city Wednesday samples tak
en from a recent discovery made in
the winze forty feet in depth, which
runs high in percentage of lead car
ried, and averages over 100 ounces
in silver.
He reports the pay streak as two
and one-half feet wide, and there is
not an ounce of waste. in evidence,
the vein widening with depth in
the grade of the ore increasing in
value also. The winze was started
from an old tunnel of 300 feet in
length, and the strike is regarded as
the most important ever made on
the property. Mr. Roland also
shows samples which carry horn
silver, which only adds to the in
terest of the future rating of his
holdings. He will continue devel
opment and feels elated over the
outlook. He is located south of
and near the old Button camp.
fournal-Miner High class job work
(From Saturday's Daily.)
H. E. Barmin, placer and quartz"
mining on the desert, east of Ehren
berg, is in the city to meet his bro
ther and the latter's wife who are
expected from Littliefield Kansas, to
remain for the winter. Mrs. Barmin
being in poor health. More miners
are flocking into that section tharr
ever before known, while the area o
placer ground being worked is less
than usual, with only fair returns
given. Several new quartz mines are
being located, and as a rule the:
new arrivals are well equipped witfr
camp facilities.
REDUCTION WORKS
DAMAGED BY THE COLD
(From FrlSsyt Dally.)
During the cold weather of the
week, the new concentrating plant
of the Humboldt Consolidated Smel
ting Company suffered considerable,
damage by frozen pipes, and as a
result this ore treating adjunct of
the big plant will not be started
up for several days, or until the
damage is remedied. The building
is located some distance from the
smelter, and was exposed for the
three days of the extremely cold
weather. A large tonnage of ore
had accumulated for the initial start
ing up of this plant, which was ex
pected to begin operations this
week. Inside of the next ten days it
is believed the leaks will be repair
ed and the big reduction works:
started up on a permanent basis,
with one shift employed for the;
present.
ALBANY, Jan. lp. The engineer
had been drinking the night before
and loss of sleep caused the wreck
on the Lackawanna Road at Corning:
July 4th, in which forty were killed7
and seventy-five injured, according-
to the report of the State Public
Service Commission. Enm'nccr
C7t I t , r
dismissed.

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