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Weekly journal-miner. (Prescott, Ariz.) 1908-1929, December 20, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1922-12-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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UNIVERSITY RhADlNu
ROOM
Bar silver: ' . ''s erally fair; Jo change in temperature.
. Prescott Temperatures, Dec. 19
Foreign 62c 'to, Sn-m2Z U-46 5p-m 40
PIONEER PAPER OF ARIZONA
PRESCOTT JOURNA L-M I N E R WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1922.
FIFTY-NINTH YEAR
World Stops "ship DesttuctionTM TREMBLES FOR SAFETY; FIGiT 01 IS!
DENVER BANDITS DID
THAT JOB, BUT POLICE
CAN7 HND ANY CLUE
(Associated Press Night Wire)
DENVER, Dec. 19. City, state
and federal authorities tonight, after
a day and night spent in searching
for the masked bandits who yester
day morning shot and killed Charles
Linton, stole a consignment of $200,
000 fiom federal reserve guards in
one of the most daring and sensa
tional daylight hold-ups ever staged
in the west, were without tangible
clues as to the identity of the ban
dits. That the robbery was accomplished
by Denver bandits and not by out
side highwaymen is the belief of
Chief of Police Williams and the
search for them is being conducted
with that theory in mind.
Roads leading into the mountains
were thoroughly policed today by
details of policemen in an effort to
find trace of the escaped men. but
all searching parties reported to
headquarters that their trips had
been fruitless.
is
PROPOSED BHK
(Associated Press Ntcht Wife)
rilOENIX, Dr--.- I4.- -Kliaiination
of the state automobile license fee
and the substitution in its place of a
higher tax on gasoline was urged to
day by James H. Kcrby, secretary of
state-elect in, an address before the
state tax commission and the county
assessors of the state who assembled
in the state capitol for their annual
conference.
Acting upon the suggestion, the
assessors appointed the members of
the state tax commission and Mr.
Kerby members of a committec to
investigate the feasibility of legisla
tion to provide for the change.
Mr. Kerby also suggested the
elimination of the property tax on
automobiles, this fee also to be taken
care of in the gasoline tax.
If these changes were made, the
secretary of state-elect said, a part
of the expense of keeping up the
roads in the state would be paid by
automobile tourists traversing the
state.
EASTEllSlON
WAY TO COAST GRIDS
(Associated Press Nisht Wire)
STATE COLLEGE, Pa., Dec. 19.
Twenty-two Pcnn State College
football nlavers left here today on
the first lap of their 3,000-milc jour
ney to Pasadena, Cam., where tney
will meet the University of Southern
California on New Year's Day in the
inter-sectional game of the Carnival
of Roses.
MOUNTAINEERS ENTRTAIN
MORGANTOWN, W Va., Dec. 19
The West Virginia University foot
ball squad of 28 men including the
coaches and trainers left here today
in a private car for San Diego, Calif.
The Mountaineers will meet Gonzago
University on Christmas Day. Coach
Spears said his men were in fine
trim.
C. G. C. PLAYERS IN
POST PERFORMANCE
The musical and vaudeville show
presented by the Catholic Girls' club
at the Litlc Theatre last week re
peated its success before -a packed
house in the Red Cross building at
Whipple Barracks last night. The
performance lasted nearly two hours,
the vaudeville and musical number
and the one-act play, "An Economi
cal Boomerang," elicited much ap-
nlnnse and aoorcciation from the
men. The play was given under the
direction of Mrs. John .Massing.
ooooooooooooooooo
o
o HOLIDAY ISSUE OF THE c
o JOURNAL-MINER OMITTED, c
o
n For the first time in many c
o years, the Journal-Miner will c
o skip an issue of a week-day pa- c
o per when next Tuesday morning c
o will pass without the publication c
o of the morning newspaper. (
o The absence at this time of le- c
o gal publications requiring contin- c
n iinn runs makes it possible for c
o the Journal-Miner to take a holi- o
o day, just like regular loncs.
ooooooooooooooooo
. : -DACE MEM APCC fffiMEi7lll7MfE7
SCRAPPING OF
VESSELS
SUED m
(Associated Press Night Wire)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 19.
Responding to a house resolution,
Secretary Dcnby transmitted to con
gress today the information in the
hands of the navy department on the
status of warships scrapped under the
terms of the Washington arms con
ference naval treaty or otherwise dis
posed of by the signatories since the
adjournment of the conference. The
report showed that neither the
United States nor Japan plans to
complete the scrapping of any exist
ing capital ships, at least pending
promulgation of the treaty, although
both nations have stopped work on
large building programs of capital
ships.
Great Britain, on the other hand.
was shown to have disposed of or
to be disposing of a very consider
able number of older capital ships.
The United States, according to
the report, in addition to suspending
work on vessels under construction!
i .v. i . i j :
unuer ine wcuiy nus uttuiiiiuaiuin-Li
all completed ships affected except
the battleship Connecticut, which
soon will he placed out of commis
sion, and has sold the Maine and
Missouri, which arc actually being
broken up.
Great Britain. Mr. Denby said, at
the time thcinformation was gather
ed, which was not indicated, had
broken up three capital ships, sold
to be broken up seven, sold but not
dismantled one, completed mutila
tions on two and was engaged in
mutilating six others. The Australian
government, he added, had decided to
scrap the battle cruiser Australia.
Through her ministry of marine,
the secretary continued. Japan "had
stated, that while work preliminary
to scrapping will be done, the hulls
will not be broken up or sunk until
the treaty has been ratified by all
the powers." '
Neither France nor Italy was re
quired to scrap any completed ves
sels by the treaty.
HOLM! MCES FO
1IIE0M JUlfflOI
H ON NEK TEWS
(Special to the Journal-Miner)
PHOENIX, Dec. 18. Interest of
Arizona motordom is centering upon
the forthcoming automobile races at
the state fair ground track just out
side of Phoenix as the big New
Year's day feature program under the
direction of the Arizona Speedway
association. Application has been
made to the A. A. A. for official
sanction, as the races will be con
ducted under the national regulations.
Between 20 and 30 special machines
as well as the proven veterans of
previous road and track events in
Arizona, are expected to be entered
for one or more of the four num
bers on the New .Year's schedule.
One 25-mile contest, three 10-mile
grinds, a motorcycle race over the
same distance and two novelty com
edy races comprise the program.
Experienced pilots from practically
every section of the state are getting
ready to compete for honor and
prize money, according to letters re
ceived daily at association headquar
ters, 233 West Adams street.
The New Year's day program is
the opening step in a plan to put
automobile racing on its feet in Ari
zona, the purpose for which the Ari
zona Speedway association, com
posed of race car owners and drivers,
was organized.
TRADE UNION OFFICIALS
vNUMEROUS IN COMMONS
I
(Associated Press)
LONDON. Dec. 19. For the first
time in 50 years; the legal profession
is not the occupation of a majority
of members of the House of Com
mons. The new commons will con
tain 83 members who make their liv
ing as trade union officials, while on
ly 80 of the members are lawyers.
The number of lawyers is less than
the average for the last half century,
ind represents less than a third of
the number of members of the pro
fession who were candidates. The
trade union officials were more suc
cessful in the last election, electing
73 out of 102 candidates.
SAFE CONDUCT OF MINERS VIOLATED WI1
DEFENDERS OF PITS WEI Li TO BUTCHERY
(Associated Press Night Wire)
MARION, 111., Dec. 19. The first
survivor of the Herrin riots to take
the witness stand, Robert Officar, a
graduate of the Univcrsitv of Penn
sylvania, testified today at the trial
of five men charged with murder in
connection wiin inc Kiuiny ui u nun
union men in the riot.
Officar. a bookkeeper at the strip
mine where the trouble started, told
of the attack on the property the
afternoon of Tune 21 last when three
uhion miners were shot and killed.
Tnst after nitrhtfall on June 21, the
witness said, those in the mine raised
a white flag but the sniping from
surrounding hills continued all night
snd the flag was lowered at day
break when the non-union men took
refuge in some freight cars. Then
the fierceness of the attack increased
and the besieged miners decided to
surrender, again raising a white tlag,
he said.
After beincr assured of their safety,
according to the witness, the 48 non
Close competition and closer fig
uring marked the bids of contractors
on the recent work offered jointly by
the state and county for the con
struction of the road and bridges
that make up project 62 from Cedar
Glade to Ash Fork. This stretch is
the last half of the Prescott-Ash
Fork highway to be contracted under
the Yavapai county bond issue. Re
maining on the board's program is
only the Fossil Creek highway which
will be contracted under the regula
tions of the bureau of public roads,
as $50,000 in forest aid money is to
be added to the county's fund.
The job of building project 62 was
let to the state highway department
on a cost plus $10 bid. The state
and county highway commission then
sub-contracted
parts of the work, reserving all blade
or grader won: tor tnc state wnicn
has demonstrated its ability with
FIGURES SHOW
CONTESTS OKI
001 CQMGT
tfllmen and machinery to do this sort
of road work more cheaply than the
usual run of contracting companies.
The 23-mile road contains two large
bridges and a number of smaller
structures and the jobs to be con
tracted were divided into four sched
ules on which the following bids
were obtained:
' Schedule 1
Small structures, culverts, etc.
Daniels & Kennedy $19,484.0a
Henry Galbraith 21,617.25
DeWard & Cobham 22.182.5U
S. B. Shumway 21,189.6:
Checks retained until award is
made.
Schedule 2
Concrete arch bridge, 155 feet long
over Hell canyon.
Daniels & Kennedy. $24,484.33
Henry Galbraith
23,755.90
L". C. Lashmet
23,064.90
24,459.38
24,022.35
DeWard &" Cobham
H. J. Mann
Pnntrnrt nwnrHed snhiect to
state's approval, on basis of work
starting December 23 and being fin
ished in 150 working days.
Schedule 3
Two-span steel bridge, 161 feet
long over Little Hell canyon.
Daniels & Kennedy $22,78S.50
S. B. Shumway 23,315.00
Monarch Engr. Co 2O,765.00
Contract tentatively awarded,
subject to work starting on Decem
ber 2S and being finished in 180
working days.
' Schedule 4
Rock work in and about Hell
canvon.
Henry Galbraith $32,590.30
L. C. Lashmet 26,806.60
S. B. Shumway 29,082.95
Contract let to Lashmet.
LAST YEAR'S FAILURES IN
ENGLAND SHOW INCREASE
(Associated Frcss)
LONDON, Dec. 1. (By Mail)
The vear 1921 was a record bank
ruptcy year in England and Wales,
the number of failures being 2,824 in
excess of the 1920 total. The in
spector general in bankruptcy, in his
report, says "the magnitude of the
failures, is much greater than in any
year since the act of 18S3 came into
operation." When compared with
1920 the figures show an increase in
liabilities of 15.034,065 pounds sterl
ing, and in assets of 5,849,260 pounds
sterling.
union men were led from the mine,
C. K. McDowell, the superintendent,
limping along on his wooden leg.
The crowd constantly increased and
Officar quoted one of its leaders
whom he could not identify as shout
ing "They're nothing but strike
breakers and we ought to kill them
all!"
About a mile from the mine Mc
Dowell was led away' by two men.
Other witnesses have testified that
the crippled superintendent was slain
at this spot. , '
Then the crowd marched about
two miles farther on. where it lined
the remaining 47 prisoners before a
barbedwire fence in front of a clump
of weeds, Officar said. "We are go
ing to give you a chance for your
lives," he quoted one of the leaders
as shouting and then the firing be
gan. Officar said he dropped at the first
discharge and rolled under the fence,
fleeing while the crowd was hunting
down those who had escaped the
rain of lead.
filOTIO GROWN
KING ME HOW
SHIPPI OSES
Peu$e who have just arrived from
Crown' King report that shipments
have begun from the Springgreen
mine. The first car-load was ship
ped yesterday to the Humboldt smcl-lt;on
ter. lne springgreen 15 uwhcu
Ed Block and his associates and
promises to develop into a real mine.
Assays recently taken across- a four
foot body of ore show the values to
be from 30 to 60 ounces silver and
from $4 to $8 gold per ton with a
small percentage of copper. '
The Springgreen mine adjoints the
old Crown King mine which, records
show, has been one of the largest
producers of gold in the Bradshaw
mountains. There is more activity
being shown in the Crown King dis
trict at this time than for many years
and it is predicted that a real min-
mg, boom will be m evidence in the
i"'"K
THOUGHT HE'D BUY
HO STEM-BOAT
ANKER TESTIFII
(Associated Press Night Wire)
YUMA, Dec. 19 The trial of Alva
E. Smith charged with embezzling
$6,000 of the funds of the Parker
Valley bank was halted temporarily
this afternoon due to the illness of
one of the jurors. Court recessed
until noon tomorrow. Smith who
was on a hoat nouna irom aan
Diego to Mexico when he was ar
rested last summer, after the failure
of the Parker bank, testified today
that he was making a trip to Mazat
lan to investigate a steamship which
he contemplated buying.
rnniMS ippffli
2 CfflMESE TBEHIES
(Associated Press Night Wlre
BRUSSELS, Dec. 19 The cham
ber of deputies today approved the
text of the two treaties concluded at
the Washington Arms Conference by
the powers having interests in China.
The treaties referred to were sign
ed besides China by representatives
of the United States, Belgium, Great
Britain, Italy, Japan and the Nether
lands.
Read the
I M M HI IB I R n - I U rII HI M W m U B W U R H U TJ H M I
(Associated Press Night Wire)
LAUSANNE, Dec. 19. Turkish
fears of submarines, Turkish fears
cf swiftly flying military airplanes,
laden with bombs and generally
Turkish fears of aggressions from
without that will put Constanti
nople in danger have tonight placed
the. whole Lausanne conference in
jeopardy.
The United States is silent on
the situation, and the allied leaders
said tonight that they have uttered
their last word on the question of
liberty of the straits. Tomorrow
the Turks must say yes or no to
the allied projects.
The British experts, Admiral
Keyes and General Burdett-Stuart,
already have left for England, be
lieving their work to have been
completed and the French experts
are preparing to depart tomorrow
night at the conclusion of the "last
session" for discussion cf the
straits. Whether a rupture will
come on the straits problem de
pends chiefly on whether the en
tente diplomats and their experts
can remove the Turkish fears.
This they are trying to do tonight.
M. J. Ebert and Mike O'Donnell,
proprietors of Grant pool-hall, yester
day afternoon were arrested by fed
eral prohibition agents, charged with
violating sections 3, 6 and 33 of the
national prohibition act by the pos
session of alcoholic liquor, and sec
37 of the tj 5 criminal code
by conspiring to commit an offense
against the United States. The of
fense the defendants are accused of
conspiring to commit is that of un
lawfully selling liquor. The infor
mation does not allege that they sold
liquor, but that they conspired to do
so.
In the raid on the Grant hall,
which Ebert and O'Donnell recently
took under their management, the
officers declared they found five
very pretty pint bottles of liquor,
neatly put up and stoppered. The
liquor was found in a suit-case be
hind the counter, wrapped in burlap.
A pint bottle only partly full of
liquor was found in a pocket of one
of the defendant's coat. Commis
sioner Renoe set the time for hear
ing of the charge against Ebert and
O'Donnell at 10 o'clock this morn
ing. OB AND POSSE IN
MCE FOR SKULKER
IN GEORGIA SWAM?
(Associated Press Night Wire)
TOCCOA, Ga., Dec. 19. An un
identified netrro is believed to be sur
rounded in a swamp near here fol
lowing an alleged attempted assault
upon a married woman today. His
capture is hourly expected. i mou
is searching the swamp and a posse
of officers is bending every effort to
make the arrest before violence is
done. The woman was attacked in
the bedroom of her home by the
negro, who had concealed himself
there. She screamed and he fled.
BLSSI KN6CKS OFF
D
(Associated Press Night Wire)
YAKIMA, Wash.. Dec. 19 A 12
ton charge of TNT was set off to
day at the government construction
camp at Rimrock, Wash., and a huge
ledge of rock estimated to weigh
60,000 tons was heaved outward and
upward and then slid into the Teton
river. The rock later will be piled
against the core wall of the Rimrock
dam, to be the largest earth-filled
dam ever constructed in the United
States. It cost $57,000 to prepare
the blast.
BELGIAN'S CHALLENGE
(Associated Press Night Wire)
BRUSSELS, Minister of the Col
onies Franck has challenged Former
Premier Paul Tlvmans to a duel. M
Franck sent his seconds to M. Hy
mans today after sharp words had
passed between them in the chamber
of deputies.
TI U HELD
FOO IL41G
LAW ON LIOUQR
I AT HOME
POLICY FORCED
UPON Hi
(Associated Press Night Wire)
PHOENIX, Dec. 19. Present
freight rates have created tariffc be
tween states that have narrowed the
market of many commodities to the
confines of the community in which
thej; are produced, William A.
Shoenfeld, director of market re
search of the United States depart
ment of agriculture, declared in an
address before the Arizona Indus
trial congress which closed its annual
two-day convention here today.
"Because of these rates certain
markets open to you in the pre-war
days are now closed, while others
have been narrowed," Mr. Shoenfeld
said. "Your only salvation, there
fore, is the development of local
markets by creating a demand for
products you grow here at home, or
unable to do this, convert your pro
ducts from heavy bulky goods to
light, compast products of high
value."
The two-day convention of the
congress was attended by approxi
mately 400 accredited delegates from
all parts of the state and the prob
lems and accomplishments in the
field of Arizona developments were
discussed by experts during the nu
merous general and special sessions
of the congress.1
Election of officers and selection
of the meeting place for the next
convention were left to the board of
directors of the organization.
CHRISTMAS EKE
The principal address at the mu
nicipal Christmas tree on the plaza
Sunday night will be delivered by
the Rev. O. M. Andrews, pastor of
the First Methodist Episcopal church,
it was announced yesterday by Prof.
S. H. Martin, who made public the
program. The program will be pre
ceded by a band concert by the city
band under the direction of F. W.
Terry. Christmas music will make
up the band program which starts at
6 o'ciock.
At 6:20 the following program will
be rendered:
Christmas Carols by the Prescott
school children, under the direction
of Miss Ethel Robinson.
Invocation The Rev. C. F. Yorkc,
pastor of the .Methodist churcn,
South.
Vocal solo: "Star of the East"
Miss Robinson; Mrs. S. II. Martin,
accompanist.
Address The Rev. O. M. An
drews. .
Benediction Dr. Lee Howard,
pastor of the Congregational church.
The great spruce, erected in the
olaza. will be beautifully trimmed
and electrically lighted.' Gift baskets
for the worthy poor will DC at
tributed, all Prescott agencies for the
handling of needy cases co-operating.
The piano for- the program will be
furnished bv Bert Tilton.
GIANT PITCHER IS
HURT BI CAR, SUES
(Associated Pres3 Night Wire)
NEW YORK, Dec. 19. Hugh Mc
Quillan, twirler for the New York
Giants in the last world series sus
tained injuries in an automobile ac
cident October 26 which may per
manently cripple his pitching arm, it
became known today when be sued
Miss Mildred Taylor in Queens coun
ty supreme court for $50,000 dam
ages. The ball player alleges his wife is
still suffering from injuries she sus
tained in the accident. The defend
ant is a daughter of James B.. Tay
lor, New York stockbroker. Her
carelessness as a driver caused the
accident, McQuillan charges.
COTTON MARKET
(Associated Press Night Wire)
NEW YORK, Dec. 19. Cotton
closed net 9 points higher to 12
points lower, the decline being on
next crop deliveries.
HEWS ILL
IKE ADDRESS
FREE BONDS IS
TO BEHQT DUE
(Associated Press Night Wire)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 19.
After a sharp preliminary skirmish
the house took up today a resolution
proposing an amendment to the con
stitution under which the issuance .of
tax exempt securities by the govern
ment and states would be prohibited.-
Backed by the endorsement of
President Harding and the treasury,
the proposal was the center of a hard
fight in which many republicans op
posed it. Passage of the measure
offered ,by Representative Green of
Iowa will require a two-thirds vote
of the house. Opponents claimed,
tonight it would be defeated although
leaders who caused it to be brought
up insisted it would go through. Four
hours of general debate allotted un
der a special rule giving the measure
right of way had not been concluded
on adjournment tonight.
ielWais
SFREE
There will he no prosecution of
the husband of Gabrielle D'Arley.
This was made clear and definite
yesterday when Mrs. D'Arley return
ed from Los Angeles, after having
dismissed the robbery complaint
against the husband who had forced
her to cash him a check for. $2,000 at
a local bank, practically at the point
of a revolver.
Bernardi Melvin, theJuisband, who
was held in custody al Los Angeles
awaiting a deputy sheriff from Yava
pai county, was turned loose after
Mrs. D Arley had extracted trom him
what remained of the $2,000 and a
quantity of jewels of hers, he was
said to have appropriated.
Deputy Sheriff Bill Fitzgerald, who
went to" bring Melvin back to stand
trial, returned yesterday, the expense
he had been to in going after Melvin
having been put up by Mrs. D'Arley
after her dismissal of the formal
charges of robbery.
The action of the prosecutrix winds
up what promised to be a stirring
chapter in a scries of dramatic do
mestic relations. The arrival of the
Prescott lodging-house keeper in Los
Angeles was greeted with large head
lines in the Los Angeles press.
r finnii
LLulUn WM
TO OBSERVE X1S
The committee in charge of Christ
mas arrangements for the local
American Legion post met Monday
night and laid definite plans which
include the distribution of more than
600 Christmas boxes to disabled men
at Fort Whipple, and if possible to
those outside of the post. The
(American Legion boxes will contain
the things which make a merry,
home-like Christmas, and most of the
supplies for them have already been
purchased.
A novel plan oj distribution win
be followed. Dr. and Mrs. H. T.
Southworth will act as Santa Clatis.
and the tree will be carried from
ward to ward, presents being given
out at the bedside, of every patient.
It is believed that this system will
greatly enhance the. disabled men's
pleasure in the event.
Anyone desiring to assist in the
work arc requested1 to get in touch
with any member of the committee,
which consists of Dr. Southworth,
chairman; Mrs. Southworth, George
Nilsson. Mrs. C. H. Dunning. Chas.
Born, Frank Steed. Mrs. R. O. Bar
rett. Mrs. Smith, Miss Sills, and W.
J. Baker, commander-elect for 1923.
FILES LABOR LIEN
A notice and claim of labor lien
were filed by Clarence M. Morgan
against the Peck Silver Mines, a
trust, operating mining property in
the Peck mining district. The amount
of the claim, $1,420.25. is for work
performed as miner on the mining
property, being unpaid wages from
March 1, 1922, until October 23,
1922, the notice says.
SCOUTS HOLD RALLY
Troop Two won first place in tests
of scout work at the annual rally of
Prescott Boy Scouts last night, and
Trop One took second place and
Troop Four, third. The tests were
held in sepaphore signalling, first
aid and bandaging, horse-anud-rider
tourney (won by Troop One), troop
stunt and troop exhibit. Art Mid
dleton of Troop Four won the pie
eating contest.

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